Joe Burrow was the No.1 pick in the 2020 NFL Draft when he was selected by the Cincinnati Bengals but can the former LSU quarterback follow his top pick in the draft with a 'Hall of Fame' career amongst the pros...?

The Iowa native enjoyed a stellar college career and is an enormous talent, having won the Heisman Trophy and Maxwell Award during his final year with LSU.

The signal caller has all the attributes to succeed in the NFL but history doesn't dictate that he'll transition from being first pick amongst the class of 2020 to becoming a hall of famer in the future.

Having grabbed its first College Football Championship since 2007, the LSU that Burrow leaves behind is +650 in the American football odds for NCAAF glory in 2021.

Burrow meanwhile starts out into the rest of his career with the weight of being No.1 draftee on his back. 

Of the 14 previous No.1 picks to make it into the Hall of Fame, here's a reminder of the three most recent inductees.

Orlando Pace – No.1 pick in 1997

The St Louis Rams took Pace as the top pick in the '97 Draft following his promising time at Ohio State. On his induction to the HOF, it was recorded that Pace had become "one finest offensive linemen of his era" during his NFL career.

His Rams team shattered NFL scoring records with their outstanding offensive play and their thrilling 23-16 win over the Tennessee Titans in Super Bowl XXXIV marked the end of almost a half-century waitfor ultimate success for the St Louis franchise on the biggest stage. 

Pace would also line out in the Super Bowl against New England at the end of the 2001 season but his side lost out in a knife-edge contest. 

He was selected in seven consecutive Pro Bowls and made 169 NFL appearances, making the NFL's All-Decade Team of the 2000s.

Troy Aikman – No.1 pick in 198

After switching to UCLA from Oklahoma, Aikman finished his college career as the third highest rated passer in NCAA history at that time. 

He was drafted by a struggling Dallas Cowboys outfit coming off their worst record since going 0-11-1 in its 1960 inaugural season.

In his dozen NFL season he made six Pro Bowls and led Dallas to three Super Bowl wins ('92, '93 and '95) as well as recording more NFL wins during the 1990s than any other quarterback.

In his career, Aikman threw a stunning tally of 32,942 yards and 165 touchdowns, giving him a passer rating of 81.6 on his retirement.

Bruce Smith – No.1 pick in 1989

Blessed with raw speed and acceleration, Smith impressed anyone who watched him at Virginia Tech and he attracted top pick from the Buffalo Bills in 1989.

He enjoyed an NFL career that spanned close to two decades and was selected on 11 Pro Bowls during his run. 

At the end of 1990 season, his Bills side lost 20-19 to the New York Giants in Super Bowl XXI in Florida. That was as close as Smith got to a ring, with the Bills well beaten in future appearances against the Washington Redskins and Dallas Cowboys (twice). Smith started in all four of those Super Bowls.

With 200 career sacks, he's recognized as an all-time leader in defensive play and holds the NFL record for most sacks. 




Rock n roll is always considered to be more of a lifestyle than a form of music. Rock stars are known to live in excesses. It's popularly romanticized as a life of excess drugs, sex and hedonism. Many rockers bend the rules and stretch it to the limit. Some survive, some become casualties. The golden era of rock n roll was probably the 60s with legendary bands like Led Zeppelin, The Beatles and The Doors pushing the limits both musically as well as in their own personal lives. 

There are several sordid stories of overdosing on drugs and sometimes even endangering the lives of those around them. This kind of a lifestyle is something you can probably taste a slice of in Las Vegas with all its casinos and clubs. Although it's true that Las Vegas now does offer more than just gambling like this article says. But as we enter the era of hip hop and electronic music, it would be a good idea to look back and go through some of the greatest tragedies of rock n roll history. 

Death of John Bonham

There is absolutely no doubt that Led Zeppelin was one of the greatest bands on the planet and that John Bonham was one of the greatest drummers who ever lived. His unique style of drumming remains unparalleled and still inspires a whole new generation of drummers. Bonham was known for his excessive drinking which is what led to his death in 1980 when he was only 32 years old. The band decided not to carry on without him and that was the end of Led Zeppelin. His death is considered to be one of the greatest losses to the world of rock.

Death of John Lennon

There has probably never been a more famous band in the history of the world than The Beatles. It's a remarkable story how four young lads from Liverpool went on to confquer the world with their brilliant tunes and sharp songwriting. John Lennon was at one point considered to be almost god like. After quitting the The Beatles, Lennon pursued a solo career and went through a series of personal awakenings and changes. His wife Yoko Ono and he became activists and protested against a lot of decisions that the government was taking at that time. In 1980, John Lennon was shot dead outside his home by a crazed Beatles fan by the name of Mark Chapman. Chapman claims he was upset by claims that Lennon had made about The Beatles being more famous than Jesus. Chapman is still in jail and seeking parole according to this article

Death of Buddy Holly

Buddy Holly was an American singer-songwriter known for being an influential figure in the rock n roll scene of the 50s. He is known to be the first musician to come up with the traditional band format of two guitars, drums and bass. He had a very short career and yet his work managed to influence legends like Elvis Presley, Bob Dylan and Eric Clapton. In 1959, Buddy Holly died in a plane crash along with the rest of his band mates. The event was considered to be so tragic that Don McLean refers to it in his song American Pie saying it was the day that music died. 

There are many more events that could make the list like the Lynyrd Skynyrd plane crash and Elvis Presley's death that changed the course of rock n roll forever. 

Six NBA players that retired too soon

NBA fans waiting for the resumption of the season can get the best deals for casino games at live dealer roulette NJ. In addition to enjoying digital experiences, fans also continue to debate who are some of the greatest basketball players to have exited stage right before their time. 

Yao Ming

The first pick in the 2002 NBA Draft, Yao Ming came to the league with a stellar reputation after five years with the Shanghai Sharks in the CBA. The Chinese star lived up to the hype during his nine-year stint at the Houston Rockets, where he was named Rookie of the Year and helped the franchise to the NBA Play-offs on four occasions.

Ming’s exceptional rebounding and blocking ability saw him become an eight-time NBA All-Star. Still, after playing all 164 games in his first two seasons, injuries started to regularly hamper his game time. After suffering a fractured left ankle in the 2010/11 season, Ming decided to retire at just 30-years of age. 

Magic Johnson

Magic Johnson was one of the three best NBA players in the 1980s alongside Michael Jordan and Larry Bird, but his career came to an abrupt end in 1991 when he was diagnosed with HIV. Johnson is still regarded as the best point guard to have played the game, and he backed up his talent with five NBA Championships between 1980 and 1989.

After twelve years with the Los Angeles Lakers, the then 31-year-old retired to become an advocate for HIV and AIDS prevention, though he did win an Olympic gold medal for the US as part of “The Dream Team” in 1992. Johnson briefly returned in 1996 for a 32-game stint with the Lakers, but fans are still left wondering what might have been if he had been able to continue playing in his prime.

Michael Jordan

Still regarded as the greatest player to ever play basketball, Michael Jordan retired twice in his career after securing infamous “three-peats” with the Chicago Bulls. Jordan started a new career in Minor League Baseball in late 1993 before returning to the Bulls in 1995, where he went on to secure NBA Championships in 1996, 1997, and 1998 before retiring for a second time at 35 years of age.

With the Bulls still in the ascendency at that time, commentators have speculated that Jordan and the Bulls could have continued its dynasty and dominated the Eastern Conference for a few more years if he and teammates Scottie Pippen and Dennis Rodman had stayed together. ‘Air Jordan’ returned for a third and final stint with the Washington Wizards before retiring for good in 2003.

Brandon Roy

Shooting guard Brandon Roy was the sixth pick in the 2006 NBA Draft and was named Rookie of the Year in his first season with the Portland Trail Blazers. However, he was never able to fulfill his potential due to an ongoing knee problem. Roy averaged 19 points a game with the Blazers over five seasons before joining the Minnesota Timberwolves.

The then 27-year-old had already undergone six surgeries in an attempt to fix the problem, but he was unable to hold out any longer and eventually retired in 2011. A brief comeback in 2012/13 also ended after five regular-season games as Roy succumbed to another knee injury.

Gilbert Arenas

Gilbert Arenas is still considered to be one of the best second-round draft picks. After joining the Golden State Warriors in 2001, ‘Agent Zero’ was named the most improved player in the league after the 2002/03 season and continued to make a name for himself as a leading point guard after being traded to the Washington Wizards.

A career-high record of 29.3 points followed soon after. Unfortunately, things took a turn in the late 2000s when a knee injury and a controversial incident involving a handgun resulted in an indefinite suspension from the NBA. Arenas was never quite the same again, and he retired at 30-years of age in 2012.

Tracy McGrady

Florida-native Tracy McGrady can be considered an NBA journeyman after playing for seven teams during his 16-year career, but many still believe he may have left the game too soon. McGrady, the ninth pick for the Toronto Raptors in the 1997 NBA Draft, really came into his own during a four-year stint with the Orlando Magic in the early 2000s, where he was a two-time NBA scoring champion.

McGrady was a seven-time NBA All Star between 2001 and 2007 before back and knee injuries started to eat into his natural talent and dull the shooting streaks for which he was renowned. He eventually retired at 32 years of age.

We here at Notinhalloffame.com thought it would be fun to take a look at the major awards in North American team sports and see how it translates into Hall of Fame potential.

Needless to say, different awards in different sports yield hall of fame potential.  In basketball, the team sport with the least number of players on a roster, the dividend for greatness much higher.  In baseball, it is not as much as a great individual season does not have the same impact.

Last time, we looked at the NBA Finals MVP.  This time we went back to baseball, and the Comeback Player of the Year.

This is a recent award, first created in 2005, so the sample size at present is not a large one, but that has not stopped us before.  As with most awards in the Majors, there is one issued for both the National League and the American League.

So how many MLB Comeback Player of the Years have made the Baseball Hall of Fame?

Let’s find out!

The following are the past players who have won the Comeback Player of the Year who are eligible for the Baseball Hall of Fame and have been enshrined.

Ken Griffey Jr., Cincinnati Reds (NL: 2005)                    

Ken Griffey Jr was beset with injury after injury from 2001 to 2004 as a Cincinnati Red with the most games he had in a year being 111.  This season, Griffey Jr appeared in 128 Games and had 35 Home Runs with a .301 Batting Average.  He played until 2010, retiring with 630 Home Runs and 2,781 Hits.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2016.

Jim Thome, Chicago White Sox (AL: 2006)                      

In 2005, Thome had elbow problems and batted only .205 as a Philadelphia Phillie.  The Phils traded him to the White Sox, and he rebounded with 42 Home Runs and 109 RBIs.  The slugger played until 2012 and left the game with 612 Home Runs.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2018.

Mariano Rivera, New York Yankees (AL: 2013)                

Mariano Rivera was already entrenched as the greatest Relief Pitcher in history before he won this award, and in 2012 it looked like he had to retire.  In May of that year, he tore his ACL, and it was expected that he would not return, but he did and was back in form.  In what was his final season, the career Yankee had 44 Saves and was an All-Star for the 13thtime.  Rivera ended his career as the all-time leader in Games Finishes (952), Saves (652) and ERA+ (205).  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2019.

The following are the players who have won the Comeback Player of the Year who are eligible for the Baseball Basketball Hall of Fame and have not been selected:

Jason Giambi, New York Yankees (AL: 2005)                   

Jason Giambi won the 2000 MVP, and was a top slugger for the seasons after but knee issues held him to 80 Games in 2004.  In 2005, he returned with 32 Home Runs, and led the American League in Walks (108) and On Base Percentage (.440).  Eligible Since 2020.  Was on the ballot for one year in 2020 and received 1.5% of the ballot.  Ranked #98 on Notinhalloffame.com

Nomar Garciaparra, Los Angeles Dodgers (NL: 2006)       

Injuries compiled on Garciaparra for years, taking him away from surefire Hall of Famer to also-ran.  He missed most of 2005 due to a torn groin, but 2006 had Garciaparra go to his first All-Star Game since 2003.  Garciaparra had 20 Home Runs, and batted .303 this year.  Realistically, this was his last good year, and he retired in 2009.  Eligible Since 2015.  Was on the ballot for two years in 2015 finishing as high as 5.5% in 2015.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Carlos Pena, Tampa Bay Rays (AL: 2007)                        

Carlos Pena had a pair of 100 Hit years, and had a 27 Home Run season in 2004, but he was released by the Tigers before the start of the 2006 season.  He signed with the Yankees, but was released before he played for them.  He did manage to get in 18 Games for Boston, but was in the minors for most of the year.  Pena signed a minor league deal with Tampa before the 2007 season, and he rewarded them with a 46 Home Run and .282 Batting Average year.  Pena was ninth in MVP voting, and two years later he won the Home Run Title (39) and was an All-Star.  Pena would later play for the Cubs, Houston, Kansas City and Texas.  He retired with 286 Home Runs.  Eligible Since 2020.  Was on the ballot for one year in 2020 but did not receive any votes.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Dmitri Young, Washington Nationals (NL: 2007)             

An All-Star in 2003 with the Detroit Tigers, Young’s 2006 season was his last in Motown, where he only played in 48 Games, had a sub .300 OBP and was treated for substance abuse and depression.  The Tigers released him that year, and it looked like his career might be over.  The Nationals signed Young, and in 2007 he was an All-Star again and he batted .320, which was good enough for fifth in the NL. He played one more season, and he retired with 1,389 Hits and 171 Home Runs.  Eligible Since 2014.  Although Young was eligible in 2014, he was not on the ballot.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Cliff Lee, Cleveland Indians (AL: 2008)                            

Lee won at least 14 Wins annually from 2004 to 2006, and was fourth in Cy Young voting in 2005.  Lee had a horrendous 2007 where he had abdominal issues and was sent down to the minors, and his ERA was over six in his 20 Games with Cleveland. He rocketed back with his best year ever, going 22-3, and he led the AL in Wins, ERA (2.54) and FIP (2.83), and he won the Cy Young, making him the first to win the Cy Young and the Comeback Player of the Year at the same time.  Eligible Since 2020.  Was on the ballot for one year and received 0.5% of the vote.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Brad Lidge, Philadelphia Phillies (NL: 2008)                    

An All-Star in 2005, Lidge’s game fell apart after and he dropped to 19 Saves in 2007 from his 42 two years before.  Lidge joined the Phillies, and he was an All-Star again with 41 Saves and an ERA of 1.95.  Lidge finished fourth in Cy Young voting, was an All-Star, and won the Rolaids Relief and Delivery Man of the Year Award.  The Phillies won the World Series that season, and Lidge was the first player to win the Comeback Player of the Year and the World Series in the same year.  Lidge played until 2012 and retired with 225 Saves.  Eligible Since 2018.  Was on the ballot for one year and received 0.5% of the vote.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Chris Carpenter, St. Louis Cardinals (NL: 2009)              

In 2007, Carpenter threw only six innings and underwent Tommy John Surgery and he was only on the mound for 15.1 Innings in 2008 due to shoulder issues.  The Pitcher stormed back as the Cy Young runner-up and had a 17-4 record while leasing the National League in ERA (2.24).  Carpenter would be an All-Star again the following year, and he played until 2012, finishing his career with a 144-94 record.  Eligible Since 2018.  Was on the ballot for one year and received 0.5% of the vote.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Tim Hudson, Atlanta Braves (NL: 2010)                          

An All-Star twice with Oakland, Tim Hudson joined the Braves in 2005 and did well until Tommy John Surgery took him out in 2008 and he missed most of 2009.  In 2010, he was an All-Star again with a 17-9 record and a fourth place finish in the Cy Young.  Hudson was an All-Star again in 2014 as a San Francisco Giant and retired the year later with 222 Wins and 2,080 Strikeouts.  Eligible Since 2021.  His first year of eligibility is this year.  Ranked #101 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Lance Berkman, St. Louis Cardinals (NL: 2011)               

Lance Berkman was a five-time All-Star with the Astros, but in an injury plagued 2010 he only had 14 Home Runs and batted .249. Berkman joined the Cardinals and blasted 31 Home Runs, was an All-Star for his sixth and final time and he helped the Cardinals win the World Series.  He played two more seasons and retired with 1,648 Hits, 326 Home Runs and 1,090 RBIs.  Eligible Since 2019.  He was on he ballot for one year and had 1.2% of the ballot.  Ranked #88 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Let’s update our tally, shall we?        

Award in Question

Percentage of recipients who have entered the HOF

Percentage of recipients by year who have entered the HOF.

NBA MVP

100%

100%

NHL Art Ross

100%

100%

NBA Finals MVP

91.3%

94.9%

NHL Norris

90.5%

96.4%

NBA All-Star Game MVP

89.5%

91.7%

NHL Conn Smythe

74.2%

85.4%

NFL Bert Bell Award

73.7%

71.4%

NFL AP Offensive Player of the Year

73.1%

79.4%

NFL AP MVP

68.3%

74.0%

NHL Lady Byng

63.8%

76.0%

NFL Defensive Player of the Year

60.8%

71.1%

NFL Super Bowl MVP

60.6%

64.9%

NBA Defensive Player of the Year

58.3%

56.5%

NHL Vezina

57.1%

66.3%

NBA Rookie of the Year

56.5%

56.5%

MLB MVP

55.0%

60.2%

NFL Pro Bowl MVP

52.3%

54.8%

MLB Lou Gehrig Award

51.9%

51.9%

MLB Roberto Clemente Award

47.4%

47.4%

MLB/NL/AL Cy Young Award

44.4%

55.4%

MLB Babe Ruth Award

37.0%

39.3%

NHL Frank J. Selke Trophy

33.3%

36.7%

MLB World Series MVP

33.3%

36.8%

MLB Hutch Award

33.1%

33.1%

NFL Offensive Rookie of the Year

28.6%

28.6%

NHL Bill Masterton Memorial Trophy

27.9%

27.9%

MLB Edgar Martinez Award

26.7%

17.2%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Designated Hitter)

25.0%

30.8%

MLB Comeback Player of the Year

25.0%

25.0%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Shortstop)

23.5%

52.6%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove

21.7%

36.8%

NFL Defensive Rookie of the Year

20.6%

20.6%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Catcher)

20.0%

22.5%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Second Base)

18.8%

39.8%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Shortstop)

18.2%

35.1%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Pitcher)

18.2%

20.1%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Second Base)

16.7%

32.7%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Outfield)

16.7%

30.1%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Outfield)

15.7%

25.2%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Third Base)

14.3%

14.3%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Third Base)

13.6%

14.3%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (First Base)

13.6%

13.3%

MLB (NL/AL) Rookie of the Year

13.3%

13.3%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Catcher)

10.3%

15.2%

NBA Most Improved Player of the Year

5.3%

3.2%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (First Base)

3.8%

3.2%

NFL AP Comeback Player of the Year

0.0%

0.0%

So, who is up next?

The following are the players who have won the Comeback Player of the Year in MLB who have retired but have not met the mandatory years out of the game to qualify for the Baseball Hall of Fame:

Aaron Hill, Toronto Blue Jays (AL: 2009)

Aaron Hill suffered a concussion in late May of 2008, and he was put for the remainder of the season.  Hill came back to have the best season of his career where he was an All-Star for the first and only time of his career, and would post career-highs in Home Runs (36), RBIs (108) and Hits (195).  The Second Baseman would also win his lone Silver Slugger this season. Hill went on to play for Arizona, Milwaukee, Boston and San Francisco, and he retired with 1,501 Hits and 162 Home Runs.  Eligible in 2023.

Jacoby Ellsbury, Boston Red Sox (AL: 2011)

Jacoby Ellsbury played only 18 Games due to fractured ribs in 2010, but he returned the following season to have his only All-Star year.  Ellsbury had career-highs in Hits (212), Home Runs (32), RBIs (105), and the Slash Line (.321/.376/.552).  He would later win his second World Series ring with the BoSox in 2013, and he finished his career with 104 Home Runs and 1,376 Hits.  Eligible in 2023.

Chris Young, Seattle Mariners (AL: 2014)

Thoracic Outlet Syndrome held Chris Young to only nine minor league starts in 2013, and he was a long way removed from his 2007 All-Star year in San Diego.  Young was a Mariner for only this season, and he went 12-9 with a 3.65 ERA.  He played three more years with Kansas City, winning a World Series ring and retiring with 79 Wins against 67 Losses.  Eligible in 2023.

Chris McGehee, Miami Marlins (NL: 2014)

Chris McGehee debuted in 2008, and had a decent 2010 season, but was a journeyman after that, playing in Japan in 2013. McGehee returned to the Majors as a Miami Marlin, and he would collect 177 Hits with a .287 Batting Average.  He went back to journeyman status and was out of the majors after 2016.  McGehee had 721 Hits over his career.  Eligible in 2022.

Prince Fielder, Texas Rangers (AL: 2015)

Prince Fielder won the Home Run Title in 2007 with the Milwaukee Brewers, and he had six more 30-Home Run years right after. Fielder joined the Texas Rangers in 2014, but he had season-ending neck surgery after 42 Games.  In 2015, Fielder had 187 Hits, 23 Home Runs and batted .305, and was an All-Star for the sixth and final time.  Injuries kept him to only one more season, and he retired after the 2016 season with 319 Home Runs and 1,645 Hits.  Eligible in 2022.

The following are the players who have won the MLB Comeback Player of the Year who are still active.

Francisco Liriano, Minnesota Twins (AL: 2010)

Francisco Liriano was an All-Star as a rookie in 2006, but he missed all of 2007 due to Tommy John Surgery, and he was injured for much of 2008 and 2009.  Liriano rebounded with a 14-10 record in 2010 with a 3.62 ERA.  36 Years Old, Playing for the Philadelphia Phillies.

Fernando Rodney, Tampa Bay Rays (AL: 2012)

Fernando Rodney los the closers job with the Angels the year before with only three Saves and a 4.50 ERA.  With the Rays, he came back with a vengeance with 48 Saves, a 0.60 ERA, a 0.777 WHIP and a fifth place Cy Young finish.  43 Years Old, Free Agent.

Buster Posey, San Francisco Giants (NL: 2012)

Buster Posey was the 2010 Rookie of the Year and the Catcher helped lead the Giants to a World Series win.  2011 was not as good, as a home plate collision fractured his fibula and tore ligaments.  Posey rebounded by taking the Giants to another World Series win with 24 Home Runs, a Batting Title (.336) and an MVP.  Posey won another World Series Ring with the Giants in 2014.  33 Years Old, Playing for the San Francisco Giants.

Francisco Liriano, Pittsburgh Pirates (2) (NL: 2013)

Liriano made history as the first player to win the Comeback Player of the Year twice, and he did it in both leagues.  This time, he made a comeback after an awful 2012 split between Minnesota and Chicago (AL), and in his first season as a Pirate he had his best year in baseball.  Liriano went 16-8 with a 3.02 ERA and a ninth-place finish in Cy Young voting.  36 Years Old, Playing for the Philadelphia Phillies.

Matt Harvey, New York Mets (NL: 2015)

An All-Star in 2013, Matt Harvey missed all of 2014 from Tommy John Surgery.  Harvey went 13-8 for the Mets in 2015, and had a 2.71 ERA with 188 Strikeouts.  31 Years Old, Free Agent.

Rick Porcello, Boston Red Sox (AL: 2016)

After having six good seasons with the Detroit Tigers, Rick Porcello joined the Red Sox, but had a poor year with a 9-15 record and an ERA near five.  Porcello had a monster 2016 with a 22-4 record and a league-leading SO/BB (5.91). He would also win the Cy Young, and two years later, he helped Boston win the World Series.  31 Years Old, Playing for the New York Mets.

Anthony Rendon, Washington Nationals (NL: 2016)

Rendon had a great 2014 year with a fifth place finish in MVP voting.  The season after, he had a poor year and missed his share of games, but he bounced back with a 20 Home Run year in 2016. Rendon would later lead the Nationals to their first World Series win in 2019.  29 Years Old, Playing for the Anaheim Angels.

Mike Moustakas, Kansas City Royals (AL: 2017)

Mike Moustakas helped the Royals win the 2015 World Series, but in 2016, he had a torn ACL and only played in 27 Games.  In 2017, Moustakas was an All-Star for the second time and he belted 38 Home Runs, his personal best.  31 Years Old, Playing for the Cincinnati Reds.

Greg Holland, Colorado Rockies (NL: 2017)

Greg Holland was an All-Star closer in 2013 and 2014, and he was injured late in the 2015 season, which coincided with the Royals World Series win.  Holland missed all of 2016 following Tommy John Surgery, and he returned in 2017, though with Colorado.  Holland was again an All-Star and he led the National League in Games Finished (58) and Saves (41).  31 Years Old, Playing for the Kansas City Royals.

David Price, Boston Red Sox (AL: 2018)

David Price had a down year in 2017 with elbow issues holding him to 16 Games, but he was healthy in 2018 and went 16-7 with 177 Strikeouts. Price and the Red Sox would win the World Series this year.  34 Years Old, Playing for the Boston Red Sox.

Jonny Venters, Tampa Bay Rays and Atlanta Braves (NL: 2018)

With all due respect to all of the other winners, this has to be the most inspirational winner ever.  Venters was an All-Star in 2011 (his second year in the league) and he led the National League in appearances (2011).  Venters would have arm trouble and had to endure his second and third Tommy John Surgery, and after last playing in 2012, he returned in 2018, now as a Tampa Bay Ray. He was traded back to the Braves in July of that year, and would see more action than he had as a Ray. Venters had a total 5-2 record with three Saves.  35 Years Old, Playing for the Boston Red Sox.

Carlos Carrasco, Cleveland Indians (AL: 2019)

This is the first winner who had a weaker year than the season before, but Carlos Carrasco is the first winner to battle cancer.  Carrasco has a 17-10 year in 2018 and in June of 2019, he was diagnosed with chronic myeloid leukemia.  Carrasco returned in September. 33 Years Old, Playing for the Cleveland Indians.

Josh Donaldson, Atlanta Braves (NL: 2019)

In 2018, injuries held the former MVP to 52 Games, but Josh Donaldson had a lot to prove in 2019.  The Third Baseman joined Atlanta as a Free Agent and in his comeback year he had 37 Home Runs and 94 RBIs.  34 Years Old, Playing for the Minnesota Twins.

The Comeback Player of the Year was all over the place and based on what we see, its percentage of Hall of Famers will likely decline.

So, what is up next?

We return to basketball and the J. Walter Kennedy Citizenship Award, which is awarded to the player who shows the most outstanding service and dedication to the community.

As always, we thank you for your support, and look for that soon.

NASCAR season is back. Sunday, May 17, at Darlington Raceway, will be the initial race out of seven, over 11 days during the month. However, things will not be quite the same after the recess' fogs dissipate. Last Friday, competition executives released an official bulletin filled with rules changesfor the remaining 2020 NASCAR Cup Series season and forward. The technical changes detail safety and competition alterations as a measure to restrain the team’s costs and boosting racing safety measures.

These guidelines come from the deliberation that took place after the preliminary investigation into Ryan Newman’s crash. The violent incident on the final lap of the Daytona 500 left the driver severely injured. After missing three races and a still recovering bruised brain, he was cleared to come back on May 10. NASCAR is preparing a media briefing to reveal the Newman investigation findings.

As competition grows endlessly, the regulations promise safe quality racing for both the teams and the fans. The mentioned regulations will not affect current competition significantly. Moreover, those intend to lessen comprehensive modifications for the Next Gen Car to debut on the 2021 season. However, NASCAR senior vice president of racing development, John Probst, stated that teams were provided with details about the technical changes in advance.

NASCAR's return comes impregnated with a lot more than instructions for custom wheels manufacturer selectionand tuning restrictions. The following modifications are very specific and its goals are aiming to minimize about 30 to 40 horsepower from 510 hp for Daytona and Talladega tracks. Although these modifications are a decision NASCAR took after Newman’s incident, overall rules were reviewed and adjusted according to the identified needs. The following is a summarized version of the recently released bulletin.

  1. During the remaining season, NASCAR will not allow on-track testing for Cup Series, Gander Truck Series, and Xfinity Series.
  2. Wind tunnel usage time is now under restriction. Every organization will have only 150 hours to test. These will be distributed for 70 hours during 2020 and 90 hours in 2021.  Individual NextGen vehicle organizations are banned from wind tunnel testing. Only a few facilities were approved for wind-testing such as Aerodyn Wind Tunnel in Mooresville and Windshear Wind Tunnel in Concord, both in North Carolina.

  3. Short block sealed engine changes are now restricted to eight. This measure is for both full or long blocks and the bottom portion only or short blocks. This means that each vehicle needs to endure these events with a short-block sealed engine.  It will require the team’s adaptation since it previously was a 13 limit. For all the remaining races or cycles, teams can only change engine parts such as valves, cylinder heads, and valve springs. This action is meant to prevent time and costly rebuilds.

  4. Restrictions on the throttle body were reduced to 57/64” at superspeedways. It was formerly a 59/64”.

  5. Obligatory changes and updates regarding the padding roll bar. These will be mandatory for all vehicles from June 1.

  6. Talladega beginning tracks require the setting up of a check valve at overflow expansion tanks and/or oil reservoir tanks.

  7. Superspeedways tracks require the application of slip tape along the facing surfaces. It needs to be applied throughout the entire lower rearward. Likewise, within the rear bumper cover extension.

  8. Mandatory addition of a lower main roll support bar #20 and an upper main roll support bar #21. This modification will be needed for superspeedways tracks. Additionally, requirements demand an intrusion plate. This specification is optional in other tracks.

  9. Chassis modification regulations. Each organization will be allowed twelve active and four inactive certified chassis modifications. Those can only be retired after a minimum of three races use. However, if irreversibly damaged after a crash in a shorter period, the chassis can be replaced. Each racing organization is restricted to ten unique chassis designs. These may be available for display in preseason shows.
  10. Officials limited at-track or road crewmembers. Maximum personnel is twelve during race weekends. This includes engineers and mechanics, crew chiefs, and spotters. Moreover, the organizational staff is reduced to three. Also, the driver’s team will be 16 members only. This measure is an answer to the global pandemic situation.

  11.  Superspeedway tracks will not have aero ducts. 

Although previous incidents lead to car modifications that teams will struggle to fulfill, stock-car racing is not only about cars. During a NASCAR race, a driver must be in flawless physical strength to be able to endure sustained high G force. Three G of acceleration on turns triple the driver’s weight. Additionally, the driver is wearing a helmet, gloves, and a long-sleeved fire suit. These, along with the mid-summer weather rises internal car temperature to hit the 120°F. In these scenarios, drivers can lose focus and experience dizziness. Consequently, riders need to train hard to endure these harsh circumstances. Pit crews also train very hard. These athletes have 15 seconds and no retries to accomplish their task: jacking up the largely heavy car to change its tires and refilling its fuel tank.

Patience, discipline, and adaptability are the main skills surrounding this fast-paced sport. Stock-car racing embraces crewmembers and organizations working together as an engine to lead both the vehicle and its driver on top conditions. Poor communication and a miniscule mistake during the job can lead to accidents like Newman's.

NASCAR Safety Standards Regarding Coronavirus Pandemic

While NASCAR prepares to resume its season with the coronavirus pandemic still in motion, safety measures are being taken with this in mind. NASCAR prepared a protocol following the advice of health professionals. Carolina’s public health officials gave their blessing and added a few recommendations. The safety protocol during Daytona and Talladega races aims to safeguard the competitors and the surrounding community’s health. These recommendations include:

  • Zero fans attendance plan. NASCAR is still considering if fans will be allowed into July's competition. Social distancing measures are being taken into account.

  • Cancellation of the 2020 submission meetings. It might include the cancellation of the traditional Champaign opening at the end of the matches.

  • Lowering staff member’s size according to NASCAR bulletin specifications.

  • Use of the most local venues possible, allowing organizations to travel through roads. This to avoid air mobilization and the need for accommodations.

  • Drivers and crewmembers are confined to their motorhomes, disseminated all over the facility. Self-isolation is mandatory until the competition starts.

  • The use of face masks is required, including for drivers on the way to their vehicles.

  • Teams were asked to self-monitor their staff using random temperature checking through the event.

NASCAR is working hard to be the first major U.S. sport to resume competitions. Therefore, a mistake could become a landmark for its history and put lives into high-risks. After all, the NCS is the racing highest level of competition. About 700 hundred people are expected to meet at the Daytona track. That number will only include the 40-car crews, leaving outside the picture officials, inspectors, and the broadcast team.

If things run smoothly, other sports eager to come back might consider resuming matches. NASCAR executive vice president, Steve O'Donnell stated: "We realize upfront it's a huge responsibility for us as a sport… We're certainly going to learn as we go, the process we put in place gives the industry the confidence that we can be first." Moreover, Mark Miles, Indianapolis Motor Speedway CEO, told the press "We can do it. We are prepared for fans… Just based on the size of our facility we can do it… We've got time to get this right."

Additionally, rules are strictly enforced and those with personal staffs who do not follow those, including the general COVID19 recommendations such as facemasks use and social distancing will be removed from the facilities and presented with a $50,000 fine. NASCAR is making an extraordinary effort on its return. Real-life racing comes with real-life incidents and circumstances. Safety precautions aim to guarantee the event develops hassles-free.

Nathan Spears is a managing editor at BlaqueDiamond
<https://blaquediamond.com/>. He became a car enthusiast at the age of
four, when his father taught him the difference between Chevy and Ford. In
2012 Nathan put his knowledge in practice and started reporting on cars,
races and the auto industry on different social media platforms. Currently,
he’s a happy owner of a 1967 Alfa Romeo and a Lancer GSR and a person who
still has lots of topics to cover.

Celebrities are just like regular people when it comes to sports. They love to watch and attend sporting occasions, whether it be football, hockey, soccer, basketball, tennis, golf or any other sport. As long as there is a ball to be hit, a sharp corner to negotiate or a punch to be thrown, the buzz of sports is the same for everyone.

Celebrities have even become part of sporting occasions. Their attendance in the crowd gathers airtime, and some also perform at the stadium – just look at the Super Bowl and its string of megastar performers. But who are the most prominent celebrity sports fans?

1.   Floyd Mayweather

He may be better known for his eagle eye and fast defence in the ring, but Mayweather also likes to kick back and watch sports as well. He attends boxing games but is known to be a big fan of the NBA. While Mayweather has been busy staking thousands on sports betting - reportedly winning over $6million on an NBA game back in 2013, he's also not shy of the casinos themselves. Having won nearly £800,000 on a slot machine in 2017, his latest conquest seems to be to tackle Japan by building a new casino in 2020/21.

2.   Denzel Washington

America's acting hall of fame has a seat for Denzel Washington. But the movie star is not just about taking his place among the film gods. He likes to take a seat at Lakers and Yankees games too and is known to be in the crowd always wearing his all-black cap. But Washington could play the game as well. During his university days at Fordham University, he was a point guard for coach Carlesimo. Yes, the same coach who made it to the NBA.

3.   Kevin Hart

Kevin Hart has gone from working as a shoe salesman to being one of the world's best comedians with some flagship acting jobs along the way. When Hart is not writing comedy gold, he is a massive sports fan. He participates in the NBA's All-Star weekend and even plays himself in the celebrity match, which he has won the MVP award on three occasions. By being in and around the players, he has acquired some new NBA buddies.

4.   Jerry Seinfeld

But Hart is not the only comedy royalty to love sports. Jerry Seinfeld, the creator of his namesake comedy hit show, is a renowned Mets fan. When he is not watching sports, he can be found talking about them on the WFAN sports radio station in New York. This may be why his famous show includes many references to Mets and one or two appearances from players.

5.   Drake

Actor rapper and singer, Drake has a controversial history with the sporting world. It began when he was denied access to the locker room of Miami Heat after they won the championship in 2013. In the same year, he announced himself as an official ambassador for the Raptors. Since then, the cameras have been on him during sporting occasions due to his courtside behaviours and celebrations. Some think it could be part of a publicity stunt, but he undoubtedly loves his sports.

We here at Notinhalloffame.com thought it would be fun to take a look at the major awards in North American team sports and see how it translates into Hall of Fame potential.

Needless to say, different awards in different sports yield hall of fame potential.  In basketball, the team sport with the least number of players on a roster, the dividend for greatness much higher.  In baseball, it is not as much as a great individual season does not have the same impact.

Last time, we looked at the Art Ross Trophy.  This time we went back to basketball, and the NBA Finals MVP.

The award was first given out in 1969, and basketball is the most star driven team sport of the big four, so we should expect that it will have a higher yield than the others.

So how many NBA Finals MVPs have made the Naismith Basketball Hall of Fame?

Let’s find out!

The following are the past players who have won the NBA Finals MVP who are eligible for the Basketball Hall of Fame and have been enshrined.

Jerry West, Los Angeles Lakers, 37.9 PPG, 4.7 RPG, 7.4 APG (1969)    

The first NBA Finals MVP was a Laker, which is not a shock, but with Jerry West, it was also from a losing team, as L.A. lost to the Boston in seven games.  West did everything he could, and considering he pulled his hamstring in Game 5, and was still performing at an elite level in Games 6 and 7, it was hard to award to anyone else.  In the regular season, West was a Second Team All-NBA Selection, and he was a First Team Selection in his first six seasons.  West played 14 years in the NBA, all with Los Angeles, and he was an All-Star in every single one of those years.  He would finally win his title as a player in 1972.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1980.

Willis Reed, New York Knicks, 23.0 PPG, 10.5 RPG, 2.8 APG (1970)    

Willis Reed had a phenomenal 1969-70 year.  Reed became the first player to win the NBA MVP, the All-Star Game MVP and the Finals MVP in the same year.  Reed was injured in the Finals with a torn thigh muscle, and was forced to miss Game 6, but he willed his way to play in Game 7, where he only scored four Points, but considering he should not have been on the court at all, it was miraculous.  That display of courage helped will the Knicks over the Lakers to win the Championship.    Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1982.

Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, Milwaukee Bucks, 27.0 PPG, 18.5 RPG, 2.8 APG (1971)      

Known at the time as Lew Alcindor, Abdul-Jabbar was only in his second season in the NBA, and he followed up being the Rookie of the Year with his first MVP and Scoring Title.  Abdul-Jabbar was the undisputed best player in the game at the time, and he led Milwaukee to a four-game sweep over the Philadelphia 76ers to win his first title, and the first for Milwaukee.    Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1995.

Wilt Chamberlain, Los Angeles Lakers, 19.4 PPG, 23.2 RPG, 2.6 APG (1972)

Wilt Chamberlain was the most prolific scorers in the history of basketball, and some will say that he was the best.  “The Stilt” was near the end of his career, and at 35, and now a Laker, Chamberlain showed a more nuanced game to help Los Angeles beat the Knicks.  Over his career, Chamberlain won four MVPs, seven Scoring Titles, and two NBA Titles. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1979.

Willis Reed, New York Knicks, 16.4 PPG, 9.2 RPG, 2.6 APG (2) (1973)

Willis Reed would win his second NBA Championship this year, but his All-Star years were behind him.  While he was good in the Finals, there were other teammates (Bill Bradley, Walt Frazier and Dave DeBusschere) that could have won this. Reed’s injuries compounded, and he retried a year after.  Over his career, Reed was a five-time All-Star, a Rookie of the Year, and an MVP. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1982.

John Havlicek, Boston Celtics, 26.4 PPG, 7.7 RPG, 4.7 APG, 1.9 SPG, 0.0 BPG (1974)   

The Boston Celtics were loaded with superstars and they won a plethora of championships in the 1960s.  Boston was still a very good team in the 1970s, and John Havlicek was part of a lot of their success, and this year was his seventh of eight NBA Titles.  The Celtic was a 13-time NBA All-Star, a four-time First Team All-NBA player and this year he helped will the Celtics over Kareem Abdul-Jabbar and the Milwaukee Bucks.  He played his entire career with the Celtics and retired in 1978.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1984.

Rick Barry, Golden State Warriors, 29.5 PPG, 4.0 RPG, 5.0 APG, 3.5 SPG, 0.8 BPG (1975)      

The Hall of Fame career of Rick Barry was a complicated one, as he could be as moody as he was talented.  Barry began his career with the Warriors, and after a run in the ABA, he was back and he led Golden State to the title in their sweep over the Washington Bullets.  Barry would be a 12-time All-Star and he was also a six-time All-NBA and four-time All-ABA Selection.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1987.

Jo Jo White, Boston Celtics, 21.7 PPG, 4.3 RPG, 5.8 APG, 1.5 SPG, 0.0 BPG (1976)       

A member of the Celtics’ 1974 Championship, Jo Jo White was an All-Star annually from 1971 to 1977.  In 1976, The Celtics defeated the Phoenix Suns in six games, with White notably scoring 33 Points in the Game 5 triple-overtime win.  White, who was also a Second Team All-NBA player twice, played until 1981, though he did not finish his career with Boston. White also played with Golden State and the Kansas City Kings.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2015.

Bill Walton, Portland Trail Blazers, 18.5 PPG, 19.0 RPG, 5.2 APG, 1.0 SPG, 3.7 BPG (1977)    

Bill Walton had a pro career that was constantly plagued with foot problems, so much so that the famed Grateful Dead fan missed three full years during his prime.  In 1976-77, Walton was mostly healthy, and he led Portland to an upset over the favored 76ers.  Walton, who was a two-time All-Star, won a second title with the Boston Celtics in 1985-86, when he won the Sixth Man of the Year Award.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1993.

Wes Unseld, Washington Bullets, 9.0 PPG, 11.7 RPG, 3.9 APG, 0.6 SPG, 0.1 BPG (1978)

Elvin Hayes was by far the better statistical performer in the Bullets’ 1978 championship, but the popular Wes Unseld won this honor on the strength of his defense.  Unseld was a five-time All-Star, and he played his entire career with the Baltimore/Washington franchise.  Unseld’s 9.0 PPG is the lowest of any NBA Finals MVP.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1988.

Dennis Johnson, Seattle SuperSonics, 22.6 PPG, 6.0 RPG, 6.0 APG, 1.8 SPG, 2.2 BPG (1979)

In the only NBA Championship of the existence of the Seattle SuperSonics, Dennis Johnson was an All-Star for the first of five times over his career.  This was a star-making performance for Johnson, who would later win two more NBA Titles as a member of the Boston Celtics.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2010.

Magic Johnson, Los Angeles Lakers, 21.5 PPG, 11.2 RPG, 8.7 APG, 2.7 SPG, 0.3 BPG (1980)  

For the first and to date only time in the history of the NBA Finals MVP, a rookie and/or Rookie of the Year won the award. Johnson came in to Los Angeles at the start of the season as the new star of the team and the number one pick also went from NCAA Champion to NBA Champion.  The Lakers won over the Sixers in six games and Magic was now considered one of the best clutch players in the NBA.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2002.

Magic Johnson, Los Angeles Lakers, 16.2 PPG, 10.8 RPG, 8.0 APG, 2.5 SPG, 0.3 BPG (2) (1982)      

Johnson and the Lakers again faced Philadelphia, and while Johnson’s star was rising, he had a tumultuous 12 months prior with injuries and clashes with management.  Winning cures everything, and Johnson was again money in their six-game series win.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2002.

Moses Malone, Philadelphia 76ers, 25.8 PPG, 18.0 RPG, 2.0 APG, 1.5 SPG, 1.5 BPG (1983)     

This was the first season of Moses Malone in a Philadelphia 76ers uniform after being a two-time MVP with the Houston Rockets. Malone was an NBA All-Star for the sixth of twelve straight years, and he also won his fourth of six Rebounding Titles.  Malone won his third MVP (and last MVP), and the Sixers finally won the title and Malone was incredible in their sweep over the Lakers.  He played until 1995, with stops in Atlanta, Milwaukee, Philadelphia (again) and San Antonio.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2001.

Larry Bird, Boston Celtics, 27.4 PPG, 14.0 RPG, 3.6 APG, 2.1 SPG, 1.1 BPG (1984)        

Larry Bird was already a superstar player and an NBA Champion.  This was his fifth season in basketball, and he was an All-Star each year, but this year he was the elite player, on a championship team on a legendary franchise. Bird helped topple Magic Johnson and the favored Lakers, and he became a legend in the process.  Notably, Bird also won the MVP for the first time.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1998.

Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, Los Angeles Lakers, 25.7 PPG, 9.0 RPG, 5.2 APG, 1.0 SPG, 1.5 BPG (2) (1985)       

It was 14 years since Abdul-Jabbar won his first Finals MVP, and a lot happened since that first win.  The big man won five more MVPs, bringing his total to six, and he took the Lakers to titles in 1980 and 1982.  Abdul-Jabbar was no longer the best player, that was Magic Johnson, but he was still a great player, and was great in their six-game win over the Celtics.  Abdul-Jabbar played until 1989, and he was named an All-Star in all but one of his seasons.  He was also a ten-time First Team All-NBA Selection, and a First Team, All-Defensive Player five times.  At the time of his retirement, he was the all-time leader in Games Played, Points, Field Goals and Minutes Played.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1995.

Larry Bird, Boston Celtics, 24.0 PPG, 9.7 RPG, 9.5 APG, 2.7 SPG, 0.3 BPG (2) (1986)     

Bird won the MVP and Finals MVP in 1984, and in the year after, he was “just” the MVP.  Bird did reach the Finals, but they lost to the Lakers. Boston made it to the Finals again in 1986, with Bird winning his third straight MVP, however this time they were opposed by the Houston Rockets.  Bird and the Celtics won in six games, with Bird leading Boston to a lopsided Game Six win.  This year would be the last MVP and Title for Bird, who began to suffer back issues, but played until 1992.  Bird was an All-Star every year of his career but one, and he went on to be the only man in NBA history to win the Rookie of the Year, MVP, All-Star Game MVP, Finals MVP, Coach of the Year and Executive of the Year.  This will likely never happen again.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1998.

Magic Johnson, Los Angeles Lakers, 26.2 PPG, 8.0 RPG, 13.0 APG, 2.3 SPG, 0.3 BPG (3) (1987)      

Magic Johnson became the first player to win the NBA Finals MVP three times, and his 13.0 APG is the most ever by a Finals MVP. Johnson’s Laker beat the Celtics in six, and this season, he was also named the league MVP.  Johnson won the MVP again in 1988 and 1990, and this year was his fourth NBA Title of five as a player.  Johnson would test positive for HIV in 1991, retiring abruptly, but he came back for the 1992 All-Star Game and briefly in 1996.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2002.

James Worthy, Los Angeles Lakers, 22.0 PPG, 7.4 RPG, 4.4 APG, 0.7 SPG, 0.6 BPG (1988)     

James Worthy was the first overall pick of the 1982 Draft, and he would play his entire career with the Lakers.  The Small Forward went to his first of seven All-Star Games in 1986.  The 1988 championship was Worthy’s third (and last), but his “Big Game James” was at full-force in this seven-game series win over the Detroit Pistons.  Worthy played until 1994, and would also be a two-time Third Team All-NBA Selection.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2003.

Joe Dumars, Detroit Pistons, 27.3 PPG, 1.8 RPG, 6.0 APG, 0.5 SPG, 0.3 BPG (1989)      

Joe Dumars may have been part of the “Bad Bo Pistons” but he was not exactly a player who fit that mold.  No matter.  Dumars arrived this season and was the highest scorer with his 27.3 PPG in Detroit’s sweep of the Lakers.  Dumars would later go to six All-Star Games, and he would play his entire career with the Pistons.  He retired in 1999, and would win another championship as a Pistons Executive in 2004. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2006.

Isiah Thomas, Detroit Pistons, 27.6 PPG, 5.2 RPG, 7.0 APG, 1.6 SPG, 0.4 BPG (1990)    

Isiah Thomas was the face of the Pistons for years, and it is fitting that he was one of the players who won the Finals MVP. Thomas the top scorer in the five-game series win over Portland, and this year he was an All-Star for the ninth time of what was 12 straight.  Thomas was a three-time First Team All-NBA choice, and he played his entire career with the Pistons, retiring in 1994.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2000.

Michael Jordan, Chicago Bulls, 31.2 PPG, 6.6 RPG, 11.4 APG, 2.8 SPG, 1.4 BPG (1991)

The Chicago Bulls had arrived, and Michael Jordan was their king.  We could go one step further.  Michael Jordan was the king of the entire sport.  No, one more step.  He was the king of all sports!  This was the first title for Jordan and the Bulls and Jordan won his second MVP. Jordan was Chicago’s leading scorer in the first four games, of what was a five-game series win over the Lakers.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2009.

Michael Jordan, Chicago Bulls, 35.8 PPG, 4.8 RPG, 6.5 APG, 1.7 SPG, 0.3 BPG (2) (1992)       

Jordan was an MVP for the third time, and while he was not the first man to become the NBA Finals MVP for a second time, he was the first to win it in back-to-back years.  Jordan and the Bulls beat the Portland Trail Blazers in six games, and he was Chicago’s leading scorer in every game.  Jordan was also the leading scorer regardless of the team in five of those games.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2009.

Michael Jordan, Chicago Bulls, 41.0 PPG, 8.5 RPG, 6.3 APG, 1.7 SPG, 0.7 BPG (3) (1993)       

Jordan lost out on the MVP to Charles Barkley, but Jordan was not going to lose out to Barkley in the NBA Finals.  Chicago defeated Phoenix in six games and the Bulls would “Three-peat”, a term they coined.  Jordan’s 41.0 PPG is the highest ever in NBA Finals history, and conceivable it could stay like that for decades.  Jordan became the second player after Magic Johnson to win the Finals MVP three times, but Jordan was the first to do it three consecutive years.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2009.

Hakeem Olajuwon, Houston Rockets, 26.9 PPG, 9.1 RPG, 3.6 APG, 1.6 SPG, 3.9 BPG (1994)   

Hakeem Olajuwon made history this year as the first non-American born player to win the Finals MVP.  The Nigerian born Olajuwon was the key to defeating the New York Knicks in the seven-game series, as he outplayed New York’s star, Patrick Ewing. Olajuwon was also named the league MVP. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2008.

Hakeem Olajuwon, Houston Rockets, 32.8 PPG, 11.5 RPG, 5.5 APG, 2.0 SPG, 2.0 BPG (2) (1995)     

Olajuwon and the Rockets successfully defended their NBA Championship, and Olajuwon was statistically better in his second win than the was in the first.  The Rockets swept the Orlando Magic, who made their Finals debut.  Olajuwon played with the Rockets until 2001, and he was a 12-time All-Star, two-time Defensive Player of the Year and a six-time First Team All-NBA Selection.  Olajuwon retired in 2002 after one final year with the Toronto Raptors.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2008.

Michael Jordan, Chicago Bulls, 27.3 PPG, 5.3 RPG, 4.2 APG, 1.7 SPG, 0.2 BPG (4) (1996)       

Michael Jordan was back after an attempt to make Major League Baseball, and the Bulls were ready to dominate again.  Chicago defeated the Seattle SuperSonics in six, and Jordan won the MVP for the fourth time.  Jordan was again Chicago’s leading scorer in all of the games, and he was the first player to be named the Finals MVP on a fourth occasion.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2009.

Michael Jordan, Chicago Bulls, 32.3 PPG, 7.0 RPG, 6.0 APG, 1.2 SPG, 0.8 BPG (5) (1997)       

Jordan made history again with his fifth NBA Championship Ring and fifth Finals MVP.  Jordan, who was not the league MVP this year, led his Bulls to a six-game win over the Utah Jazz.  Jordan was his team’s top scorer in five games, and in assists in all of them.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2009.

Michael Jordan, Chicago Bulls, 33.5 PPG, 4.0 RPG, 2.3 APG, 1.8 SPG, 0.7 BPG (6) (1998)       

For the second time, the Chicago Bulls “three-peated” and Jordan did the same with his record sixth NBA Finals MVP.  Jordan had the what looked to be the final shot of his career in Game Six, as he sank the series winner over the Jazz.  Jordan was also named the league MVP for the fifth time.  Jordan retired, but came back with the Washington Wizards in 2001 for two years. Michael Jordan is the best player of all-time, and that should be an undisputed fact.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2009.

Tim Duncan, San Antonio Spurs, 27.4 PPG, 14.0 RPG, 2.4 APG, 1.0 SPG, 2.2 BPG (1999)       

This was the second season of Tim Duncan’s career, and “The Big Fundamental” took over as the big star of the Spurs for David Robinson.  Duncan was the top scorer and rebounder in three of the games, which was a five-game series win over the New York Knicks.  Duncan did not go to the All-Star Game this year, but he was named a First Team All-Defensive and First Team All-NBA player.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2020.

Shaquille O’Neal, Los Angeles Lakers, 38.0 PPG, 16.7 RPG, 2.3 APG, 1.0 SPG, 2.7 BPG (2000)

This championship was the beginning of the new Lakers dynasty, starring a dominant Shaquille O’Neal and a rising Kobe Bryant. O’Neal and the Lakers beat the Indiana Pacers in six, and in every single game, was his team’s leading scorer and rebounder.  In fact, there was only one game where a Pacer had more boards (game six) than O’Neal. O’Neal was a First Team All-NBA selection, and he was named the league MVP.   Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2016.

Shaquille O’Neal, Los Angeles Lakers, 33.0 PPG, 15.8 RPG, 4.8 APG, 0.4 SPG, 3.4 BPG (2) (2001)    

Shaq and the Lakers dispatched the Philadelphia 76ers in five games, and O’Neal was his usual dominant self, although Kobe Bryant was approaching being his equal.  O’Neal was again a First Team All-NBA Selection.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2016.

Shaquille O’Neal, Los Angeles Lakers, 36.3 PPG, 12.3 RPG, 3.8 APG, 0.5 SPG, 2.8 BPG (3) (2002)    

O’Neal became the second player to win the NBA Finals MVP in three straight years, and he again was a First Team All-NBA Selection, an honor, he would secure in the next four seasons.  O’Neal also was the NBA leader in PER for the fifth straight year. In this year’s Finals, Los Angeles swept the Nets, but this was the shocking end of the Kobe/Shaq dominance. They made it to the Finals again in 2004, but lost to the Pistons, and the two could no longer work together. O’Neal won a fourth title with the Miami Heat, and he would later play for Phoenix, Cleveland and Boston, retiring in 2011.   Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2016.

Tim Duncan, San Antonio Spurs, 24.2 PPG, 17.0 RPG, 5.3 APG, 1.0 SPG, 5.3 BPG (2) (2003)  

Duncan was the MVP in 2001-02, and he was named the MVP again this year, and he was in his fifth consecutive season as a First Team All-NBA selection.  In this NBA Finals, the Spurs beat the New Jersey Nets in six games, and Duncan’s 5.3 Blocks per Game are by far a Finals record.  In Game Six, Duncan was two Blocks away from a quadruple-double and replays show that he likely should have had two more Blocks.  Nevertheless, Duncan was incredible in this series.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2020.

Tim Duncan, San Antonio Spurs, 20.6 PPG, 14.1 RPG, 2.1 APG, 0.4 SPG, 2.1 BPG (3) (2005)  

Duncan joined the rare three-time NBA Finals club in 2005, and Duncan led the Spurs in a seven-game series win over the Detroit Pistons.  2005 also saw Duncan named to his seventh straight First Team All-NBA.  This year ended a streak, but he earned that honor two more times.  Duncan won two more NBA Titles, was a 15-time All-Star and he played his entire career with the Spurs, retiring in 2016.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2020.

Kobe Bryant, Los Angeles Lakers, 32.4 PPG, 5.6 RPG, 7.4 APG, 1.4 SPG, 1.4 BPG (2009)        

Bryant was dominant in his first NBA Championship win as the top banana.  The Lakers took out Orlando in five games, and this was a year after he won his lone MVP award.  This season also saw Bryant earn his seventh First Team All-NBA Selection.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2020.

Kobe Bryant, Los Angeles Lakers, 28.6 PPG, 8.0 RPG, 3.9 APG, 2.1 SPG, 0.7 BPG (2) (2010)   

Bryant 5, O’Neal 4.  That was on the mind of many as Bryant eclipsed his former teammate in rings, and Bryant climbed another rung on the basketball pyramid. Bryant played until 2016, all of which were with the Lakers.  He would go to 18 All-Star Games, 11 First Team All-NBAs and would have a legacy where his name is spoken amongst the best basketball player ever.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2020.

 

The following are the players who have won the NBA Finals MVP who are eligible for the Naismith Basketball Hall of Fame and have not been selected:

Cedric Maxwell, Boston Celtics, 17.7 PPG, 9.5 RPG, 2.8 APG, 0.2 SPG, 1.0 BPG (1981)  

Cedric “Cornbread” Maxwell was Boston’s leading scorer in three of Boston’s games, and he stepped up when his teammate, Larry Bird was focused on by Houston’s defense.  Maxwell would help the Celtics win the 1984 NBA Championship, and he played until 1988.  Maxwell is the first player to win the NBA Finals MVP who never was an All-Star.  Eligible Since 1994.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com

Chauncey Billups, Detroit Pistons, 21.0 PPG, 3.2 RPG, 5.2 APG, 1.2 SPG, 0.0 BPG (2004)       

The Detroit Pistons five-game series win over Shaq, Kobe and the Lakers will likely be the biggest upset ever in the NBA Finals, and it will always be looked more as the Lakers losing than the Pistons winning. Regardless, Billups was the Point Guard of a very balanced team, and for years, there were GM trying to mimic the Pistons title.  Billups would later be named to five All-Star Games, and he went on to play with Denver, New York, and the Los Angeles Clippers before returning to Detroit and retiring in 2004.  Billups is the most likely player on the ’04 Championship team to enter the Hall.  As of this writing, there are none.  Eligible Since 2018.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com

Let’s update our tally, shall we?

Award in Question

Percentage of recipients who have entered the HOF

Percentage of recipients by year who have entered the HOF.

NBA MVP

100%

100%

NHL Art Ross

100%

100%

NBA Finals MVP

91.3%

94.9%

NHL Norris

90.5%

96.4%

NBA All-Star Game MVP

89.5%

91.7%

NHL Conn Smythe

74.2%

85.4%

NFL Bert Bell Award

73.7%

71.4%

NFL AP Offensive Player of the Year

73.1%

79.4%

NFL AP MVP

68.3%

74.0%

NHL Lady Byng

63.8%

76.0%

NFL Defensive Player of the Year

60.8%

71.1%

NFL Super Bowl MVP

60.6%

64.9%

NBA Defensive Player of the Year

58.3%

56.5%

NHL Vezina

57.1%

66.3%

NBA Rookie of the Year

56.5%

56.5%

MLB MVP

55.0%

60.2%

NFL Pro Bowl MVP

52.3%

54.8%

MLB Lou Gehrig Award

51.9%

51.9%

MLB Roberto Clemente Award

47.4%

47.4%

MLB/NL/AL Cy Young Award

44.4%

55.4%

MLB Babe Ruth Award

37.0%

39.3%

NHL Frank J. Selke Trophy

33.3%

36.7%

MLB World Series MVP

33.3%

36.8%

MLB Hutch Award

33.1%

33.1%

NFL Offensive Rookie of the Year

28.6%

28.6%

NHL Bill Masterton Memorial Trophy

27.9%

27.9%

MLB Edgar Martinez Award

26.7%

17.2%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Designated Hitter)

25.0%

30.8%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Shortstop)

23.5%

52.6%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove

21.7%

36.8%

NFL Defensive Rookie of the Year

20.6%

20.6%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Catcher)

20.0%

22.5%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Second Base)

18.8%

39.8%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Shortstop)

18.2%

35.1%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Pitcher)

18.2%

20.1%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Second Base)

16.7%

32.7%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Outfield)

16.7%

30.1%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Outfield)

15.7%

25.2%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Third Base)

14.3%

14.3%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Third Base)

13.6%

14.3%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (First Base)

13.6%

13.3%

MLB (NL/AL) Rookie of the Year

13.3%

13.3%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Catcher)

10.3%

15.2%

NBA Most Improved Player of the Year

5.3%

3.2%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (First Base)

3.8%

3.2%

NFL AP Comeback Player of the Year

0.0%

0.0%

So, who is up next?

The following are the players who have won the NBA Finals MVP in the NBA who have retired but have not met the mandatory years out of the game to qualify for the Naismith Basketball Hall of Fame:

Dwyane Wade, Miami Heat, 34.7 PPG, 7.8 RPG, 3.8 APG, 2.7 SPG, 1.0 BPG (2006)

Shaquille O’Neal won his fourth NBA Title, but it was Dwyane Wade who was the star of the show by far in Miami six-game series win over Dallas.  This was Wade’s first title, and it was also the first championship for Miami.  Years later, Wade was joined by LeBron James and Chris Bosh, and the trio would win two NBA Championships.  Wade left Miami for brief runs in Chicago and Cleveland, but he returned appropriately to the Heat to finish his career, retiring in 2019. Over his career, Wade was an All-Star 13 times, and was an All-NBA Selection eight times, with two of them being First Team.  Eligible in 2023.

Tony Parker, San Antonio Spurs, 24.5 PPG, 5.0 RPG, 3.3 APG, 0.8 SPG, 0.0 BPG (2007)

Tony Parker was not only the first Frenchmen to win the Finals MVP, but also the first European to win it.  This season, the Spurs swept LeBron James and he Cleveland Cavaliers and Parker was the leading scorer of the series.  Parker was a six-time All-Star, a four-time NBA Champion and he played until 2019, all with the Spurs with the exception of his final year, which was in Charlotte.  Eligible in 2023.

Paul Pierce, Boston Celtics, 21.8 PPG, 4.5 RPG, 6.3 APG, 1.2 SPG, 0.3 BPG (2008)

Paul Pierce was the star of the Celtics for years but there was only so much he could do.  Boston’s fortune changed this year when they added Kevin Garnett and Ray Allen, and they won the NBA Championship by beating Los Angeles in six games.  Pierce was a ten-time All-Star, all of which occurring as a Boston Celtic.  He was with Boston until 2013, and he finished his career in 2017 after playing for Brooklyn, Washington and the Los Angeles Clippers.  Eligible in 2021.

Dirk Nowitzki, Dallas Mavericks, 26.0 PPG, 9.7 RPG, 2.0 APG, 0.7 SPG, 0.7 BPG (2011)

The Dallas Mavericks were not supposed to beat James, Wade and Bosh, but they did, and were led by Dirk Nowitzki, their German star who played his entire career in Dallas.  Nowitzki was four years removed from his MVP, and while he was older, he was wiser, and the Mavericks won their first NBA Title.  Nowitzki was a 14-time All-Star and a four-time First Team All-NBA player.  Eligible in 2023.

 

The following are the players who have won the NBA Finals MVP who are still active.

LeBron James, Miami Heat, 28.6 PPG, 10.2 RPG, 7.4 APG, 1.6 SPG, 0.4 BPG (2012)

LeBron James finally won the big one, and he did it by taking over as the primary weapon for the Heat, eliminating any doubt between him and his friend, Dwyane Wade.  James was Miami’s leading scorer and rebounder and Miami soundly beat Oklahoma City in five.  James was also named the MVP for the third time in his career.  35 Years Old, Playing for the Los Angeles Lakers.

LeBron James, Miami Heat, 25.3 PPG, 10.9 RPG, 7.0 APG, 2.3 SPG, 0.9 BPG (2) (2013)

LeBron and the Heat successfully defended their title in a grueling seven-game win over San Antonio.  James did it all as he was Miami’s leader in Points, Rebounds, Assists and Steals, and he was also the league MVP.  The mileage that James logged this year was staggering but he got the job done.  35 Years Old, Playing for the Los Angeles Lakers.

Kawhi Leonard, San Antonio Spurs, 17.8 PPG, 6.4 RPG, 2.0 APG, 1.6 SPG, 1.2 BPG (2014)

A new star emerged with San Antonio, as Duncan, Parker and Manu Ginobili were getting older but with Kawhi Leonard and a team-first ethic, the Spurs beat the Heat in five.  Leonard went on to win two Defensive Player of the Year Awards, and was a First Team All-NBA Selection twice for the Spurs before he became disenchanted with the team.  He would be traded to the Toronto Raptors before the 2018-19 season.  28 Years Old, Playing for the Los Angeles Clippers.

Andre Iguodala, Golden State Warriors, 16.3 PPG, 5.8 RPG, 4.0 APG, 1.3 SPG, 0.3 BPG (2015)

This was the first time that an NBA Finals MVP did not start every game, as Andre Iguodala was incredible in his role, though arguably Steph Curry, who outscored Iggy by almost 10 Points per Game could have won it without a backlash.  The Warriors won by beating LeBron and the Cavaliers in six.  28 Years Old, Playing for the Los Angeles Clippers.

LeBron James, Cleveland Cavaliers, 29.7 PPG, 11.3 RPG, 8.9 APG, 2.6 SPG, 2.3 BPG (3) (2016)

As impressive as LeBron was in the 2013 Finals, what James did in 2016 had to feel infinitely more fulfilling.  James finally brought the title to Cleveland, and to do so they had to defeat a powerful Golden State Warriors team.  In the seven-game series, James led all players in all five major offensive categories.  Seriously, how impressive was that?  35 Years Old, Playing for the Los Angeles Lakers.

Kevin Durant, Golden State Warriors, 35.2 PPG, 8.2 RPG, 5.4 APG, 1.0 SPG, 1.6 BPG (2017)

Kevin Durant won the MVP in 2014 with the Oklahoma City Thunder, and he was a perennial All-Star, but he grew frustrated. When he was a free agent in 2016, he jumped to the Golden State Warriors, joining a super team.  The Warriors were spectacular, and Durant led his new team to a title, despite many people cheering against KD.  31 Years Old, Playing for the Brooklyn Nets.

Kevin Durant, Golden State Warriors, 28.8 PPG, 10.8 RPG, 7.5 APG, 0.8 SPG, 2.3 BPG (2) (2018)

Durant repeated as NBA Champion and Finals MVP, and the Warriors would obliterate the Cavaliers in a four-game sweep.  Durant would be a First Team All-NBA Selection for the sixth time in his career.  31 Years Old, Playing for the Brooklyn Nets.

Kawhi Leonard, Toronto Raptors, 28.5 PPG, 9.8 RPG, 4.2 APG, 2.0 SPG, 1.2 BPG (2) (2019)

The Toronto Raptors rolled the dice, trading their best player, DeMar DeRozan for Kawhi Leonard.  It was a huge gamble, as Leonard had only one year left on his contract, and was unlikely to stay in Canada.  Leonard only played the one year, but he led the Raptors to their first ever NBA Championship, and he became the first player ever to win the Finals MVP in both conferences.  28 Years Old, Playing for the Los Angeles Clippers.

It should come as no surprise that the Finals MVP yield so many Hall of Famers.  Basketball is more star driven sport than the other team sports, and it is where the best have the most opportunity due to minutes logged and the nature of the game.

So, what is up next?

We return to baseball, but it will be a quick one, as we look at the Comeback Player of the Year.  That award has only come into existence in 2005, so it won’t be a long read!

As always, we thank you for your support, and look for that soon.

How Real is Willie Beaman? 

In the 2001 season, the once-great American Football team Miami Sharks, had a hard time making it to the AFFA (Associated Football Franchises of America) divisional playoffs.  Coached by Tony D’Amato, the 30-year veteran that had seen it all, the team lost its starting quarterback Jack “Cap” Rooney, and second string quarterback Tyler Cherubini due to injuries.  

This leaves the desperate Sharks to depend on their third-string QB, University of Houston graduate Willie Beamen. Never doing anything beyond warming the bench, Beamen pukeshis guts out and embarrasses the hell out of the Miami Sharks on the first few games, but then he just gets it and becomes the MVP, star quarterback that carries the team to glory.  

You probably figured it out by now, this is the tale of Oliver Stone’s 1999 movie Any Given Sunday. Where Coach D’Amato is played by Al Pacino, Cap Rooney by Dennis Quaid, and rookie-turned-narcissist-starring-QB Willie Beamen is no other than Jamie Foxx.

It’s pretty cool to see the upsets that are taking place during the first games where Beamen is leading the Sharks as starting quarterback.  At the beginning bookies wouldn’t give him and his team a chance, and when the movie was made there were no legal sports-betting apps that everyone can use from their mobile phone to place bets.  But if it was today, the whole stadium would have pulled out their phones and use their sports-betting app for sure to place bets on the Miami Sharks every time Beaman threw up, as that became is trademark for winning plays.  

So how much of this great American sports drama is based on true events? And does Beamen have any truth in him? Or is the Sharks hall-of-fame quarterback totally made up? The story is based on a novel by the same name written by ex NFL Defensive End, and Super Bowl champion Pat Toomay.  Selected in the sixth round of the 1970 NFL draft by the Dallas Cowboys, he started an impressive football career which in addition to the Cowboys, included playing for the Buffalo Bills, Tampa Bay Buccaneers and Oakland Raiders.  Toomay said that the characters are loosely based on actual players.

Although the NFL declined to participate, and supposedly issued a memo to teams suggesting they do not cooperate with the film, Jamie Williams who was the movie’s technical adviser and writer played in the league for 12 years, including playing as a Tight End for the San Francisco 49ers.  Many others involved with the movie, other crew or cast, have played professional football at some point in their lives.  And most said that Beamen is “very close to the real thing.” 

Beaman is supposedly based on several NFL players, including Washington Redskins, Super Bowl XXII MVP Doug Williams, Philadelphia Eagles’ quarterback Randall Cunningham.  Many also draw similarities to larger-than-life Defensive Back Deion Sanders who was one of the most interesting and famous players the NFL has seen.  

And when asking Jamie Fox who played Beamen, he actually thinks the real-life Beamen is Dallas Cowboys Quarterback Dak Prescott.  “He’s the real live Willie Beaman” said Jamie Foxx in an interview.  But that may be due to Foxx being a die-hard Cowboys fan. 

But if you are into real, non-fictional sports action, now is the time to get into the excitement of sports-betting, casino and poker mobile apps and websites, which are legal in many states in the US including Pennsylvania, Nevada, New Jersey, West Virginia, and many more states that are now in the process of signing legal bills that allow punters to legally download a sportsbook mobile app and place bets online safely and securely. 

Rogers Hornsby, the Hall of Fame second baseman second only to fellow Hall of Famer Ty Cobb in career batting average, once said, "People ask me what I do in the winter when there's no baseball. I tell you what I do. I stare out the window and wait for spring." The right-handed slugger, who remains the only player to combine a .400 batting average with 40 or more home runs in the same season (1922, the year he won the first of his two Triple Crowns), also never went to the movies (or read books), claiming that it would harm his eyesight.

We here at Notinhalloffame.com thought it would be fun to take a look at the major awards in North American team sports and see how it translates into Hall of Fame potential.

Needless to say, different awards in different sports yield hall of fame potential.  In basketball, the team sport with the least number of players on a roster, the dividend for greatness much higher.  In baseball, it is not as much as a great individual season does not have the same impact.

Last time, we looked at the World Series MVP.  This time we went back to hockey, and the Art Ross Trophy.

Named after Hockey Hall of Fame player, coach and general manager, Art Ross, the award began in 1947-48, and is awarded to the player who accumulates the most Points in the regular season.  Unlike most awards, it is not arbitrary at all, as it based purely on one statistic.  Notably, if players tie in Points, the tie-breaker goes to the player with the most Goals.

So how many Art Ross Trophy winners have made the Hockey Hall of Fame?

Let’s find out!

The following are the past players who have won the Art Ross Trophy who are eligible for the Hockey Hall of Fame and have been enshrined.

Elmer Lach, Montreal Canadiens, 30 G, 31 A, 61 P (1948)

How fitting is it that a Montreal player won this award first?  Elmer Lach has already won two Stanley Cups for Montreal, and he won the coveted Hart Trophy in 1944-45.  This season, he won his only Art Ross Trophy, narrowly beating New York’s Buddy O’Connor by one point.  Lach would finish third in Hart Trophy voting, and was a First Team All-Star this season.  Lach played for the Habs until 1954, and he would win another Stanley Cup, and earned another First Team All-Star before retiring.  He would have 623 career Points.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1966.

Roy Conacher, Chicago Blackhawks, 26 G, 42 A, 68 P (1949)      

This was by far the best season of Roy Conacher’s career.  As a rookie with the Boston Bruins, he would lead the NHL in Goals (26), and would win the Stanley Cup.  He won his second two years later, but individually this was his best year, where had a career-high 68 Points, and the then Blackhawk winger would finish third in Hart Trophy voting and was a First Team All-Star for the first and only time. Conacher played three more years and retired with 427 Points.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1998.

Ted Lindsay, Detroit Red Wings, 22 G, 55 A, 78 P (1950)   

This would be Ted Lindsay’s only Art Ross win, with him earning the second First Team All-Star of what would be eight over his career.  Finishing seventh in Hart Trophy voting this season, Lindsay would win his first Stanley Cup, and he won three more in the 1950s.  Lindsay played until 1960, with another season in 1964-65.  He had 851 Points overall in his career.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1966.

Gordie Howe, Detroit Red Wings, 43 G, 43 A, 86 P (1951)  

Gordie Howe had already been established as a star in the NHL after having been named a Second Team All-Star the last two seasons, but this year he destroyed everyone in the race for the Art Ross. His 86 Points were 20 more than the second place finisher (Rocket Richard), and he was third in Hart Trophy voting.  This was just the beginning of Howe’s association with the Art Ross.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1972.

Gordie Howe, Detroit Red Wings, 47 G, 39 A, 86 P (2) (1952)      

Gordie Howe became the first player to repeat as the Art Ross Trophy winner and also the first to win the Hart Trophy in the same season.  Howe helped the Red Wings the Stanley Cup, which was second, as he helped them win in 1950.  Notably, Howe’s closest competitor was his teammate, Ted Lindsay, who was 17 Points behind.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1972.

Gordie Howe, Detroit Red Wings, 47 G, 39 A, 86 P (3) (1953)      

Howe made history again as the first three-time winner, which he accomplished in three straight seasons.  Howe again would see his teammate, Ted Lindsay, and this time he led his closest competitor by 24 Points.  Howe repeated as the Hart Trophy winner. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1972.

Gordie Howe, Detroit Red Wings, 33 G, 48 A, 81 P (4) (1954)      

Another year, and another Art Ross Trophy for Howe, who made it four in a row.  Howe again led the Red Wings to another Stanley Cup, and he was again more than ten Points ahead of his nearest competitor, who this year was Rocket Richard who had 67 Points.  Howe finished fourth in Hart Trophy voting.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1972.

Bernie Geoffrion, Montreal, 38 G, 37 A, 75 P (1955)       

In the province of Quebec, this is the most controversial Art Ross Trophy winner, despite the fact that a member of the Montreal Candiens won it.  Bernie Geoffrion beat his teammate, Rocket Richard, by one Point, which he was able to accomplish when Richard was suspended by the league for striking an official.  Richard was so popular, that they booed Geoffrion for winning the scoring title and it was Richard who was named a First Team All-Star, and not Geoffrion, who was named to the Second Team.  This marked the first time that an Art Ross winner would not be a First Team All-Star. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1972.

Jean Beliveau, Montreal, 47 G, 41 A, 88 P (1956)           

Playing his entire career with the Montreal Canadiens, Jean Beliveau won the Art Ross and the Hart Trophy this year.  This might have been Beliveau’s only Art Ross, but this was the second First Team All-Star of what would be six.  Beliveau would also win the Hart again in 1963-64, and this season he captured the first of his ten Stanley Cups.  The Quebecer played until 1971 and retired with 1,219 career Points.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1972.

Gordie Howe, Detroit Red Wings, 44 G, 45 A, 89 P (5) (1957)      

Howe would help the Red Wings win another Stanley Cup in 1955, and this season not only did he win his fifth Art Ross Trophy, he won his third Hart Trophy.  Howe’s closest competitor was again his teammate, Ted Lindsay, who was only four Points behind.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1972.

Dickie Moore, Montreal Canadiens, 36 G, 48 A, 84 P (1958)        

Dickie Moore would also win his only Goal Scoring Title this season, and he was eighth in Hart Trophy voting.  Moore also helped Montreal win the Stanley Cup this year.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1974.

Dickie Moore, Montreal Canadiens, 41 G, 55 A, 96 P (2) (1959)   

Moore went back-to-back with Art Ross Trophies, and this was also his second (and final) First Team All-Star Selection. Moore again won the Stanley Cup, this being the fourth of what would be six total.  Moore played until 1968, where he would accumulate 607 Points.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1974.

Bobby Hull, Chicago Blackhawks, 39 G, 42 A, 91 P (1960)

Bobby Hull narrowly defeated Bronco Horvath of the Boston Bruins by one Point to win his first Art Ross Trophy.  “The Golden Jet” was a First Team All-Star for the first time, and he also won his first Goal Scoring Title, and he finished second in Hart Trophy voting.  He would help Chicago win the Stanley Cup this season.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1974.

Bernie Geoffrion, Montreal, 50 G, 45 A, 95 P (2) (1961)  

This was Geoffrion’s second and last Art Ross, and considering the drama he dealt with in his first one in 1955, this had to feel so much better.  Geoffrion did finish ahead of another teammate, Jean Beliveau, by five Points but Habs fans were ok this time.  This season, Geoffrion was a First Team All-Star for the only time, and he also captured the Hart Trophy.  While Montreal did not win the Stanley Cup this year, he helped them win the previous five.  Geoffrion played for Montreal until 1966, and had two final seasons with the New York Rangers.  He retired with 822 Points.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1972.

Bobby Hull, Chicago Blackhawks, 39 G, 42 A, 91 P (2) (1962)      

For the first time there was a tie in the Points standings, but Hull had 50 Goals to Andy Bathgate’s 28, thus giving the Blackhawk his second Art Ross trophy.  Hull was third in Hart Trophy voting this season.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1974.

Gordie Howe, Detroit Red Wings, 38 G, 48 A, 86 P (6) (1963)      

This was the last Art Ross of Gordie Howe’s career, and it was also his last Hart Trophy, which coincidentally was also his sixth.  Howe defeated Andy Bathgate by five Points for this honor.  Overall, he was a 12-time First Team All-Star, and he retired in 1971. He would come back in the WHA in 1973, first with the Houston Aeros, and then the New England Whalers, who became the Hartford Whalers of the NHL in 1979.  Howe stayed with the team for their first year in the NHL.  He retired with 2,358 combined Points in the NHL/WHA. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1972.

Stan Mikita, Chicago Blackhawks, 39 G, 50 A, 89 P (1964)

Stan Mikita was a First Team All-Star for the third straight year, and he was fifth in Hart Trophy voting in his first Art Ross winning season.  While this would not be Mikita’s proverbial breakout season, he was cemented as an elite player.  Notably, Mikita won the scoring title by two points over Bobby Hull, his longtime teammate. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1983.

Stan Mikita, Chicago Blackhawks, 28 G, 59 A, 87 P (2) (1965)    

Mikita went back-to-back in Art Ross Trophy wins, but he was not named a First Team All-Star, as that would go to Norm Ullman the person who finished second in scoring to him.   Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1983.

Bobby Hull, Chicago Blackhawks, 39 G, 42 A, 91 P (3) (1966)      

Bobby Hull won his third and final Art Ross Trophy and did so the season after he secured his first Hart and only Lady Byng Trophy.  This year would see Hull win his second straight Hart.  Hull stayed in the NHL until 1972 (and would return in 1980 with the Jets), he was a nine-time First Team All-Star.  Hull would join the Winnipeg Jets in 1972, where he stayed during the NHL/WHA merger, and he played nine final games in pro hockey with the Hartford Whalers before retiring.  His combined NHL/WHA Points totaled 1,808.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1974.

Stan Mikita, Chicago Blackhawks, 28 G, 59 A, 87 P (3) (1967)    

Mikita returned as the scoring leader after Bobby Hull had it the year before, and he was 17 Points ahead of the nearest skater, which was Hull.  Mikita swept the major regular season awards with not only the Art Ross, but also the Hart Trophy and the Lady Byng.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1983.

Stan Mikita, Chicago Blackhawks, 28 G, 59 A, 87 P (4) (1968)    

This was Mikita’s fourth and final Art Ross, and the second back-to-back for the star.  Mikita’s win also marked five consecutive Blackhawks winning the Art Ross. Like the season before, Mikita also won the Hart and Lady Byng.  Mikita played until 1980, in a career that was spent entirely with Chicago.  He finished his career with 1,467 Points.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1983.

Phil Esposito, Boston Bruins, 49 G, 77 A, 126 P (1969)  

As expansion diluted the talent pool, it was only a matter of times before there was a 100 Point Scorer.  This season there were three, with Gordie Howe (103), Bobby Hull (107) and this season’s Art Ross Trophy winner, Phil Esposito (126). The Boston Bruin would win his first Hart Trophy and also made his First Team All-Star debut.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1984.

Bobby Orr, Boston Bruins, 33 G, 87 A, 120 P (1970)       

What Bobby Orr accomplished this year was unprecedented.  This season, Orr became the first, and to date only Defenseman, to win the Art Ross Trophy.  It was such a phenomenal year, that Orr would lead the Bruins to a Stanley Cup Championship, and he won the Conn Smythe Award as the playoff MVP.  Orr would also win the Norris Trophy and the Hart Trophy this year.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1979.

Phil Esposito, Boston Bruins, 76 G, 76 A, 156 P (2) (1971)

The season before, Esposito, Orr and company took Boston to a Stanley Cup win.  They did not win this season, but Esposito shattered the single-season Goal record and his own Points record.  Amazingly, he was not the Hart Trophy winner, as that went to Orr (who had 139 Points). Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1984.

Phil Esposito, Boston Bruins, 66 G, 67 A, 133 P (3) (1972)

The Bruins won the Stanley Cup again, with Esposito having a lot to do with their success.  Orr repeated as the runner up (117), and he was again the Hart Trophy winner with Esposito coming in at third.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1984.

Phil Esposito, Boston Bruins, 55 G, 75 A, 130 P (4) (1973)

Esposito’s 130 Points were 26 more than Bobby Clarke of Philadelphia, his nearest competitor, and he repeated as the runner-up to the Hart, losing to Clarke.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1984.

Phil Esposito, Boston Bruins, 68 G, 77 A, 145 P (5) (1974)

Esposito became the second player to earn five Art Ross Trophies and the second to have four straight wins.  This would be his last Art Ross, and he would also earn his second (and last) Hart Trophy.  Esposito would also have his sixth straight and final First Team All-Star this year. He would be traded to the New York Rangers in 1975, and he retired after the 1980-81 Season, ending his career with 1,590 Points.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1984.

Bobby Orr, Boston Bruins, 33 G, 87 A, 120 P (2) (1975)  

It took Esposito’s teammate, Bobby Orr, to break his Art Ross streak, and while it did end Esposito’s run, this was the seventh year in a row where a Boston Bruin won the Art Ross.  In between his first and second Art Ross Trophy, Orr won another Stanley Cup, another Conn Smythe Trophy, four Norris Trophies and two Hart Trophies.  This season, he would win his eighth and final Norris Trophy, and he was already cemented as the greatest Defenseman that ever lived, a mantle he still holds today. Orr played until 1979, and he was fast-tracked into the Hockey Hall that year.  He retired at the age of 30, as back issues forced hm out of the game, and Orr would have 915 Points in only 657 career Games.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1979.

Guy Lafleur, Montreal Canadiens, 56 G, 69 A, 125 P (1976)        

For the first time in the 1970s, a non-Boston Bruin won the Art Ross Trophy, and it went back to Montreal with Guy Lafleur, who had six more Points than Bobby Clarke of Philadelphia.  Lafleur, who had a Stanley Cup in 1973, would win his second this year.  He was third in Hart Trophy voting this year.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1988.

Guy Lafleur, Montreal Canadiens, 56 G, 80 A, 136 P (2) (1977)   

Two touchdowns of points ahead of Marcel Dionne, Lafleur again won a Stanley Cup Ring with the Canadiens, this time winning the Conn Smythe Trophy.  The Quebecois superstar also won the Hart Trophy for the first time.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1988.

Guy Lafleur, Montreal Canadiens, 60 G, 72 A, 132 P (3) (1978)   

Lafleur won his third straight Art Ross, and this would be his final time winning the coveted award.  This also was his second and last Hart Trophy win, but it was year four of six straight First Team All-Star selections.  Montreal again won the Stanley Cup, and captured another the year after making it four straight.  He played until 1985, and would retire.  That would be short-lived, as he returned as a New York Ranger in 1988, and played two more years after that with the Quebec Nordiques.  Lafleur would have 1,353 career Points.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1988.

Bryan Trottier, New York Islanders, 47 G, 87 A, 134 P (1979)     

It took a dozen years, but Bryan Trottier became the first player from an expansion team to win the Art Ross Trophy. Trottier beat Marcel Dionne by four Points for the Award, and the Islander would also win the Hart Trophy. Following this win, Trottier would lead New York to four consecutive Stanley Cups.  Trottier became a two-time First Team and two-time Second Team All-Star, and he later played for the Pittsburgh Penguins earning two more Stanley Cups.  He retired in 1994 with 1,425 career Points.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1997.

Marcel Dionne, Los Angeles Kings, 53 G, 84 A, 137 P (1980)       

Marcel Dionne tied Wayne Gretzky of the Edmonton Oilers in Points, but Dionne got the nod for the Art Ross over “The Great One”. Dionne became the first King to win this award, and he was the runner-up for the Hart.  Over his career that spanned from 1971 to 1989, Dionne played for Detroit, L.A. and the New York Rangers, and he would have 1,307 Points. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1997.

Wayne Gretzky, Edmonton Oilers, 55 G, 109 A, 164 P (1981)     

Wayne Gretzky tied Marcel Dionne in Points the year before, but lost out on the Art Ross due to a goal differential of two. Gretzky did not have to worry about Dionne, who was second with 135 Points, but that was 29 behind the number of the Edmonton Oiler, who set the new benchmark for Points in a season. Gretzky would win his second straight Hart Trophy this season.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1999.

Wayne Gretzky, Edmonton Oilers, 92 G, 120 A, 212 P (2) (1982)

Wayne Gretzky broke so many records this year. First, he shattered his own record with 212 Points, making him the first player to elevate the single-season Points record two years in a row in the Art Ross era.  Second, he set the single-season Goal mark with 92.  Third, he was the first player to have a 200 Point season.  Mike Bossy of the New York Islanders was the closest competitor with 212 Points. Gretzky would again win the Hart, his third in a row.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1999.

Wayne Gretzky, Edmonton Oilers, 80 G, 71 A, 196 P (3) (1983)  

Gretzky did it again, destroying any competitor for the Art Ross.  His nearest competitor was Peter Stastny, the Nordiques star from Czechoslovakia, who “only” had 124.  Gretzky again won the Hart Trophy, but this time his Oilers reached the Stanley Cup Finals, a harbinger of what was to come.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1999.

Wayne Gretzky, Edmonton Oilers, 87 G, 118 A, 205 P (4) (1984)

Gretzky again reached the 200 Point threshold, and it was his teammate, Paul Coffey at 126 Points who was the closest.  This year the Oilers broke through by winning the Stanley Cup, and Gretzky again captured the Hart Trophy.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1999.

Wayne Gretzky, Edmonton Oilers, 87 G, 118 A, 205 P (5) (1985)

Gretzky repeated as a Stanley Cup Champion, but this year he would win the Conn Smythe as the playoff MVP.  By winning his fifth straight Art Ross Trophy, Gretzky broke the record that was shared by Gordie Howe and Phil Esposito in terms of consecutive Art Ross winners.  Gretzky again destroyed his nearest competitor, Jari Kurri, who was also an Oiler. Not surprisingly, he won his sixth consecutive Hart Trophy.   Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1999.

Wayne Gretzky, Edmonton Oilers, 52 G, 163 A, 215 P (6) (1986)

It was a bittersweet year for Gretzky as he broke his own mark by three Points, and his 215 Points has set a since unbreakable mark.  He won the Hart Trophy again, but in the playoffs, the Oilers were upset in the divisional round, and he did not win a Stanley Cup.  Gretzky was again much further ahead than his nearest rival, but this year it was Mario Lemieux of the Pittsburgh Penguins, who had 141 Points.  This win would also tie Gordie Howe for the most Art Ross Trophies.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1999.

Wayne Gretzky, Edmonton Oilers, 62 G, 121 A, 183 P (7) (1987)

The Edmonton Oilers were back on track, and they won their third Stanley Cup in four years, with Gretzky winning the Conn Smythe.  Gretzky set Art Ross history as he broke Howe’s record of six Art Ross trophies, and he did it in seven straight years, also a record.  “The Great One” also secured his eighth straight Hart Trophy. Once again, nobody was near Gretzky, as Jari Kurri, who was second, had 108 Points.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1999.

Mario Lemieux, Pittsburgh Penguins, 62 G, 121 A, 183 P (1988)

Gretzky had 149 Points this year, but his Art Ross trophy streak ended at seven when Mario Lemieux bet his total by 19. Lemieux became the first Penguin to win the Art Ross, and this year he also was the first Penguin to win the Hart. As you will see, Lemieux was just getting started!  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1997.

Mario Lemieux, Pittsburgh Penguins, 62 G, 121 A, 183 P (2) (1989)     

Lemieux was one Point shy of 200, and his 199 would be a career-high, as he went back-to-back in Art Ross Trophy wins. Despite his 199 Points, Gretzky’s 168 Points for his new team, Los Angeles, was enough to earn him the Hart. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1997.

Wayne Gretzky, Los Angeles Kings, 40 G, 102 A, 142 P (8) (1990)        

After two years of not winning the Art Ross, Gretzky returned to the top of the scoring table, but this time it was as a Los Angeles King.  Gretzky, who won the Hart Trophy as a King the year before finished fourth this year behind Mark Messier, his former teammate who led his former team, Edmonton, to their fifth Stanley Cup.  Messier was second in scoring to Gretzky, 13 behind.  As for Lemieux, he had 129 Points in only 59 Games.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1999.

Wayne Gretzky, Los Angeles Kings, 41 G, 122 A, 163 P (9) (1991)        

Gretzky went back-to-back again, and he was incredible this season.  While he did not win the Hart, he was 32 Points ahead of the one who did win it (and was second), Brett Hull.  Hull would however have 86 Goals, well more than twice as much as Gretzky.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1999.

Mario Lemieux, Pittsburgh Penguins, 44 G, 87 A, 131 P (3) (1992)       

Mario Lemieux may have only finished fifth in Hart voting, but he won the scoring title only with 64 Games.  More importantly, he led the Penguins to their second straight Stanley Cup win.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1997.

Mario Lemieux, Pittsburgh Penguins, 44 G, 87 A, 131 P (4) (1993)       

Lemieux’s 160 Points was a dozen more than his nearest competitor, Pat Lafontaine, but Lemieux had his Points in only 60 Games! Despite only playing 60 Games, what he did was so impressive that the Hart Trophy voters could not help but vote for him.  Lemieux would also win the Bill Masterton Trophy this season.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1997.

Wayne Gretzky, Los Angeles Kings, 38 G, 92 A, 130 P (10) (1994)        

Arguably, his was the end of an era, as this was Gretzky’s tenth and last Art Ross Trophy.  Nobody has won this more than the native of Brantford, Ontario, and it is quite likely that nobody ever will.  Gretzky did not win the Hart, as that went to Sergei Fedorov, who he beat by 10 Points to win Art Ross.  Gretzky actually never received any Hart votes, but he did have nine, which is more than any other player.  This season also saw Gretzky win his fourth of what would be five Lady Byng Trophies. He was an eight-time First Team All-Star, a seven-time Second Team All-Star and he retired with 2,857 Points, well more than any other player.  As expected, the Hockey Hall relaxed their three-year wait, and he was inducted immediately.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1999.

Mario Lemieux, Pittsburgh Penguins, 69 G, 92 A, 161 P (5) (1996)       

Mario Lemieux sat out the entire 1994-95 season due to Hodgkin’s lymphoma.  He came back the year after with a vengeance, winning his fifth Art Ross, beating his teammate, Jaromir Jagr by 12 Points.  Lemieux would win the Hart Trophy for the third and final time.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1997.

Mario Lemieux, Pittsburgh Penguins, 50 G, 72 A, 122 P (6) (1997)       

This was the last Art Ross Trophy win by Mario Lemieux, and he completed it with three two-year runs.  His 122 Points was his lowest Point win, but was still 13 Points higher than Teemu Selanne, who was second.  Lemieux retired after this year, but came back three years later, but this time as a player/owner, as he bought the team in 1999.  He continued to play until 2006, and retired with 1,723 Points. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1997.

Peter Forsberg, Colorado Avalanche, 29 G, 77 A, 106 P (2003)    

Peter Forsberg became the first player in Colorado Avalanche franchise history, and the first Swedish player to win the Art Ross. To win the award, he eked out another Swede, Markus Naslund by two Points.  Forsberg, who had already won two Stanley Cups with the Avalanche, won the Hart Trophy this season.  Forsberg played until 2011, and retired with 885 Points in 708 Games.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2014.

Martin St. Louis, Tampa Bay Lightning, 38 G, 56 A, 94 P (2004)

After two unremarkable seasons with the Calgary Flames, Martin St. Louis became a surprise star with the Tampa Bay Lightning. In the 2003-04 Season, Martin St. Louis won the Art Ross, and also won the Hart Trophy.  St. Louis also took the Lightning to their first Stanley Cup this season.  He was a First Team All-Star this year, and would be a Second Team All-Star four more times. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2018.

Martin St. Louis, Tampa Bay Lightning, 17 G, 43 A, 60 P (2) (2013)     

In the strike-shortened 48-game season, Martin St. Louis’s 60 Points were the lowest ever for an Art Ross winner.  St. Louis would only finish ninth in Art Ross voting, but he did win his third Lady Byng this season. St. Louis played until 2015, with two final years in the New York Rangers.  He retired with 1,033 Points.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2018.

 

The following are the players who have won the Art Ross Trophy who are eligible for the Hockey Hall of Fame and have not been selected:

None.

Let’s update our tally, shall we?

Award in Question

Percentage of recipients who have entered the HOF

Percentage of recipients by year who have entered the HOF.

NBA MVP

100%

100%

NHL Art Ross

100%

100%

NHL Norris

90.5%

96.4%

NBA All Star Game MVP

89.5%

91.7%

NHL Conn Smythe

74.2%

85.4%

NFL Bert Bell Award

73.7%

71.4%

NFL AP Offensive Player of the Year

73.1%

79.4%

NFL AP MVP

68.3%

74.0%

NHL Lady Byng

63.8%

76.0%

NFL Defensive Player of the Year

60.8%

71.1%

NFL Super Bowl MVP

60.6%

64.9%

NBA Defensive Player of the Year

58.3%

56.5%

NHL Vezina

57.1%

66.3%

NBA Rookie of the Year

56.5%

56.5%

MLB MVP

55.0%

60.2%

NFL Pro Bowl MVP

52.3%

54.8%

MLB Lou Gehrig Award

51.9%

51.9%

MLB Roberto Clemente Award

47.4%

47.4%

MLB/NL/AL Cy Young Award

44.4%

55.4%

MLB Babe Ruth Award

37.0%

39.3%

NHL Frank J. Selke Trophy

33.3%

36.7%

MLB World Series MVP

33.3%

36.8%

MLB Hutch Award

33.1%

33.1%

NFL Offensive Rookie of the Year

28.6%

28.6%

NHL Bill Masterton Memorial Trophy

27.9%

27.9%

MLB Edgar Martinez Award

26.7%

17.2%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Designated Hitter)

25.0%

30.8%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Shortstop)

23.5%

52.6%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove

21.7%

36.8%

NFL Defensive Rookie of the Year

20.6%

20.6%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Catcher)

20.0%

22.5%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Second Base)

18.8%

39.8%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Shortstop)

18.2%

35.1%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Pitcher)

18.2%

20.1%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Second Base)

16.7%

32.7%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Outfield)

16.7%

30.1%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Outfield)

15.7%

25.2%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Third Base)

14.3%

14.3%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Third Base)

13.6%

14.3%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (First Base)

13.6%

13.3%

MLB (NL/AL) Rookie of the Year

13.3%

13.3%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Catcher)

10.3%

15.2%

NBA Most Improved Player of the Year

5.3%

3.2%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (First Base)

3.8%

3.2%

NFL AP Comeback Player of the Year

0.0%

0.0%

So, who is up next?

The following are the players who have won the Art Ross Trophy in the NHL who have retired but have not met the mandatory years out of the game to qualify for the Hockey Hall of Fame:

Jarome Iginla, Calgary Flames, 52 G, 44 A, 96 P (2002)

This would be the lone Art Ross for Jarome Iginla, and while he never had a 100 Point season, he would not need to in this era. Iginla played most of his career with the Calgary Flames, and he would have 1,095 career Points.  Eligible in 2020.

Henrik Sedin, Vancouver Canucks, 52 G, 44 A, 96 P (2010)

Henrik Sedin was the first Vancouver Canuck to win the Art Ross, which he won by besting both Sidney Crosby and Alex Ovechkin by three Points.  Sedin would also win the Hart Trophy this year, and he was a First Team All-Star this season, and the one after.  Sedin played until 2018, all with Vancouver, and he would retire with 1,070 career Points. Eligible in 2021.

Daniel Sedin, Vancouver Canucks, 41 G, 63 A, 104 P (2011)

There have been players who have won the Art Ross in back-to-back years.  There have been different teammates who have won this accolade in two straight years. This is the first time, and we think likely the only time where we will have twins capture the Art Ross in two years. Like his brother, Henrik, Daniel Sedin played his entire career with the Canucks, but he did not win the Hart like his brother as he would finish second to Corey Perry.  Sedin played until 2018 and would have 1,041 career Points.  Eligible in 2021.

The following are the players who have won the Art Ross Trophy who are still active.

Jaromir Jagr, Pittsburgh Penguins, 32 G, 38 A, 70 P (1995)

This was Jagr’s first Art Ross, and he narrowly beat Eric Lindros to get it.  Both stars had 70 Points in this strike-shortened year, but Jagr had three more Goals than Lindros.  Lindros would however edge out Jagr for the Hart Trophy.  Jagr was a First Team All-Star for the first time, and he had already won two Stanley Cups with Pittsburgh.  Historically speaking, this is the first time that a non-Canadian would win the Art Ross.  48 Years Old, Playing in the Czech League.

Jaromir Jagr, Pittsburgh Penguins, 32 G, 38 A, 70 P (2) (1998)

Jagr would also lead the NHL in Assists for the first time this season.  The Czech star was a First Team and Second Team All-Star in the two years prior, and this year, it was Peter Forsberg of Colorado who was his closest competitor with 91 Points, and he was second to Dominik Hasek of Buffalo for the Hart.  48 Years Old, Playing in the Czech League.

Jaromir Jagr, Pittsburgh Penguins, 44 G, 83 A, 127 P (3) (1999)

Jagr became the second Penguin to win consecutive Art Ross Trophies, besting Teemu Selanne by 20 Points.  Jagr’s 127 Points would be a career-high, and for the first time in his career, he would win the Hart Trophy.  48 Years Old, Playing in the Czech League.

Jaromir Jagr, Pittsburgh Penguins, 42 G, 54 A, 96 P (4) (2000)

The Czech star made it three in a row, and for the first time in a full season in decades we have an Art Ross Trophy winner under 100 Points.  Jagr narrowly beat Pavel Bure by two Points, though St. Louis Defenseman, Chris Pronger, beat them both for the Hart.  48 Years Old, Playing in the Czech League.

Jaromir Jagr, Pittsburgh Penguins, 52 G, 69 A, 121 P (5) (2001)

This would be Jagr’s last Art Ross Trophy, and he joined the four in a row club.  Jagr was third in Hart voting, behind his teammate (and boss), Mario Lemieux, and Joe Sakic, who won the award, and was only three Points behind Jagr. This would be Jagr’s last season with the Penguins, as he was traded to the Washington Capitals in the offseason. Jagr later played for the New York Rangers, Avangard Omsk of the KHL, Philadelphia, Dallas, Boston, New Jersey, Florida, Calgary, and then the Czech League.  In the NHL, Jagr had 1,921 career Points.  48 Years Old, Playing in the Czech League.

Joe Thornton, Boston Bruins & San Jose Sharks, 52 G, 69 A, 121 P (2006)

For the first time in Art Ross Trophy winner was split between two teams.  In the season prior, Joe Thornton was the Bruins top star, but management questioned his leadership and the Boston fan base began to turn on him.  Furthermore, Thornton was frustrated with the fate of the Bruins, and he needed a change of scenery, which he got 23 games into this season.  Thornton’s Art Ross winning 121 Points was split with 33 in Boston and 92 with San Jose. Thornton was only two Points ahead of Jaromir Jagr, who he also edged out for the Hart Trophy this year.   Thornton, who was a First Team All-Star, would go on to have two more Second Team All-Stars.  40 Years Old, Playing for the San Jose Sharks.

Sidney Crosby, Pittsburgh Penguins, 36 G, 84 A, 120 P (2007)

Sidney Crosby became the third Pittsburgh Penguin to win the Art Ross Trophy, and he did so with a six-Point lead over the previous winner, Joe Thornton.  “Sid the Kid” was just that, as he was only 19 when the year started, and he was in his second year in the NHL.  Crosby also won the Hart Trophy and was a First Team All-Star for the first time in his career.  Two years later, he would hoist the Stanley Cup.  32 Years Old, Playing for the Pittsburgh Penguins.

Alexander Ovechkin, Washington Capitals, 65 G, 47 A, 112 P (2008)

Ovechkin became the first Washington Capital and the first Russian to win the Art Ross this year.  This was Ovechkin’s third season in hockey, and his third consecutive First Team All-Star, and it was Ovechkin who defeated Sidney Crosby for the Calder.  Ovechkin also won the Hart Trophy this year.  Since that win, he went to three more First Team All-Stars, won two more Hart Trophies, and led the Capitals to the Stanley Cup in 2018.  32 Years Old, Playing for the Pittsburgh Penguins.

Evgeni Malkin, Pittsburgh Penguins, 35 G, 78 A, 113 P (2009)

Malkin’s win allowed Russian born players to go back-to-back in Art Ross wins, and he became the fourth Penguin to win trophy. Malkin was only three points ahead of Ovechkin for the Art Ross, but was second for the Hart to Ovechkin.  This season, Ovechkin, Crosby and the Penguins would win the Stanley Cup.  32 Years Old, Playing for the Pittsburgh Penguins.

Evgeni Malkin, Pittsburgh Penguins, 50 G, 59 A, 109 P (2) (2012)

This season, Malkin won his second Art Ross, but this season, he would win the Hart Trophy.  Malkin would lead the Penguins win the 2016 and 2017 Stanley Cups.  32 Years Old, Playing for the Pittsburgh Penguins.

Sidney Crosby, Pittsburgh Penguins, 36 G, 68 A, 104 P (2) (2014)

In between Crosby’s first Art Ross and this one, he had won a Stanley Cup, and was a Second Team and First Team All-Star. This season, he was a First Team All-Star again, and also a Hart Trophy winner.  Crosby and the Penguins would win the Stanley Cup the next two seasons. 32 Years Old, Playing for the Pittsburgh Penguins.

Jamie Benn, Dallas Stars, 36 G, 68 A, 104 P (2015)

Jamie Benn won the Art Ross by only one Point (edging out John Tavares), and it was done in a season that bookended First Team All-Stars.  Benn was a Second Team All-Star this year, and was only 12thin Hart Trophy voting, but he was an Art Ross winner.  This would be the first time that Minnesota North Star/Dallas Star won the Art Ross.  30 Years Old, Playing for the Dallas Stars.

Patrick Kane, Chicago Blackhawks, 46 G, 60 A, 106 P (2016)

Patrick Kane already won three Stanley Cups with Chicago, and he was 16 Points ahead of last year’s winner, Jamie Benn.  Kane would be a First Team All-Star for the second time, and this season he won the Hart Trophy.  31 Years Old, Playing for the Chicago Blackhawks.

Connor McDavid, Edmonton Oilers, 30 G, 70 A, 100 P (2017)

Connor McDavid was one of the most highly touted NHL prospects in years, and in his second year, he would win not only the Art Ross but the Hart Trophy as well.  He was 11 Points ahead of Sidney Crosby, who was also second in Hart Trophy voting.  23 Years Old, Playing for the Edmonton Oilers.

Connor McDavid, Edmonton Oilers, 41 G, 67 A, 108 P (2) (2018)

McDavid won his second straight Art Ross, this time with a six-point lead over Claude Giroux.  The Oiler was fifth in Hart voting, but did win the Lester B. Pearson Award, which was his also his second in a row.  23 Years Old, Playing for the Edmonton Oilers.

Nikita Kucherov, Tampa Bay Lightning, 41 G, 87 A, 128 P (2019)

Connor McDavid was unable to make it three straight, as he was second, 12 Points behind Nikita Kucherov. Kucherov also won the Hart Trophy, and this was his second consecutive year as a First Team All-Star.  26 Years Old, Playing for the Tampa Bay Lightning.

100 Percent.  Every single winner of the Art Ross Trophy has made it to the Hockey Hall of Fame.  The Hart Trophy and the Norris Trophy can’t say that.  From what we can see, it looks like the Art Ross will be perfect in resulting in Hall of Famers for a long time.

So, what is up next?

We are going to return to the court, and look at the NBA Finals MVP.

As always, we thank you for your support, and look for that soon.