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Baseball

Established in 1936, and currently based in Cooperstown, New York, the Baseball Hall of Fame may be the most prestigious of any Sports Hall of Fame.  Although Baseball may have taken a backseat to Football in recent years, there is no doubt that Baseball’s version of the Hall of Fame is by far the most relevant and the most difficult to get enshrined in.  At present, a player has to receive seventy five percent of the votes from the Baseball Writers Association of America, which has proven to be no easy task.  Failing that, a player could be inducted by the Veterans committee, though few have been inducted this way.  Our list will focus on the players only, and although we could easily do a tally focusing on mangers, broadcasters or other vital personnel, as always it is far more enjoyable to discuss the merits of those on the field as oppose to those off of it.

Until Then, Let’s get some peanuts and cracker jacks and cast some votes of our own!

Sincerely,

The Not in Hall of Committee.

Statistically, there is no argument about the Hall of Fame qualifications of Pete Rose.  Even the most casual baseball fan is aware that “Charlie Hustle” is the all time hit king with 4,256 hits; a record that may never be broken.  Rose also was a seventeen time All Star, and proved to be a clutch performer as evidenced by his three World Series Rings; including a World Series MVP.  Sadly, as much as casual sports fans are aware of Rose’s on field accomplishments, many who have never turned their dial to ESPN knows his off field embarrassments. {module…
Did he or didn’t he conspire to fix to the 1919 World Series?  Over eighty years after the fact, there is still a sizable debate as to whether “Shoeless” Joe Jackson was involved in the “Black Sox” scandal that saw the Chicago White Sox throw the World Series for financial gain against the Cincinnati Reds. Prior to his expulsion from baseball, Jackson had already proved himself Hall of Fame worthy.  In ten full Major League seasons, Shoeless Joe had over 1,700 hits and had a career batting average of .356.  The latter remains iconic as this puts him third…
You may have noticed many sportswriters who have a Hall of Fame ballot for the Baseball drink a little more these days. The PED question is now completely unavoidable with the new wave of eligible candidates as the sport’s biggest stars of the last two decades are now eligible for Hall of Fame enshrinement.
Couldn’t we just say look at the previous Barry Bonds entry and say “Ditto”? Seriously, the parallels are too great to ignore.
Dubbed the “Big Unit” for his imposing 6’ 10” stature, Randy Johnson was a dominating flamethrower for years. He has won every trophy worth winning as a Pitcher including the Cy Young five times, a World Series Ring (and the World Series MVP in the process), four ERA Titles, nine Strikeout Titles and appeared in ten All Star Games. Cumulatively speaking he is currently second overall in Strikeouts, ninth for Pitchers in WAR and hit the magical 300 mark for Wins. As he has no PED stain on him, he should be a lock for the Hall of Fame; that…
One of the most fun debates in baseball has been who the best offensive Catchers of all time is. Some may say Johnny Bench, others Mickey Cochrane, some may say Yogi Berra or perhaps Gary Carter. We however think that Mike Piazza might have the greatest claim to that title.
Pedro Martinez did not physically look like a power pitcher, but that is exactly what he was. Pedro “only” won 216 games, but lost a mere 100 games giving him one of the best winning percentages in history. If his low win total is an issue for some, his three Cy Young Awards more than make up for it as does his 3,000 plus Strikeouts. The Domincan won the ERA title five times, the WHIP title six times and the most Strikeouts three times. His career WAR of 86.0 is more than enough to put him in the Baseball Hall…
Of all the interesting candidates who became eligible for the 2014 Baseball Hall of Fame, Mike Mussina’s resume could be the most interesting of them all. He received little attention from the press as his year of eligibility matched with Greg Maddux & Tom Glavine. His career numbers are very good, but the perceived Hall of Fame milestones were not hit. For example, Mussina was also considered an ace around the MLB, but he never won the Cy Young Award, though he has five top five finishes in voting and four 6th place finishes. He has a great…
It is very easy to forget just how good Tim “Rock” Raines was.  His best seasons were in the 1980’s in the baseball wasteland of Montreal where he put up All Star caliber numbers and was amongst the best on the base paths.  As Raines played in the same era as the eccentric and attention grabbing Rickey Henderson, his prolific base stealing was not as celebrated as much as it should have been. Tim Raines was not just a base stealer; he was a smart base stealer.  He finished his career with base stealing percentage of 84.7 which is…
If you think that all of the Turn of the Century Baseball Players that should be in the Hall of Fame is already in, then we ask you to think again.  We offer you the case of “Bad” Bill Dahlen, whose Hall of Fame campaign is being championed by sabremetricians and traditionalists alike. At the time of Bill Dahlen’s retirement, he was the all time League Leader in Games Played and was in the top ten in many other key offensive categories.  Granted, this was still early in the game’s history, but Dahlen remains entrenched in the top 100…
For the record, we love outspoken athletes. They may not always be popular with fans (and other players), but they sure make for far better sound bites than “we gotta go out there and give 100 percent” or other such statements from the “Athlete’s guide to dealing with the Media”. Ironically, Schilling is now part of the media, but remains as outspoken as ever.
3,000 Hits should make one a lock for the Baseball Hall of Fame. Craig Biggio became one of a handful of players to achieve this impressive milestone, yet his accomplishments are either quietly undervalued or overvalued; depending on your point of view.
Playing with Alan Trammell for virtually his entire career, Lou Whitaker was one half of the longest running double play combination in Baseball history.  Like Trammell, Whitaker was a great player with both bat and glove and a big part of Detroit’s World Series win in 1984. Whitaker was one of the top Second Basemen of his era, yet he did not receive the same respect or notoriety as others.  He won the American League Rookie of the Year in 1978 and though he did not live up to the lofty expectations placed upon him, records show that he…
There are not that many baseball players who can make the claim that they were an All Star calibre Starting Pitcher. The amount that can say that they were an All Star Starter and Relief Pitcher can be counted on one hand. John Smoltz is one of those rare men. Smoltz was not just an All Star at both Pitching positions, as he hit the 200 Win and 3,000 Strikeouts mark, won the Rolaids Relief Award and a Cy Young Award. It is one of the most unique resumes on the Hall of Fame ballot and should be considered Hall…

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  • 400. The Gun Club
    Of the many Punk bands that emerged from L.A. (or really anywhere for that matter), the Gun Club could have conceivably drew from more outside influences than anyone else. With a serious Blues injection to their music, the Gun Club indirectly helped create a harder Alternative Country market that really hadn’t existed before and a list of successful bands who…
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