We here at Notinhalloffame.com thought it would be fun to take a look at the major awards in North American team sports and see how it translates into Hall of Fame potential.

Needless to say, different awards in different sports yield hall of fame potential.  In basketball, the team sport with the least number of players on a roster, the dividend for greatness much higher.  In baseball, it is not as much as a great individual season does not have the same impact.

Last time, we looked at the Walter Payton Man of the Year Award in the NFL.  This time we went back to hockey, with the Calder Trophy, given annually to the NHL Rookie of the Year.

So how many Calder Trophy winners have made the Pro Hockey Hall of Fame?

Let’s find out!

The following are the past players who have won the Calder Trophy who are eligible for the Hockey Hall of Fame and have been enshrined.

Carl Voss, New York Rangers & Detroit Red Wings, Center: 8 G, 16 A, 24 P, 2.8 PS 1933       

You could argue that we are starting this one with an asterisk, as Voss was not inducted into the Hall of Fame as a player, but as a builder for his work as an Administrator in various minor leagues of hockey.  Having said that, don’t sleep on his career as the American born-Canadian raised player was a great athlete, who prior to his NHL career won the Grey Cup in 1924 with Queen’s College and in the minors was a leading scorer (IHL in 1932).  Voss had played for the Toronto Maple Leafs for 14 Games in the late 20s, but he finally became a regular on the roster of the New York Rangers for in 1932.  Ten Games into the season, he was sold to the Detroit Red Wings, where he proved his worth in the NHL, and was the first ever rookie of the year.  Voss later played for the Ottawa Senators, St. Louis Eagles, New York Americans, Montreal Maroons and Chicago Blackhawks, where in his final NHL game, he scored the Stanley Cup winning goal to seal the deal for the 1938 Title.  Forced to retire afterward due to a knee injury, Voss would begin his career as an administrator.

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1974.

Sweeney Schriner, New York Americans, Left Wing: 18 G, 22 A, 40 P, 4.5 PS 1935        

Sweeney Schriner goes down in history as the only Calder Trophy winner in the history of the New York Americans.  The Left Wing would lead the NHL in scoring the next two seasons, where he was a First Team All-Star and Second Team All-Star respectively. Later in his career, he was traded to the Toronto Maple Leafs where he won two Stanley Cups and was again a First Team All-Star.  Schriner played until 1946, retiring with 407 Points in 484 Games.

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1962.

Syl Apps, Toronto Maple Leafs, Centre: 16 G, 29 A, 45 P, 6.1 PS 1937         

Apps played all of his career with the Leafs and in his rookie year, he led the NHL in Assists.  He did that again as a sophomore, where he was a Second Team All-Star, an accolade he repeated twice more.  Apps was also a First Team All-Star twice, a Lady Byng winner, and he was second in Hart Trophy voting three times.  The Centre helped to lead Toronto to the Stanley Cup three times and he scored 432 Points in 423 Games.

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1961.

Frank Brimsek, Boston Bruins, Goalie: 33-9-1 Record, 1.56 GAA, 11.3 GPS 1939

Frank Brimsek became the second American Goalie to win the Calder, but he shattered the overall success of his predecessor. The Minnesotan was the first player to win the Calder and the Vezina in the same year, and also the first to win the Calder and Stanley Cup in the same season.  He led all Goalies in Wins (33), GAA (1.56), Shutouts (10), and Point Shares (11.3), and he was named a First Team All-Star.  Brimsek would later win a second Vezina, was a First Team All-Star one more time, a Second Team, All-Star six times and won another Cup in 1941.  Brimsek would also play for the Blackhawks, and he retired with 252 Wins and a career 2.70 GAA.

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1961.

Edgar Laprade, New York Rangers, Center: 15 G, 19 A, 34 P, 2.9 PS 1946   

Laprade played the entirety of his NHL career with the New York Rangers, which would span ten seasons.  A clean player, Laprade would win the Lady Byng in 1949/50, and he was seventh in Hart Trophy voting that year.  He scored 280 Points, which may not seem like a lot but he was also a skilled defensive forward.

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1993.

Terry Sawchuk, Detroit Red Wings, Goalie: 44-12-13 Record, 1.97 GAA, 17.0 PS 1951  

The 1950/51 season began one of the most phenomenal half-decades that a Goalie ever had in the NHL.  Terry Sawchuk would not only win the Calder in his rookie year, he would also lead the NHL in Wins (44), Goalie Point Shares (17.0), and was a First Team All-Star.  Over the next four seasons, the Red Wings Goalie won three Stanley Cups, three Vezinas, two First Team All-Star Selections, two GAA Titles, and four more league-lead in Wins.  Following that incredible run, Sawchuk was still a very good Goalie, winning a Vezina in 1964/65, another Stanley Cup in 1967 with Toronto and two Second Team All-Star nods.  Over his career, Sawchuk also played for Boston, Los Angeles and New York, and he retired with 350 career Wins.

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1971.

Bernie Geoffrion, Montreal Canadiens, Right Wing: 30 G, 24 A, 54 P, 7.4 PS  1952       

Geoffrion led the NHL in Power Play Goals as a rookie (10), and he went on to have a long and prosperous career with the Canadiens. The French-Canadian went on to win six Stanley Cups, two Goal Scoring Titles, two Art Ross Trophies and the Hart Trophy in 1961.  Geoffrion scored 822 Points over a 883-Game career.

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1972.

Gump Worsley, New York Rangers, Goalie: 44-12-13 Record, 1.97 GAA, 17.0 PS 1953   

Worsley did the best he could on a poor Rangers team, but the hockey world recognized that the “Gump” was a talented Goalie. Worsley played until the mid-70s, and he would win four Stanley Cups with Montreal where he was also a two-time Vezina Trophy winner.  Worlsey played into his mid-40s, where he the charismatic Goalie played for the Minnesota North Stars for his last four years.

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1980.

Glenn Hall, Detroit Red Wings, Goalie: 30-24-16 Record, 2.10 GAA, 14.5 PS 1956         

How do you replace a legend like Terry Sawchuk? With a legend like Glenn Hall.  As a rookie, Hall was a Second Team All-Star, and he led the NHL in Shutouts (12).  Hall was a First Team All-Star in his second season, but despite this he was traded to the Chicago Blackhawks after the season.  Hall played for Chicago for a decade where he won two Vezinas, was a First Team All-Star five times, and backstopped the Blackhawks to a Stanley Cup win in 1961.  Hall joined the expansion St. Louis Blues in 1967 and immediately made them relevant, bringing them to three Stanley Cup appearances, and while they lost them all, Hall was the Conn Smythe winner in 1968.  He also won a third Vezina playing in St. Louis.  The Goalie played until 1971, and retired with a record of 279-229-107.

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1975.

Frank Mahovolich, Toronto Maple Leafs, Left Wing: 20 G, 16 A, 36 P, 4.9 PS 1958        

Nicknamed the “Big M”, Mahovolich had a decent rookie year, but would morph into one of the leaders of a powerful Toronto squad that won four Stanley Cups in the 1960s.  In this period, Mahovolich was a two-time First Team All-Star and four-time Second Team All-Star, and had two top-five finishes for the Hart. Following Toronto’s last Cup win in 1967, Mahovolich was traded to Detroit during the 1967/68 season, and he added a pair of Second Team All-Stars in Motown.  He later played for Montreal, where he won the Stanley Cup twice more with another First Team All-Star etched on his resume.  Mahovolich had 1,103 Points in the NHL, and he also had four pro seasons in the WHA where he scored 232 Points.

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1981.

Bill Hay, Chicago Blackhawks, Centre: 18 G, 37 A, 55 P, 4.9 PS: 1960         

Hay did well as a rookie, and played a significant role on the Chicago team that won the Stanley Cup the year after.  Hay eclipsed his 55 Point Rookie year three times and led the NHL in Assists per Game in 1961/62.  Hay played his entire NHL career with the Blackhawks, collecting 386 career Points.  We will count this as while Hay did not have a Hall of Fame career as a player, he was inducted as a builder for his work as the past President and CEO of the Calgary Flames and as the Hockey Hall of Fame Chairman.

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2015 as a Builder.

Dave Keon, Chicago Blackhawks, Centre: 20 G, 25 A, 45 P, 4.2 PS: 1961     

After Keon’s Calder winning season, he became a core part of the Maple Leafs squad that won four Stanley Cups, so much so that he won the Conn Smythe Trophy in 1967 as the playoff MVP.  Keon would be a two-time Second Team All-Star, and he won the Lady Byng in consecutive seasons in 1962 and 1963.  Keon bolted for the WHA in 1975, playing for Minnesota, Indiana and New England, rejoining the NHL, when the Whalers were one of the four teams that merged with the senior hockey circuit.  Keon retired in 1982 with 986 NHL Points and 291 WHA Points..

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1986.

Jacques Laperriere, Montreal Canadiens, Defenseman:  2 G, 28 A, 30 P, 6.7 PS: 1964

Laperriere had a great rookie campaign as he not only won the Calder but was named a Second Team All-Star.  Playing all 12 years of his NHL career with the Habs, the Defenseman was a First Team All-Star the two years after his rookie season, and was the Norris Trophy winner in 1965/66.  Laperriere helped Montreal win five Stanley Cups, and was a one-time leader in Plus/Minus.

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1987.

Bobby Orr, Boston Bruins, Defenseman:  13 G, 28 A, 30 P, 6.7 PS: 1964

Orr was a Second Team All-Star in his rookie season and was third in Norris Trophy voting.  It was a good year, but it did not accurately foreshadow what Orr would accomplish.  Over the next eight seasons, Orr was an annual First Team All-Star and Norris Trophy winner.  He won three straight Hart Trophies (1970-72), two Stanley Cups, and was the first Defenseman to lead the NHL in scoring; which he did twice!  Orr transformed what Defenseman could do, and some will argue that he is not just the greatest blueliner of all-time, but the best hockey player ever!  

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1979.

Tony Esposito, Chicago Blackhawks, Goalie:  38-17-8 Record, 2.17 GAA, 14.7 GPS: 1970

Esposito played 13 Games the previous year with the Montreal Canadiens and the Blackhawks claimed him in the Intraleague Draft (basically, waivers).  Esposito had a monster rookie year where he led the NHL in Wins (38), Save Percentage (.932) and Shutouts (15) and he was a First Team All-Star and a Vezina Trophy win. Esposito played his entire career with Chicago and he went on to win two more Vezina, two First Team All-Stars and two Second Team All-Stars.  The Goalie would have 302 career Wins.

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1988.

Gilbert Perreault, Buffalo Sabres, Centre:  38 G, 34 A, 72 P, 6.5 GPS: 1971

Perreault was the first Buffalo Sabre to win the Calder, and two years later he won the Lady Byng.  The French-Canadian played his entire career with Buffalo where he was a two-time Second Team All-Star and exceed the 100 Point mark twice. Perreault scored 1,326 Points over 1,191 Games.

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1990.

Ken Dryden, Montreal Canadiens, Goalie:  39-8-15 Record, 2.24 GAA, 15.0 GPS: 1972

Dryden did this backwards, as he was already a legend BEFORE he completed his rookie year.  Late in the 1970/71 season, he replaced the injured Rogie Vachon, and he was astounding.  Dryden backstopped the Habs to a Stanley Cup win where he won the Conn Smythe, thus becoming the first player to win the Conn Smythe before the Calder.  In that Calder Trophy winning season, he was a Second Team All-Star, the runner-up for the Hart and the league-leader in Wins (39). Dryden played until 1979 where he led the NHL three more times in Wins, five First Team All-Stars, five Vezinas, and five more Stanley Cups.  Dryden was the top Goalie of the 1970s and he had a career record 258-57-74 with a 2.24 GAA.

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1983.

Denis Potvin, New York Islanders, Defenseman:  17 G, 37 A, 54 P, 8.7 PS: 1974

Easily the best Defenseman in Islanders history, Potvin was the first player in Long Island to win the Calder and he was the first building block that would become the Islanders dynasty in the early 1980s. Potvin played all 15 years of his career with New York, was a First Team All-Star five times, two Second Team All-Stars and won three Norris Trophies.  He scored 1,052 career Points.

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1991.

Bryan Trottier, New York Islanders, Centre:  32 G, 63 A, 95 P, 8.6 PS: 1976

Above was the first piece of the Islanders dynasty, Denis Potvin.  Here is the second one, Bryan Trottier.  The Centre set a then record for rookies with 95 Points, and he would become one of the top scorers in the NHL.  Trottier would win the Hart and Art Ross in 1978/79, and the year after he won the Conn Smythe in New York’s first of four straight Stanley Cups.  A two-time First Team and two-time Second Team All-Star, Trottier played the late stages of his career with the Pittsburgh Penguins, where he won two Stanley Cups as an elder statesman.  Trottier scored 524 Goals and 1,425 Points.

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1997.

Mike Bossy, New York Islanders, Right Wing:  32 G, 63 A, 95 P, 8.6 PS: 1976

This of this for a second.  With the Calder win of Bossy, there were three Islander Calder winners in a five-year period, all of whom would enter the Hockey Hall of Fame.  Is it any wonder that this trio led the Islanders a four-Cup dynasty?  Bossy was the first Calder winner to net over 50 Goals, and was a Second Team All-Star.  Bossy went on to win two Goal-scoring titles, five First Team All-Stars, three Lady Byngs and a Conn Smyth.  Injuries forced him out at the age of 30, but he still retired with 573 Goals and 1,126 Points.

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1990.

Ray Bourque, Boston Bruins, Defenseman:  32 G, 63 A, 95 P, 8.6 PS: 1980

Bourque was a First Team All-Star as a rookie, and he earned that honor 12 more times in his career.  Also, a three-time Second Team All-Star, Bourque won the Norris Trophy five times, and he NEVER had a year where he did not finish at least seventh in voting.  Bourque was Boston hockey for nearly two decades, but he never won the Stanley Cup as a Bruin.  In what would be his penultimate NHL season, Bourque was traded to Colorado to chase the Holy Grail of Hockey.  The season after that trade, Bourque and the Avalanche won the Cup, and as happy as Denver was, Boston fans were just as happy for their beloved former star.  In a 21-year career, the Montreal native scored 1,579 Points, the most ever by a Defenseman.

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2004.

Peter Stastny, Quebec Nordiques, Centre:  39 G, 70 A, 109 P, 8.6 PS: 1981

This was a groundbreaking Calder Trophy win. Peter Stastny was the first Quebec Nordique/Colorado Avalanche to win, the first from a former WHA team to win, the first to score over 100 Points, but most importantly, he was the first European to win the Calder.  Stastny was a superstar for the Czechoslovakian National Team and he defected to Canada to play for the Nordiques.  Stastny had six more 100 Point years (all with Quebec) and had 1,239 over his 15 NHL seasons.  

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1998.

Dale Hawerchuk, Winnipeg Jets, Centre:  45 G, 58 A, 103 P, 8.6 PS: 1981

From one former WHA team to another we go from Quebec City to Winnipeg, with Dale Hawerchuk, the first superstar for the team in their NHL era.  Hawerchuk had 103 Points as a rookie, and hit the three-digit Point mark five more times, all as a Jet.  Hawerchuk was a Second Team All-Star in 1984/85 and he was second behind Wayne Gretzky for the Hart.  Also playing for Buffalo, St. Louis and Philadelphia, Hawerchuk scored 1,409 Points in 1,188 Games.  

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2001.

Mario Lemieux, Pittsburgh Penguins, Centre:  43 G, 57 A, 100 P, 7.5 PS: 1985

Mario Lemieux is a player who saved an NHL franchise twice.  The first was in his Calder season where he instantly lived up to the hype, and became at one time the best player in the league.  Remember, this was no small task, as it was Wayne Gretzky who he had to dethrone.  Lemieux captured the Hart Trophy three times, the Art Ross six times, and was a First Team All-Star five times.  Lemieux took the Pens to two Stanley Cup wins, he overcame cancer, and then he saves the team again.  With the Penguins in financial despair, he worked out the remaining money owed to him and worked out a deal to buy the team.  He played again, becoming the first owner/player in the modern era, and as an owner he won three more Cups.  Lemieux scored 1,723 Points in 915 Games.

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1997.

Luc Robitaille, Los Angeles Kings, Left Wing:  45 G, 39 A, 84 P, 6.8 PS: 1985

Robitaille was a Second Team All-Star as a rookie, and he would be a First Team All-Star five of the next six seasons.  The Left Wing exceeded the 100 Point plateau four times and while he played most of his career with Los Angeles, he won a Stanley Cup with the Detroit Red Wings in 2002.  Robitaille also played for the Penguins and the Rangers, and he scored 1,394 career Points, 1,154 of which as a King.

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2009.

Joe Niewendyk, Calgary Flames, Centre:  51 G, 41 A, 92 P, 8.7 PS: 1988

It is possible to claim that Nieuwendyk’s Calder winning season was his best regular season in hockey.  He scored 51 Goals, his career-best and he tied that mark as a sophomore.  Nieuwendyk also was first in Power Play Goals as a rookie.  If it is in fact the case that Nieuwendyk never matched his skill level in his first two years like other Calder winners, the Centre did however remain at a high tier for years and he amassed a long career where he scored 1,126 Points.  Niewendyk helped take Calgary to a Stanley Cup win in 1989 and later in a renaissance performance in 1999, he won the cup again as a Dallas Star where he won the Conn Smythe.  He also played for New Jersey, Toronto and Florida.

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2011.

Brian Leetch, New York Rangers, Defense:  23 G, 48 A, 71 P, 9.0 PS: 1989

One of the best American Defenseman in hockey history, Leetch was also the best blueliner in the team history of the New York Rangers.  With New York, Leetch was a two-time Norris Trophy winner, was a two-time First Team All-Star and a three-time Second Team All-Star.  These were great things to put in a trophy case, but it was the Conn Smythe Trophy he won when he anchored that Rangers to the 1994 Stanley Cup. Leetch would play until 2006 and scored 1,028 Points, 981 of which were as a Ranger.

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2009.

Sergei Makarov, Calgary Flames, Right Wing:  24 G, 62 A, 86 P, 6.8 PS: 1990

It was not that Sergei Makarov did not deserve the Calder.  Statistically speaking, he did.  The backlash was that he as 31 Years Old, and a top flight player from the Soviet Red Army, so his experience level was through the roof.  Makarov is the only player to win the Calder Trophy, who did so AFTER his peak.  He played in the NHL until 1997 with 384 career Points.  Makarov entered the Hockey Hall but it was mostly for his work in the former Soviet Union.

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2016.

Ed Belfour, Chicago Blackhawks, Goalie:  43-19-7 Record, 2.47 GAA, 14.0 GPS: 1991

Belfour’s rookie season would not just see him win the Calder, as he was also the Vezina Trophy winner, William M. Jennings winner, and a First Team All-Star.  Belfour led all the Goalies in Wins (43), Saves (1,713), Save Percentage (.910) and Goals Against Average (2.47).  Belfour went on to win another Vezina, three more Jennings, a First Team All-Star, a Second Team All-Star and a Stanley Cup with the Dallas Stars.  The Goalie also played for San Jose, Toronto and Florida.  Belfour had a career record of 484-320-126.

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2011.

Pavel Bure, Vancouver Canucks, Right Wing:  34 G, 26 A, 60 P, 5.7 PS: 1992

After a good rookie year, Bure but up back-to-back 60 Goal years, the second one being good enough to lead the NHL, and land him a First Team All-Star nod.  Bure later played for Florida, where he had two more league-leading seasons in Goals, both of which were Second Team All-Star worthy.  Bure finished his NHL career in 2003, and he had 779 Points in only 702 Games.

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2012.

Teemu Selanne, Winnipeg Jets, Right Wing:  76 G, 56 A, 132 P, 13.4 PS: 1993

A case can be made that Teemu Selanne’s debut season was the best ever by a non-Gaolie.  Selanne set a rookie record with 76 Goals, and he was a First Team All-Star.  Selanne never matched that total, but he had a long and fruitful career, where he led the NHL twice more in Goals, was a First Team All-Star a second time, was a two-time Second Team All-Star, and a Stanley Cup Champion with the Ducks. Selanne also played for San Jose and Colorado, and would score 1,457 Points over his 21-year career.

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2017.

Martin Brodeur, New Jersey Devils, Goalie:  27-11-8 Record, 8.9 GPS: 1994

The career of Martin Brodeur is nothing short of outstanding.  Following his Calder win, he captured three Stanley Cups, four Vezina Trophies, five William M. Jennings Trophies, and was a three-time First Team and Second Team All-Star.  Brodeur led the NHL in Wins nine times, and was the league-leader in GAA once.  When Brodeur retired, he had the “W” 691 times, more than anyone Goalie. And he is also the all-time leader in Saves (28,928), Shutouts (125) and Minutes Played (74,439).

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2018.

Peter Forsberg, Quebec Nordiques, Centre:  15 G, 35 A, 50 P, 5.0 GPS: 1995

Eric Lindros refused to play for the Quebec Nordiques when they drafted him and after sitting out a year, Quebec traded him to Philadelphia for a glut of picks, players and the rights to a Swedish Center named Peter Forsberg.  We can argue that Forsberg was the best player in the transaction.  Forsberg went on to help Colorado (Quebec relocated) win two Stanley Cups and individually he won the Hart and Art Ross Trophy in 2002/03. He was also a three-time First Team All-Star and he retired with 885 Points in only 708 Games.  Forsberg also played for Philadelphia and Nashville.

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2014.

 

The following are the players who have won the Calder Trophy who are eligible for the Hockey Hall of Fame and have not been selected:

Russ Blinco, Montreal Maroons, Center: 14 G, 9 A, 23 P, 4.1 PS 1934

Unless the Montreal Maroons are suddenly resurrected, Russ Blinco will be the only member of this long defunct franchise to win the Calder.  Blinco would help the Maroons win the Stanley Cup the following year, where he was also the runner-up for the Lady Byng.  He played for Montreal three more years, and had one more season with the Chicago Blackhawks before he retired.  Blinco had 125 Points over his six-year career.

Eligible since 1942.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Mike Karakas, Chicago Blackhawks, Goalie: 21-19-8 Record, 1.85 GAA, 9.5 GPS 1936  

Karakas made history as the first American born and raised to win the Calder, and he was also the first Goalie to win the award. For that matter, he was also the first American born and raised Goalie in the NHL.  Karakas would play until 1946, with all but five of his games played in a Chicago uniform.  He won a Stanley Cup in 1938.

Eligible since 1949.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Cully Dahlstrom, Chicago Blackhawks, Centre: 10 G, 9 A, 19 P, 1.3 PS 1938        

Dahlstrom made it back-to-back for American born Calder winners, and the Centre would play his entire eight-year career with the Blackhawks.  The Calder would be the only individual honor that Dahlstrom would win on the professional level, but his name was etched on the Stanley Cup when Chicago won it all in 1938.  Dahlstrom scored 206 Points in 345 career Games.

Eligible since 1948.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Kilby MacDonald, New York Rangers, Centre: 15 G, 13 A, 28 P, 3.8 PS 1938        

The sky might have seemed to be the limit for Kilby MacDonald, as he not only won the Calder Trophy, he also hoisted the Stanley Cup over his head in his rookie season.  That would not be the case for MacDonald, who never matched his rookie year, and was sent down to the minors shortly after before joining the Canadian Army. He made it back to the Rangers in 1943, playing two more years before going back to the minors.  MacDonald only had 79 career Points.

Eligible since 1948.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

John Quilty, Montreal Canadiens, Centre: 18 G, 16 A, 34 P, 3.9 PS 1941    

Quilty’s rookie year was by far his best, as he never came close to these numbers again.  World War II would see Quilty leave the NHL for the Canadian Army, and he missed several years, returning for three Games in 1946-47.  He played only one more year in the NHL, splitting time between Montreal and Boston, but he was not playing at an NHL worthy level. A compound fracture of his leg resulted in his retirement, and Quilty would only have 70 career Points.

Eligible since 1951.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Grant Warwick, New York Rangers, Right Wing: 16 G, 17 A, 33 P, 3.0 PS 1942     

Like the previous two Calder winners, Grant Warwick likely won’t get into the Hockey Hall of Fame, however unlike those two individuals, Warwick did not peak as a rookie.  The Saskatchewan native would not miss time due to World War II, and he exceeded his rookie Point total six times.  Warwick would also play for Boston and Montreal in his career, and in 1955, he was the player/coach on the Canadian Team that won the World Hockey Championship.  The Right Wing scored 289 career Points.

Eligible since 1953.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Gaye Stewart, Toronto Maple Leafs, Left Wing: 24 G, 23 A, 47 P, 4.0 PS 1943      

After Gaye Stewart won the Calder (and the Stanley Cup), he went into the Canadian Military to serve in World War II.  The Left Winger came back for the 1945/46 Season and promptly built on his rookie year as if he never left, leading the NHL in Goals (37) was a First Team All-Star, and was the runner-up for the Hart. Stewart’s production dipped the following year, but he helped Toronto win another Stanley Cup.  After a poor start in 1947/48 he was traded to Chicago and rebounded with a Second Team-All-Star nod, which was the last one he had.  He would later play for Detroit, New York and Montreal, and had 344 Points in his nine-year career.

Eligible since 1956.  Ranked #145 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Gus Bodnar, Toronto Maple Leafs, Centre: 22 G, 40 A, 62 P, 4.5 PS 1944    

Bodnar likely got an early opportunity to earn an NHL spot due to the World War II depletion of talent.  That might be why he never eclipsed his rookie totals, but he had a long 12-year career and won two Stanley Cup Rings (1945 & 1947) with the Toronto Maple Leafs.  Bodnar also played for Chicago and Boston, and he would accumulate 397 Points.

Eligible since 1958.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Frank McCool, Toronto Maple Leafs, Goalie: 24-22-4, 3.22 GAA, 10.1 GPS 1945   

There may never be another player who won the Calder Trophy who had a career as brief as Frank McCool.  Playing at Goalie, McCool was the third straight Maple Leaf to win the Calder, and this year he backstopped Toronto to a Stanley Cup win. He played only 22 Games the following year, only to retire abruptly due to severe ulcers.  We can’t imagine another Calder winner with only 72 Games Played in his career.

Eligible since 1949.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Howie Meeker, Toronto Maple Leafs, Right Wing: 27 G, 18 A, 45 P, 5.3 GPS: 1947        

Meeker was the fourth Maple Leaf in five years to win the Calder, and his 45 Point year turned out to be the best of his career. Meeker would win the Stanley Cup as a rookie, and twice again in 1948 and 1951.  Meeker would go onto greater fame as a broadcaster in Hockey night in Canada as an analyst for over twenty-five years.  He would score 185 Points over 346 Games.

Eligible since 1958.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Jim McFadden, Detroit Red Wings, Centre: 24 G, 24 A, 48 P, 5.7 GPS: 1948        

McFadden became the first Detroit Red Wing to win the Calder, and like so many before him, the Centre set personal bests in scoring (48) as a rookie.  McFadden won the Stanley Cup with Detroit in 1950, and he would also play for the Blackhawks.  His NHL career ended in 1954, and he would score 226 Points over seven seasons.

Eligible since 1957.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Pentti Lund, New York Rangers, Right Wing: 14 G, 16 A, 30 P, 2.6 PS: 1949         

Here is something you wouldn’t think was true. The first Scandinavian born player to win a major individual award took place before 1950.  Granted, that player was Finnish-born Pentti Lund, who immigrated to Canada as a six-year-old, so it doesn’t count for the most part, but he was the first nevertheless.  Lund never won another accolade in the NHL, and he lasted a total of five seasons, three with New York and two with Boston.  He would score 77 Points in his career.

Eligible since 1956.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Jack Gelineau, Boston Bruins, Goalie: 22-30-15, 3.28 GAA, 7.3 GPS: 1950  

Gelineau played four games for the Bruins in 1948/49 and took over as the top netminder for the Boston Bruins the following year, where despite the losing record, he had a good rookie year keeping the Bruins competitive.  Gelineau had an even better sophomore year, but when he sought a raise from Bruins ownership he was rebuffed.  Rather than stay in Boston, he returned to his native province of Quebec, where he played a few years in the provincial league for a few seasons, save for two games in 1954 with Chicago.

Eligible since 1956.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Camille Henry, New York Rangers, Centre: 24 G, 15 A, 39 P, 5.4 PS: 1954  

20 of Henry’s 24 Goals were on the power play, and it was enough to lead the NHL.  Henry struggled the next two seasons, and was demoted to the minors.  He returned to again lead the NHL in Power Play Goals twice, and in 1957/58 he was a Second Team All-Star and Lady Bing winner. Henry played most of his career with New York, finishing his professional run with Chicago and St. Louis. He would have 478 Points.

Eligible since 1973.  Ranked #201 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Ed Litzenberger, Montreal Canadiens and Chicago Blackhawks, Centre: 23 G, 28 A, 51 P, 5.8 PS: 1955   

It was a unique rookie year for Litzenberger, who began the year as a Montreal Canadian, but was donated early in the season to the Chicago Blackhawks in an effort to help save the team from folding. Litzenberger played 29 Games that year in Montreal, scoring 11 Points, but he went on to have 40 Points in 44 Games to conclude the season in Chicago.  Litzenberger went on to have three 60-plus years with the Blackhawks, and would win four Stanley Cups; one with Chicago and three with the Toronto Maple Leafs.  He retired with 416 career Points.

Eligible since 1967.  Ranked #190 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Ralph Backstrom, Montreal Canadiens, Centre: 18 G, 22 A, 40 P, 3.8 PS: 1959    

In Backstrom’s Calder Trophy winning year with the Montreal Canadiens, he was a member of the Stanley Cup Championship Team. Providing good two-way hockey for years, Backstrom won five more Cup with the Habs.  He would later play for Los Angeles and Chicago, before moving to the WHA with stints with Chicago, Denver, Ottawa and New England. Backstrom had 639 NHL Points and 253 WHA Points. 

Eligible since 1980.  Ranked #33 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Bobby Rousseau, Montreal Canadiens, Right Wing: 21 G, 24 A, 45 P, 4.5 PS: 1962        

In his rookie year, Bobby Rousseau had four Short-Handed Goals, which was enough to lead the NHL.  Rousseau did not do that again, but he found a niche in the powerful Montreal Canadiens team that won four Stanley Cups in the 1960s. During his stint in Montreal, Rousseau was a Second Team All-Star and league-leader in Assists in 1965/66. When the decade ended, Rousseau was a Minnesota North Star for one season and a New York Ranger for four before retiring in 1975.  Bobby Rousseau Rousseau scored 703 Points over a 942-Game career.

Eligible since 1978.  Ranked #158 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Kent Douglas, Toronto Maple Leafs, Defenseman: 7 G, 15 A, 22 P, 6.6 PS: 1963   

It took 30 years for the Calder Trophy to be awarded to a Defenseman, and again it went to a Toronto Maple Leaf.  A relatively late arrival to the NHL (he was 26), Douglas led the NHL in Defensive Point Shares as a rookie (5.1), but it would be the only time he would do so.  Douglas won the Stanley Cup as a rookie, and technically did two more times, but he was not on those post-season rosters, which reflects that his best season was as a rookie.  He would also play for Oakland, Detroit and the New York Raiders of the WHA.  

Eligible since 1976.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com

Roger Crozier, Detroit Red Wings, Goalie: 40-22-7 Record, 2.42 GAA, 14.4 PS: 1965     

Roger Crozier did not just win the Calder, as he was a First Team All-Star, and the NHL leader in Wins (40), Shutouts (6) and Goalie Point Shares (14.4).  The Red Wings Goalie would take the Red Wings to the Stanley Cup Finals the next season against the heavily favored Montreal Canadiens.  Montreal won, but Crozier was spectacular and he became the first Conn Smythe winner on a losing team.  Crozier’s career went downhill after, but he played until 1977 with stints in Buffalo and Washington.  He had a career record of 206-194-72.

Eligible since 1980.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com

Brit Selby, Toronto Maple Leafs, Left Wing: 14 G, 13 A, 27 P, 2.0 PS: 1966

While there were many Calder winners who had much shorter careers than Brit Selby, it is hard to argue that he was the worst player to win the award.  With only 2.0 Point Shares in his Calder year (nearly half of his career 4.3), Selby was sent back to the minors and was not a member of the Leafs 1967 Stanley Cup win. The next year, he was a member of the expansion Philadelphia Flyers, and he would later play again for Toronto, St. Louis and the WHA’s Quebec Nordiques, New England Whalers and Toronto Toros.  He would have 117 career NHL Points and 74 Points in the WHA.

Eligible since 1978.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com

Derek Sanderson, Boston Bruins, Centre: 24 G, 25 A, 49 P, 4.8 PS: 1968     

After his good Calder year, Sanderson would have a long career (mostly with the Boston Bruins), and while he was a good player, the tough guy’s good looks and fame were much higher than his on-ice skill. He would help Boston win two Stanley Cups.  His hard-partying lifestyle held his career back, but he did score 452 Points in a career that also saw Sanderson play for the New York Rangers, St. Louis, Vancouver and Pittsburgh.  

Eligible since 1981.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Danny Grant, Minnesota North Stars, Left Wing: 34 G, 31 A, 65 P, 5.6 PS: 1969   

Grant played 22 Games the year before with Montreal, where he was a member of the Canadiens’ Stanley Cup Championship Team. He did not exceed rookie limits, thus was able for the Calder in 1969, though he was now a Minnesota North Star, as the Hans had traded him.  With this Calder win, Grant was the first Calder winner from an Expansion Team. Grant would go on to play in three All-Star Games, scoring 536 Points in a career that also extended to Detroit and Los Angeles.  

Eligible since 1982.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Steve Vickers, New York Rangers, Left Wing: 30 G, 23 A, 53 P, 5.9 PS: 1973        

Vickers played his entire NHL career with the New York Rangers, and had at least 30 Goals in his first four seasons.  Two seasons after his Calder Trophy win, Vickers was a Second Team All-Star, and would score 586 career Points over a ten-year career.  

Eligible since 1985.  Ranked #247 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Eric Vail, Atlanta Flames, Left Wing: 39 G, 21 A, 60 P, 6.1 PS: 1975   

In between the Calder wins of Hall of Famers, Denis Potvin and Bryan Trottier was Eric Vail, the first of two Calder winners when the Flames were located in Atlanta.  Vail had a decent career with three 60-plus Point years in his career that generated 476 Points.    

Eligible since 1985.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Willi Plett, Atlanta Flames, Right Wing: 33 G, 23 A, 66 P, 4.8 PS: 1977       

Plett became the second Atlanta Flame, and also the second Flame to earn the Calder in between future Islanders Hall of Famers (Trottier and Mike Bossy).  While Plett went on to score a respectable 437 Points in the NHL, he would be known more for his pugilistic skills, amassing 2,570 Penalty Minutes.    

Eligible since 1991.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Bobby Smith, Minnesota North Stars, Centre: 30 G, 44 A, 74 P, 5.0 PS: 1979       

A four-time All-Star, Smith had a good career, peaking with a 114-Point year in 1981-82.  The Centre had nine 70-plus years and would have a Stanley Cup win with the Montreal Canadiens in 1996.  Smith had 1,036 career Points in 1,077 Games.    

Eligible since 1985.  Ranked #31 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Steve Larmer, Chicago Blackhawks, Right Wing: 43 G, 47 A, 90 P, 8.4 PS: 1983   

Larmer was with Chicago for all but his last two seasons, and the Right Wing would tie or exceed his 90 Point rookie year total tice more and from 1982/83 to 1992/93 he would also have at least 70 Points. Larmer accumulated 1,012 Points.

Eligible since 1998.  Ranked #32 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Tom Barrasso, Buffalo Sabres, Goalie: 26-12-3 Record, 7.5 PS: 1984   

Barrasso had a phenomenal rookie campaign where he not only won the Calder, he was a Vezina winner and First Team All-Star. The American Goalie was a Second Team All-Star and a William M. Jennings winner in his second season, and he was only 20!   Barrasso had a long career afterward, though he was never again won a Vezina. Barrasso would win two Stanley Cups with Pittsburgh, and he was also a Second Team All-Star there.  The Goalie also played for Ottawa, Carolina, Toronto and St. Louis and he had a career record of 369-277-86.   

Eligible since 2006.  Ranked #18 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Gary Suter, Calgary Flames, Defense: 18 G, 50 A, 68 P, 8.0 PS: 1986  

Gary Suter was the first of two Calgary Flames to win the Calder in the 1980s (the other being Joe Nieuwendyk) and he was the first American blueliner to win the trophy.  Suter helped Calgary win the Stanley Cup in 1989, and the year before he was a Second Team All-Star.  Suter also played with Chicago and San Jose, and he would have 844 Points over his 17 NHL seasons.

Eligible since 2005.  Ranked #35 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Daniel Alfredsson, Ottawa Senators, Right Wing: 26 G, 35 A, 61 P, 5.3 PS: 1996  

Daniel Alfredsson was the first Calder winner for the Ottawa Senators, and is safe to say that he was the best player in the team’s resurrection.  Alfredsson was a Second Team All-Star in 2005/06, and he would also win the King Clancy and Mark Messier Leadership Award.  With the exception of his final season in Detroit, Alfredsson was a career Senator and he scored 1,157 Points in his career.

Eligible since 2017.  Ranked #5 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Bryan Berard, New York Islanders, Defense: 8 G, 40 A, 48 P, 7.6 PS: 1997   

Berard played ten years in the NHL, which was incredible considering he almost lost an eye early in his career.  That injury occurred early in his career, and impeded what could have been a great career.  Still, the Defenseman had 323 career Points and won the Bill Masterton Award in 2004.

Eligible since 2011.   Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Sergei Samsonov, Boston Bruins, Left Wing: 22 G, 25 A, 47 P, 5.5 PS: 1998         

From Moscow, Samsonov never ascended to superstar status, but this was a really good player for a long time.  The Left Wing played for Boston, Edmonton, Montreal. Chicago, Carolina and Florida and scored a respectable 571 career Points.

Eligible since 2014.  Ranked #282 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Chris Drury, Colorado Avalanche, Centre: 20 G, 24 A, 44 P, 5.0 PS: 1999    

Two years after he won the Calder, Drury helped the Avalanche win their second NBA Title.  Drury was a good two-way player, and he also played for Buffalo and the New York Rangers over a 615-Point career.

Eligible since 2014.  Ranked #296 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Scott Gomez, New Jersey Devils, Centre: 19 G, 51 A, 70 P, 7.3 PS: 2000     

Gomez would win the Stanley Cup as a rookie, and again in 2003, both of which with the New Jersey Devils.  The Alaskan would also play for the Rangers, Montreal, San Jose, Florida, St. Louis and Ottawa with 655 career Points.

Eligible since 2019.  Ranked #249 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Evegeni Nabokov, San Jose Sharks, Goalie: 32-21-7 Record, 11.7 PS: 2001

Nabokov became the first San Jose Shark and the first Russian Goalie to win the Calder.  Nabokov was a First Team All-Star in 2008, and would have a career record of 353-227-86 in a career mostly with San Jose.

Eligible since 2018.  Ranked #122 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Dany Heatley, Atlanta Thrashers, Right Wing: 26 G, 41 A, 67 P, 6.8 PS: 2002      

Heatley will go down in history as the only Atlanta Thrasher to win the Calder.  He was the driver in an accident that killed his teammate, and needing a change of scenery, he was traded to the Ottawa Senators where he a one-time First Team and Second Team All-Star.  Heatley also played for San Jose, Minnesota and Anaheim and had 791 Points.

Eligible since 2018.  Ranked #108 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Barrett Jackman, St. Louis Blues, Defense: 3 G, 16 A, 19 P, 5.4 PS: 2003    

The Calder Trophy would be the only award that Jackman would win, or even receive a vote for, but this was stay-at-home defenseman who knew his role and did it well.  The Defenseman played 13 years with the Blues, and one final one with Nashville.

Eligible since 2019.  Unrankedon Notinhalloffame.com.

Andrew Raycroft, Boston Bruins, Goalie: 29-18-9 Record, 2.05 GAA, 12.6 PS: 2004      

This was the best season of Raycroft’s career, and he only ever had one good year again, which was when he was with Toronto. Raycroft also played for Colorado, Vancouver and Dallas, and had a record of 113-114-27 upon retirement.

Eligible since 2015.  Unrankedon Notinhalloffame.com.

Let’s update our tally, shall we?        

Award in Question

Percentage of recipients who have entered the HOF

Percentage of recipients by year who have entered the HOF.

NBA MVP

100%

100%

NHL Art Ross

100%

100%

NBA Finals MVP

91.3%

94.9%

NHL Norris

90.5%

96.4%

NBA All-Star Game MVP

89.5%

91.7%

NHL Conn Smythe

74.2%

85.4%

NFL Bert Bell Award

73.7%

71.4%

NFL AP Offensive Player of the Year

73.1%

79.4%

NFL AP MVP

68.3%

74.0%

NFL Walter Payton Man of the Year

66.7%

66.7%

NHL Lady Byng

63.8%

76.0%

NFL Defensive Player of the Year

60.8%

71.1%

NFL Super Bowl MVP

60.6%

64.9%

NBA Defensive Player of the Year

58.3%

56.5%

NHL Vezina

57.1%

66.3%

NBA Rookie of the Year

56.5%

56.5%

MLB MVP

55.0%

60.2%

NFL Pro Bowl MVP

52.3%

54.8%

MLB Lou Gehrig Award

51.9%

51.9%

MLB Roberto Clemente Award

47.4%

47.4%

NHL Calder Trophy

46.5%

46.5%

NBA J. Walter Kennedy Citizenship Award

46.0%

46.0%

MLB/NL/AL Cy Young Award

44.4%

55.4%

MLB Babe Ruth Award

37.0%

39.3%

NHL King Clancy Award

36.8%

36.8%

NHL Frank J. Selke Trophy

33.3%

36.7%

MLB World Series MVP

33.3%

36.8%

MLB Hutch Award

33.1%

33.1%

NFL Offensive Rookie of the Year

28.6%

28.6%

NHL Bill Masterton Memorial Trophy

27.9%

27.9%

MLB Edgar Martinez Award

26.7%

17.2%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Designated Hitter)

25.0%

30.8%

MLB Comeback Player of the Year

25.0%

25.0%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Shortstop)

23.5%

52.6%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove

21.7%

36.8%

NFL Defensive Rookie of the Year

20.6%

20.6%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Catcher)

20.0%

22.5%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Second Base)

18.8%

39.8%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Shortstop)

18.2%

35.1%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Pitcher)

18.2%

20.1%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Second Base)

16.7%

32.7%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Outfield)

16.7%

30.1%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Outfield)

15.7%

25.2%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Third Base)

14.3%

14.3%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Third Base)

13.6%

14.3%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (First Base)

13.6%

13.3%

MLB (NL/AL) Rookie of the Year

13.3%

13.3%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Catcher)

10.3%

15.2%

NBA Most Improved Player of the Year

5.3%

3.2%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (First Base)

3.8%

3.2%

NFL AP Comeback Player of the Year

0.0%

0.0%

So, who is up next?

The following are the players who have won the Calder Trophy in the NHL who have retired but have not met the mandatory years out of the game to qualify for the Hockey Hall of Fame:

Steve Mason, Columbus Blue Jackets, 33-20-7 Record, 2.29 GAA, 11.2 GPS, 2009

In his rookie season, Mason was a Second Team All-Star, was the runner-up for the Vezina and was fourth in Hart voting. Mason never replicated that year, but did have a ten-year run where he also played for Philadelphia and Winnipeg. He retired with a career record of 205-183-64.

Eligible in 2021.

The following are the players who have won the Calder Trophy who are still active.

Alex Ovechkin, Washington Capitals, Centre: 52 G, 54 A, 106 P, 12.7 PS 2006

The Russian is easily the best European star of his generation and he was a First Team All-Star as a rookie.  Since that time, he has been a First Team All-Star five times and won the Hart three times.  The future Hall of Famer took the Capitals to their first Stanley Cup in 2018.

34 Years Old,Playing for the Washington Capitals.

Evgeni Malkin, Pittsburgh Penguins, Centre: 52 G, 54 A, 106 P, 12.7 PS 2007

Malkin was the second Russian Centre to win the Calder in a row, and how fitting is that Malkin played for Pittsburgh, a rival of Alex Ovechkin’s Washington Capitals.  Since his Calder win, Malkin has won three Stanley Cups, a Hart and two Art Ross Trophies.  He is already a member of the 1,000 Point club.

33 Years Old,Playing for the Pittsburgh Penguins.

Patrick Kane, Chicago Blackhawks, Right Wing: 21 G, 51 A, 72 P, 7.2 PS, 2008

Since his Calder win, Kane won the Hart Trophy and led Chicago to three Stanley Cups.  Kane is already a member of the 1,000 Point Club, has three First Team All-Stars, and an Art Ross Trophy on his mantle.

32 Years Old,Playing for the Chicago Blackhawks.

Tyler Myers, Buffalo Sabres, Defense: 11 G, 37 A, 48 P, 9.8 PS, 2010

After that good rookie year, Myers has yet to replicate that success and his 48 Points and 9.8 Point Shares remain career-highs.

30 Years Old,Playing for the Vancouver Canucks.

Jeff Skinner, Carolina Hurricanes, Left Wing: 31 G, 32 A, 63 P, 8.1 PS, 2011

Jeff Skinner has matched his rookie output of 63 Points twice but has yet to exceed it.

28 Years Old,Playing for the Buffalo Sabres.

Gabriel Landeskog, Colorado Avalanche, Left Wing: 22 G, 30 A, 52 P, 6.8 PS, 2012

Gabriel Landeskog has had a good career thus far that has been spent entirely with the Avalanche.  He has had six 50-plus Point years, but nothing higher than 75 Points.

28 Years Old,Playing for the Colorado Avalanche.

Jonathan Huberdeau, Florida Panthers, Center: 14 G, 17 A, 31 P, 3.3 PS, 2013

Jonathan Huberdeau is the first Panther to win the Calder and he was an All-Star in 2020.

27 Years Old,Playing for the Florida Panthers.

Nathan MacKinnon, Colorado Avalanche, Center: 24 G, 39 A, 63 P, 7.7 PS, 2014

Since his Calder season, MacKinnon went on a current three-year 90-Point streak.  He was an All-Star in 2002, and was the runner-up for the Hart in 2018.

25 Years Old,Playing for the Colorado Avalanche.

Aaron Ekblad, Florida Panthers, Defense: 12 G, 27 A, 39 P, 8.5 PS, 2015

Aaron Ekblad became the second Florida Panther in three seasons to win the Calder.  He has participated in two All-Star Games since.

24 Years Old,Playing for the Florida Panthers.

Artemi Panerin, Chicago Blackhawks, Left Wing: 30 G, 47 A, 77 P, 9.8 PS, 2016

Following his rookie year, Panerin was a Second Team All-Star and is coming off of a 95 Point season in his first year in New York.

29 Years Old,Playing for the New York Rangers.

Auston Matthews, Toronto Maple Leafs, Center: 40 G, 29 A, 69 P, 9.7 PS, 2017

In Matthews’ rookie year, his 32 Even-Strength Goals led the NHL. He would do so again with 35 in 2019-20.

22 Years Old,Playing for the Toronto Maple Leafs.

Matthew Barzal, New York Islanders, Center: 22 G, 63 A, 85 P, 8.2 PS, 2018

Barzal’s Calder Trophy winning season is to date his best in his young NHL career.

23 Years Old,Playing for the New York Islanders.

Elias Pettersson, Vancouver Canucks, Center: 28 G, 38 A, 66 P, 7.8 PS, 2019

Pettersson has been with the Canucks for two seasons and played in the All-Star Game in both years.

22 Years Old,Playing for the Vancouver Canucks.

Doesn’t it feel like the Calder means more than other league Rookies of the Year?

For the most part, winning the Calder reflects a great player, especially in the second half of this awards existence.

So, what is up next?

We stay with the NHL and look at the most important individual award in the NHL. The Hart Trophy.

As always, we thank you for your support, and look for that soon.

One of the greatest entertainment aspects that the majority of people enjoy is definitely the sports segment. This broad aspect of sports consist of different kinds of segments that are suited for various people, so no matter your particular interest you will be sure to find something you enjoy in the sports hall of fame. This rather interesting term refers to the latest news that is happening in this particular world where you, as a viewer and a fan, would have the chance to explore and enjoy your free time. 

Sports have been around for ages now this indicates that their impact is often a subject of discussion as many people are trying to understand how it actually influences our everyday life. There have been so many interesting approaches over the years that are trying to explain this major influence, so in order to make things easier for you, we have created this article with the sole purpose of helping you understand the importance of the sports influence. So, continue reading to find out more regarding this subject.

The Offseason Entertainment Opportunities

If you are familiar with the statement that sport is more than just a hobby for many people that are not professional players you might get confused. This is the case just because their passion for this activity translates onto their everyday lives making them look for ways to spend their offseason period. 

No matter what sport you like to watch, there is a time in the season where all of the sports activities take a break. This period is commonly known as the offseason. Here you are facing a lack of your favourite activity so you searching for ways to incorporate the fun and excitement that watching your favourite team play. As one of the most popular segments when it comes to these offseason entertainment opportunities is playing online casino games. If you visit casino.netbet.com you will find a number of sports-related games that perfectly depict your favourite sport giving you the chance to place your bet and enjoy a round of entertainment. 

This is just one of the most recent forms of entertainment where you can clearly see the sports influence, especially in the break period. This way people are still getting a chance to enjoy their favourite activity but from a new and exciting perspective.  

Helping You Build Community Relations

There is nothing more exciting than finding people that share the same passion for a particular sport the same amount as you. The sports influence is really changing the way people connect and form relations based on the things that they enjoy doing in their free time. Oftentimes, various sports teams and leagues form communities where sports enthusiasts can share their love and support for the team they root for. 

The age of technology is offering you easier access to the latest sports news where you will get a chance to look into every single detail of the greatest achievements of football players that deserve a place in the hall of fame. These rankings often establish the basis of a particular community where sports enthusiasts can exchange their passion and knowledge. 

The Bottom Line

Seeing how the entertainment world is changing and how people are forming their relationships is a fascinating thing. When you look at the sports industry you can see that this activity, in particular, has become a regular part of people’s everyday lives and will continue to hold its steady place in the years to come. Keeping all of this in mind, you can actually create a unique entertainment approach that will correspond with all of your specific entertainment preferences and at the same time will help you enjoy your favourite sport from a new and exciting perspective. This only implies that you, as the viewer have a lot more chances to be a part of your favourite sport. 

Albert Pujols: A big contract bringing clipping the Angels’ wings

Alberto Pujols is still playing baseball? That question may have crossed your mind when it was announced the current Los Angeles Angels first baseman had passed Alex Rodriguez on Major League Baseball’s all-time RBI list this week. Pujols knocked in his 2,087thRBI on August 24thand is now trailing Hank Aaron as the all-time Major League Baseball leader. Sports fans are enjoying a large amount of sports available currently from baseball to horse racing. The biggest horse race in the world will take place on September 5that Churchill Downs and fans can watch a Kentucky Derby live stream to follow all of the action on race day. 

Now, 40-years-old, Pujols’ standing as one of the greatest in Major League Baseball history doesn’t seem to be as firm as it was years ago. Pujols has spent the last eight and a half seasons playing for the Angels. So, if you forgot he was even in the league at this point, you can be forgiven. 

Pujols’ 2020 season has been rather forgettable. His RBI on Monday night to pull him closer to Aaron was a milestone but there was little to actually celebrate. The Angels are 10-22 as of this writing and 12.0 games out of first place in the AL West. For all the talk of the greatness of Pujols and Mike Trot, they sure have done little to get the Angels into American League West winning position. Of course, baseball takes more than just two players, but Pujols’ stats show a player limping toward retirement and hanging on for too long.

The first baseman is hitting .215 with an OBP of .253, and slugging percentage of .367 as of August 27th. He has hit just three home runs and knocked in 12 RBI in 79 at bats. The once great hitting machine is a shell of his former self. 

Since arriving in Los Angeles in 2012, Pujols has regularly failed to get the Angels into the playoffs. Just one time have the club made the postseason following Pujols’ big money move from St. Louis. In pure poor money management, the Angels rewarded Pujols for what he did with the Cardinals and not what he could do in the future. 

The club signed him to a 10-year contract in 2012 for a $240 million. According to Spotrac, Pujols was due $29m this season alone. In 2012, signing Pujols for 10 years may have sounded like a great deal. He was 32 and coming off of winning the World Series with the Cardinals. He was also a three-time MVP. 

Pujols’ batting average has never risen over .300 for a full season in Los Angeles. Three times his OBP has dipped below .300, including this season. Other than in the 2015 season, Pujols hasn’t shown the power of his time in St. Louis. The 2015 campaign witnessed Pujols hitting 40 home runs. He hit 40 or more homers six times for the Cardinals. Just once has he done it in Los Angeles.

The last eight and a half seasons in Los Angeles have been well paid for Pujols. But with the Angels making the playoffs just once in that time, Pujols is now just a huge contract around the club’s neck. That deal won’t end until after the 2021 season. Pujols will earns $30m next season.

What is America’s most-watched sport? Rightly said, it is Football. Football represents an amazing display of stamina and strength, exquisite finesse, excellent team spirit, and dramatic finishes. You can never speculate when an underdog can defeat a favorite giant on any given Sunday. Every football match pumps up the adrenaline like never before. That’s the beauty of America’s most popular sport.

No doubt, football has been chosen as the subject of many Hollywood movies. All the drama and glory of the field are precisely presented in each feature film based on football. You can feel the excitement and rush of adrenaline, often further heightened by betting odds offered on these matches at some of the best betting sites UK and other countries’ sportsbooks. Today we list the top 5 football-themed movies that Americans have even witnessed.

Any Given Sunday (1999)

Director- Oliver Stone

Writers- John Logan (screenplay), Daniel Pyne (story)

Stars- Al Pacino, Cameron Diaz, Dennis Quaid

IMDbrating– 6.9/10

The Oliver Stone football classic is one of the best sports films ever. It shows the behind-the-scenes stories of the legends on the field and those who manage them. The movie shows plenty of NPL legends and some great football actions.

Varsity Blues (1999)

Director- Brian Robbins

Writers- W. Peter Iliff

Stars- James Van Der Beek, Paul Walker, Jon Voight

IMDb rating– 6.5/10

Jonathan Moxon, played by James Van Der Beek, is a reserve quarterback who takes the field to keep up with the wishes of his football-crazy father. But when the star quarterback gets injured, he steps up and leads the team towards victory.

Wildcats (1986)

Director- Michael Ritchie

Writers- Ezra Sacks

Stars- Goldie Hawn, Robyn Lively, Swoosie Kurtz

IMDb rating– 6.0/10

This movie features Goldie Hawn as a high school rookie football coach who dreams of coaching a football team. She applies to coach an inner-city team and gets the job. The movie is about her challenges is coaching this team and taking to the championship finals.

North Dallas Forty (1979)

Director- Ted Kotcheff

Writers- Frank Yablans (screenplay), Peter Gent (story)

Stars- Nick Nolte, Mac Davis, Charles Durning

IMDbrating– 7.0/10

Nick Nolte plays the protagonist's role here (Peter Gent), a former American football player in Dallas. The movie is semi-fictional, and the team in the movie – North Dallas Bulls holds a lot of similarity to the Dallas Football club. The famous club was a bit disappointed since the movie showcased pain killers' use in a positive light.

Remember The Titans (2000)

Director- Boaz Yakin

Writers- Gregory Allen Howard

Stars- Denzel Washington, Wood Harris, Will Patton

IMDbrating– 7.8/10

The movie is about a young team and their newly appointed coach who overcomes racial boundaries and play as one unit based on true events. Denzel Washington plays the role of the coach (Herman Boone). This movie is one of the best performances of Denzel Washington and even terming it as a classic might seem to be an understatement.

A Guide for Sports Fans: How to Keep Yourself Entertained During the Offseason

No matter what sport you enjoy watching, there will come a time at least once a year when it enters its offseason period. All sports need this break in their schedule, simply because it provides the athletes with a chance to rest their bodies, improve their performance, and ultimately prolong their careers.

Offseason might be necessary, but it’s still incredibly boring! If you want to keep yourself entertained when your favorite sport enters its annual break, you’re going to have to put the advice laid out below into practice.

Find another sport to follow

Different sports are suited to different conditions and seasons — baseball, for example, is played during the summertime, whereas basketball is played throughout the winter — which means that you have the opportunity to indulge in sporting action all year round. 

Following another sport might feel sacrilegious at first, but, if nothing else, it’ll provide you with the sporting rush you need to keep yourself entertained throughout the long, arduous months of your offseason. You never know, you might end up enjoying your new sport enough to follow it even once your favorite sport starts up again.

Pick up a new pastime

You might not have the luxury of being able to watch your favorite sporting action for the time being, but that doesn’t mean you have to mope around every weekend. There are always going to be new, fun and exciting pastimes out there for you to pick up. You just have to be willing to try something a bit different.

If you’re determined to recreate the thrill of the sporting action that you enjoy, you should seriously consider picking up poker as your pastime of choice. The excitement that you experience as you take risks, formulate strategies, and place your bets will be akin to the sensation that you feel when you watch your favorite sports team take to the field. 

Should you decide to pick up poker as your offseason pastime of choice, be sure to check out the poker strategies provided by Unibet. If you heed their advice, you’ll be sure to become an expert player in no time.

Start watching a TV show about your favorite sport

Regardless of what sport you are passionate about, chances are there has been a TV show made about it at some point in the past. Whether based on fact or purely fictional, these sorts of shows are perfect to binge on when there’s no real sporting action to watch on the weekend. If nothing else, the roar of the make-believe crowd will trick you into thinking that you are actually watching live sporting action take place.

Here are just a few of the different sports-related shows that you can watch:

  • Ballers, Friday Night Lights, Blue Mountain State— American Football
  • The White Shadow, Hangin' With Mr. Cooper, Inside the NBA— Basketball
  • The League, Back in the Game, Eastbound and Down— Baseball

The offseason might be an incredibly boring time, but it’s necessary. If you want to keep yourself entertained while you wait for your favorite sport to start up again, be sure to heed the above advice.

Top Films Based on Video Games

The film industry has undergone many transformations over the past few decades. Video game films started gaining popularity in 1993 after Hollywood produced a film that was based on Super Mario Bros. Video game sales reached US$30.4 billion in 2016, according to the Entertainment Software Association. Hollywood has been trying to adapt renowned video games into movies to increase its sales. The following are the eight top films based on video games.

1.   Double Dragon (1994)

Double Dragon is a unique video game adaptation whose budget resembled that of a blockbuster. The film is entertaining and fun to watch. You will feel the crew and cast as they make their contribution in the movie.

2.   Mortal Kombat (1995)

Gamers who like playing arcade games enjoy watching Mortal Kombat. It has the sensibility of Mortal Kombat games. Christopher Lambert and other actors make the film interesting to watch. It entails heavy-metal battles.

3.   Computer Chess (2013)

Some movie enthusiasts claim that Computer Chess isn't a video game film. It is more entertaining than many triple-A video games. The film is suitable for chess lovers. It entails computers that are playing chess with one another. The chess programming competition in Computer Chess resembles the Super Showball gameplay found in many online casinos. Those who take part in the tournament go to a hotel and gradually increase their experience in chess. Computer Chess is intelligent and touching.

4.   Doom (2005)

Doom was one of The Rock's first films to act before he became an action star. The film has a great visual aesthetic and has a first-person shooter sequence at the end. Characters in Doom are one-dimensional and it has a ridiculous plot.

5.   Final Fantasy VII Advent Children (Nomura/Nozue, 2005)

The film is entertaining and it has great visuals. But, its characters and narrative might confuse you in certain scenes. Final Fantasy VII is a real reflection of the Final Fantasy VII video game.

6.   Silent Hill (2006)

Christophe Gans directed Silent Hill. It features Radha Mitchell, Alice Krige, Laurie Holden, and Sean Bean. The film is atmospheric and scary. It is suitable to watch at night. Besides Silent Hill, Christophe also directed the Brotherhood Of The Wolf.

7.   Resident Evil:Retribution (2012)

The Resident Evil series has made millions of sales since the early 2000s. Resident Evil:Retribution features Milla Jovovich with a tight leather outfit. She punches, shoots and kicks as she passes through undead humanity. Retribution is more exciting than Afterlife and Extinction.

8.   Tomb Raider (2018)

Roar Uthaug directed Tomb Raider while Alastair Siddons and Geneva Robertson-Dworet developed its screenplay. Warner Bros. Studios shot the film in Cape Town, South Africa, and Hertfordshire, England in 2017. The movie is based on the Tomb Raider video game. Alicia Vikander acts as Lara Croft and goes on a risky journey to the last-known destination of her father. Many movie fans praised Tomb Raider for its action sequences, grittiness, and tone.

There are different types of films such as action, comedy, horror, sports, romance, and video game films. Double Dragon, Mortal Kombat, Computer Chess, Doom, Final Fantasy VII Advent Children, Silent Hill, Resident Evil:Retribution, and Tomb Raider are the best video game movies. They are charismatic and fascinating. Also, people of all ages can watch these films.

If you ask any basketball fan who their favourite player is then chances are that 9 out of 10 times the name you'd hear is Michael Jordan. Michael Jordan is undoubtedly one of the greatest in the world of basketball. He was responsible for the sudden growth in popularity of the NBA back in the 1980s. His incredibly flamboyant style of playing and his high jumps found him titles like Air Jordan and His Airness, names that have stuck to this day. Between him and Scottie Pippen, they turned around the fortunes of the Chicago Bulls making the team one of the greatest of that era.

The Chicago Bulls won six championship titles with Michael Jordan which pretty much made him one of the most bettable sportsmen of the time. Sports betting back in those days was very different from what it is now. These days, one can go online and even bet on virtual sports like this article describes If Michael Jordan were playing today, he would most definitely be one of the most bankable players. His sheer talent and skill is also the reason why he was so popular. In fact here are a few reasons for his popularity and his dependability.

He can act

Sure, Michael Jordan can play basketball but can he act? Yes, he can! Michael Jordan made his debut in Hollywood in a most bizarre movie called Space Jam where he acted opposite not human beings but cartoon characters. His co-stars were the iconic Daffy Duck and Bugs Bunny from Looney Tunes. The story is about a bunch of aliens coming down to earth to enslave these characters as well as steal some basketball talent from the guys at NBA. Michael Jordan manages to come to the rescue as he always does. 

He can play even with the flu

Most people would be in bed, sipping hot soup and resting when they get the flu but not Michael Jordan. He gets up and plays basketball. The match between Chicago Bulls and Utah Jazz featuring a flu-ridden Michael Jordan is one for the history books because he leads the team to a crazy 90-88 win before finally collapsing in a heap. 

The Last Shot

Michael Jordan's last match was in 1998 before retirement. The Chicago Bulls were playing against Utah Jazz. Michael Jordan dribbled his way through Bryon Russell and then gently pushed him and stole an opportunity to win a point. This won him his final title and the match has gone down in history as one of the greatest ever. No wonder then that the shoes he wore during that match fetched thousands of dollars at a recent auction. 

These are just some of the high points of MJ's career that made him one of the most dependable sportsmen ever. It was so difficult to keep him out of the game that he even returned to the court at the age of 40 and managed to score 43 points against New Jersey Nets. 

We here at Notinhalloffame.com thought it would be fun to take a look at the major awards in North American team sports and see how it translates into Hall of Fame potential.

Needless to say, different awards in different sports yield hall of fame potential.  In basketball, the team sport with the least number of players on a roster, the dividend for greatness much higher.  In baseball, it is not as much as a great individual season does not have the same impact.

Last time, we looked at the J. Walter Kennedy Citizenship Award of the NBA.  This time we look at its Football counterpart, the Walter Payton Man of the Year.

The Walter Payton Man of the Year Award originated in 1970, and is given to the player honoring a player’s volunteer and charity work.  It was originally named the Man of the Year, and it was renamed in the honor of former winner and Pro Football Hall of Famer, Walter Payton, after he died in 1999.

While this is generally given to star players, we will not dissect the season in question as the award is not meant to be defined by stat lines and on field accomplishments.  

So how many Walter Payton Man of the Year Award winners have made the Pro Football Hall of Fame?

Let’s find out!

The following are the past players who have won the Walter Payton Man of the Year Award who are eligible for the Pro Football Hall of Fame and have been enshrined.

Johnny Unitas, Baltimore Colts 1970                            

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1979.

Willie Lanier, Kansas City Chiefs 1972                           

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1986.

Len Dawson, Kansas City Chiefs 1973                            

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1987.

George Blanda, Oakland Raiders 1974                            

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1981.

Franco Harris, Pittsburgh Steelers 1976                        

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1980.

Walter Payton, Chicago Bears 1977                                

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1993.

Roger Staubach, Dallas Cowboys 1978                           

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1985.

Joe Greene, Pittsburgh Steelers 1979                            

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1987.

Harold Carmichael, Philadelphia Eagles 1980                

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2020.

Lynn Swann, Pittsburgh Steelers 1980                           

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2001.

Dwight Stephenson, Miami Dolphins 1985                     

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1988.

Steve Largent, Seattle Seahawks 1988                           

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1985.

Warren Moon, Houston Oilers 1989                                

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2000.

Mike Singletary, Chicago Bears 1990                             

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1998.

Anthony Munoz, Cincinnati Bengals 1991                     

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1998.

John Elway, Denver Broncos 1992                                 

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2004.

Derrick Thomas, Kansas City Chiefs 1993                     

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2009.

Junior Seau, San Diego Chargers 1994                           

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2015.

Darrell Green, Washington Redskins 1996                     

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2008.

Troy Aikman, Dallas Cowboys 1997                               

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2006.

Dan Marino, Miami Dolphins 1998                                 

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2005.

Cris Carter, Minnesota Vikings 1999                              

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2013.

Derrick Brooks, Tampa Bay Buccaneers 2000 (co-winner)

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2014.

Jerome Bettis, Pittsburgh Steelers 2001                        

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2015.

Peyton Manning, Indianapolis Colts 2005                      

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2021.

LaDainian Tomlinson, San Diego Chargers 2007            

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2017.

Jason Taylor, Miami Dolphins 2008                               

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2017.

Kurt Warner, Arizona Cardinals 2009                             

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2017.

The following are the players who have won the Walter Payton Man of the Year Award who are eligible for the Pro Football Hall of Fame and have not been selected:

John Hadl, San Diego Chargers 1971                             

Eligible Since 1983.  Ranked #103 on Notinhalloffame.com

Ken Anderson, Cincinnati Bengals 1975                        

Eligible Since 1992.  Ranked #10 on Notinhalloffame.com

Joe Theismann, Washington Redskins 1982                  

Eligible Since 1991.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Rolf Benirschke, San Diego Chargers 1983                    

Eligible Since 1991.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Marty Lyons, New York Jets 1984                                  

Eligible Since 1995.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Reggie Williams, Cincinnati Bengals 1986                     

Eligible Since 1995.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Dave Duerson, Chicago Bears 1987                                

Eligible Since 1997.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Boomer Esiason, Cincinnati Bengals 1995                     

Eligible Since 2003.  Ranked #82 on Notinhalloffame.com

Jim Flanigan, Chicago Bears 2000 (co-winner)               

Eligible Since 2009.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Troy Vincent, Philadelphia Eagles 2002                         

Eligible Since 2012.  Ranked #275 on Notinhalloffame.com

Warrick Dunn, Atlanta Falcons 2004                              

Eligible Since 2014.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Brian Waters, Kansas City Chiefs 2009                          

Eligible Since 2014.  Ranked #156 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Madieu Williams, Minnesota Vikings 2010                     

Eligible Since 2014.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Matt Birk, Baltimore Ravens 2011                                 

Eligible Since 2014.  Ranked #74 on Notinhalloffame.com.

 

Let’s update our tally, shall we?        

Award in Question

Percentage of recipients who have entered the HOF

Percentage of recipients by year who have entered the HOF.

NBA MVP

100%

100%

NHL Art Ross

100%

100%

NBA Finals MVP

91.3%

94.9%

NHL Norris

90.5%

96.4%

NBA All-Star Game MVP

89.5%

91.7%

NHL Conn Smythe

74.2%

85.4%

NFL Bert Bell Award

73.7%

71.4%

NFL AP Offensive Player of the Year

73.1%

79.4%

NFL AP MVP

68.3%

74.0%

NFL Walter Payton Man of the Year

66.7%

66.7%

NHL Lady Byng

63.8%

76.0%

NFL Defensive Player of the Year

60.8%

71.1%

NFL Super Bowl MVP

60.6%

64.9%

NBA Defensive Player of the Year

58.3%

56.5%

NHL Vezina

57.1%

66.3%

NBA Rookie of the Year

56.5%

56.5%

MLB MVP

55.0%

60.2%

NFL Pro Bowl MVP

52.3%

54.8%

MLB Lou Gehrig Award

51.9%

51.9%

MLB Roberto Clemente Award

47.4%

47.4%

NBA J. Walter Kennedy Citizenship Award

46.0%

46.0%

MLB/NL/AL Cy Young Award

44.4%

55.4%

MLB Babe Ruth Award

37.0%

39.3%

NHL Frank J. Selke Trophy

33.3%

36.7%

MLB World Series MVP

33.3%

36.8%

MLB Hutch Award

33.1%

33.1%

NFL Offensive Rookie of the Year

28.6%

28.6%

NHL Bill Masterton Memorial Trophy

27.9%

27.9%

MLB Edgar Martinez Award

26.7%

17.2%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Designated Hitter)

25.0%

30.8%

MLB Comeback Player of the Year

25.0%

25.0%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Shortstop)

23.5%

52.6%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove

21.7%

36.8%

NFL Defensive Rookie of the Year

20.6%

20.6%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Catcher)

20.0%

22.5%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Second Base)

18.8%

39.8%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Shortstop)

18.2%

35.1%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Pitcher)

18.2%

20.1%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Second Base)

16.7%

32.7%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Outfield)

16.7%

30.1%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Outfield)

15.7%

25.2%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Third Base)

14.3%

14.3%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Third Base)

13.6%

14.3%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (First Base)

13.6%

13.3%

MLB (NL/AL) Rookie of the Year

13.3%

13.3%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Catcher)

10.3%

15.2%

NBA Most Improved Player of the Year

5.3%

3.2%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (First Base)

3.8%

3.2%

NFL AP Comeback Player of the Year

0.0%

0.0%

So, who is up next?

The following are the players who have won the Walter Payton Man of the Year Award in the NFL who have retired but have not met the mandatory years out of the game to qualify for the Pro Football Hall of Fame:

Charles Tillman, Chicago Bears 2013

Eligible in 2021.

Anquan Boldin, San Francisco 49ers 2015

Eligible in 2022.

Eli Manning, New York Giants 2016 co-winner

Eligible in 2025.

Chris Long, Philadelphia Eagles 2018

Eligible in 2024.

The following are the players who have won the Walter Payton Man of the Year who are still active.

Drew Brees, New Orleans Saints 2006

41 Years Old,Playing for the New Orleans Saints.

Jason Witten, New Orleans Saints 2013

38 Years Old,Playing for the Las Vegas Raiders.

Thomas Davis, Carolina Panthers 2014

37 Years Old,Playing for the Washington Football Team.

Larry Fitzgerald, Arizona Cardinals 2016 co-winner

37 Years Old,Playing for the Arizona Cardinals.

J.J. Watt, Houston Texans 2017

31 Years Old,Playing for the Houston Texans.

Calais Campbell, Jacksonville Jaguars 2019

34 Years Old,Playing for the Baltimore Ravens.

 

This is an award based more on character, and will likely continue to yield winners all over the ability spectrum, but let’s be honest; it is a lot easier to be philanthropic when you are a star name!

…and yes we know Peyton is not inducted yet, but come on!

So, what is up next?

We return to the NHL with a similar award to this one, the King Clancy Memorial Award.

As always, we thank you for your support, and look for that soon.

Garden State Greatness in the World of Sports

New Jersey is known for many things including the iconic Atlantic City and its fabulous hotel and casino operations, world-famous sports teams, and NJs mind-boggling population density. From an sports and entertainment perspective, the Garden State stands proud. It is home to New York's finest – not the police officers – the New York Jets and the New York Giants – NFL titans. These teams play for the Empire State, but their stadium is located in East Rutherford New Jersey, at MetLife Stadium. Interestingly enough, according to 888sport’s Brett Chatz, the New York Jets and the New York Giants are the only NFL teams to share a stadium since 1984. Granted, the LA Chargers will be sharing a stadium with the LA Rams from 2020 onwards, at the SoFi stadium in California.

The New Jersey Devils Stun the Crowds at the NHL 

The best New Jersey Devils Teams of all time are pretty easy to identify. They're the ones who won the Stanley Cup, back in 1994/5, 1999/2000, and again in 2002/3. As the quintessential picture of perfection, these New Jersey Devils teams went hell for leather and brought home the ultimate prize in the NHL. Their first Stanley Cup victory took place under the management of coach J. Lemaire. Fast forward to 1999/2000. The New Jersey Devils again performed superbly under coaches L. Robinson and R. Ftorek, winning their second cup. The last time the New Jersey Devils won the Stanley Cup was back in 2002/3. That year, it was coach P. Burns who led the team to victory in a spectacular way. The New Jersey Devils are without doubt one of the best exports to emerge from the state. They are currently ranked at #14 in the Eastern Conference (2019/2020) with plenty of opportunities to move up the ranks in coming seasons.

The New York Giants and the New York Jets Playing Out of Jersey

No sport captivates the attention of fans more than the NFL. The other 3 major sports in the US include MLB, NBA, and NHL, in that order. True to form, New York's NFL prospects – the Giants and the Jets have cemented their place in history among fans. What many folks outside of New York and New Jersey don't know is that both these NFL teams are based in the Garden State. According to NFL power rankings (2019 regular season), the New York Giants in the NFC East are in third place, and the New York Jets in the AFC East are also in third place. Both of these teams have their home base at MetLife Stadium, East Rutherford, New Jersey. The Giants have won 4 NFL Championships, in 1956, 1938, 1934, 1927. They also won 4 Super Bowls, in 2012, 2008, 1991, and 1987. The New York Jets have just 1 NFL Championship to their credit, when they beat the Baltimore Colts 16-7, back in 1969.

The Brooklyn Nets Playing Out of New Jersey

The Brooklyn Nets were once known as the New Jersey Nets, and this NBA team certainly made waves in the basketball arena. The best Brooklyn Nets players include the likes of: Jason Kidd, Julius Erving, Buck Williams, Drazen Petrovic, Brook Lopez, Richard Jefferson, Rick Barry, John Williamson, Keith Van Horn, Kerry Kittles, andKenyon Martin, among others. Some of their best performances ever took place in the following years:

  • 1973/4– the Brooklyn Nets delivered a 55-29 win/loss performance in the ABA. Legendary players, Larry Kenon and Julius Erving starred.
  • 1975/6- the 1976 Slam Dunk contest with none other than Julius Irving a.k.a. Dr J won the hearts of fans the world over. He was named the ABA Most Valuable Player, and was appointed to the ABA First Team. In that year, the Brooklyn S came in second with a 55-29 record in the ABA.
  • 2002/3– during the season, the Brooklyn Nets had the best defensive rating in the league. Richard Jefferson stepped in, replacing Van Horn. Just two games were lost during the play-offs in the Eastern conference, as the Brooklyn Nets made it to the NBA Finals. In 2002, their win percentage was .634, and in 2003 their win percentage was .598.
  • 2001/2– in this year, Jason Kidd spearheaded the Nets towards greatness as they reached the NBA finals. While the Lakers dominated, the Nets showed their grit. The Eastern conference team could not possibly hope to compete with the Western Conference team, but their regular-season winnings got them to the finals.

These New Jersey teams have left an indelible impression on the sports world. Many of these teams are etched into the annals of history in the NHL Hall of Fame, the NBA Hall of Fame, and the NFL Hall of Fame. It's been some time since a team from New Jersey lifted a championship trophy, but they've done it before and they can certainly do it again!

Joe Burrow was the No.1 pick in the 2020 NFL Draft when he was selected by the Cincinnati Bengals but can the former LSU quarterback follow his top pick in the draft with a 'Hall of Fame' career amongst the pros...?

The Iowa native enjoyed a stellar college career and is an enormous talent, having won the Heisman Trophy and Maxwell Award during his final year with LSU.

The signal caller has all the attributes to succeed in the NFL but history doesn't dictate that he'll transition from being first pick amongst the class of 2020 to becoming a hall of famer in the future.

Having grabbed its first College Football Championship since 2007, the LSU that Burrow leaves behind is +650 in the American football odds for NCAAF glory in 2021.

Burrow meanwhile starts out into the rest of his career with the weight of being No.1 draftee on his back. 

Of the 14 previous No.1 picks to make it into the Hall of Fame, here's a reminder of the three most recent inductees.

Orlando Pace – No.1 pick in 1997

The St Louis Rams took Pace as the top pick in the '97 Draft following his promising time at Ohio State. On his induction to the HOF, it was recorded that Pace had become "one finest offensive linemen of his era" during his NFL career.

His Rams team shattered NFL scoring records with their outstanding offensive play and their thrilling 23-16 win over the Tennessee Titans in Super Bowl XXXIV marked the end of almost a half-century waitfor ultimate success for the St Louis franchise on the biggest stage. 

Pace would also line out in the Super Bowl against New England at the end of the 2001 season but his side lost out in a knife-edge contest. 

He was selected in seven consecutive Pro Bowls and made 169 NFL appearances, making the NFL's All-Decade Team of the 2000s.

Troy Aikman – No.1 pick in 198

After switching to UCLA from Oklahoma, Aikman finished his college career as the third highest rated passer in NCAA history at that time. 

He was drafted by a struggling Dallas Cowboys outfit coming off their worst record since going 0-11-1 in its 1960 inaugural season.

In his dozen NFL season he made six Pro Bowls and led Dallas to three Super Bowl wins ('92, '93 and '95) as well as recording more NFL wins during the 1990s than any other quarterback.

In his career, Aikman threw a stunning tally of 32,942 yards and 165 touchdowns, giving him a passer rating of 81.6 on his retirement.

Bruce Smith – No.1 pick in 1989

Blessed with raw speed and acceleration, Smith impressed anyone who watched him at Virginia Tech and he attracted top pick from the Buffalo Bills in 1989.

He enjoyed an NFL career that spanned close to two decades and was selected on 11 Pro Bowls during his run. 

At the end of 1990 season, his Bills side lost 20-19 to the New York Giants in Super Bowl XXI in Florida. That was as close as Smith got to a ring, with the Bills well beaten in future appearances against the Washington Redskins and Dallas Cowboys (twice). Smith started in all four of those Super Bowls.

With 200 career sacks, he's recognized as an all-time leader in defensive play and holds the NFL record for most sacks.