We here at Notinhalloffame.com thought it would be fun to take a look at the major awards in North American team sports and see how it translates into Hall of Fame potential.

Needless to say, different awards in different sports yield hall of fame potential.  In basketball, the team sport with the least number of players on a roster, the dividend for greatness much higher.  In baseball, it is not as much as a great individual season does not have the same impact.

Last time, we looked at the Bert Bell Award.  This time we went back to baseball, and the World Series MVP.

The World Series was first played in 1903, but they did not award an MVP of the Fall Classic until 1955.  It goes without saying only a great team can win a World Series, but in a seven-game series any player can get on a hot streak.

So how many World Series MVPs have made the Baseball Hall of Fame?

Let’s find out!

The following are the past players who have won the World Series MVP who are eligible for the Baseball Hall of Fame and have been enshrined.

Whitey Ford, New York Yankees, Pitcher (1961)             

Based on who won the World Series MVP from 1955 to 1960, we think it safe to day that Whitey Ford will forever be the first chronological World Series MVP to enter the Baseball Hall of Fame.  Ford was a career-Yankee who would help the Bronx Bombers win six World Series Titles.  In 1961, Ford won the Cy Young Award with a 25-4 record, and in the World Series he won both starts.  Ford pitched 14 Innings without allowing a single run, and the Yankees would defeat the Cincinnati Reds in five games.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1974.

Sandy Koufax, Los Angeles Dodgers, Pitcher (1963)        

Sandy Koufax was on year two of his second-half of brilliance, and in the regular season he would win the first of five consecutive ERA Titles.  In the World Series, his Dodgers were paired against the New York Yankees, and Koufax won both starts.  He would throw for 18 Innings with a 1.50 ERA.  Los Angeles would sweep New York.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1972.

Bob Gibson, St. Louis Cardinals, Pitcher (1964)              

Bob Gibson would do well in 1964 with a 19-12 record, but he was still not yet a superstar.  The World Series would change that.  He led the St. Louis Cardinals to a win over the New York Yankees where he went 2-1 with 27 Innings and 31 Strikeouts.  Gibson would go to the All-Star Game annually from 1965 to 1970 but had plenty left to offer. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1981.

Sandy Koufax, Los Angeles Dodgers, Pitcher (2)(1965)   

Koufax became the first player to repeat as the World Series MVP, and doesn’t it seem appropriate?  In between his World Series MVPs, Koufax won the Cy Young and MVP.  This year, Los Angeles faced the Minnesota Twins and Koufax went 2-1 with a 0.38 ERA.  He played two more seasons, winning the Cy Young in both of them.  Koufax retired after that with a record of 165-87 and 2,396 Strikeouts.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1972.

Frank Robinson, Baltimore Orioles, Outfield (1966)       

The Cincinnati Reds made a colossal error when they traded Frank Robinson to the Baltimore Orioles after 1965 season. Robinson proceeded to have the best year of his life, becoming the first player to win the MVP in both leagues. It got even better, as Robinson led the Orioles to their first World Series, and he would have two Home Runs with a 1.217 OPS in Baltimore’s sweep of the Los Angeles Dodgers.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1982.

Bob Gibson, St. Louis Cardinals, Pitcher (2) (1967)         

Gibson’s star rose since 1964, and in 1967, he had an even better World Series performance than his first.  Gibson pitched three complete games, winning them all, and only allowed three earned runs.  His 1.00 ERA was matched with an equally spectacular WHIP of 0.704.  Gibson would have a phenomenal 1968 in the “Year of the Pitcher” where he led the National League with a 1.12 ERA and a 0.853 WHIP.  He won the Cy Young and MVP that season, and he would play until 1975, ending a career spent entirely with the St. Louis Cardinals.  Gibson had a record of 251-174 with 3,117 Strikeouts.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1981.

Brooks Robinson, Baltimore Orioles, Third Base(1970)  

Brooks Robinson was already a superstar by this point, as he was already a World Series champion (1966), an MVP (1964), and he was on year 11 of 15 straight All-Star Games.  The 16-time Gold Glove winner batted .429 with two Home Runs in the Orioles five-game victory over the Reds.  Robinson played his entire career with Baltimore and would accumulate 2,848 Hits, 268 Home Runs and 1,357 Runs Batted In.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1983.

Roberto Clemente, Pittsburgh Pirates, Outfield(1971)   

A legend with 3,000 career Hits, Clemente was already a World Series Champion (1960), and an MVP (1966).  In 1971, the 15-time All-Star batted .414 with two Home Runs in the Pirates seven-game win over Baltimore.  Clemente only played one more season and died shortly after in a plane crash.  He was delivering aid to earthquake victims in Nicaragua.  He was fast-tracked to the Baseball Hall of Fame the year after.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1973.

Reggie Jackson, Oakland Athletics, Outfield (1973)       

Reggie Jackson won the American League MVP this year, and would win the first of what would be four Home Run Titles.  In the seven-game win over the New York Mets, Jackson batted .315 with a Home Run, in what was Oakland’s second of three straight World Series Championships.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1993.

Rollie Fingers, Oakland Athletics, Pitcher (1974)           

This was the last of three straight Oakland World Series titles, and the future Hall of Fame closer was in the beginning of his turn as an elite closer.  In this World Series, Fingers appeared in four Games, won one of them, had two Saves with an ERA of 1.93.  Fingers would later win the Cy Young and MVP in 1983 when he was with the Milwaukee Brewers. He would play until 1985 and accumulate 341 Saves over his 17-year career.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1992.

Johnny Bench, Cincinnati Reds, Catcher (1976)             

The Catcher of the “Big Red Machine”, was a two-time MVP by this point and had already won two Home Run Titles.  In this year’s World Series, Bench batted .533, a 1.667 OPS with two Home Runs and six Runs Batted In.  The 14-time All-Star played his entire career with Cincinnati and would collect 2,048 Hits, 389 Home Runs and 1,376 RBIs.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1989.

Reggie Jackson, New York Yankees, Outfield (2)(1977)  

This was the first of two straight World Series Championships for the New York Yankees, and it was this year where Reggie Jackson became “Mr. October”.   In Game Six of the 1977 World Series, Jackson belted three Home Runs on three first pitches against Dodger hurlers, and that was the clinching game.  He would bat .450 with an OPS of 1.792 with five taters.  Jackson played until 1987, and would retire with 2,584 Hits, 563 Home Runs, 1,702 RBIs. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1993.

Willie Stargell, Pittsburgh Pirates, First Base (1979)       

Winning the MVP this year (though he probably should not have), Willie Stargell did earn both NLCS and World Series MVP.  The career-Pirate helped his team defeat Baltimore in seven games with a .400 Batting Average with three Home Runs and seven RBIs.  He played 21 seasons and retired in 1982 with 2,232 Hits, 475 Home Runs and 1,540 RBIs. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1988.

Mike Schmidt, Philadelphia Phillies, Third Base (1980)  

This season, Mike Schmidt won the first of what would be three MVPs and it was also the year he set career-highs (also league-leading) in Home Runs (48) and Runs Batted In (121).  Schmidt also finished first in Slugging Percentage (.624) and OPS (1.004).  The Phillies would win his first World Series this year as Schmidt batted .381 with a two Home Runs and seven RBIs.  Philadelphia would beat Kansas City in six games.  Schmidt played his entire career with the Phils and would retire in 1989. Overall, he would appear in twelve All-Star Games, win six Silver Sluggers, ten Gold Gloves and had 2,234 Hits with 548 Home Runs and 1,595 RBIs.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1995.

Alan Trammell, Detroit Tigers, Shortstop (1984)            

This year, Alan Trammell was on his second of what would be six All-Star Games and the Detroit Tigers were an unstoppable team in 1984.  In this World Series, Detroit took out the San Diego Padres in five games with Trammell batting .450 with two Home Runs, six RBIs and a 1.300 OPS.  He would play his entire career with the Tigers, retiring in 1996 with 2,365 Hits, 185 Home Runs, four Silver Sluggers and three Gold Gloves.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2018.

Jack Morris, Minnesota Twins, Pitcher (1991)                

Jack Morris already won a World Series title in 1984 with the Detroit Tigers, but this title was especially sweet.  In the 1991 World Series, Morris pitched in three games, winning two games with a 1.17 ERA.  In Game 7, Morris pitched a ten-inning shutout to win the Fall Classic for the Twins.  Morris went on to win two more World Series Rings with the Toronto Blue Jays.  He retired in 1994 with a record of 254 Wins against 186 Losses with 2,478 Strikeouts.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2018.

Paul Molitor, Toronto Blue Jays, Third Base and Designated Hitter (1993)   

Paul Molitor was with the Milwaukee Brewers for 15 years before joining the Toronto Blue Jays in 1993, who were the defending World Series Champions.  That year, Molitor would go to his fifth All-Star Game, and led the American League in Hits (211) and would bat .332.  The Blue Jays returned to the World Series, and in their successful title defense, Molitor batted .500 with two Home Runs, eight RBIs and a 1.571 OPS.  Moltor played until 1998, and retired with 3,319 Hits, 234 Home Runs, 1,307 RBIs with a Batting Average of .303.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2004.

Tom Glavine, Atlanta Braves, Pitcher (1995)                  

The Atlanta Braves were one of the most loaded teams of the 1990s, but it only translated into one World Series win. That was in 1995, and the World Series MVP went to one of the big three, Tom Glavine.  He would win the 1991 Cy Young, and later the 1998 Cy Young, and this season was a nice 16-7 year, a 3.08 ERA, and a third place finish in the Cy Young vote.  In the World Series, Glavine won both starts and had an ERA of 1.29, a WHIP of 0.714 and 11 Strikeouts.  He retired in 2008 with a 305-203 record and 2,607 Strikeouts.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2014.

Mariano Rivera, New York Yankees, Pitcher (1999)         

Considered to be the greatest Relief Pitcher of all-time, Mariano Rivera would win five World Series Rings, and was a 13-time All-Star. In the 1999 World Series, Rivera appeared in three games, winning one, saving two, and he did not allow a run. Rivera’s overall post-season record was 8-1, 42 Saves, 0.70 ERA, 0.759 WHIP over 141 Innings.  Let that sink in!   When Rivera retired, he was the all-time leader in Saves (652), Games Finished (952) and a career WHIP of 1.000.  Rivera became the first player to be inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame with a unanimous vote.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2019.

Derek Jeter, New York Yankees, Shortstop (2000)          

Playing his entire career with the New York Yankees, Derek Jeter was not only the leader of the team, but was the most popular player and recognizable player of his day.  In the 2000 World Series, he batted .409 with two Home Runs, two RBIs and an OPS of 1.344.  Jeter would overall go to 14 All-Star Games, and was a five-time Silver Slugger and five-time Gold Glove winner.  He retired in 2014 with 3,465 Hits, 260 Home Runs, 1,311 RBIs and a Batting Average of .310. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2020.

Randy Johnson, Arizona Diamondbacks, Pitcher (co-winner) (2001)    

Sharing the World Series MVP with Curt Schilling, Randy Johnson was on the third of four straight Cy Young Awards, one of the most incredible runs of any pitcher in the history of the game.  With the Arizona Diamondbacks, Johnson took the team that was still under ten years old to the World Series, and he won three World Series Games with a 1.04 ERA against the Yankees.  He also had a WHIP of 0.692 with 19 Strikeouts.  Johnson played until 2009, and retired with a record of 202-166 with 4,875 Strikeouts.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2015.

 

The following are the players who have won the World Series MVP who are eligible for the Baseball Hall of Fame and have not been selected:

Johnny Podres, Brooklyn Dodgers, Pitcher (1955)

The winner of the first World Series MVP, coincided with the only championship that the Dodgers would win in Brooklyn.  This was Podres third year in baseball, and he had been an average starter at best.  He would win both his starts, including a shutout in Game 7.  Over 18 Innings, he had a 1.00 ERA with 10 Strikeouts. Podres would play until 1969, mostly with the Dodgers and he retired with a record of 141-116 with 1,435 Strikeouts. He won two more World Series Rings with the Dodgers after they relocated to Los Angeles.  Eligible Since 1975.  Podres was on the ballot for three years and finished as high as 0.8% in both 1975 and 1978. Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com

Don Larsen, New York Yankees, Pitcher (1956)

After only lasting 1.2 Innings in Game 2 (though all four runs were unearned due to errors), Larsen came back to throw a perfect game, the only time that this happened in the history of the World Series.  The Yankees beat the Dodgers in seven games, and Larsen’s Game 5 meant you could not possibly give the World Series MVP to anyone else.  Aside from the most spectacular pitching performance ever, Larsen was an average pitcher at best.  The 11 regular season Wins that he had in this regular season, was the most he had, and Larsen would only post 81 Wins against 91 Losses.  Eligible Since 1973.  Larsen was on the ballot for fifteen years and finished as high as 12.3% in 1979. Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com

Lew Burdette, Milwaukee Braves, Pitcher (1957)

This was the only World Series that the Braves would win while competing in Milwaukee.  Burdette, who was an All-Star this year, had a 17-9 regular season record, would win all three of his World Series starts, throwing for 27 Innings with a 0.67 ERA.  Burdette would go to a second All-Star Game two years later and would retire in 1967 with a 203-144 record.  179 of those wins were with the Braves.  Eligible Since 1973.  Burdette was on the ballot for fifteen years and finished as high as 24.1% in 1984. Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com

Bob Turley, New York Yankees, Pitcher (1958)

This was the best season of Bob Turley’s career as he was an All-Star for the third (and final) time, and he would have a career-high 21 Wins.  For the regular season, he won the Cy Young, and was the runner-up for the MVP.  In the World Series, he lost his first start, but won the next two, aiding the Yankees in their seven-game win over the Milwaukee Braves.  In the process, the Yanks became the second team to overcome a 3-1 deficit to win the World Series.  It was all downhill for Turley, as he never had another 10 Win season again, and he retired with 101 Wins against 85 Losses.  Eligible Since 1969.  Although he was eligible, he was not on the ballot.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Larry Sherry, Los Angeles Dodgers, Pitcher (1959)

1959 was Sherry’s second year of an 11-year journeyman career.  In the six-game series win over the Chicago White Sox, he appeared in four games, pitched in 12.2 Innings and had a 2-0 record with 2 Saves.  He had a 0.71 ERA and a 0.789 WHIP over the Fall Classic. Sherry would have a record of 53-44 with 82 Saves.  Eligible Since 1974.  Although he was eligible, he was not on the ballot.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Bobby Richardson, New York Yankees, Second Base (1960)

The sixth World Series MVP finally went to a position player, and while it is not a Hall of Famer, it is of course a New York Yankee!  Bobby Richardson was already a two-time All-Star, and he would go to five more over his career.  Historically speaking, this was also the first, and to date, only player to win the World Series as the member of the losing team.  Richardson would bat .367 with 11 Hits in the Series.  While the Yanks lost this one, Richardson would win three rings with the team.  He retired in 1966 with 1,432 career Hits.  Eligible Since 1972.  Richardson was on the ballot for three years and finished as high as 2.0% in 1972.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Ralph Terry, New York Yankees, Pitcher (1962)

Ralph Terry would only go to one All-Star Game in his career, which would be 1962.  That season, he led the American League in Wins (23) and Innings Pitched (298.2) and was 14thin MVP voting.  Terry was on the World Series Title the year before with New York, and in this championship, he went 2-1 with an ERA of 1.80 and WHIP of 0.766.  This was the best year he had, and he played until 1967, retiring with a record of 78-59.  Eligible Since 1973.  Although he was eligible, he was not on the ballot.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Mickey Lolich, Detroit Tigers, Pitcher (1968)

Mickey Lolich had an up and down 1968, and was overshadowed by Denny McClain, who was a 30-Game winner that year.  However, in the 1968 World Series, it was Lolich who was the star, winning all three starts with a 1.67 ERA.  He would later go to three All-Star Games, and finished his career with a 217-191 record and 2,832 Strikeouts.  Eligible Since 1985.  Lolich was on the ballot for fifteen years and finished as high as 25.5% in 1988. Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Donn Clendenon, New York Mets, First Base (1969) 

A very unlikely winner of the World Series MVP, Donn Clendenon was traded midway through the 1969 season from the Montreal Expos and he would platoon at First Base with Ed Kranepool.  Clendendon did not even play on the NLCS, but played in four of the five World Series Games where he batted .367 with three Home Runs and four RBIs.  He played until 197 and had 1,273 Hits with 159 Home Runs.  Eligible Since 1978.  Although he was eligible, he was not on the ballot.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Gene Tenace, Oakland Athletics, Catcher (1972)

It was in the 1972 post-season where Gene Tenace finally won the starting Catcher’s job, and in what was the first of three straight World Series wins by Oakland, Tenace was on fire.  He would bat .348 with four Home Runs and nine RBIs. He would play until 1983, winning a fourth World Series win with the Cardinals in 1982.  Eligible Since 1989.  Tenace was on the ballot for one year and finished with 0.2% of the ballot. Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Pete Rose, Cincinnati Reds, Third Base (1975)

Pete Rose was at the heart of Cincinnati’s Big Red Machine, and he was already an MVP.  In this World Series, Rose and the Reds beat Boston and had a .370 Batting Average with 10 hits with five Walks.  Rose would help the Reds win another World Series in 1976, and the first for Philadelphia in 1980.   He played until 1986 and would retire as the all-time leader in Hits with 4,256.  Eligible Since 1992.  Rose was declared ineligible by the Baseball Hall of Fame due to gambling on baseball. Ranked #1A on Notinhalloffame.com.

Bucky Dent, New York Yankees, Shortstop (1978)

Bucky Dent was never known for his hitting, but the three-time All-Star came to life in the 1978 World Series.  Prior to that, he hit the Home Run tin the tie-breaker where the Yankees beat the Red Sox to win the AL East.  He batted .417 with seven RBIs in the World Series, earning him his second ring, as he was with the Yanks the year before.  Dent played until 1984 and retired with 1,114 Hits.  Eligible Since 1990.  Dent was on the ballot for one year and finished with 0.7% of the ballot. Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Ron Cey, Los Angeles Dodgers, Third Base (co-winner) (1981)

For the first and only time in World Series MVP history, there were three co-winners.  Prior to this win, Ron Cey was a six-time All-Star, and had already appeared in three World Series for the Dodgers, albeit in losing efforts.  This year, he batted .350 with a Home Run and six RBIs.  He played until 1987, and had 1,868 Hits and 316 Home Runs when he retired.  Eligible Since 1993.  Cey was on the ballot for one year and finished with 1.9% of the ballot. Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Pedro Guerrero, Los Angeles Dodgers, First Base (co-winner) (1981)

For the first and only time in World Series MVP history, there were three co-winners.  This season would see the first of five All-Star years for Pedro Guerrero, and in the World Series, he batted .333 with two Home Runs, seven RBIs and an OPS of 1.179.  Eligible Since 1998.  Guerrero was on the ballot for one year and finished with 1.3% of the ballot. Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Steve Yeager, Los Angeles Dodgers, Catcher (co-winner) (1981)

For the first and only time in World Series MVP history, there were three co-winners.  A light hitting Catcher but well-respected handler of pitchers, Steve Yeager had two key Home Runs with a ,286 Batting Average in the World Series. Eligible Since 1998.  Yeager was on the ballot for one year and finished with 0.5% of the ballot. Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Darrell Porter, St. Louis Cardinals, Catcher (1982)

Darrell Porter had been a four-time All-Star prior to this World Series, and in this season’s Fall Classic, the Catcher batted .286 with one Home Run and five RBIs.  Notable, he batted .556 in the NLCS, and won the NLCS MVP that season. He played until 1987, and retired with 1,369 Hits and 188 Home Runs.  Eligible Since 1993.  Porter was on the ballot for one year but did not receive any votes.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Rick Dempsey, Baltimore Orioles, Catcher (1983)

For the third year in a row, a Catcher won the World Series MVP.  Dempsey, who was never known for being a great hitter delivered on this stage with a .385 Batting Average and a Home Run in Baltimore’s five-game Series win over Philadelphia.  Dempsey would later win a second World Series Ring with the Los Angeles Dodgers in 1988. He played until 1992.  Eligible Since 1998.  Dempsey was on the ballot for one year and finished with 0.2% of the vote.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Bret Saberhagen, Kansas City Royals, Pitcher (1985)

In his second year in the Majors, Bret Saberhagen won the Cy Young with a 20-6 record and a league-leading 1.056 WHIP. In the World Series win over the Cardinals, he would win both starts and have a stellar 0.50 ERA and 0.667 WHIP. Saberhagen would win his second Cy Young in 1989.  The hurler would play until 2001 and retire with a record of 167-117 and 1,715 Strikeouts. Eligible Since 2007.  Saberhagen was on the ballot for one year and finished with 1.3% of the vote.  Ranked #65 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Ray Knight, New York Mets, Third Base (1986)

While it could be joked that the World Series MVP was really Bill Buckner, Ray Knight had an incredible World Series.  He would bat .391 with an OPS of 1.005 with one Home Run and five RBIs.  Knight was an All-Star twice and he played until 1988 with 1,311 Hits.  Eligible Since 1994.  Knight was on the ballot for one year and finished with 0.2% of the vote.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Frank Viola, Minnesota Twins, Pitcher (1987)

Finishing sixth in Cy Young voting this year, Frank Viola ascended to the ace of the Twins pitching staff.  In the seven-game World Series win over the St. Louis Cardinals, Viola started three of them and went 2-1 over 19.1 Innings with an ERA of 3.72 and 16 Strikeouts.  Viola would win the Cy Young the following season, and he played until 1996, retiring with a record of 176-150.  Eligible Since 2002.  Viola was on the ballot for one year and finished with 0.4% of the vote.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Orel Hershiser, Los Angeles Dodgers, Pitcher (1988)

Before 1988, Orel Hershiser was already the ace of the Dodgers pitching staff, but he was about to embark on the best season of his career.  This year, Hershiser won the Cy Young while leading the National League in Wins (23) and posting an ERA of 2.26 with 178 Strikeouts.  Hershiser would win the NLCS MVP, appearing in four games, winning one, and earning an ERA of 1.09.  In that World Series, he won both starts against the Oakland A’s winning both games with an ERA of 1.00 and a WHIP of 0.722.  Hershiser played until 2000 and would have a record of 204-150 with 2,014 Strikeouts.  Eligible Since 2006.  Hershiser was on the ballot for two years and finished as high as 11.2% in 2006.  Ranked #71 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Dave Stewart, Oakland Athletics, Pitcher (1989)

From 1987 to 1990, Dave Stewart finished in the top four in Cy Young voting, and was the ace of the Oakland staff that went to three straight World Series (1988-90).  1989 was the only one of the three that the A’s would win, and in this year, he would win both starts against the San Francisco Giants with a 1.69 ERA and 14 Strikeouts.  Stewart played until 1995, retiring with a 168-129 record and 1,741 Strikeouts.  Eligible Since 2002.  Stewart was on the ballot for two years and finished as high as 7.4% in 2001. Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Jose Rijo, Cincinnati Reds, Pitcher (1990)

Jose Rijo and the Cincinnati Reds would shock Oakland in a four-game sweep in the World Series, and Rijo won both starts, with a phenomenal 0.59 ERA and 14 Strikeouts.  The Puerto Rican played until 1995, and after a five-year layoff due to injury, he returned for two years before retiring for good in 2002. He would have a record of 116-91. Eligible Since 2008.  Rijo was on the 2001 ballot and received 0.2% of the ballot, and appeared again in 2008, but had no votes that year.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Pat Borders, Toronto Blue Jays, Catcher (1992)

An unlikely World Series MVP, Pat Borders never had a season where he hat over 125 Hits and only had two 100 Hit plus years. Regardless, his bat was on fire in the 1992 World Series where he batted .450 with nine Hits, one Home Run and three RBIs.  This would be the first World Series win for the Toronto Blue Jays, and he would help them win it again in 1993.  He played until 2006.  Eligible Since 2011.  Although Borders was Hall of Fame eligible, he was never on the ballot.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com. 

John Wetteland, New York Yankees, Pitcher (1996)

John Wetteland played two seasons with the New York Yankees, and this was the second of them.  For the first and only time, the closer would lead the league in Saves (43), and he was an All-Star for what would be the first of three times. Wetteland appeared in five games in the ’96 World Series against the Braves, and he would net four Saves with a 2.08 ERA and six Strikeouts.  He played until 2000, retiring with 330 Saves.  Eligible Since 2006.  Wetteland was on the ballot for one year and received 0.8% of the vote.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Livan Hernandez, Miami Marlins, Pitcher (1997)

In Florida’s shocking World Series win, Livan Hernandez was a rookie, who was the runner-up for the Rookie of the Year Award. Hernandez was incredible in the post-season, winning the NLCS MVP (2-0), and he won both his starts in the ’97 World Series against the Cleveland Indians, albeit with a 5.27 ERA. Hernandez played until 2012, and was a two-time All-Star.  He finished his career one game over .500, with a record of 178-177.  Eligible Since 2018.  Hernandez was on the ballot for one year and received 0.2% of the vote.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Scott Brosius, New York Yankees, Third Base (1998)

Scott Brosius became very popular when he arrived in 1998 to New York.  This would be his only All-Star year, and in the World Series he batted .471 with two Home Runs and six RBIs.  Brosius played for three more years, and retired with two more World Series Rings and 1,001 Hits.  Eligible Since 2007.  Brosius was on the ballot for one year and but did not receive any votes.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Curt Schilling, Arizona Diamondbacks, Pitcher (co-winner) (2001)

In the regular season, Curt Schilling finished second in Cy Young voting to his teammate, Randy Johnson, which would be the same hurler who he shared the World Series MVP with.  In this World Series, Schilling pitched in three games, winning one with an ERA of 1,69 with 26 Strikeouts.  He would win two more World Series rings with the Boston Red Sox, and he retired in 2007 with a record of 216-146 with 3,116 Strikeouts.  Eligible Since 2013.  Schilling has been on the ballot for eight years and has finished as high as 70.0% in 2020.  Ranked #5 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Troy Glaus, Anaheim Angels, Third Base (2002)

Troy Glaus was a four-time All-Star, two of which happened before 2002, and two after.  In the Angels first World Series win, Glaus batted .385 with an OPS of 1.313. and three Home Runs and eight RBIs.  He would play until 2010 and retired with 320 Home Runs.  Eligible Since 2016.  Glaus was on the ballot for one year and but did not receive any votes.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Josh Beckett, Florida Marlins, Pitcher (2003)

We think it can be safely stated that the Marlins are the most unlikely two-time World Series Champions, but that is sports for you!  Their second World Series MVP was Josh Beckett, who was in his third year in the Majors.  In this World Series, he would pitch in two Games, going 1-1 with a 1.10 ERA and 19 Strikeouts.  A future three-time All-Star, Beckett would later help the Red Sox win the 2007 World Series, and he played until 2014, retiring with a 138-106 record.  Eligible Since 2020.  Beckett was on the ballot for one year and but did not receive any votes.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Manny Ramirez, Boston Red Sox, Outfield (2004)

One of the huge reasons that the “Curse of the Bambino” was finally eradicated in 2004 was because of Manny Ramirez, who was on year seven of eleven straight All-Star Game appearances.  In the four-game sweep of the St. Louis Cardinals, Ramirez batted .412 with a Home Run and four RBIs.  His controversial career came to an end in 2011, and would have 2,574 Hits, 555 Home Runs and 1,831 RBIs.  Eligible Since 2017.  Ramirez has been on the ballot for four years and has finished as high as 28.2% in 2020. Ranked #6 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Jermaine Dye, Chicago White Sox, Outfield (2005)

An All-Star in 2000, and later in 2006, Jermaine Dye would win his first and only World Series ring in 2005 with the Chi-Sox. In the White Sox sweep of the Astros, Dye had a Home Run, three Runs Batted In, and a .438 Batting Average. He played until 2009, and would have 1,779 Hits with 325 Home Runs.  Eligible Since 2015.  Dye was on the ballot for one year and but did not receive any votes.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

David Eckstein, St. Louis Cardinals, Shortstop(2006)

This was the first of two straight All-Star Game years for David Eckstein, and he had already won a World Series Championship with the Anaheim Angels in 2002.  Eckstein batted .364 with four RBIs in this World Series, and he played until 2010.  Eligible Since 2016.  Eckstein was on the ballot for one year and received 0.5% of the vote.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Mike Lowell, Boston Red Sox, Third Base (2007)

Mike Lowell finished fifth in MVP voting this year, which would be the highest he would ever finish.  A four-time All-Star, Lowell already had a World Series Ring with the Marlins, and in this World Series sweep over the Colorado Rockies, he would bat .400 with a Home Run with four RBIs.  Lowell played until 2010, and he retired with 1,619 Hits and 223 Home Runs. Eligible Since 2016.  Lowell was on the ballot for one year and but did not receive any votes.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Hideko Matsui, New York Yankees, Outfield (2009)

Hideki Matsui was already a two-time All-Star, and with his MVP in the 2009 World Series, he became the first Japanese to win the award.  In the six-game win over the Philadelphia Phillies, “Godzilla” blasted three Home Runs, had eight RBIs, and had a disgusting Slash Line of .615/.643/1.385, meaning he had an OPS over 2.000.  He played in the Majors until 2012.  Eligible Since 2018.  Matsui was on the ballot for one year and received 0.8% of the vote.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Edgar Renteria, San Francisco Giants, Shortstop (2010)

This was the penultimate season of Edgar Renteria, who was a five-time All-Star, who had previously won a World Series Ring in 1997 as a Florida Marlin.  In the 2010 World Series, the Venezuelan Shortstop had two Home Runs, six RBIs and batted .412.  Retiring in 2011, Reneteria had 2,327 Hits with 140 Home Runs.  He was also a three-time Silver Slugger and twice a Gold Glove winner.  Eligible Since 2018.  Matsui was on the ballot for one year and received 0.8% of the vote.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

 

Let’s update our tally, shall we?

Award in Question

Percentage of recipients who have entered the HOF

Percentage of recipients by year who have entered the HOF.

NBA MVP

100%

100%

NHL Norris

90.5%

96.4%

NBA All Star Game MVP

89.5%

91.7%

NHL Conn Smythe

74.2%

85.4%

NFL Bert Bell Award

73.7%

71.4%

NFL AP Offensive Player of the Year

73.1%

79.4%

NFL AP MVP

68.3%

74.0%

NHL Lady Byng

63.8%

76.0%

NFL Defensive Player of the Year

60.8%

71.1%

NFL Super Bowl MVP

60.6%

64.9%

NBA Defensive Player of the Year

58.3%

56.5%

NHL Vezina

57.1%

66.3%

NBA Rookie of the Year

56.5%

56.5%

MLB MVP

55.0%

60.2%

NFL Pro Bowl MVP

52.3%

54.8%

MLB Lou Gehrig Award

51.9%

51.9%

MLB Roberto Clemente Award

47.4%

47.4%

MLB/NL/AL Cy Young Award

44.4%

55.4%

MLB Babe Ruth Award

37.0%

39.3%

NHL Frank J. Selke Trophy

33.3%

36.7%

MLB World Series MVP

33.3%

36.8%

MLB Hutch Award

33.1%

33.1%

NFL Offensive Rookie of the Year

28.6%

28.6%

NHL Bill Masterton Memorial Trophy

27.9%

27.9%

MLB Edgar Martinez Award

26.7%

17.2%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Designated Hitter)

25.0%

30.8%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Shortstop)

23.5%

52.6%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove

21.7%

36.8%

NFL Defensive Rookie of the Year

20.6%

20.6%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Catcher)

20.0%

22.5%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Second Base)

18.8%

39.8%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Shortstop)

18.2%

35.1%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Pitcher)

18.2%

20.1%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Second Base)

16.7%

32.7%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Outfield)

16.7%

30.1%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Outfield)

15.7%

25.2%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Third Base)

14.3%

14.3%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Third Base)

13.6%

14.3%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (First Base)

13.6%

13.3%

MLB (NL/AL) Rookie of the Year

13.3%

13.3%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Catcher)

10.3%

15.2%

NBA Most Improved Player of the Year

5.3%

3.2%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (First Base)

3.8%

3.2%

NFL AP Comeback Player of the Year

0.0%

0.0%

So, who is up next?

The following are the players who have won the World Series MVP in the NFL who have retired but have not met the mandatory years out of the game to qualify for the Baseball Hall of Fame:

David Freese, St. Louis Cardinals, Third Base (2011)

David Freese will mostly be remembered over his career for his 2011 playoffs, where he won both the NLCS MVP and World Series MVP. In Game 6 of the World Series, Freese tied the game to send it into extra innings.  In the 11thinning, he homered to win it, and force a Game 7, which the Redbirds won.  Overall, in the World Series, he had seven RBIs, the aforementioned Home Run, and a .348 Batting Average.  He played until 2019, and had 1,041 Hits.  Eligible in 2025.

David Ortiz, Boston Red Sox, Designated Hitter and First Base (2013)

This season would be the ninth of ten of All-Star seasons, for David Ortiz, which would also see him earn his third and final World Series Ring.  In the 2013 World Series against the St. Louis Cardinals, Ortiz had the following Slash Line: .688/.760/1.188.  Incredible right?  He played until 2016, and would end his career with 2,472 Hits, 541 Home Runs, and 1,768 RBIs.  Eligible in 2022.

Ben Zobrist, Chicago Cubs, Second Base (2016)

In what Ben Zobrist’s first of four years in Chicago, the Cubs finally broke their curse and won their first World Series in well over a century.  In the regular season, Zobrist was an All-Star for the third and final time, and he would win the World Series for the second straight year, as he was with the Royals in 2015.  In this World Series, he batted .357 with 10 Hits and two RBIs.  He played until 2019 and retired with 1,566 Hits and 167 Home Runs. Eligible in 2025.

Steve Pearce, Boston Red Sox, Outfield (2018)

This was the penultimate year for Steve Pearce, who over 13 years would never have a 100 Hit season.  In the 2018 World Series, his bat was on fire with a three Home Run, eight RBI performance with a .333 Batting Average.  He would only have 572 Hits over his career.  Eligible in 2025.

The following are the players who have won the World Series MVP who are still active.

Cole Hamels, Philadelphia Phillies, Pitcher (2008)

Cole Hamels led the National League in WHIP this year and in the World Series, he pitched two games, going 1-0 with an ERA of 2.77.  Hamels also won the NLCS MVP.  35 Years Old, Playing for the Atlanta Braves.

Pablo Sandoval, San Francisco Giants, First Base (2012)

Exceptionally popular, Pablo Sandoval would bat .500 in the four-game sweep over the Detroit Tigers and the “Panda” would have three Home Runs and four RBIs.  33 Years Old, Playing for the San Francisco Giants.

Madison Bumgarner, San Francisco Giants, Pitcher(2014)

Bumgarner was on year two of a four-year run of All-Star Game years, and he would finish fourth in Cy Young voting.  In the 2014 playoffs, Bumgarner was on fire winning both the NLCS MVP and the World Series MVP.  In the latter, he went 2-0 with a 0.43 ERA, and earned a save in the deciding Game 7 over the Kansas City Royals.  30 Years Old, Playing for the Arizona Diamondbacks.

Salvador Perez, Kansas City Royals, Catcher (2015)

An All-Star for the third straight year, Salvador Perez batted .364 in Kansas City’s five-game World Series win over the New York Mets.  He would also have two Doubles and two RBIs.  30 Years Old, Playing for the Kansas City Royals.

George Springer, Houston Astros, Outfield (2017)

This was the breakout year for George Springer, and the breakout for the Houston Astros, who won their first World Series this year. In the seven-game series over the Los Angeles Dodgers, Springer blasted five Home Runs, with seven RBIs, with a .379 Batting Average and an even 1.000 OPS.  30 Years Old, Playing for the Houston Astros.

Stephen Strasburg, Washington Nationals, Pitcher(2018)

In the regular season, Stephen Strasburg led the National League in Wins (18), and was fifth in Cy Young voting.  In the World Series, he pitched twice, winning both games with 14 Strikeouts and a 2.51 ERA.  31 Years Old, Playing for the Washington Nationals.

You can’t win the World Series MVP, without making the World Series, and winning teams have stars, average players, and those who seize the moment.  The World Series MVP reflects all of those players.

So, what is up next?

We are going to return to the ice, and look at the Art Ross Trophy, which is awarded annually to the player who has the most Points in a season.

As always, we thank you for your support, and look for that soon.

Should Rey Mysterio Be Inducted into the WWE Hall of Fame? 

The WWE has, ever since it was founded in 1980, long been the home to a diverse range of different characters, personalities, and styles. However, despite that, you rarely get an athlete who truly captures the heart of the wrestling community. Rey Mysterio is undoubtedly one of the most entertaining competitors that have ever stepped foot in the ring. 

Because of that, we think he deserves to be inducted into the WWE Hall of Fame.  

A Fan-Friendly Style that Produced Some Iconic Moment 

Throughout his career as a professional wrestler for the WWE, Mysterio enjoyed many iconic moments in the ring that are likely to never be forgotten, as his fearless approach to entertainment made him a genuine fan favorite. The now 45-year-old will long be remembered for his lucha libre style that made him a two-time heavyweight champion and, in the process, saw the American-born athlete produce one of the companies most memorable underdog moments.  

At WrestleMania 22 in April 2006, Mysterio claimed the title from Kurt Angle in spectacular fashion after unexpectantly defeating the Olympic gold medalist and Randy Orton in a Triple Threat match. Because of his size, Mysterio often went into many of his match-ups as the underdog. However, as demonstrated on numerous title-winning occasions, he more than made up for his lack of height with agility, balance, and speed.  

Mysterio is one of few athletes to have ever been on the WWE roster to consistently provide fans with high-flying entertainment, and, as a result of that, established himself as one of the most innovative performersin the history of professional wrestling. This is epitomized by the fact that the mask-wearing wrestler wasted no time in demonstrating his acrobatic style to WWE fans across the globe by leaping from the cageon his debut in a highly-anticipated cage match back in 2002.  

The Importance of Promotion in the Entertainment Sector  

Because of Mysterio’s style, as a wrestler, he was easy to promote. He was also part of an era that saw many of the sport’s most famous stars enter their peak years, including Shawn Michaels, Triple H, and The Undertaker. The difference with Mysterio, as opposed to other iconic names that have graced the WWE over the last two decades, is that he could promote himself by doing the unexpected when he entered the ring. Generally, he didn’t need a microphone to generate interest in his fights as fans knew what to expect from his all-action style. 

Outside of the WWE, promotions have become central to the broader entertainment industry in recent years, with marketing now being essential to the successes of modern-day releases in both the film and music sectors. However, it is not just limited to these, with the iGaming sector also reaching new heights having focused their attentions on incentivizing user participation, with Casino Bonus USpromoting a range of online operators who offer bonus money and non-deposit offers, in addition to deposit lotteries and free spins.  

An Icon Worthy of Continued Recognition 

Ultimately, Mysterio is a once-in-a-lifetime athlete who will likely not be easy to replace. Although new and emerging professional wrestlers may opt to mirror his high-flying style, the fearlessness of the former WWE champion has resulted in numerous against-the-odds performances, which will live long in the memory. 

Spring is in the air, and that means baseball is back!  For our purposes at Notinhalloffame.com, that means we are looking ahead to the Baseball Hall of Fame Class of 2021, which for the first time in years does not have any first ballot nominees who look like they will make it to ballot number two.

We say this with all due respect to Mark Buehrle, Tim Hudson, and Torii Hunter, who are the three biggest names who will debut in 2021.  All three were fine baseball players, but it will take an awful lot of surprise votes for any of the three to make the 5% threshold.  Throw that fact, and that 22 former players have been elected by the voters over the last seven years, has reduced the backlog that has plagued the ballot for years is now over.  This makes the 2021 vote the most opportune one in years for players to gain significant ground and make that Cooperstown run.  There are three huge beneficiaries in Curt Schilling, Barry Bonds and Roger Clemens, all of whom exceed 60% last year, and are all in their penultimate year of Hall of Fame eligibility.  According to Paruk from SportsBettingDime, it would not be a surprise if the controversial trio enter together in 2021.

Of the three, Schilling has the best chance.  The hurler had 70.0 percent, up from last year’s 60.9.  The outspoken right-wing thinker has often been critical of the media, and there have been voters who have openly said in the past that it cost him their vote.  In the last year, Schilling has been contrite, and if he can do that for another year, the Hall of Fame plaque should come his way.

The cases for Clemens and Bonds are less clear.  While a few years ago, the idea of either player enshrined seemed ridiculous, both have inched their way over the 60% threshold.  In the past few years, Jeff Bagwell, Mike Piazza and Ivan Rodriguez were voted in, and all three of them had PED whispers over their career.  Granted, it was outright kicking and screaming with Clemens and Bonds over their alleged PED use, but the induction of Bagwell, Piazza and I-Rod opened the door.  Voters have also voiced their opinion of Bud Selig being voted in by the Veteran’s Committee, as justification to vote for Clemens and Bonds, as it was under Selig where the PED crisis began, and was handled slowly.

A fourth possibility for induction is Omar Vizquel.  Considered to be the best defensive infielder of his generation, Vizquel went up nearly 10 percent to 53.6% on his third year of eligibility. The 11-time Gold Glove recipient could potentially shoot up the necessary 21.4% in 2021, but the odds are that his induction speech might have to wait a little longer.

Also look for a strong increase for Scott Rolen (35.3% in 2020) and Todd Helton (29.2% in 2020), though neither receive the necessary votes to enter the Hall in 2021.

Regardless of the outcome, we will be watching! 

While not as widely known as many other sports’ celebrations of its stars in America, soccer has its own Hall of Fame too.

The National Soccer Hall of Fame was founded back in 1979 and set-up at the Toyota Stadium in Texas, where it remains to this day.

A museum was built in Oneonta, New York, to cement the work of the Hall of Fame, and that opened its doors to the public for the first time in 1999.

Numerous stars from Major League Soccer and overseas have made their way into the Hall of Fame, from Bruce Arena to Erik Wynalda and everyone in between.

The highest honor that the HoF bestows is the ‘Medal of Honor’, awarded to those who have ‘demonstrated vision and played a historic role in changing the course of soccer in America.’

So far, the medal has been awarded to three individuals and one team: Alan Rothenberg, the popular former director of U.S. Soccer; Lamar Hunt, co-founder of the NASL; Phil Anschutz, a former owner of six different MLS teams who was vital in the development of soccer-specific stadiums, and finally the  U.S. women’s national team, who won the inaugural World Cup in 1991.

The qualification criteria for Hall of Fame entry are clear. The individual must have been retired for at least three years but no longer than ten, won 20 or more caps for the U.S. national team and played at least five seasons in a major American competition, be it the MLS or NWSL.

There are also categories for ‘veterans’, i.e. those who have been retired more than ten years, and ‘builders’, who are individuals that have played a major role in the development of soccer in America in a non-playing capacity.

With these eligibility criteria in mind, let’s try and predict five future entries into the National Soccer Hall of Fame:

Megan Rapinoe

Few individuals of any gender have done more to put U.S. soccer on the world map in the modern era than Megan Rapinoe.

Something of a feminist and LGBT icon, Rapinoe has transcended the sport with her outspoken views on issues ranging from gender equality to politics.

But like all Hall of Famers, she can take care of business out on the turf too. The 34-year-old is a Ballon d’or Feminin winner – the highest award bestowed upon an individual player, as well as a World Cup champion and an Olympic gold medalist.  

Landon Donovan

It’s only a matter of time before Landon Donovan is inducted into the Hall of Fame – literally, given that he retired in 2018 and so will be eligible for entry next year.

A six-time MLS Cup winner, Donovan is also a seven-time Best XI selection who enjoyed a fine career outside of America playing for the likes of Everton and Bayern Munich.

He is the joint all-time record goalscorer for the national team, the all-time leader in assists and the second most-capped player.

In short, Donovan enjoyed a phenomenal career that will surely be recognized with an induction into the Hall of Fame in the very near future.

Brian Schmetzer

There are soccer coaches, and then there’s Brian Schmetzer.

Famously employed by the Seattle Sounders after a job interview in a coffee shop back in 2001, Schmetzer has been with the franchise in a variety of roles ever since.

He will be forever remembered for winning two MLS Cups with the Sounders, including last season’s edition, and the fire is still burning strong now with Seattle well-fancied to retain their title according to the football betting at Space Casino market.

Clint Dempsey

In many ways, nobody has blazed a trail greater for U.S. soccer players looking to enjoy a career overseas than Clint Dempsey.

The attacker didn’t enjoy just one season in the English Premier League, he enjoyed seven with Fulham and Tottenham, scoring 57 goals along the way and reaching the Europa League final with the Cottagers.

The joint leading goalscorer for the USMNT alongside Donovan, Clint Dempsey is another ‘shoe in’ for HoF selection when the time is right.

Christian Pulisic

We don’t have a crystal ball, but surely Christian Pulisic is a Hall of Famer in waiting?

It’s a weighty tag to put on a 21-year-old’s shoulders, but Pulisic has already played for two giants of European soccer in Borussia Dortmund and Chelsea – his $73 million transfer to London making him the most expensive American player of all time.

He is the youngest-ever captain of the national team too, and alongside the likes of Tyler Adams, Paxton Pomykal and Antonee Robinson he will be tasked with taking the United States forward in the game.

If Pulisic can, he will no doubt join the other candidates on this list in the National Soccer Hall of Fame.

We here at Notinhalloffame.com thought it would be fun to take a look at the major awards in North American team sports and see how it translates into Hall of Fame potential.

Needless to say, different awards in different sports yield hall of fame potential.  In basketball, the team sport with the least number of players on a roster, the dividend for greatness much higher.  In baseball, it is not as much as a great individual season does not have the same impact.

Last time, we looked at the NFL MVP.  As this often overlapped the Bert Bell Award, we thought we would take it a little easy, and go right to this one.

The Award is named after Bert Bell, who was the NFL Commissioner from 1946 to his death until 1959.  It is voted on by the Maxwell Football Club, which comprises of NFL Owners, football personnel, coaches and media.

So how many Bert Bell Award winners have made the Pro Football Hall of Fame?

Let’s find out!

The following are the past players who have won the Bert Bell Award who are eligible for the Pro Football Hall of Fame and have been enshrined.

Johnny Unitas, Baltimore Colts, Quarterback (1959)      

Johnny Unitas led the Baltimore Colts to the NFL Championship, and in his fourth season in the NFL, he would take his team to back-to-back titles.  This year, “Johnny U” led the NFL in Completions (193), Passing Yards (2,899), Touchdown Passes (32), and he was a First Team All-Pro for the second time. Unitas would also win the NFL MVP this season.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1979.

Norm Van Brocklin, Philadelphia Eagles, Quarterback (1960)

Norm Van Brocklin was a grizzled veteran by this time, as he played for the Los Angeles Rams from 1949 to 1957, and he joined the Eagles in 1958.  A Champion with the Rams in 1951, the 1960 campaign would see him go 10-2, with 2,471 Yards, and 24 Touchdowns.  In what was his ninth Pro Bowl, he would go to his first and only First Team All-Pro, while also leading the Eagles to the NFL Championship.  This was his last year as a player, as he hoped to be named the team’s head coach after.  That didn’t happen, but he would take over as the HC for the Minnesota Vikings.  Van Brocklin retired with a record of 61-36-4 with 23,611 Yards and 173 Touchdowns. He would also win the AP MVP this year.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1971.

Paul Hornung, Green Bay Packers, Halfback & Kicker (1961)

A former Heisman Trophy winner from Notre Dame, Paul Hornung played his entire with the Green Bay Packers, and in 1960, he rushed for 597 Yards.  The Packers would also win the NFL Championship that year, and he was also rewarded with the NFL AP.  Hornung played until 1966, and won three more titles with Green Bay.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1986.

Andy Robustelli, New York Giants, Defensive End (1962)

In his tenth season in the NFL, Andy Robustelli became the first defensive player to win the Bert Bell Award.  The Defensive End was already a two-time NFL Champion (1951 with Los Angeles, 1956 with New York) and he would already go to seven Pro Bowls and was chosen for six First Team All-Pros.  Curiously, this year he was neither a Pro Bowl, nor a First Team All-Pro, and he would never win those awards again, as he played only two more seasons.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1971.

Jim Brown, Cleveland Browns, Running Back (1963)

By 1963, Jim Brown had already won the AP MVP twice and the UPI MVP once, and in 1963 he would secure his sixth Rushing Title. While he was not awarded the AP MVP this year, the Bert Bell Award was his, and it came in his best statistical season.  Brown rushed for a career-high of 1,863 Rushing Yards, and he led the NFL in 12 Rushing Touchdowns.  Brown played two more seasons, winning the NFL Championship in 1964 and capturing his third AP MVP and UPI MVP in 1965, which would be his final season, as the Running Back would abruptly retire.  He would finish his career with 12,312 Rushing Yards, which was then the all-time record.  In the nine seasons he played, Brown was a Pro Bowl in all of them, and a First Team All-Pro in eight.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1971.

Johnny Unitas, Baltimore Colts, Quarterback (2) (1964)

This season, Unitas took his team to the NFL Championship, though they would fall to the Cleveland Browns in an upset. Regardless, this was a stellar regular season for the “Golden Arm”, as Unitas was chosen for his third First Team All-Pro and he threw for 19 TDs against only 6 Interceptions.  Unitas also went 12-2 with 2,824 Yards.  Also the AP MVP this season, Unitas became the first repeat Bert Bell Award winner.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1979.

Johnny Unitas, Baltimore Colts, Quarterback (3) (1967)

Arguably, this is the last great season of Unitas’s career, who would play until 1973, with one forgettable year in San Diego. 1967 saw him go to his tenth Pro Bowl and fifth First Team All-Pro, both of which would be his last.  Also winning the AP MVP this year, Unitas threw for 20 Touchdowns and 3,428 Yards, and for the first and only time in his career, he led the NFL in Completion Percentage (58.5).  When he retired, he had a record of 118-63-4, 40,239 Passing Yards and 290 Touchdowns.  He is a member of the 1960s All-Decade Team, 75thAnniversary Team and 100thAnniversary Team.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1979.

Leroy Kelly, Cleveland Browns, Running Back (1968)

It is impossible to follow Jim Brown in the Browns backfield, but Leroy Kelly did a pretty good job.  Kelly was a First Team All-Pro in 1966 and repeated that in both 1967 and 1968.  Kelly won the Rushing Title in both ’67 and ’68, with the latter seeing him put up personal highs in both categories (1,239 Rushing Yards and 16 Rushing Touchdowns). Kelly also led the NFL in All-Purpose Yards (1,536) and Touchdowns (20).  He played until 1973 (all with Cleveland), and he retired with 7,274 Rushing Yards, 9,555 All-Purpose Yards and 87 Touchdowns.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1994.

George Blanda, Oakland Raiders, Kicker (1970)

The first Oakland Raider to win the Bert Bell Award, George Blanda seemed to earn a lifetime achievement award as this was not exactly a banner year for the former Quarterback/Kicker.  Blanda began his career in 1949, and he was a four-time Pro Bowl Selection prior to winning this honor.  Blanda was 43 years old, and was mostly used just as a Place Kicker at this point and as awesome as his overall career was, he was not realistically among the top 100 players in football at this point.  Blanda played until 1975, and he was named the Man of the Year in 1974. While we have major respect for Blanda, this was a horrific choice for 1970 and it cheapened the award.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1981.

Roger Staubach, Dallas Cowboys, Quarterback (1971)

Roger Staubach became the second Cowboys Quarterback to win Bert Bell Award and he did so in his third year in the NFL. This season, the Cowboys would win their first Super Bowl, with “Captain Comeback” winning the Super Bowl MVP. During the regular season, the former Navy star had 15 Touchdown passes, 1,882 Passing Yards, and finished first in Quarterback Rating (104.8).  The Quarterback played his entire career with Dallas and he would throw for 22,700 Passing Yards with 153 Touchdowns.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1985.

O.J. Simpson, Buffalo Bills, Running Back (1973)

The accomplishments of O.J. Simpson in 1973 was at its time in the stratosphere.  The Running Back became the first player to exceed 2,000 Yards on the ground (2,003) and he also led the NFL in Rushing Touchdowns (12) and Yards from Scrimmage (2,073).  Simpson also won the AP MVP, NEA MVP and the Offensive Player of the Year.  This was the second of what would be four Rushing Titles, and he finished his career in 1979 with 11,236 Rushing Yards and 94 Touchdowns, with another 14 TDs coming from the air.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1985.

Merlin Olsen, Los Angeles Rams, Defensive Tackle (1974)

Merlin Olsen debuted in 1962 and was a Pro Bowl that season.  He would repeat that accolade every year until his final season in 1976.  Becoming the first Defensive Tackle to win the Bert Bell Award, this feels more like a “Lifetime Achievement Award” as this was well past his five straight seasons of being a First Team All-Pro (1966-70), though this was still a good season for the native of Utah.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1982.

Fran Tarkenton, Minnesota Vikings, Quarterback(1975)

The best scrambling Quarterback of the 1970s, Fran Tarkenton would lead the NFL in Completions (273) and Touchdown Passes (25) with 2,994 Yards.   He would also win the AP MVP this year.  This was his eighth of nine Pro Bowl Selections, and he would finish his career with 47,003 Yards and 342 Touchdowns, while also rushing for 3,674 Yards and another 32 TDs.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1986.

Ken Stabler, Oakland Raiders, Quarterback (1976)

Two years before, Ken Stabler won the AP MVP, NEA MVP and the Offensive Player of the Year.  While “The Snake” did not in any of those this season (nor was he even a First Team All-Pro), he was s till a Pro Bowler, led the NFL in Touchdown Passes (27), and more importantly led the Oakland Raiders to a Super Bowl win. He stayed with Oakland until 1979, and played five more years with the New Orleans Saints before retiring.  He would have 27,938 Passing Yards with 194 Touchdowns.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2016.

Bob Griese, Miami Dolphins, Quarterback (1977)

The two Super Bowls were behind him, but Bob Griese still had a lot left in a career spent entirely with the Miami Dolphins. This season, Griese led the NFL in Passing Touchdowns (22) and Passer Rating (87.8) while throwing for 2,252 Yards. He would be named a First Team All-Pro for the second and final time and was a Pro Bowl for the fifth of what would be six selections.  He ended his career in 1980m and would accumulate 25,092 Yards with 192 TDs.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1990.

Terry Bradshaw, Pittsburgh Steelers, Quarterback (1978)

You win a lot of games when you have as good a defense as Terry Bradshaw had with the Steel Curtain, but don’t mistake that for the Quarterback not doing his fair share.  Playing his entire career (1970-83) with Pittsburgh, Bradshaw won four Super Bowls, with 1978 being his third.  This season, he would lead the NFL in Touchdown Passes (28) with 2,915 Passing Yards, and would win the AP MVP.  He retired in 1983 with 27,989 Passing Yards and 212 TDs.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1989.

Earl Campbell, Houston Oilers, Running Back (1979)

Coming out of the University of Texas, Earl Campbell was the best Running Back in the first three years of his NFL career, all of which seeing him win the Rushing Title and Offensive Player of the Year.  1979 was the second of those seasons, and in addition to leading the NFL in Rushing Yards (1,697) and also first in Rushing Touchdowns (19).  He also won the AP MVP this year.  Campbell would play until 1985 and would have 10,213 Yards from Scrimmage with 74 Touchdowns over his career.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1991.

John Riggins, Washington Redskins, Running Back (1983)

You are not supposed to have your best year as a Running Back at age 34 but that is precisely what John Riggins did as a member of the Washington Redskins in 1983.  This year, he would run the ball into the end zone 24 times, well ahead of any other Back.  Rushing for 1,347 Yards this year, he was a First Team All-Pro, and would take Washington to a Super Bowl appearance.  He retired in 1985 with 11,352 career Rushing Yards and 104 TDs.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1992.  

Dan Marino, Miami Dolphins, Quarterback (1984)

Playing his entire career with the Miami Dolphins, this was the second season that Dan Marino was in the NFL.  This year, he shattered the Passing Yards record with 5,084, making him the first QB to hit the 5,000 mark.  He also threw for 48 Touchdowns, destroying Y.A. Tittle’s 36 in 1963.  Marino was also first in Quarterback rating (108.9), Approximate Value (21), Completions (362), and also won the AP MVP.  The Dolphin pivot would lead the NFL in Passing Yards four more times, and after he retired in 1999, he would have 61,361 Yards with 420 Touchdowns.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2005.  

Walter Payton, Chicago Bears, Running Back (1985)

This was the year of the Super Bowl Shuffle and the Bears first title in the Super Bowl era.  It was Walter Payton, who had been their top offensive weapon for a decade that would win the Bert Bell Awards, and he would also capture his fifth and final selection to the First Team All-Pro roster.  He played two more years, and retired with what was then an all-time Rushing Yard record of 16,726.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1993.

Lawrence Taylor, New York Giants, Linebacker (1986)

Arguably the greatest Linebacker of all time, Lawrence Taylor debuted in 1981, where he began a six-year streak of First Team All-Pro Selections.  This season, Taylor would lead the NFL in Quarterback Sacks (20.5) and won his third Defensive Player of the Year Award.  Taylor also won the AP MVP.  He would take the Giants to a Super Bowl win this year, and again four years later.  Taylor played his entire career with the Giants, and would play in 10 Pro Bowls and recorded 132.5 Sacks over his career.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1999.

Jerry Rice, San Francisco 49ers, Wide Receiver(1987)

Also, the Offensive Player of the Year, Jerry Rice was on his third season in the NFL, and would earn his second of ten First Team All-Pro Selections.  Rice led the NFL in Receiving Yards the year before, and while his 1,078 Yards seems low, he had a career-high and league-leading 22 Touchdown Receptions. He would go on to win three Super Bowls with the 49ers and five more Receiving Yards Titles.  He finished his career with three and a half seasons in Oakland, and a half-year in Seattle.  Rice is the all-time leader in Receiving Yards (22,895) and a Receiving Touchdowns (197).  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2010.

Joe Montana, San Francisco 49ers, Quarterback (1989)

You would have thought that Joe Montana would have won an MVP by now considering that prior to 1989, he had already won three Super Bowls with five Pro Bowls and a First Team All-Pro.  “Joe Cool” also had already led the NFL in Touchdown passes twice and Completion Percentage four times.  This year, Montana would win his fourth Super Bowl, was again a First Team All-Pro, an AP MVP and Pro Bowl, and he again led the league in Completion Percentage (70.2).  Montana also threw for 3,521 Passing Yards and 26 TDs. He played two final seasons in the league with the Kansas City Chiefs, and retired in 1994. He left the game with 40,551 Passing Yards and 273 Touchdown Passes.    Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2000. 

Barry Sanders, Detroit Lions, Running Back (1991)

Barry Sanders won his first Rushing Title in 1990, and in 1991 he was second with 1,548.  This year saw Sanders lead the NFL Rushing Touchdowns (16), and he would be named to his second of what would be six First Team All-Pros.  Sanders, who spent his entire career in Detroit, was also a Pro Bowler, but there was never a season in the NFL where he wasn’t.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2004.

Steve Young, San Francisco 49ers, Quarterback (1992)

While Steve Young was the starting Quarterback for the 49ers in 1991, 1992 was the year where he proved he should be.  Young led the NFL in Completion Percentage (66.7), Touchdown Passes (25) and Quarterback Rating (107.0), and would go to his first of seven straight Pro Bowls.  This year, he was also named the AP MVP.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2005.

Emmitt Smith, Dallas Cowboys, Running Back (1993)

Emmitt Smith and the Dallas Cowboys won the Super Bowl the year before, and in 1993 he won his third straight Rushing Title with 1,486 Yards.  Smith was also first in Yards from Scrimmage (1,900) and he also won the Bert Bell Award. Dallas would win the Super Bowl with Smith winning the Super Bowl MVP.  Smith would be named to the next two First Team All-Pros and secured a third Super Bowl ring two later, which coincided with his fourth Rushing Title. The Running Back played for Dallas until 2002, and had two final seasons with the Arizona Cardinals before he called it a career in 2004.  He retired with 18,355 Rushing Yards and 164 Rushing Touchdowns, which makes him first all-time.  Smith is also second all-time in All-Purpose Yards with 21,579.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2010.

Steve Young, San Francisco 49ers, Quarterback (2) (1994)

In 1993, Young was again a First Team All-Pro, and was also named the AP MVP.  Young led the NFL in Completion Percentage (70.3), 35 Passing Touchdowns and QB Rating (112.8).  Young would also lead San Francisco to a Super Bowl win this year.  He would have three more seasons where he finished first in Completion Percentage, one more in Touchdown Passes, and two more in QB Rating. Young played until 1999, and retired with 33,124 Passing Yards, 232 Touchdown Passes, 4,239 Rushing Yards and 43 Rushing TDs.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2005.

Brett Favre, Green Bay Packers, Quarterback (1995)

After four attempts (with no completions) for the Atlanta Falcons in 1992, Brett Favre joined the Green Bay Packers where he went to the Pro Bowl in both 1992 and 1993.  In 1995, “The Gunslinger” earned his third Pro Bowl, his first First Team All-Pro, and he would lead the NFL in Passing Yards (4,413), Touchdown Passes (38), and he also won the Bert Bell Award.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2016.

Brett Favre, Green Bay Packers (2), Quarterback (1996)

Favre had another phenomenal year where he went to Pro Bowl number four, First Team All-Pro number two, and again won the MVP and the Bert Bell Award.  Statistically, he led the NFL in Touchdown Passes (39) with 3,899 Passing Yards, and he would lead the Packers to a Super Bowl win.  Favre would have four more Pro Bowls with Green Bay, one with the Jets, and one with the Vikings and retired in 2010.  He would finish his career with 71,838 Passing Yards and 508 Touchdown Passes. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2016.

Barry Sanders, Detroit Lions, Running Back (2)(1997)

This was the most productive season of Barry Sanders career, where he won his fourth Rushing Title with a career-high 2,053 Rushing Yards.  He also rushed for 11 Touchdowns, and was first overall in Yards from Scrimmage with 2,358 (also a career-high).  Sanders would also win the AP MVP, and was the Offensive Player of the Year for the second time.  Sanders played one more season, retiring in his prime at 30, and he was named to the Pro Bowl in all 10 of his years in the NFL.  He ended his career with 15,269 Rushing Yards, 2,921 Receiving Yards and 109 Touchdowns.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2004.

Kurt Warner, St. Louis Rams, Quarterback (1999)

1999 was the improbable season ever for a Quarterback.  Kurt Warner went from Northern Iowa to bagging groceries to the Arena League and then to the NFL, where he won the back-up job to Trent Green, which in itself was a huge accomplishment.  Green would be injured in the preseason, and Warner was the starting QB, and he made the most of his opportunity.  The leader of the “Greatest Show on Turf”, Warner would throw for 4,353 Yards and lead the NFL in Completion Percentage (65.1), Touchdown Passes (41) and Quarterback Rating (109.2).  Warner would then lead the Rams to a Super Bowl Championship.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2017.

Marshall Faulk, St. Louis Rams, Running Back (2001)

Faulk joined the Rams in 1999, and he helped Kurt Warner and the Rams win the Super Bowl and was the Offensive Player of the Year. In his 2000 AP MVP season, Faulk led the NFL with 18 Rushing Touchdowns, 26 Total Touchdowns and had 2,189 Yards from Scrimmage.  This year would see Faulk win the Bert Bell Award and the Offensive Player of the Year with 2,147 All-Purpose Yard season with a league-leading 21 Touchdowns.  He played until 2005, accumulating six Pro Bowls, three First Team All-Pros, 12,279 Rushing Yards, 6,875 Passing Yards and 136 Touchdowns.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2011.

LaDainian Tomlinson, San Diego Chargers, Running Back (2006)

Debuting in 2001, Tomlinson would have 1,236 Rushing Yards, which would be the least he would have until 2008.  This year, he would win his fourth of five Pro Bowls, second of three First Team All-Pro, and his first of two Rushing Titles with 1,815. He would also lead the NFL in Rushing Touchdowns (28) and Touchdowns (31).  Tomlinson also won the PFWA MVP, NEA MVP, AP MVP, Offensive Player of the Year and Walter Payton Man of the Year.  Damn, what a season!  Tomlinson played with the Chargers until 2009, and he would have two final seasons in football with the New York Jets.  His career ended with 13,684 Rushing Touchdowns, 4,772 Receiving Touchdowns and 153 Touchdowns.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2017.

The following are the players who have won the Bert Bell Award in the NFL who are eligible for the Pro Football Hall of Fame and have not been selected:

Pete Retzlaff, Philadelphia Eagles, Tight End (1965)

Pete Retzlaff would become the first Tight End to win the Bert Bell Award, and this was the first year (and only) that he would be named a First Team All-Pro.  He would have 1,190 Receiving Yards, 10 Touchdowns, and he would play one more season before calling it a career.  Retzlaff had 7,412 Receiving Yards and 47 TDs.  Eligible Since 1972.  Ranked #110 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Don Meredith, Dallas Cowboys, Quarterback (1966)

The first of what would be many popular Quarterbacks in Dallas Cowboy history, Don Meredith broke out in 1966.  This would be his first of three Pro Bowl seasons, and he would throw for a career-high 2,805 Passing Yards and 24 Passing Touchdowns. Meredith was not a First Team All-Pro this year, nor would he ever be one.  He retired after 1968 with 17,199 career Passing Yards and 135 TDs.  Eligible Since 1974.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com

Roman Gabriel, Los Angeles Rams, Quarterback (1969)

The first Filipino-American star in football, Roman Gabriel was the number one pick in the 1963 Draft, but he did not become the permanent starting Quarterback for the Rams until 1966.  He would ascend into the upper-tier of NFL pivots, and he went to the Pro Bowl each year from 1967 to 1969, and in ’69, he would lead the league in Touchdown Passes (24), and he also threw for 2,549 Yards. Gabriel would also win the AP MVP this year.  Gabriel would later join the Philadelphia Eagles, winning the Comeback Player of the Year in 1973.  He played until 1977, and retired with 29,444 Passing Yards and 201 Touchdowns.  Eligible Since 1982.  Ranked #38 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Larry Brown, Washington Redskins, Running Back(1972)

In the first four years of Larry Brown’s career, he was one of the better Running Backs in the NFL.  Brown, who had won the Rushing Title in 1970, would not do so in 1972, but would put up a career-high in Rushing Yards in 1972.  That season, he also had another 473 Receiving Yards, and was first in the league in Yards From Scrimmage (1,689).  Brown regressed after that, and he retired in 1975 with 8,360 Yards from Scrimmage with 55 TDs.  Brown also was named the AP MVP this season.  Eligible Since 1982.  Ranked #160 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Ron Jaworski, Philadelphia Eagles, Quarterback(1980)

After three seasons with the Los Angeles Rams, Jaworski was traded to the Philadelphia Eagles, where he became the starting Quarterback.  1980 was the only Pro Bowl season for “Jaws”, and he threw for 27 Touchdowns and 3,529 Yards, while leading Philadelphia to their first NFC Title.  He played with the Eagles until 1986, and had brief stints in Miami and Kansas City before retiring in 1989 with 28,190 career Passing Yards and 179 Touchdowns.  Eligible Since 1995.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Ken Anderson, Cincinnati Bengals, Quarterback (1981)

Ken Anderson is considered by most Bengals fans to be the most important player in franchise history, and the biggest Hall of Fame snub.  Anderson spent his entire career with the Bengals (1971-86) and in 1981, he would go to his third of four Pro Bowls and took Cincinnati to their first Super Bowl. In the regular season, Anderson threw for 29 Touchdowns, 3,754 Yards, and was also the AP MVP.  He played until 1986, and retired with 32,838 Yards with 197 TDs.  Eligible Since 1982.  Ranked #12 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Joe Theismann, Washington Redskins, Quarterback(1982)

This was the strike-shortened season, and the first of two Pro Bowl years for the Redskins’ Quarterback. Theismann would have 13 Touchdown Passes, 2,033 Yards, and take the Redskins to a Super Bowl win. Theismann actually had a better 1983, winning the AP MVP, and returning to the Super Bowl, but this time they lost. A few seasons later, a gruesome leg injury at the hands of the Giants’ Lawrence Taylor would end his career, and Theismann retired with 25,206 Passing Yards and 160 Touchdowns.  Eligible Since 1991.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Randall Cunningham, Philadelphia Eagles, Quarterback (1988)

As football evolves, you would see more Quarterbacks become more mobile.  Randall Cunningham was a pioneer of that skill, and in 1988, the Eagles QB would be chosen for his first Pro Bowl with 3,808 Passing Yards and 24 TDs, while also rushing for 624 Yards and 6 TDs.  Eligible Since 2003.  Ranked #36 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Randall Cunningham, Philadelphia Eagles, Quarterback (2) (1990)

Since his first Bert Bell Award win, Randall Cunningham remained the most exciting QB in football.  This season, the Eagles pivot would rush for 942 Yards and five TDs, and in the air he had 3,466 Yards with 30 TDs.    Eligible Since 2003.  Ranked #36 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Randall Cunningham, Minnesota Vikings, Quarterback (3) (1998)

Cunningham is one of two multi-time Bert Bell winners to not be in the Pro Football Hall of Fame, and he is a three-time recipient, the first player to achieve that.  In the eight years between his second and third Bert Bell win, he dealt with injuries and was retired in 1996.  He came back in 1997 for the Minnesota Vikings as a backup, and he was their starter in 1998, the year where he was named a First Team All-Pro for the only time in his career.  Cunningham threw for 3,704 Yards, 34 Touchdowns, and he led the NFL in Passer Rating (106.0).  He played three more seasons and retired with 29,979 Yards, 207 TDs, and rushed for 4,927 Yards and another 35 TDs on the ground.  Eligible Since 2003.  Ranked #36 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Rich Gannon, Oakland Raiders, Quarterback (2000)

In 2000, Gannon was chosen for his second Pro Bowl and at age 35 he was a First Team All-Pro for the first time in his career. He threw for 28 Touchdowns and 3,420 Yards this season.  Eligible Since 2010.  Ranked #290 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Rich Gannon, Oakland Raiders, Quarterback (2) (2002)

This was year four of Rich Gannon’s four year run of Pro Bowls, and this season he would lead the NFL in Completions (418) and Passing Yards (4,689) while throwing for 26 Touchdowns.  Gannon took the Raiders to the Super Bowl, but they were destroyed by the Tampa Bay Buccaneers.  Gannon would get hurt the following season, and only played one more year before retiring in 2004 with 28,743 Passing Yards with 180 Touchdowns. Eligible Since 2010.  Ranked #290 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Shaun Alexander, Seattle Seahawks, Running Back (2005)

Alexander was a Pro Bowl for the third (and final) and he would lead the NFL in Rushing Yards (1,880), Rushing Touchdowns (27), and Touchdowns (28).  The Running Back also won the Offensive Player of the Year and the AP MVP.  He would play with the Seahawks until 2007, and had one final year with the Redskins before retiring.  He left the game with 9,453 Rushing Yards and 100 Rushing Touchdowns.  Eligible Since 2014.  Ranked #100 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Let’s update our tally, shall we?

Award in Question

Percentage of recipients who have entered the HOF

Percentage of recipients by year who have entered the HOF.

NBA MVP

100%

100%

NHL Norris

90.5%

96.4%

NBA All Star Game MVP

89.5%

91.7%

NHL Conn Smythe

74.2%

85.4%

NFL Bert Bell Award

73.7%

71.4%

NFL AP Offensive Player of the Year

73.1%

79.4%

NFL AP MVP

68.3%

74.0%

NHL Lady Byng

63.8%

76.0%

NFL Defensive Player of the Year

60.8%

71.1%

NFL Super Bowl MVP

60.6%

64.9%

NBA Defensive Player of the Year

58.3%

56.5%

NHL Vezina

57.1%

66.3%

NBA Rookie of the Year

56.5%

56.5%

MLB MVP

55.0%

60.2%

NFL Pro Bowl MVP

52.3%

54.8%

MLB Lou Gehrig Award

51.9%

51.9%

MLB Roberto Clemente Award

47.4%

47.4%

MLB/NL/AL Cy Young Award

44.4%

55.4%

MLB Babe Ruth Award

37.0%

39.3%

NHL Frank J. Selke Trophy

33.3%

36.7%

MLB Hutch Award

33.1%

33.1%

NFL Offensive Rookie of the Year

28.6%

28.6%

NHL Bill Masterton Memorial Trophy

27.9%

27.9%

MLB Edgar Martinez Award

26.7%

17.2%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Designated Hitter)

25.0%

30.8%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Shortstop)

23.5%

52.6%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove

21.7%

36.8%

NFL Defensive Rookie of the Year

20.6%

20.6%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Catcher)

20.0%

22.5%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Second Base)

18.8%

39.8%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Shortstop)

18.2%

35.1%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Pitcher)

18.2%

20.1%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Second Base)

16.7%

32.7%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Outfield)

16.7%

30.1%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Outfield)

15.7%

25.2%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Third Base)

14.3%

14.3%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Third Base)

13.6%

14.3%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (First Base)

13.6%

13.3%

MLB (NL/AL) Rookie of the Year

13.3%

13.3%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Catcher)

10.3%

15.2%

NBA Most Improved Player of the Year

5.3%

3.2%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (First Base)

3.8%

3.2%

NFL AP Comeback Player of the Year

0.0%

0.0%

So, who is up next?

The following are the players who have won the Bert Bell Award in the NFL who have retired but have not met the mandatory years out of the game to qualify for the Pro Football Hall of Fame:

Peyton Manning, Indianapolis Colts, Quarterback (2003)

Peyton Manning was in his sixth season in the NFL, and he would have his fourth Pro Bowl year.  Manning would be named a First Team All-Pro for the first time, and he would lead the league in Completions (379), Completion Percentage (67.0), Passing Yards (4,267) and he would throw for 29 Touchdowns.  Manning also won the NEA MVP and AP MVP this season.  Eligible in 2021.

Peyton Manning, Indianapolis Colts, Quarterback (2) (2004)

Peyton Manning went back-to-back, also securing a First Team All-Pro and a fifth Pro Bowl.  Manning finished first in Touchdown Passes (49) and Quarterback Rating (121.1), and he threw for 4,557 Yards.  In this season, Manning would also win the PFWA MVP, NEA MVP, Offensive Player of the Year, and the AP MVP. Eligible in 2021.

Michael Vick, Philadelphia Eagles, Quarterback (2) (2010)

It didn’t happen in Atlanta, but after missing two years due to being incarcerated for a dog fighting ring, but Michael Vick finally won his first individual award as a Philadelphia Eagle, which was his first year as a starter.  Vick threw for 3,018 Yards, 21 Touchdowns and would rush for 676 Yards and 6 TDs.  Vick played until 2015, after finishing his career with the New York Jets and Pittsburgh Steelers, and he would have 6,109 Rushing Yards, 36 Rushing Touchdowns, 22,464 Passing Yards and 133 Passing Touchdowns.  Eligible in 2021.

Peyton Manning, Denver Broncos, Quarterback (5) (2013)

It still seems strange to type Peyton Manning as a Denver Bronco, and he would have a monster regular season with a league-leading 450 Completions, 5,477 Passing Yards, 55 Touchdown Passes and a 80.9 QBR.  He would also capture the PFWA MVP, Offensive Player of the Year and AP MVP this season. Manning played until 2015, and while he was not great, the Broncos defense allowed him to go on top as a Super Bowl Champion.  He retired with 71,940 Passing Yards and 539 Passing Touchdowns.  Eligible in 2021.

The following are the players who have won the AP MVP who are still active.

Tom Brady, New England Patriots, Quarterback (2007)

Tom Brady already won three Super Bowls (with two Super Bowl MVPs) before he secured his first AP MVP.  This was the year of the bittersweet season where the Pats entered the Super Bowl undefeated, only to lose to Eli Manning and the New York Giants.  Still, it was an incredible year, where the Patriots’ Quarterback led the league in Completion Percentage (68.9), Passing Yards (4,806), Touchdown Passes (50), Passer Rating (117.2) and QBR (88.5).  Brady also would win the PFWA MVP, NEA MVP, AP MVP and Offensive Player of the Year this season.  42 Years Old, Playing for the New England Patriots.

Adrian Peterson, Minnesota Vikings, Running Back (2008)

In 2008, Adrian Peterson would win the first of what would be three Rushing Titles with 1,760, and also secured his first Yards from Scrimmage Title (1,885).  He had 10 TDs that year.  34 Years Old, Playing for the Washington Redskins.

Drew Brees, Green Bay Packers, Quarterback (2009)

For the fourth time in his career, Drew Brees was named to the Pro Bowl and for the first time in his career he was first in Completion Percentage (70.6) and for the second time he was atop the leaderboard in Touchdown Passes (34).  Also throwing for 4,388 Yards, Brees would take New Orleans to the promised land and they would win their first ever Super Bowl.  41 Years Old, Playing for the New Orleans Saints.

Aaron Rodgers, Green Bay Packers, Quarterback (2011)

This was Aaron Rodgers’ seventh season in the NFL but only his fourth as the Packers starter.  Rodgers won the Super Bowl the year before, and this season he would finish first in Passer Rating (122.5) and QBR (84.5), while throwing for 45 Touchdowns, and accumulating 4,643 Passing Yards.  He would also win the PFWA MVP and AP MVP.  36 Years Old, Playing for the Green Bay Packers.

Adrian Peterson, Minnesota Vikings, Running Back (2) (2012)

Adrian Peterson would be named to four First Team All-Pro selections, this being his third.  Peterson also won three Rushing Titles, with this season being the best one (and second), with him going for 2,097 Yards.  The Minnesota Viking also finished first in All-Purpose Yards with 2,314, and he secured 13 Touchdowns this year.  34 Years Old, Playing for the Washington Redskins.

J.J. Watt, Houston Texans, Defensive End (2014)

The first Houston Texan to win the Bert Bell Award, J.J. Watt also won his second Defensive Player of the Year Award in 2014. This season, he had his second 20 plus Sack year, and would lead the NFL in Tackles for Loss (29).  He would win his third Defensive Player of the Year in 2015 and also was awarded the Walter Payton Man of the Year Award in 2017.  30 Years Old, Playing for the Houston Texans.

Cam Newton, Carolina Panthers, Quarterback (2015)

Cam Newton was the Offensive Rookie of the Year in 2011, and this season, in addition to his AP MVP, he also won the AP MVP and was the Offensive Player of the Year.  Stat wise, Newton threw for 35 Touchdowns, 3,837 Yards, and rushed for 636 Yards and 10 TDs.  He took Carolina to the Super Bowl, but they lost to the Denver Broncos.  30 Years Old, Playing for the Carolina Panthers.

Matt Ryan, Atlanta Falcons, Quarterback (2016)

The first Atlanta Falcon to win the AP MVP, Matt Ryan would lead the NFL in Passer Rating (117.1) and QBR (79.4).  He would also throw for 4,944 Yards with 38 Touchdowns. This year, he would also win the Offensive Player of the Year and the AP MVP.  Ryan would take the Falcons to the Super Bowl, but they lost to the New England Patriots.  34 Years Old, Playing for the Atlanta Falcons.

Carson Wentz, Philadelphia Eagles, Quarterback(2017)

From North Dakota State, Carson Wentz broke out with a 33 Touchdown and 3,296 Passing Yard season.  This was only through 13 Games, as he suffered an injury, and was unable to complete the year, but Nick FOles stepped in, and the Eagles won their first Super Bowl.  27 Years Old, Playing for the Philadelphia Eagles.

Patrick Mahomes, Kansas City Chiefs, Quarterback (2018)

After playing backup as a rookie, Patrick Mahomes took over the starting Quarterback job for the Chiefs and he instantly became one of the most exciting players in the NFL.  Mahomes would lead the NFL in Touchdown Passes (50) and QBR (80.4), and he would throw for 5,097 Yards.  This season, he would also win the Offensive Player of the Year and AP MVP.  24 Years Old, Playing for the Kansas City Royals.

Lamar Jackson, Baltimore Ravens, Quarterback(2019)

Jackson was money in his second season. Leading the NFL with 36 Touchdown Passes against only 6 Interceptions.  Jackson would throw for 3,127 Yards, and rush for another 1,206 and led the NFL Yards per Rushing Attempt.  He also broke the plane with his legs on seven occasions. Jackson also captured the AP MVP. 23 Years Old, Playing for the Baltimore Ravens.

This did generate a high amount of Hall of Famers, but as it feels a little more arbitrary than the AP MVP, it is a shock that its HOF Percentage was higher than the AP MVP.

So, what is up next?

As we are writing this, we are inspired by Baseball’s spring training, so here is the World Series MVP.

As always, we thank you for your support, and look for that soon.

How Will LSU & Clemson Cope as Top Picks Go Pro? 

After an intriguing battle at the Mercedes-Benz Superdome in New Orleans,LSU overcame a strong challenge from Clemsonto win the collegiate National Championship, 42-25.

With five or more of those players expected to be snapped up in the first round of the 2020 NFL Draft, we take a look at the two best prospects and how their current teams might fare without them.

Joe Burrow likely first pick

LSU’s Joe Burrow is the first name on the list for good reason. The quarterback’s performance on January 14, confirmed his status as likely first pick overall in April’s draft. He recorded the most passing touchdowns in a season (passing Hawaii's Colt Brennan) and finished the season with 402 of 527 (76.3%) for 5,671 yards. He recorded 60 passing touchdowns, six interceptions and five rushing touchdowns.

Hailed by many as the best ever college quarterback, the 23-year-old could be the first name called in April with mock drafts projecting a move to the Cincinnati Bengals. Myles Brennan has been tasked with replacing the Heisman Trophy winner once the season is over. The highly-rated New Orleans native suddenly finds himself with big shoes to fill but his trajectory has set him up well and he has also bulked up over the last seasons and looks in good physical shape.

Simmons a sure-fire top-10 pick

Clemson is resigned to losing linebacker (amongst other positions) Isaiah Simmons. The 21-year-old posted some impressive stats (102 tackles, 16 tackles for loss, eight sacks, three interceptions, eight broken up passes and a forced fumble) and has been linked with the Giants in the mock drafts. He is expected to be a top-10 pick and could even make the top-three.

Clemson early favorite for coming season

Losing such a versatile defender is never easy and Clemson will have their work cut out selecting a suitable replacement. At first glance, their defense will be notably weaker as players like Simmons don’t come along too often but Clemson has a history of finding a way to compete. We will have to wait to see who they recruit to fill the 21-year-old's shoes.

Thanks to their recent consistency, having appeared in four of the last five finals, Clemson remains the early favorite in the American football betting oddsto win next year’s championship. Also, in the running are Ohio State, Alabama and 2020 winners LSU.

Heisman Trophy contenders

Burrow and all but one of the Heisman Trophy finalistswill be leaving college this season.  The exception is Ohio State quarterback Justin Fields, who has been announced as favorite to claim the award at the end of the 2020 campaign. He finished third in the 2019 voting behind winner Burrow and runner-up, Oklahoma quarterback Jalen Hurts. The Buckeyes reached the playoff semifinals where they lost 29-23 to Clemson. 

Also in contention is Trevor Lawrence, who lost the first game of his college career in the Championship final against LSU. Lawrence had previously led Clemson to a national title and will be keen to bounce back stronger before heading the NFL Draft in 2021 where he has been tipped to be No. 1 overall pick. If he can lead the Tigers to a third-straight National Championship game he could also finish the campaign as a Heisman Trophy winner.

With a thrilling end to the Super Bowl 2020, one can only wonder how exciting the next season is going to be. With unpredictability being the common element, the NFL has seen some nail biting encounters last season. Super Bowl 2021 will be played in Tampa, Florida. Betting enthusiasts would be rubbing their hands in anticipation of what’s in store. Kansas City Chiefs are the favourites to win it next year, and you can find the best NFL betting odds, statistics and power rankingsonline. One can expect plenty drama and high-quality football matches throughout the coming season.

Super Bowl 2021 venue

The Super Bowl 2021 will be hosted in Tampa, Florida at the beautiful Raymond James Stadium. The stadium is the home ground of the famous Tampa Bay Buccaneers who have already hosted the event many times in the past. This proved to be a critical requirement for the Super Bowl 2021 which was supposed to be held in Los Angeles but then was later moved to Tampa to meet the requirements of the grand event. It will be the fifth time that Tampa will host a Super Bowl having last hosted it in 2009.

Players to watch out 

Super Bowl MVP, Patrick Mahomes is the man of the moment and deservingly so. He has been fantastic in the last two seasons and would want to continue impressing and breaking records in the coming season. The young quarterback has got everybody talking and looking forward to his performances. Patrick ‘Showtime’ Mahomes as they call him, would definitely be the player to watch out, for both fans and opposition teams.

Baltimore Ravens quarterback Lamar Jackson, after being named the NFL’s most valuable player will look forward to the next season with a point to prove. He has played superbly the last year and at just 23 years of age, he has a great opportunity to win some more awards. He was awarded the NFL’s most valuable player at the pre-Super Bowl awards. The pre- Super Bowl awards also saw San Francisco 49ers Nick Bosa named Rookie of the Year. He would be an exciting watch as he also won the Defensive Rookie of the Year. Bosa along with the many other young talents will be the ones to watch out for in the coming season.

Teams to watch out 

Kansas City Chiefs with their exciting playing style and the rise of their starlets will be favourites to win the championship next year. San Francisco 49ers came very close to winning it and were only a quarter away from winning the Super Bowl 2020, and would be challenging for the championship.

Baltimore Ravens would want to start winning titles again and would face stiff competition from the New Orleans Saints in doing so. The New England Patriots would want to add to their illustrious cabinet of trophies and will definitely fight for the championship.

Date of commencement 

The 101stseason of the NFL will begin in September and end after week 17 is played in January.




Will Luka Doncic be the best NBA player in history

Luka Doncic is the number one topic in the NBA ever since he was drafted into the world's best basketball league. Entering the league at just 19 years of age, it was clear that Luka had what it takes to play on the highest level. Even though the expectations for the young Slovenian were very high, his game turned out to be better than anyone thought.

In fact, Luka is on the verge of becoming one of the best players NBA has ever seen, and he still has a long road ahead of him. With an average of 29 points, 9.5 rebounds, and 8.9 assists per game in his second season, the young player is taking the world by storm. He is also the current leader in triple-double games and a possible MVP candidate. But how did this basketball prodigy get to this level at such a young age? 

Professional player since his teens 

The toughest Super Bowl to call

In case you haven’t noticed, there happens to be a not-too-small sporting event taking place in the very near future. No, we’re not talking about the Australian Tennis Open (although, it’s looking like a great tournament). We are, of course, talking about the 54thSuper Bowl between the Kansas City Chiefs and the San Francisco 49ers that is set to take place in Miami next weekend.

So who’s going to win? Who will be named the MVP? Can the Chiefs really end their 50-year drought? Before we answer that last question, let’s take a look at the Chiefs opponents, the 49ers.

The 49ers

If we take a look back at some of the 49ers' key moments en route to the Super Bowl, we'll see that they aren’t quite invincible. In the regular season, they lost to the Ravens, the Seahawks, and surprisingly enough, the Falcons.

Despite their losses, the 49ers have arguably been one of the most outstanding teams of the season. Now, that might sound like an obvious thing to say about a team that has just made it to the Super Bowl, but the truth is that there have been plenty of teams that have made it to the final despite playing poorly throughout the season. The 49ers are beatable, but they’ll take some beating.

In the Packers game, the 49ers’ Raheem Mostert played the game of his life. 220 yards and four touchdowns left the Packers second best throughout the game and, if anything, it’s an ominous sign for the Chiefs.

The team’s running game has been impeccable, ranking second for rushing yards and first in the league for touchdowns. And this offense will come up against a defense that is well-known for giving up space on the field despite their relative tight control of the game.

If the 49ers can bring their A-game in terms of offense, we fully expect them to rack up the points. Tevin Coleman dislocated his shoulder but hasn’t yet been ruled out of the game. We have a feeling that even if he doesn’t play, Mostert will be more than able to handle the pressure as he has already proven.

The Chiefs

Caption - Can the Chiefs lift the Vince Lombardi Trophy?

Can you believe that the win over the Titans secured the Chiefs their first ever Lamar Hunt Trophy? It’s pretty incredible given that Hunt was the founder of both the Chiefs and the AFC. Once the excitement of that win died down, the reality of preparing for their first Super Bowl appearance since 1970 set in.

The Chiefs haven’t had quite the same experience this season as the 49ers. They are a backs-to-the-wall team that has snatched some miraculous wins from the jaws of defeat. They gave up a 24-point lead against the Texans and were up against it vs. the Titans when they went 10-0 down in the first quarter. Against lesser teams than the 49ers, they were able to come back by playing their air game but if they get a slow start in Miami, we’re not sure that will work this time around.

Even so, the Chiefs were the marginal favorites when both finalists were decided, but the odds seem to be changing and swinging in either team’s favor on an hourly basis. Coach Andy Reid may see this as his last opportunity to finally win the Lombardi and, if anyone deserves it, it’s the man who lost out as Eagles coach back in 2004.

Who will be the MVP?

It’s hard to look past a quarterback when it comes to the MVP. In fact, seven of the last ten MVPs at the Super Bowl have been quarterbacks. If this year is no different, then it’s a straight up contest between Patrick Mahomes and Jimmy Garoppolo.

Both players are in amazing form though we get the feeling that, despite his new lease of life at the 49ers, Garoppolo needs to add an MVP and a ring as an active player to the two he won as a back-up if he wants to avoid becoming another Randall Cunningham. Mahomes, on the other hand, seems to be a man with the world at his feet. While Garoppolo has something to prove, his Chiefs counterpart has nothing to lose and everything to gain. It all depends on how the game pans out, of course.

However, this season could see a running back take the MVP. Raheem Mostert is improving with each game and if the Chiefs play to his strengths and make a quick start to the game, he just might be the most important player on the field. This is particularly true if Tevin Coleman fails to recover from his injuryand the onus is placed on Mostert to lead the line.

Aside from Mostert, we really can’t see anyone else pushing either quarterback for the MVP. Of course, you could punt for a linebacker in Nick Bosa, but we don’t expect it to be a game where the plaudits are won by the defensive units of either team.

So which team will win?

It really is the toughest Super Bowl to call in recent memory. Both teams seem pretty evenly matched and have quarterbacks in good form. Neither team is unstoppable, but if we were to choose one team that will give up scores, it would be the Chiefs. The 49ers just seem like a more solid defensive side.

That point, however, is countered by the fact that the Chiefs have an incredibly fluid attack that is good in the air. But then the 49ers have Mostert. You see where we’re coming from when we say that this is too tough to call? In fairness, we’d like to see the Chiefs do it for Reid and the fact that it’s their first Super Bowl in 50 years, but again it’s too tough to call.

Either way, this has all the makings of a real classic. With both sides evenly matched we can see this being one of the most enjoyable Super Bowls for neutral fans in a very long time. Let’s hope it lives up to expectations.

Unprecedented Excitement ahead of Tokyo 2020 Olympics 

There are less than six months until the Tokyo 2020 Olympics, and the world is getting ready for the biggest sports event of the year. The excitement is building all over Tokyo, that worked hard in the past seven years to make everything possible. Thousands of athletes and hundreds of thousands of fans will make their way to the Land of the Rising Sun during the games.

Japan has done everything possible to make sure that the 2020 Olympics are up to standards. There's still a lot to be done with only six months until the opening ceremony, but so far, all of the preparations are going well. Everyone is doing their part, as there is no room for error or delays. Keep reading and learn everything we know about the Tokyo 2020 games so far. 

Venues

Tokyo is a massive city with close to 30 million residents. It's a densely populated area, and organizing the biggest sports event in those circumstances comes with all kinds of challenges. Japan spent 7 years building 43 new venues for visitors from all over the world. Eight of them are permanent, ten are temporary, and 25 already existed. The preparations are in full swing and the new Olympic Stadium was opened on New Year's Day. It's fitted with state of the art equipment and should serve many more generations of athletes. 

The Village Plaza was constructed for the games and it will be dismantled after the games are over. All of the materials will be returned to their donors, and the land will be re-used for new projects. The leaders of Japan and the city of Tokyo did an amazing job of planning the event. Housing so many visitors is a logistical nightmare, but if anyone can pull it off, it's Japan. So, if you're going to stay at one of these venues during the OG, you can relax after a day at the stadium with the best interactive sex gamesfor free. 

Ticketing 

The Olympic Games are the most popular sports event of the year, but the number of visitors fluctuates from year to year. Tokyo 2020 looks very promising so far. Over 8.2 million people from Japan have registered for their Tokyo ID. As the second phase of ticket sales comes to an end, the total ticket count comes down to 4.48 million tickets only in Japan. The third phase will include worldwide ticket sales, so make sure you get yours while you still can. 

Millions of registered participants 

There's no doubt that Japan will go the extra mile when it comes to the Tokyo 2020 games. Hundreds of events held all over the country have attracted close to 140,000 initiatives and activities that will be taking place during the games. Over 98 million people will participate and contribute to the Tokyo Games. 

It looks like the world is in for quite a spectacle later this year, and we can only imagine what's in store. Japan is known for many technological advancements and inventions, so we're hoping to see something special when the time comes. Speaking of modern technologies, give these 3d porn gamesa try and you won't regret it. 

Choosing a different approach

Believe it or not, the Olympic village for the Tokyo 2020 games needs over 26,000 beds for the athletes and their teams. That's a lot of beds, and Japan found the perfect way of getting them. Instead of buying them, they designed special beds made entirely of renewable materials. The mattresses are made to the highest standards, and they offer amazing quality and comfort, while the frames are made from durable cardboard. All of the beds will be recycled when the games are over. 

Venues across the city probably won't come with recyclable beds, so be careful where you point your gun while playing the Red Dead Redemption porn game

Are you ready for the 32nd Olympic Games?

The 32nd Olympic Games will take place in Japan later this year, but you can already feel the excitement all over the globe. Japan is an exotic country for most people and the culture shock is surely going to shake millions of visitors on every corner. 

It doesn't really matter if you're a sports fan or not, the Olympic Games are a special event watched by billions of people worldwide. We can't wait to see our favorite athletes and cheer for our nation's teams. There are just a few more months to go!