Multiple Maniacs

(1970 American cult film starring Divine and David Lochary;
written, produced, edited and directed by John Waters)
newly-restored screening at tiff. Bell Lightbox
August 7, 2016
by Live Music Head

Weiner

(2016 American fly-on-the-wall documentary about the sex scandal that was Anthony Weiner
and its impact on his campaign for Mayor of New York City during the 2013 election;
directed by Josh Kriegman and Elyse Steinberg)
by Live Music Head
We here at Notinhalloffame.com thought it would be fun to take a look at the major awards in North American team sports and see how it translates into Hall of Fame potential.

Needless to say, different awards in different sports yield hall of fame potential.  In basketball, the team sport with the least amount of players on a roster, the dividend for greatness much higher.  In baseball, it is not as much as a great individual season does not have the same impact.

We are taking a look at the NBA Defensive Player of the Year, which if you ask us is the most undervalued award in all of professional sports.

How will this one turn out?

Let’s take a look!



The following are the past players who have won NBA Defensive Player of the Year who are eligible for the Basketball Hall of Fame and have been enshrined.



Michael Jordan, Chicago Bulls (1988)

Yeah, that guy.  It is almost forgotten just how food MJ was defensively too.  This year, Jordan would lead the NBA in Steals per Game and would also earn his first league MVP.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2009.

Dennis Rodman, Detroit Pistons (1990)

This would be the first of two Dennis Rodman’s All Star seasons.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2011.

Dennis Rodman, Detroit Pistons (2) (1991)

“The Worm” enjoyed his first double digit rebounding season.  Rodman would lead in that category the next seven years.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2011.

David Robinson, San Antonio Spurs (1992)

The “Admiral” led the NBA with a sick 4.5 Blocks per Game and 12.2 Rebounds per Game average.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2009.

Hakeem Olajuwon, Houston Rockets (1993)

Olajuwon won the Blocks Title and posted 13 Rebounds per Game.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2008.

Hakeem Olajuwon, Houston Rockets (2) (1994)

This year, Olajuwon won the NBA Title and the Finals MVP.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2008.

Dikembe Mutombo, Denver Nuggets (1995)

Start the finger wagging.  Mutombo led the NBA in Blocks per Game and had 12.5 Rebounds per Game.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2015.

Gary Payton, Seattle Super Sonics (1996)

The “Glove” is to date the only Point Guard to ever win this award.  Payton would win the Steals title this season and was perennially a top five fixture in this category.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2015.

Dikembe Mutombo, Atlanta Hawks (2) (1997)

Mutombo would put up 3.3 Blocks and 11.6 Rebounds per Game this season.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2013.

Dikembe Mutombo, Atlanta Hawks (3) (1998)

Mutombo would put up 3.4 Blocks and 11.4 Rebounds per Game this season.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2015.

Alonzo Mourning, Miami Heat (1999)

Mourning led the National Basketball Association in Blocks per Game and put up his best Rebounding Totals with 11 per Game.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2014.

Alonzo Mourning, Miami Heat (2) (2000)

Mourning would again lead the NBA in Blocks per Game and still have a healthy rebounding average of 9.5 per Game.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2014.

Dikembe Mutombo, Atlanta Hawks/Philadelphia 76ers (4) (2001)

Mutombo win his second of two rebounding titles.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2015.



The following are the players who have won the NBA Defensive Player of the Year who are eligible for the Basketball Hall of Fame and have not been selected:



Sidney Moncrief, Miwaukee Bucks (1983)

Shooting Guard, Sidney Moncrief enjoyed his second All Star game and also enjoyed his best offensive season of his career with a 22.5 PPG and a career high PER of 22.6.  Ranked #2 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Sidney Moncrief, Miwaukee Bucks (2) (1984)

This would be Moncrief’s third All Star season and this would be the best rebounding year of his NBA career with a 6.7 RPG.  Ranked #2 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Mark Eaton, Utah Jazz (1985)

Mark Eaton would lead the NBA in Blocks per Game four times, and yes this was one of those seasons.  This year, Eaton would tally 11.3 Rebounds per Game, the best of his career.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Alvin Robertson, San Antonio Spurs (1986)

In Robertson’s sophomore season, the Shooting Guard would lwad the NBA in Steals and Steals per Game.  Robertson would win the Steals title two more times in his career.  Ranked #54 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Michael Cooper, Los Angeles Lakers (1987)

“Showtime” Michael Cooper never made an All Star Game but has five NBA Championship Rings and five First Team All Defensive Selections.  Ranked #51 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Mark Eaton, Utah Jazz (2) (1989)

This would be Eaton’s lone All Star season.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Ben Wallace, Detroit Pistons (2002)

“Big” Ben Wallace would win the Blocks and Rebounding Title this year.  Ranked #6 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Ben Wallace, Detroit Pistons (2) (2003)

Wallace would again win the Rebounding Title, this time with his highest total of 15.4.  This would be his first season named to an All Star.  Ranked #6 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Ben Wallace, Detroit Pistons (3) (2005)

This would be Wallace’s third All Star Season and he would post 2.4 Blocks and 12.2 Rebounds per Game.  Ranked #6 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Ben Wallace, Detroit Pistons (4) (2006)

This would be Wallace’s fourth and final All Star Season and he would post 2.2 Blocks and 11.3 Rebounds per Game.  Ranked #6 on Notinhalloffame.com.



Let’s update our tally shall we?



Award in Question

Percentage of recipients who have entered the HOF

Percentage of recipients by year who have entered the HOF.

NBA MVP

100%

100%

NHL Norris

90.5%

96.4%

NBA All Star Game MVP

89.5%

91.7%

NHL Lady Byng

63.8%

76.0%

NFL Super Bowl MVP

60.6%

64.9%

NBA Defensive Player of the Year

58.3%

56.5%

NBA Rookie of the Year

56.5%

56.5%

NHL Frank J. Selke Trophy

33.3%

36.7%

NFL Offensive Rookie of the Year

28.6%

28.6%

MLB Edgar Martinez Award

26.7%

17.2%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Designated Hitter)

25.0%

30.8%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Shortstop)

23.5%

52.6%

NFL Defensive Rookie of the Year

20.6%

20.6%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Catcher)

20.0%

22.5%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Pitcher)

18.2%

20.1%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Second Base)

16.7%

32.7%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Outfield)

15.7%

25.2%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Third Base)

13.6%

14.3%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (First Base)

13.6%

13.3%

MLB (NL/AL) Rookie of the Year

13.3%

13.3%





So who is up next?



The following are the players who have won the NBA Defensive Player of the Year who have retired but have not met the mandatory years out of the game to qualify for the Basketball Hall of Fame:


Marcus Camby, Denver Nuggets (2007)

While Marcus Camby was never an All-Star, he was always sought out by NBA teams to shore up their defense.  In this Defensive Player of the Year winning season, he won his third of four Blocking Titles.  Camby will be eligible for the Hall of Fame in 2018.



The following are the players who have won the NBA Defensive Player of the Year who are still active.



Metta World Peace (Ron Artest), Indiana Pacers (2004)

That season, the former Ron Artest went to his only All Star Game, however the controversial figure is not pegged as a future Hall of Famer.  Currently with the Los Angeles Lakers.  36 Years Old.   

Marcus Camby, Indiana Pacers (2007)

That season, the former Ron Artest went to his only All Star Game, however the controversial figure is not pegged as a future Hall of Famer.  Currently with the Los Angeles Lakers.  36 Years Old.   

Dwight Howard, Orlando Magic (2009)

Dwight Howard would win the Blocks and Rebounding title this season, the third of which he was named an All Star.  Currently with the Houston Rockets.  30 Years Old.   

Dwight Howard, Orlando Magic (2) (2010)

“Superman” would duplicate that sick feat, again winning both the Rebounding and Blocks title.  Currently with the Houston Rockets.  30 Years Old.   

Dwight Howard, Orlando Magic (3) (2011)

Howard didn’t win either title this year, but still put up a 14.1 Rebound and 2.4 Blocks per Game Average.  Currently with the Houston Rockets.  31 Years Old.   

Tyson Chandler, New York Knicks (2012)

The year after he won the NBA Championship with the Dallas Mavericks, Tyson Chandler would win his only individual award in the NBA.  Currently with the Phoenix Suns.  34 Years Old.   

Marc Gasol, Memphis Grizzlies (2013)

The brother of Pau Gasol went to two All Star Games, but this wasn’t one of those seasons.  Gasol had 1.7 Blocks, 1.0 Steals and 7.8 Rebounds per Game.  Currently with the Memphis Grizzlies.  31 Years Old.   

Joakim Noah, Chicago Bulls (2014)

This would be Noah’s best rebounding season in which he posted 11.3 per game.  It is notable that this was also his best offensive output with 12.6 Points per Game. Currently with the Chicago Bulls.  31 Years Old.   

Kawhi Leonard, San Antonio Spurs (2015)

Leonard would win the Steals Title this season. Currently with the San Antonio Spurs.  25 Years Old.   

Kawhi Leonard, San Antonio Spurs (2015)

This would be Leonard’s first All Star Season. Currently with the San Antonio Spurs.  25 Years Old.   





This award had it all didn’t it?

From the G.O.A.T. (Jordan) to a two time winner you forgot about (Eaton).

Based on the winners from he past ten years there is no reason to think that this will be a changing pattern, though with the recent winners, it appears that we are headed for a bit of a drought for Springfield.

So what will we look at next?

We will go back to Baseball and one of the most coveted awards in sports, the Cy Young Award.

Look for that soon and as always we thank you for your support!
We here at Notinhalloffame.com thought it would be fun to take a look at the major awards in North American team sports and see how it translates into Hall of Fame potential.

Needless to say, different awards in different sports yield hall of fame potential.  In basketball, the team sport with the least amount of players on a roster, the dividend for greatness much higher.  In baseball, it is not as much as a great individual season does not have the same impact.

We are taking a look at the NBA Defensive Player of the Year, which if you ask us is the most undervalued award in all of professional sports.

Interestingly, there has never been a duplicate winner of this award and there is little reason to think that will change.

Realistically, the winners of this award will result in the least scientific look of the respective winner, as statistics are not meant to be the first metric looked at.

How will this one turn out?

Let’s take a look!



The following are the past players who have won the King Clancy Memorial Trophy who are eligible for the Hockey Hall of Fame and have been enshrined.



Lanny McDonald, Calgary Flames (1988)

By this point, Lanny was still an effective leader but was not necessarily at a point where he was putting the puck in the net.  Still good in doing the unsung work of the game, McDonald only score 23 Points this season, but was a season away from retirement, but more importantly winning his first Stanley Cup.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1992.

Bryan Trottier, New York Islanders (1989)

Like Lanny McDonald, Bryan Trottier was in clear decline at this point and was coming off his worst performance of the year, though he would have four more seasons in the NHL each of which would follow the pattern of being his worst offensive output.  Trottier was however a bona fide star earlier in his career with the Islanders Dynasty and was active in Special Olympics and Make-A-Wish Program.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1997.

Ray Bourque, Boston Bruins (1992)

This is the first King Clancy winner who had a solid career after winning this award.  Bourque was only 31 and was still a Norris Trophy Winner and Stanley Cup Champion after this accolade.   While he is not the first to win this who was on the downswing of a career, he is still a hockey player who had a lot left in the tank.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2004.

Joe Nieuwendyk, Calgary Flames (1995)

Joe Nieuwendyk was in the prime of his career at this point and was about to move on to the Dallas Stars and win the Stanley Cup and Conn Smythe, a performance that might have put him over the Hall of Fame hump.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2011.

Ron Francis, Carolina Hurricanes (2002)

Ron Francis won this award at age 38 and was already a Hall of Famer by this point.  He would win his third of his three Lady Byngs this year andalready had 1,500 career Points.  He would play two more years in the NHL.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2011.

Brendan Shanahan, Detroit Red Wings (2003)

Ron Francis won this award at age 38 and was already a Hall of Famer by this point.  He would win his third of his three Lady Byngs this year andalready had 1,500 career Points.  He would play two more years in the NHL.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2013.





The following are the players who have won the King Clancy Memorial Trophy who are eligible for the Hockey Hall of Fame and have not been selected:



Kevin Lowe, Edmonton Oilers (1990)

Let’s continue the pattern as Kevin Lowe was already in decline by this point.  Still this is arguably the best Edmonton Oiler who has not made the Hockey Hall of Fame and he was a major contributor to charitable projects in the city of Edmonton.  Ranked #28 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Dave Taylor, Los Angeles Kings (1991)

Dave Taylor, who played his entire career with the Los Angeles Kings, would win his only individual trophies this season as not only dis he capture the Clancy, he was also awarded the Bill Masterton.  Taylor was 35 when he won this accolade and had his bet years behind him.  Still, his charitable work in SoCal earned this award.  Ranked #22 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Dave Poulin, Boston Bruins (1993)

Dave Poulin had a solid career and was one of the better defensive forwards in the game.  1993 was his last decent year and he would retire two years later.   Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.    

Adam Graves, New York Rangers (1994)

To date, Adam Graves is the youngest winner of the King Clancy, and the 1994-95 Season was by far his most memorable.  This was the season where he would win in his second Stanley Cup, and was a major part of the win.  This is also the only season where he was named a post season All Star.  Still, this was his peak, and a career worthy of Hall of Very Good.   Ranked #68 on Notinhalloffame.com.   

Kris King, Winnipeg Jets (1996)

The King Clancy Award would be the only NHL Award that fourteen year NHL veteran, Kris King would win.  The rugged forward was a fan favorite but was never going to be considered a Hall of Famer.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.   

Trevor Linden, Vancouver Canucks (1997)

Surprisingly, this is the only major award that Trevor Linden ever won in the National Hockey League.  Linden will go down as one of the most respected players in hockey but that does not mean he was one of the best.  He was a very good player though, and will forever be an icon in Vancouver.  Ranked #73 on Notinhalloffame.com.   

Kelly Chase, St. Louis Blues (1998)

Not only is this the only NHL Award that Kelly Chase won, this is the only time he was remotely close.  Chase was a goon, who never had 100 career Points but off the ice, his charitable efforts made him a saint.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.   

Rob Ray, Buffalo Sabres (1999)

Scoring only 4 Points in this campaign, like Kelly Chase, Rob Ray was a popular figure for his fisticuffs.  Ray, who would play a total of 900 NHL Games and would lead the NHL in Penalty Minutes twice, including his King Clancy Award winning season.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.   

Curtis Joseph, Toronto Maple Leafs (2000)

The first Goalie to wing the King Clancy, “Cujo” was one of the more respected netminders of his day, yet this was the only award that Joseph would ever win.  He was however a two time All Star, the second of which took place this season.  Ranked #17 on Notinhalloffame.com.   

Shjon Podein, Colorado Avalanche (2001)

Shjon Podein had a great 2000/01 season as not only did he win the King Clancy Award but would be part of the Colorado Avalanche Stanley Cup win.  Podein is not a Hall of Famer but has a ring, which is likely good enough for him.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.   

Olaf Kolzig, Colorado Avalanche (2006)

Olaf Kolzig might be the second Goalie to win the King Clancy, but he is the first European to win it.  At this point in his career, his best years were behind him and he was five seasons removed from his lone Vezina Trophy and First Team NHL nod.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.   

Ethan Moreau, Edmonton Oilers (2010)

This was the only award that Ethan Moreau would win and the sixteen year vet would have 287 career Points, not a number that will ever get him a Hall of Fame look.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.   

Doug Weight, New York Islanders (2011)

Doug Weight was a four time All Star, and in his final season in the National Hockey League he won his only individual award, the King Clancy.  Weight is a player who is on the wrong end of the HOF bubble, but at least he is on the bubble.  Ranked #34 on Notinhalloffame.com.   







Let’s update our tally shall we?



Award in Question

Percentage of recipients who have entered the HOF

Percentage of recipients by year who have entered the HOF.

NBA MVP

100%

100%

NHL Norris

90.5%

96.4%

NBA All Star Game MVP

89.5%

91.7%

NHL Lady Byng

63.8%

76.0%

NFL Super Bowl MVP

60.6%

64.9%

NBA Rookie of the Year

56.5%

56.5%

NHL Frank J. Selke Trophy

33.3%

36.7%

NFL Offensive Rookie of the Year

28.6%

28.6%

MLB Edgar Martinez Award

26.7%

17.2%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Designated Hitter)

25.0%

30.8%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Shortstop)

23.5%

52.6%

NFL Defensive Rookie of the Year

20.6%

20.6%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Catcher)

20.0%

22.5%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Pitcher)

18.2%

20.1%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Second Base)

16.7%

32.7%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Outfield)

15.7%

25.2%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Third Base)

13.6%

14.3%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (First Base)

13.6%

13.3%

MLB (NL/AL) Rookie of the Year

13.3%

13.3%





So who is up next?



The following are the players who have won the King Clancy Memorial Trophy who have retired but have not met the mandatory years out of the game to qualify:



Saku Koivu, Montreal Canadians (2007)

There are few players who were as respected as the first Finnish recipient of the King Clancy, Saku Koivu, and he will have a spot on our Notinhalloffame.com list once he is eligible.  Saying that, we are not expecting him to get inducted.  Koivu will be eligible for the Hall of Fame in 2017.

Daniel Alfredsson, Ottawa Senators (2012)

Possibly the best Ottawa Senator of all-time (including both incarnations), Daniel Alfredsson won the King Clancy late in his career, but was already a 1,000 Point scorer, a Second Team All Star and a Calder Trophy winner.  We expect that after a few years of eligibility he will enter the Hockey Hall of Fame.  Alfredsson will be eligible for the Hall of Fame in 2017.





The following are the players who have won the King Clancy Memorial Trophy who are still active.



Jarome Iginla, Calgary Flames (2004)

Jarome Iginla won this award at age 26 and built up his Hall of Fame resume since then.  We expect him to be a Hall of Fame lock.  Currently with the Colorado Avalanche.  38 Years Old.   

Vincent LeCavilier, Tampa Bay Lightning (2008)

Vincent LeCavalier won this award a year after winning his lone Rocket Richard and post season NHL All Star awards.  His career is winding down and it is not likely that he has done enough to make the Hall.  Currently with the Los Angeles Kings.  36 Years Old.   

Shane Doan, Phoenix Coyotes (2010)

The overall career of Shane Doan screams “Hall of Very Good”.  He was a damned good player, but this was the only award he ever won (see a pattern?), but when we get to greatest Coyotes of all time, it is hard to imagine Doan not topping that list.  Currently with the Arizona Coyotes.  39 Years Old.   

Patrice Bergeron, Boston Bruins (2013)

This will be interesting.  Patrice Bergeron is a three time Frank J. Selke Award winner and a Stanley Cup Champion, but is not a bona fide scoring forward.  What will happen here?  Currently with the Boston Bruins.  30 Years Old.   

Andrew Ference, Edmonton Oilers (2014)

To date this is the only individual award that Andrew Ference has won and we don’t see that changing anytime soon.  He won’t make the Hockey Hall of Fame.   Currently with the Edmonton Oilers.  36 Years Old.   

Henrik Zetterberg, Detroit Red Wings (2015)

This can’t hurt.  Zetterberg will likely be a bubble candidate as he is a former Conn Smythe Winner and a former Second Team All Star.  A very respected player, a King Clancy is a testament to his character, which might be what helps get him in.   Currently with the Edmonton Oilers.  35 Years Old.  



Honestly, I don’t know what this proved, but considering this is an award that talks about the real good guys of the game, it was worth the time and like we said at the beginning, this is not exactly scientific!

So what will we look at next?

We will go to what we consider to be the most undervalued award in sports, the NBA Defensive Player of the Year Award.

Look for that soon and as always we thank you for your support!


The Falls: a cautionary tale
(1991 Canadian non-fiction film
about mankind's interactions with Niagara Falls,
directed by Kevin McMahon)
Bloor Hot Docs cinema, Toronto
by Live Music Head
May 18, 2016
The good doctor was very surprised to see just how many fencers were on this list, and my first one concludes with one from this elegant sport.  It is fitting that it ends with an American, the nation that dominated the hot female athletes.  Here is Mariel Zagunis, a blonde beauty who can carve you up!
American middle distance competitor, Kara Goucher, is sexy and successful.   That is enough to get her on the tail end of the good doctor’s list.
While the good doctor can understand why people in North America aren’t into the biathlon, I try to find things I do like.  One of those is Austrian, Lisa Theresa Hauser.
While Cappie Pondexter should stay off of Twitter, the good doctor loves the way this WNBA star scraps and claws her way to basketball greatness.  She certainly looks good doing it too!
The good doctor likes South Korean archer, Ki Bo Bae, though I am not completely sure why.  Maybe it is because underneath that goofy hat and baggy clothing she competes in, I am certain that there is something magical.