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Baseball

Established in 1936, and currently based in Cooperstown, New York, the Baseball Hall of Fame may be the most prestigious of any Sports Hall of Fame.  Although Baseball may have taken a backseat to Football in recent years, there is no doubt that Baseball’s version of the Hall of Fame is by far the most relevant and the most difficult to get enshrined in.  At present, a player has to receive seventy five percent of the votes from the Baseball Writers Association of America, which has proven to be no easy task.  Failing that, a player could be inducted by the Veterans committee, though few have been inducted this way.  Our list will focus on the players only, and although we could easily do a tally focusing on mangers, broadcasters or other vital personnel, as always it is far more enjoyable to discuss the merits of those on the field as oppose to those off of it.

Until Then, Let’s get some peanuts and cracker jacks and cast some votes of our own!

Sincerely,

The Not in Hall of Committee.

Statistically, there is no argument about the Hall of Fame qualifications of Pete Rose.  Even the most casual baseball fan is aware that “Charlie Hustle” is the all time hit king with 4,256 hits; a record that may never be broken.  Rose also was a seventeen time All Star, and proved to be a clutch performer as evidenced by his three World Series Rings; including a World Series MVP.  Sadly, as much as casual sports fans are aware of Rose’s on field accomplishments, many who have never turned their dial to ESPN knows his off field embarrassments. As many are…
Did he or didn’t he conspire to fix to the 1919 World Series?  Over eighty years after the fact, there is still a sizable debate as to whether “Shoeless” Joe Jackson was involved in the “Black Sox” scandal that saw the Chicago White Sox throw the World Series for financial gain against the Cincinnati Reds. Prior to his expulsion from baseball, Jackson had already proved himself Hall of Fame worthy.  In ten full Major League seasons, Shoeless Joe had over 1,700 hits and had a career batting average of .356.  The latter remains iconic as this puts him third All…
The undisputed heavyweight of new eligible ballplayers in 2016 has to be Ken Griffey Jr. Arguably one of the best overall players in the 1990’s, Griffey brings the career numbers, individual accomplishments and what may be most important a clean record in terms of Performance Enhancing Drugs. The signs all point towards Ken Griffey Jr. entering on the first ballot of the Hall of Fame with the tainted stars he played with and as such ascends to the top of our Baseball ballot. Now let’s look at what he did! Ken Griffey Jr. was a former MVP (1997), a thirteen…
Couldn’t we just say look at the previous Barry Bonds entry and say “Ditto”? Seriously, the parallels are too great to ignore. Like Bonds, Clemens may have had a Hall of Fame career before he allegedly took PEDs, and like Bonds, he dominated the steroid era as he did the decade before. He has the career statistics (353 wins and 4,672 strikeouts), the dominating seasons (seven Cy Youngs and an MVP) and two World Series Rings. “Rocket” Roger Clemens is arguably the best Pitcher in the past twenty five years.
You may have noticed many sportswriters who have a Hall of Fame ballot for the Baseball drink a little more these days. The PED question is now completely unavoidable with the new wave of eligible candidates as the sport’s biggest stars of the last two decades are now eligible for Hall of Fame enshrinement. It is not that our baseball list has not been controversial in the past. We have already put it through serious revisions when we created a “1a” and a “1b” to accommodate the fact that both Pete Rose and “Shoeless” Joe Jackson are both ineligible for…
One of the most fun debates in baseball has been who the best offensive Catchers of all time is. Some may say Johnny Bench, others Mickey Cochrane, some may say Yogi Berra or perhaps Gary Carter. We however think that Mike Piazza might have the greatest claim to that title.
With all due to respect to some of the great Baseball players who ever donned a Houston Astro uniform, we believe the case can be made that Jeff Bagwell is the greatest all time Astro.  This isn’t to say that there have not been better players who were once a member of Houston’s pro baseball team (Nolan Ryan comes to mind), but in terms of overall contributions to the Astros Jeff Bagwell tops our list.
Of all the interesting candidates who became eligible for the 2014 Baseball Hall of Fame, Mike Mussina’s resume could be the most interesting of them all. He received little attention from the press as his year of eligibility matched with Greg Maddux & Tom Glavine. His career numbers are very good, but the perceived Hall of Fame milestones were not hit. For example, Mussina was also considered an ace around the MLB, but he never won the Cy Young Award, though he has five top five finishes in voting and four 6th place finishes. He has a great winning percentage…
It is very easy to forget just how good Tim “Rock” Raines was.  His best seasons were in the 1980’s in the baseball wasteland of Montreal where he put up All Star caliber numbers and was amongst the best on the base paths.  As Raines played in the same era as the eccentric and attention grabbing Rickey Henderson, his prolific base stealing was not as celebrated as much as it should have been. Tim Raines was not just a base stealer; he was a smart base stealer.  He finished his career with base stealing percentage of 84.7 which is the…
If you think that all of the Turn of the Century Baseball Players that should be in the Hall of Fame is already in, then we ask you to think again.  We offer you the case of “Bad” Bill Dahlen, whose Hall of Fame campaign is being championed by sabremetricians and traditionalists alike. At the time of Bill Dahlen’s retirement, he was the all time League Leader in Games Played and was in the top ten in many other key offensive categories.  Granted, this was still early in the game’s history, but Dahlen remains entrenched in the top 100 in…
For the record, we love outspoken athletes. They may not always be popular with fans (and other players), but they sure make for far better sound bites than “we gotta go out there and give 100 percent” or other such statements from the “Athlete’s guide to dealing with the Media”. Ironically, Schilling is now part of the media, but remains as outspoken as ever.
Playing with Alan Trammell for virtually his entire career, Lou Whitaker was one half of the longest running double play combination in Baseball history.  Like Trammell, Whitaker was a great player with both bat and glove and a big part of Detroit’s World Series win in 1984. Whitaker was one of the top Second Basemen of his era, yet he did not receive the same respect or notoriety as others.  He won the American League Rookie of the Year in 1978 and though he did not live up to the lofty expectations placed upon him, records show that he was…
A large contingent of Dodger fans will maintain that Cooperstown’s greatest omission is that of Gil Hodges.  Considering he was one of the most consistent and best Home Run hitters of the 1950’s, these fans have a strong case. A lot of players get called a model of consistency but Gil Hodges really fit that bill.  For eleven years in a row, he smacked twenty homers and delivered a three digit number Runs Batted In total for seven straight seasons.  He didn’t hit for a high average, but he did walk consistently enough to make up for it.  He was…
It is possible that this candidate is shrouded with more controversy than our 1A and 1B candidates combined? We are here to talk about the past.  Do you remember the Major League Baseball Season of 1998?  If you do, you were likely riveted by the Home Run chase contested by Sammy Sosa and Mark McGwire as they hunted down Roger Maris’ single season Home Run record.  We cheered as Big Mac broke the record and were moved by the endorsement of the Maris family.  It brought fans back to baseball who had previously disowned the sport after the 1994 season…
As one half of the longest double play tandems (with Lou Whitaker), Alan Trammell was a solid shortstop who spent his entire career with the Detroit Tigers.  Trammell didn’t just play there; he excelled there and was a major reason that Detroit won the World Series in 1984. During the 1980’s, Alan Trammell was one of the best shortstops in the league.  Defensively he was a four time Gold Glove and even as his skills started to erode he was a quick thinker and made few errors in the infield.  Trammell was a star with his bat as well, and…

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  • 111. Badfinger
    The term heir apparent is used far too often in Pop Culture. Lou Gehrig may have proved to be the rightful heir to Babe Ruth in the Yankees, but while Eric Lindros had a decent hockey career, his original nickname of the “Next One” (In reference to Wayne Gretzky’s moniker of the “The Great One”) was a title he couldn’t…
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