Before indulging in that ever-popular blood sport of listing all the reasons why the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame sucks, let's list all the reasons why it doesn't:

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We here at Notinhalloffame.com thought it would be fun to take a look at the major awards in North American team sports and see how it translates into Hall of Fame potential.

Needless to say, different awards in different sports yield hall of fame potential.  In basketball, the team sport with the least amount of players on a roster, the dividend for greatness much higher.  In baseball, it is not as much as a great individual season does not have the same impact.

We are now taking a look at the Gold Glove Award, given annually to the best defensive player in MLB in each respective position.

This will take awhile, so be patient with us!

We have just tackled the Catcher and First Base spot.

As you can imagine, we are continuing with Second Base, a position where stellar defense is certainly more required than at First.

The following are the past players who have won the Gold Glove at Second Base who are eligible for the Baseball Hall of Fame and have been enshrined.

 

Nellie Fox, ML Chicago White Sox (1957)

2.2 dWAR.  The first winner of the Gold Glove at Second Base, Nellie Fox was coming off his third season leading the AL in Hits and his seventh straight All Star Game.  Fox was a worthy debut winner, finishing second in Defensive bWAR and leading all AL Second Basemen in Assists, Putouts, Double Plays Turned, Total Zone Runs and Range Factor per Game.  We are off to a great start!  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1997.

Bill Mazeroski, NL Pittsburgh Pirates (1958)

2.9 dWAR.  While some can debate whether or not Bill Mazeroski is Hall of Fame worthy, there is no question that he deserved this Gold Glove.  “Maz” would lead the NL in Defensive WAR and would lead the NL second Basemen in Assists, Total Zone Runs and Range Factor per Game.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2001.

Nellie Fox, AL Chicago White Sox (2) (1959)

2.6 dWAR.  This would be Nellie Fox’s best year, where he would win the MVP (his only), go to the World Series (though Chicago would lose) and lead the American League in Defensive WAR.  Fox would again lead in Assists, Putouts and Total Zone Runs, this time with a whopping 21.  He would also lead in Fielding Percentage.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1997.

Nellie Fox, AL Chicago White Sox (3) (1960)

2.1 dWAR.  This time finishing fourth in Defensive WAR, Nellie Fox was still in All Star home both with his bat and glove.  Fox would again lead the AL Second Basemen in Assists, Putouts, Double Plays Turned and Range Factor per Game.  He may not have led in Total Zone Runs, but with 16 he did finish second.  Fox earned all three of these awards.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1997.

Bill Mazeroski, NL Pittsburgh Pirates (2) (1960)

1.1 dWAR.  While defensively he was not where he was in ’58, he was still good and this was the best overall year of his career.  Not only did Mazeroski finish 8th in MVP voting (the only time he would finish in the top ten), he had the game winning Home Run that would win the World Series for the Pirates.  Defensively speaking, Mazeroski led the National League Second Basemen is Assists, Putouts, Double Plays Turned, Range Factor per Game and Fielding Percentage.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2001.

Bill Mazeroski, NL Pittsburgh Pirates (3) (1961)

1.2 dWAR.  Well, how could he top last year?  He couldn’t, but this was still a very good player.  Maz still led the NL Second Baseman in Assists, Putouts, Double Plays Turned and Range Factor per Game.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2001.

Bill Mazeroski, NL Pittsburgh Pirates (4) (1963)

3.3 dWAR.  For the second and final time in his career, Bill Mazeroski would lead the National League in Defensive WAR.  Again an All Star, he would lead in Assists, Double Plays Turned, Total Zone Runs (with 23!) and Range Factor per Game.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2001.

Bill Mazeroski, NL Pittsburgh Pirates (5) (1964)

2.1 dWAR.  Now we said Mazeroski would never lead the NL in Defensive WAR again, but he did finish second this year.  Mazeroski would again make the All Star Game and he would lead all National League Second Basemen in Assists, Double Plays Turned, Total Zone Runs and Range Factor per Game.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2001.

Bill Mazeroski, NL Pittsburgh Pirates (6) (1965)

1.6 dWAR.  This year, Mazeroski would finish fifth overall in Defensive WAR in the NL.  He would not finish in the top ten in Assists and Putouts this year, as he only played 127 Games in Double Plays Turned, Total Zone Runs, Range Factor per Game and Fielding Percentage.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2001.

Bill Mazeroski, NL Pittsburgh Pirates (7) (1966)

1.6 dWAR.  Mazeroski did not finish in the top ten in Defensive WAR, but did finish with the same number he did the year before.  This was Mazeroski’s last All Star appearance, and he would again lead in Assists, Putouts, Double Plays Turned, Range Factor per Game and Fielding Percentage.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2001.

Bill Mazeroski, NL Pittsburgh Pirates (8) (1967)

2.6 dWAR.  This would be Mazeroski’s final Gold Glove and he deserved all eight of them.  Finishing second in Defensive WAR in ’67, Mazeroski is as of this writing twenty-second overall in that category.  To cap it off, Maz would finish first amongst the NL First Basemen in Assists, Putouts, and Range Factor per Game.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2001.

Joe Morgan, NL Cincinnati Reds (1973)

1.7 dWAR.  By this time, Joe Morgan had established himself as the premier offensive Second Baseman in history, and this year his defense was catching up.   The Cincinnati Red led in Double Plays Turned and finished 7th overall in Defensive bWAR.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1990.

Joe Morgan, NL Cincinnati Reds (2) (1974)

0.9 dWAR.  This wasn’t a bad season with the glove for Morgan, but he didn’t really deserve this one and was nowhere to be found in the top ten in Range Factor per Game or Total Zone Runs.  Morgan won this one with his bat and reputation and it wouldn’t be the last time.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1990.

Joe Morgan, NL Cincinnati Reds (3) (1975)

2.0 dWAR.  This was the best defensive season of Joe Morgan’s career as he finished 5th overall in Defensive bWAR and 2nd amongst NL Second Basemen in Total Zone Runs.  To top it off, Morgan had an incredible season offensively (leading in Offensive bWAR) and he justifiably won the National League MVP Award.  Oh, and he also won the World Series!  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1990.

Joe Morgan, NL Cincinnati Reds (4) (1976)

0.3 dWAR.  Morgan actually put up an even better offensive season, repeated with the MVP and the World Series.  Defensively however, Morgan was just average Second Basemen and was not Gold Glove worthy by any stretch.    Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1990.

Joe Morgan, NL Cincinnati Reds (5) (1977)

-0.5 dWAR.  While Joe Morgan was still a very good player, he took a step back defensively and had no business winning this award.  While he did lead in Putouts, he was not in the top ten in Total Zone Runs, Range Factor Per Game and finished with a negative Defensive bWAR.  This is one of those many Gold Gloves awarded on reputation alone.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1990.

Ryne Sandberg, NL Chicago Cubs (1983)

1.9 dWAR.  Ryne Sandeberg was considered the best Second Baseman in the National League of the 1980’s and rightfully became a Hall of Fame inductee.  In his sophomore season and first of many Gold Glove wins, Sandberg would finish fifth overall in Defensive bWAR while leading his NL peers in Assists, Double Plays Turned, Range Factor per Game and Fielding Percentage.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2005.

Ryne Sandberg, NL Chicago Cubs (2) (1984)

1.9 dWAR.  This would be arguably the best season of Sandberg’s career.  1984 would see Sandberg go to his first of multiple All Star Games, win his first Silver Slugger and win the National League MVP Award.  He would also again finish fifth in Defensive bWAR while leading in Assists, Total Zone Runs, Range Factor per Game and Fielding Percentage.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2005.

Ryne Sandberg, NL Chicago Cubs (3) (1985)

0.1 dWAR.  Ryne Sandberg kept his bat up but his glove game took a serious step back.  He did not lead in any defensive metric this season and won this award on reputation.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2005.

Ryne Sandberg, NL Chicago Cubs (4) (1986)

0.8 dWAR.  “Ryno” would have a better year defensively and would lead the National League Second Basemen in Assists and Fielding Percentage.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2005.

Ryne Sandberg, NL Chicago Cubs (5) (1987)

-0.9 dWAR.  With all due respect to this worthy Hall of Fame inductee this is one of the worst season ever offered to a Gold Glove winner.  It goes without saying that he did not come close to leading in any defensive metric.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2005.

Ryne Sandberg, NL Chicago Cubs (6) (1988)

1.4 dWAR.  Sandberg would rebound defensively and would lead the National League Second Basemen in Assists.  He would finish 8th overall in the National League in Defensive bWAR.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2005.

Ryne Sandberg, NL Chicago Cubs (7) (1989)

0.2 dWAR.  Sandberg would not lead in any defensive metric and this award makes you wonder if they just repeated what they had leftover on the ballot from the season before.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2005.

Ryne Sandberg, NL Chicago Cubs (8) (1990)

0.6 dWAR.  While Ryne Sandberg would lead the NL Second Basemen in Assists, we have another misappropriated Gold Glove win by the Chicago Cub.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2005.

Roberto Alomar, AL Toronto Blue Jays (1991)

-0.1 dWAR.  Do you know Sandy Alomar would go the All Star Game year after year despite having poor stats?  His brother won a plethora of Gold Gloves and shouldn’t have.  His first Gold Glove came in his first year in the American League and while his bat made him one of the best offensively at his position he did not lead in any defensive category.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2011.

Ryne Sandberg, NL Chicago Cubs (9) (1991)

1.0 dWAR.  Sandberg probably wasn’t the best choice this year either, though again would lead in Assists.  Ironically, he would have three more seasons where he would lead the Second Basemen in the NL in Total Zone Runs with two more appearances in the top ten in Defensive bWAR.  By then the writers “moved on” from Sandberg.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2005.

Roberto Alomar, AL Toronto Blue Jays (2) (1992)

0.5 dWAR.  This year, Alomar would at least lead the AL Second Basemen in Fielding Percentage but while Alomar would win another unearned Gold Glove he was stellar with the bat and propelled the Blue Jays to their first World Series win.  He would be named the MVP of the ALCS.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2011

Roberto Alomar, AL Toronto Blue Jays (3) (1993)

-0.4 dWAR.  Alomar helped Toronto win their second straight World Series but this wasn’t because of his defensive contributions.  Alomar was not only not the leader in any defensive stat, he would not appear in the top ten in Range Factor per Game, Fielding Percentage and Total Zone Runs.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2011

Roberto Alomar, AL Toronto Blue Jays (4) (1994)

-0.4 dWAR.  Wow.  Alomar had the same Defensive bWAR that he had in the year before and did so in a strike shortened season.  We don’t have to tell you that he wasn’t close to winning any defensive category.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2011.

Craig Biggio, NL Houston Astros (1994)

-0.4 dWAR.  Craig Biggio deserved to enter the Baseball Hall of Fame early but his first three Gold Gloves should not be on his mantle.  While he did lead in Assists and Putouts he was not in the race for Total Zone Runs and had a negative Defensive bWAR.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2015

Roberto Alomar, AL Toronto Blue Jays (5) (1995)

-0.4 dWAR.  Alomar had his third straight year with the same negative bWAR but at least this year he leaded in Fielding Percentage.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2011.

Craig Biggio, NL Houston Astros (2) (1995)

0.1 dWAR.  Biggio again was not a true star defensively this season but he did lead the National League Second Basemen in Assists.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2015

Roberto Alomar, AL Baltimore Orioles (6) (1996)

-0.1 dWAR.  In his sixth consecutive Gold Glove, Alomar also was consistent in not earning a single one of them.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2011.

Craig Biggio, NL Houston Astros (3) (1996)

0.4 dWAR.  Just from sheer volume, Biggio would lead in Putouts and Assists for the Second Basemen but he again failed to make the top ten in Total Zone Runs.  Let’s say “three for three”.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2015.

Craig Biggio, NL Houston Astros (4) (1997)

2.2 dWAR.  Biggio did not go four for four as this was an excellent defensive campaign for Craig Biggio.  It was arguably the only one he ever had.  Biggio finished 5th overall in the National League in Defensive bWAR and while he did lead in Assists and Putouts he also led in Total Zone Runs an Range Factor per Game.  Biggio might be a four time Gold Glove winner but should be a one time recipient.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2015

Roberto Alomar, AL Baltimore Orioles (7) (1998)

0.4 dWAR.  In regards to Defensive bWAR, this was the best season that Alomar had defensively.  He would lead the American League Second Baseman in Assists, finished third in Total Zone Runs and was second in Range Factor per Game and Fielding Percentage.  He still probably should not have won this award, but at least a case could be made.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2011.

Roberto Alomar, AL Cleveland Indians (8) (1999)

1.1 dWAR.  Alomar would for the third time lead the American League Second Basemen in Fielding Percentage and finished second in Total Zone Runs.  This is the second year in a row that a case could at least be made for Alomar winning the Gold Glove.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2011

Roberto Alomar, AL Cleveland Indians (9) (2000)

1.0 dWAR.  In regards to Defensive bWAR, this was the best season that Alomar had defensively.  He would lead the American League Second Baseman in Assists, finished third in Total Zone Runs and was second in Range Factor per Game and Fielding Percentage.  He still probably should not have won this award, but at least a case could be made.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2011

Roberto Alomar, AL Cleveland Indians (10) (2001)

0.0 dWAR.  How fitting that Roberto Alomar’s last Gold Glove was as “worthy” as his first.  Alomar would lead for the fourth and final time in Fielding Percentage but in nothing else.  Seriously, if Alomar won no Gold Gloves it might be more fitting.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2011

The following are the players who have won the Gold Glove at Second Base who are eligible for the Baseball Hall of Fame and have not been selected:

 

Frank Bolling, AL Detroit Tigers (1958)

1.9 dWAR.  An All Star twice in his career when he would play later with the Milwaukee Braves, Frank Bolling had a productive season where he would lead AL Second Basemen in Assists, Total Zone Runs and Fielding Percentage.  He might have been jobbed out of the 1961 NL version, which went to Bill Mazeroski.  Although Bolling was Hall of Fame eligible in 1972, he was never put on the ballot.

Charlie Neal, NL Los Angeles Dodgers (1959)

1.0 dWAR.  By far, this was the best season of Charlie Neal’s career.  He would go to the All Star Game, put up career numbers in Hits, Batting Average and Stolen Bases and led the NL in Triples and Sacrifice Hits, not to mention winning the World Series!  Defensively, he led the NL Second Basemen in Putouts, Souble Plays Turned, Total Zone Runs and Fielding Percentage.  Neal did not play the minimum amount of years to be Hall of Fame Eligible.

Bobby Richardson, AL New York Yankees (1961)

-0.4 dWAR.  Were the voters swept up with everything Yankees?  They must have, as Richardson had no business winning his first Gold Glove here.  While he did lead in Assists and Double Plays Turned, he did not finish in the top ten in Total Zone Runs or Range Factor per Game.  Richardson was on the ballot for three years and finished as high as 2.0% in 1972.

Bobby Richardson, AL New York Yankees (2) (1962)

0.6 dWAR.  Offensively speaking, this was the best season of Bobby Richardson’s career.  He finished second in MVP voting, led the AL in Hits and had his lone season batting over .300.  Defensively however, this was his second consecutive Gold Glove, which he should not have won.  He did lead in Double Plays turned by Second Basemen but again was nowhere to be found in the top ten for Total Zone Runs.  Richardson was on the ballot for three years and finished as high as 2.0% in 1972.

Ken Hubbs, NL Chicago Cubs (1962)

0.1 dWAR.  Named the Rookie of the Year, Ken Hubbs was set up as the next big star for the Chicago Cubs though advanced metrics showed that would have been hard and he also had no business winning the Gold Glove that year as he never came close to leading in any defensive category, although he did have a much better year with the glove the following season where the was a case that he should have beaten Bill Mazeroski for it.  Hubbs would never have a chance to win another award as he was killed in a plane crash prior to the 1964 season.  Hubbs only played three seasons and was not eligible for the Hall of Fame.

Bobby Richardson, AL New York Yankees (3) (1963)

2.0 dWAR.  While Richardson had no business winning the previous two Gold Gloves, he was definitely the right choice here.  With a 2.0 Defensive bWAR that was good enough to finish third overall, he also led the AL Second Basemen in Total Zone Runs and was fourth overall.  In terms of traditional defensive metrics, he would lead in Double Plays.  Richardson was on the ballot for three years and finished as high as 2.0% in 1972.

Bobby Richardson, AL New York Yankees (4) (1964)

0.4 dWAR.  Here we go again.  Richardson slumped back with his glove and earned another Gold Glove that he probably shouldn’t have.  He would lead in Putouts, but once again did finish in the top ten in Total Zone Runs amongst the Second Basemen of the American League.  Richardson was on the ballot for three years and finished as high as 2.0% in 1972.

Bobby Richardson, AL New York Yankees (5) (1965)

-0.5 dWAR.  Ouch.  Traditionally speaking, Richardson did lead in Double Plays turned, but again he was nowhere to be found in the top ten in Total Zone Runs.  Basically, we are saying that only earned one of his five Gold Gloves and the four he shouldn’t have won, he shouldn’t have even been considered for.  For what it is worth, he has three World Series rigs over this timeframe to console him with our words.  Richardson was on the ballot for three years and finished as high as 2.0% in 1972.

Bobby Knoop, AL California Angels (1966)

2.1 dWAR.  This was Knoop’s lone season going to the All Star Game and he would offensively lead the American League in Triples.  Knoop would lead all AL Second Basemen in Putouts, Assists, Double Plays Turned, Total Zone Runs, Range Factor per Game and Fielding Percentage.  Incidentally, in his rookie year (1964) he posted a 3.1 Defensive bWAR, but lost to Bobby Richardson and his negative bWAR.   Knoop only played nine seasons and did not qualify for the Hall of Fame.

Bobby Knoop, AL California Angels (2) (1967)

0.5 dWAR.  Knoop took a step back and while he led in Double Plays Turned, his overall defensive season was far from Gold Glove worthy.  Perhaps this makes up for his snub in his rookie year?   Knoop only played nine seasons and did not qualify for the Hall of Fame.

Bobby Knoop, AL California Angels (3) (1968)

2.0 dWAR.  This was a rebound year defensively for Bobby Knoop and he would finish 7th overall in Defensive bWAR.  Knoop would lead the American League Second Basemen in Double Plays Turned and Total Zone Runs.  Knoop only played nine seasons and did not qualify for the Hall of Fame.

Glenn Beckert, NL Chicago Cubs (1968)

1.3 dWAR.  This would be Glenn Beckert’s best season in Major League Baseball and he would finish 9th in MVP voting while also leading the NL in Runs Scored.  Defensively, he would have a good season, though he would not lead in any category.  Beckert was on the ballot for one year in 1981 and finished with 0.2% of the vote.

Davey Johnson, AL Baltimore Orioles (1969)

1.2 dWAR.  Johnson was named to his second All Star Team this year and this was his first of three seasons where he batted over .280 with an OBP of .350.  Johnson would have a good season with the glove but did not lead in any category.  Johnson was on the ballot for one year in 1984 and finished with 0.7% of the vote.

Felix Millan, NL Atlanta Braves (1969)

1.5 dWAR.  This would be the first of three appearances in the All Star Game for Felix Millan and arguably his best defensively.  Millan would lead the National League Second Basemen in Putouts, Assists, Total Zone Runs and Fielding Percentage.  Millan was on the ballot for one year in 1983 and finished with 0.3% of the vote.

Davey Johnson, AL Baltimore Orioles (2) (1970)

1.0 dWAR.  Johnson would lead in Putouts but probably didn’t have a season worthy of the Gold Glove.  Johnson likely didn’t care as he was with the World Series Championship team this year.  Johnson was on the ballot for one year in 1984 and finished with 0.7% of the vote.

Tommy Helms, NL Cincinnati Reds (1970)

0.8 dWAR.  Helms was a former Rookie of the Year and two time All Star before he won his first Gold Glove.  He would lead the NL Second Basemen in Firlding Percentage.  Helms was on the ballot for one year in 1983 and finished with 0.3% of the vote.

Davey Johnson, AL Baltimore Orioles (3) (1971)

0.7 dWAR.  The pattern continues as Davey Johnson would have an ok defensively, though would lead in Double Plays Turned.  Incidentally, Johnson would have his best season defensively in 1972 where he would lead in Total Zone Runs and finish 9th in Defensive WAR.  Johnson would later become a two time Manager of the Year  Johnson was on the ballot for one year in 1984 and finished with 0.7% of the vote.

Tommy Helms, NL Cincinnati Reds (2) (1971)

2.4 dWAR.  This was easily the best defensive season of Helms’ career.  Amongst the National League Second Basemen, Helms would lead in Assists, Double Plays Turned, Total Zone Runs, Range Factor per Game and Fielding Percentage.  He would also finish third overall in Defensive WAR and Total Zone Runs.  Helms was on the ballot for one year in 1983 and finished with 0.3% of the vote.

Doug Griffin, AL Boston Red Sox (1972)

-0.6 dWAR.  How the hell did this happen?  While sometimes Gold Glove voters are dazzled by good offensive numbers, and while this was the best offensive year that Griffin had, it was only 122 Hits with a Slash Line of .260/325/.302.  He didn’t finish in the top four in ANY defensive category.  Again, we ask how this happened!  Griffin did not play the minimum years to qualify for the Hall of Fame.

Felix Millan, NL Atlanta Braves (2) (1972)

-0.1 dWAR.  Millan earned his first Gold Glove, but not this one.  He was not even close to leading in any defensive metric and was not in the top ten in Range Factor per Game or Total Zone Runs.  Millan was on the ballot for one year in 1983 and finished with 0.3% of the vote.

Bobby Grich, AL Baltimore Orioles (1973)

3.9 dWAR.  OK, Sabremetricians…we know we don’t have to tell you who Bobby Grich is!  The darling of advanced stats led the American League in bWAR for Position Players in ’73 and was second overall in Defensive bWAR.  It is needless to say that Grich led all of the Second Basemen in the American League in Putouts, Assists, Double Plays Turned, Total Zone Runs, Range Factor per Game and Fielding Percentage.  In regards to Total Zone Runs, Grich had a sick 29 of them, first overall in the AL!  Grich was on the ballot for one year in 1992 and finished with 2.6% of the voteCurrently ranked #37 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Bobby Grich, AL Baltimore Orioles (2) (1974)

1.5 dWAR.  Grich would make his second All Star Game appearance and he finished 9th in MVP voting.  He would again lead in Putouts, Assists, Double Plays Turned and Range Factor per Game  Grich was on the ballot for one year in 1992 and finished with 2.6% of the voteCurrently ranked #37 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Bobby Grich, AL Baltimore Orioles (3) (1975)

2.5 dWAR.  Grich returned to the top ten in Defensive bWAR by finishing fifth.  He would once again finish first in many defensive categories, this time in Putouts, Assists, Double Plays Turned Total Zone Runs and Range Factor per Game.  Grich was on the ballot for one year in 1992 and finished with 2.6% of the voteCurrently ranked #37 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Bobby Grich, AL Baltimore Orioles (4) (1976)

0.7 dWAR.  We love Bobby Grich but this was not a year he should have won this accolade.  He only led in Putouts, though he did finish second in Range Factor per Game and Fielding Percentage.  Grich was on the ballot for one year in 1992 and finished with 2.6% of the voteCurrently ranked #37 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Frank White, AL Kansas City Royals (1977)

1.8 dWAR.  Realistically, Frank White should have won his first Gold Glove the year before, but this was still an appropriate win.  White would lead in Fielding Percentage and finish third in Total Zone Runs.  He would also finish 10th overall in Defensive bWAR.  White was on the ballot for one year in 1996 and finished with 3.8% of the vote.

Frank White, AL Kansas City Royals (2) (1978)

1.9 dWAR.  Overall Frank White would finish 5th in Defensive bWAR.  This year he would lead all of the American League Second Basemen in Total Zone Runs.  White was on the ballot for one year in 1996 and finished with 3.8% of the vote.

Davey Lopes, NL Los Angeles Dodgers (1978)

0.3 dWAR.  This would be Lopes first of four consecutive All Star Game appearances, which he may have earned.  Basically we are saying he should not have won this one!  Lopes led the Second Basemen in Errors and was not in the top ten in Range Factor per Game, Total Zone Runs or Fielding Percentage.  Lopes was on the ballot for one year in 1993 and finished with 0.5% of the vote.

Frank White, AL Kansas City Royals (3) (1979)

0.4 dWAR.  Here we go again on reputation!  White was not in the mix for any defensive statistic lead and should not have won this award.  He was not in the top ten in Total Zone Runs either.  White was on the ballot for one year in 1996 and finished with 3.8% of the vote.

Manny Trillo, NL Philadelphia Phillies (1979)

1.6 dWAR.  By far, this was the best defensive season of Manny Trillo’s career.  Trillo would finish seventh overall in Defensive bWAR and finished second amongst the National League Second Basemen in Total Zone Runs.  Trillo was on the ballot for one year in 1995 but did not receive any votes.

Frank White, AL Kansas City Royals (4) (1980)

1.2 dWAR.  While Frank White had a better year with the glove, he probably still was not the best choice here.  He did however win the ALCS MVP this year.  White was on the ballot for one year in 1996 and finished with 3.8% of the vote.

Doug Flynn, NL New York Mets (1980)

1.4 dWAR.  This would be the only award Flynn would win in MLB and did so in a season where he would lead the National Second Basemen in Fielding Percentage and was second in Total Zone Runs.  Although Flynn was eligible for the Hall of Fame in 1990 he was not on the ballot.

Frank White, AL Kansas City Royals (5) (1981)

0.3 dWAR.  Another win on reputation.  White did not finish in the top ten in ANY defensive category.  At least this wasn’t a case of Gold Glove winner with a negative Defensive bWAR winning!  White was on the ballot for one year in 1996 and finished with 3.8% of the vote.

Manny Trillo, NL Philadelphia Phillies (2) (1981)

-0.2 dWAR.  This was a very bizarre statistical defensive line for Trillo.  He had a negative bWAR on the defensive side of the ledger and did lead in Putouts and finish second in Range Factor per Game but was not in the top ten in Total Zone Runs.  Trillo was on the ballot for one year in 1995 but did not receive any votes.

Frank White, AL Kansas City Royals (6) (1982)

0.9 dWAR.  This year, Frank White at least led in one defensive stat, Putouts.  He also led in Errors.  White was on the ballot for one year in 1996 and finished with 3.8% of the vote.

Manny Trillo, NL Philadelphia Phillies (3) (1982)

0.5 dWAR.  In what would be his third and final Gold Glove season (though he should have only won one) Trillo would lead in Fielding Percentage but again did not appear in the top ten in Total Zone Runs.  Trillo was on the ballot for one year in 1995 but did not receive any votes.

Lou Whitaker, AL Detroit Tigers (1983)

1.0 dWAR.  In 1981 and 1982, Lou Whitaker finished 4th in the American League in Defensive bWAR and led the Second Basemen in Total Zone Runs.  Of course, he wins the Gold Glove in 1983, when he did none of those things.  While this was still a decent defensive season for Whitaker, he was unable to lead in any defensive category.  Whitaker was on the ballot for one year in 2001 and finished with 2.9% of the vote.  Ranked #10 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Lou Whitaker, AL Detroit Tigers (2) (1984)

0.7 dWAR.  Again, this was an ok season for Lou with the glove, but he also didn’t lead in any defensive stat again.  Not that he cared, as this was the year of the dominant Detroit Tigers World Series Championship squad of ‘84.  Whitaker was on the ballot for one year in 2001 and finished with 2.9% of the vote.  Ranked #10 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Lou Whitaker, AL Detroit Tigers (3) (1985)

0.2 dWAR.  What a mess.  This was Whitaker’s third and last Gold Glove and while he probably deserved three Gold Gloves over his career, he didn’t in the season he won them.  He would have seven better seasons in terms of Defensive bWAR than the best he finished in a Gold Glove winning season.  Whitaker was on the ballot for one year in 2001 and finished with 2.9% of the vote.  Ranked #10 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Frank White, AL Kansas City Royals (7) (1986)

1.7 dWAR.  This was a renaissance of sorts for White as he was again an All Star and had his best Home Run Total and posted a good defensive season.  White did not lead amongst the AL Second Basemen in any defensive category but finished second in Total Zone Runs.  White was on the ballot for one year in 1996 and finished with 3.8% of the vote.

Frank White, AL Kansas City Royals (8) (1987)

1.9 dWAR.  White would finish fourth in Defensive bWAR and would lead for his second and final time in Total Zone Runs.  Overall Frank White lost out on Gold Gloves he should have won and was awarded quite a few he shouldn’t have come close too.  White was on the ballot for one year in 1996 and finished with 3.8% of the vote.

Harold Reynolds, AL Seattle Mariners (1988)

0.2 dWAR.  Reynolds was a flashy and popular player but in the season that was his second and last All Star appearance, he had no business earning a Gold Glove.  Reynolds would lead in Assists and Double Plays Turned but he also led in Errors and was not a factor in the race for the most Total Zone Runs by an American League Second Baseman.  Reynolds was eligible for the Hall of Fame in 2000 but was not on the ballot.

Harold Reynolds, AL Seattle Mariners (2) (1989)

1.7 dWAR.  Harold Reynolds may not have been named an All Star, but at least this was a Gold Glove worthy season.  Reynolds may have again led the American League Second Basemen in Errors, but he also led in Total Zone Runs as well as Range Factor per Game.  Reynolds was eligible for the Hall of Fame in 2000 but was not on the ballot.

Harold Reynolds, AL Seattle Mariners (3) (1990)

2.5 dWAR.  Finishing 5th in the AL in Defensive bWAR, this was the best defensive campaign of Harold Reynolds’ career.  He would also lead the AL Second Basemen in Assists and Total Zone Runs, the latter stat of which saw him finish fourth overall in the League.  Reynolds was eligible for the Hall of Fame in 2000 but was not on the ballot.

Jose Lind, NL Pittsburgh Pirates (1992)

0.2 dWAR.  This was the only award that Lind would win professionally, but he should have been skunked.  Lind would lead the NL Second Basemen in Fielding Percentage but was nowhere to be found in Total Zone Runs.  Lind was eligible for the Hall of Fame in 2001 but was not on the ballot.

Robby Thompson, NL Pittsburgh Pirates (1993)

1.6 dWAR.  Robby Thompson saw 1993 as the best season of his career. He would go to his second (and final) All Star Game and receive votes for the MVP Award, the only time that would happen.  Thompson did not lead in any category but his 1.6 Defensive bWAR was the second best of his career.  Thompson was on the ballot for one year in 2002 but did not receive ant votes.

Chuck Knoblauch, AL Minnesota Twins (1997)

2.0 dWAR.  Before Chuck Knoblauch became a Yankee, he was an excellent infielder as a Minnesota Twin and this was his best year defensively.  Knoblauch would finish fifth in the American League in Defensive bWAR and would lead in Assists, Double Plays Turned and Total Zone Runs.  After this season, Knoblauch morphed into one of the worst infielders in the American League.  Knoblauch was on the ballot for one year in 2008 and received 0.2% of the vote.

Bret Boone, NL Cincinnati Reds (1998)

-0.4 dWAR.  Unbelievable.  This was Boone’s first Gold Glove of four.  He had something in common in all four, as he never should have won any of them.  Not only did he have a negative Defensive bWAR but he did not lead in any defensive metric.  Boone was on the ballot for one year in 2011 and received 0.2% of the vote.

Pokey Reese, NL Cincinnati Reds (1999)

3.2 dWAR.  Pokey Reese would put together the best season of his career in 1999, both with his bat and glove.  Defensively, Reese was third overall Defensive bWAR and Total Zone Runs.  Reese would lead the NL Second Basemen in Total Zone Runs with a very impressive tally of 27.  Reese did not play enough seasons in MLB to be eligible for the Hall of Fame.

Pokey Reese, NL Cincinnati Reds (2) (2000)

1.7 dWAR.  Reese would again put up a great defensive effort and finished fourth overall in Defensive bWAR in the National League.  Reese again led in Total Zone Runs amongst the Second Basemen and was fourth overall.  While this would be his last Gold Glove, in 2004 as a member of the World Series Champion Boston Red Sox he finished 5th overall in the AL in Defensive bWAR despite only playing 96 Games.  He was also second that year in Total Zone Runs.  He would never play another game in the Majors.  Reese did not play enough seasons in MLB to be eligible for the Hall of Fame.

Fernando Vina, NL St. Louis Cardinals (2001)

0.4 dWAR.  This was a bit of Jekyll & Hyde season for Vina.  He would lead the National League Second Basemen in Putouts, Double Plays Turned and Fielding Percentage he would not finish in the top ten in Range Factor per Game and Total Zone Runs.  Vina did have a good season offensively, which may have helped this win, though we know it shouldn’t.  Although Vina was eligible for the Hall of Fame in 2010 he was not on the ballot.

Bret Boone, AL Seattle Mariners (2) (2002)

0.5 dWAR.  The year before, Boone finished tenth in Defensive bWAR in the American League and led the Second basemen in Total Zone Runs, so of course he wins his second Gold Glove in a season he did none of those things.  He would however lead in Fielding Percentage.  Boone was on the ballot for one year in 2011 and received 0.2% of the vote.

Fernando Vina, NL St. Louis Cardinals (2) (2002)

0.5 dWAR.  While Vina’s overall Defensive bWAR didn’t change much from the previous season, he would not lead in any defensive category.  Although Vina was eligible for the Hall of Fame in 2010 he was not on the ballot.

Bret Boone, AL Seattle Mariners (3) (2003)

0.0 dWAR.  Boone again had a mediocre defensive season but was rewarded anyway.  He did not lead in any defensive category.  Boone was on the ballot for one year in 2011 and received 0.2% of the vote.

Luis Castillo, NL Florida Marlins (2003)

1.2 dWAR.  This was the best season of Castillo’s career, both offensively and defensively, not to mention he won the World Series that year.  Castillo would lead the NL Second Basemen in Putouts and finished second in Total Zone Runs.  Castillo was on the ballot for one year in 2016 but did not receive any votes.

Bret Boone, AL Seattle Mariners (4) (2004)

-0.7 dWAR.  So, Bret Boone saved the best for last?  Not exactly.  There is not metric that shows that Boone should have won this award and overall he had a career negative Defensive bWAR.  So, how did he win four Gold Gloves again?  Boone was on the ballot for one year in 2011 and received 0.2% of the vote.

Luis Castillo, NL Florida Marlins (2) (2004)

1.0 dWAR.  Castillo would lead the National League Second Basemen in Total Zone Runs.  Castillo was on the ballot for one year in 2016 but did not receive any votes.

Luis Castillo, NL Florida Marlins (2) (2005)

0.9 dWAR.  Castillo had a decent season defensively but it was nothing special.  He did not lead in any defensive category.  Castillo was on the ballot for one year in 2016 but did not receive any votes.

Mark Grudzielanek, AL Kansas City Royals (2006)

1.9 dWAR.  A decade after going to his lone All Star Game as a member of the Montreal Expos, Grudzielanek would win his lone Gold Glove.   The G-Man finished 5th in Defensive bWAR the year before and was 7th this year.  He would lead the American League Second Basemen in Double Plays Turned.  Grudzielanek was on the ballot for one year in 2016 but did not receive any votes.

Let’s update our tally shall we?

Award in Question

Percentage of recipients who have entered the HOF

Percentage of recipients by year who have entered the HOF.

NBA MVP

100%

100%

NHL Norris

90.5%

96.4%

NBA All Star Game MVP

89.5%

91.7%

NHL Conn Smythe

74.2%

85.4%

NHL Lady Byng

63.8%

76.0%

NFL Super Bowl MVP

60.6%

64.9%

NBA Defensive Player of the Year

58.3%

56.5%

NBA Rookie of the Year

56.5%

56.5%

MLB/NL/AL Cy Young Award

44.4%

55.4%

NHL Frank J. Selke Trophy

33.3%

36.7%

NFL Offensive Rookie of the Year

28.6%

28.6%

MLB Edgar Martinez Award

26.7%

17.2%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Designated Hitter)

25.0%

30.8%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Shortstop)

23.5%

52.6%

NFL Defensive Rookie of the Year

20.6%

20.6%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Catcher)

20.0%

22.5%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Second Base)

18.8%

39.8%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Pitcher)

18.2%

20.1%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Second Base)

16.7%

32.7%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Outfield)

15.7%

25.2%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Third Base)

13.6%

14.3%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (First Base)

13.6%

13.3%

MLB (NL/AL) Rookie of the Year

13.3%

13.3%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Catcher)

10.3%

15.2%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (First Base)

3.8%

3.2%

So who is up next?

The following are the players who have won the Gold Glove at Second Base who have retired but have not met the mandatory years out of the game to qualify for the Baseball Hall of Fame:

 

Orlando Hudson, AL Toronto Blue Jays (2005)

2.3 dWAR.  Orlando Hudson would lead the American League in Defensive bWAR in 2004 and finish second in 2003.  In 2005, he would finish second overall and lead the National League Second Basemen in Putouts, Range Factor per Game and Fielding Percentage.   Eligible for the Hall of Fame in 2018.

Orlando Hudson, NL Arizona Diamondbacks (2) (2006)

1.6 dWAR.  Hudson may not have finished in the top ten of his new league this year but this was still a very good year with the glove.  Hudson would lead the National League Second Basemen in Assists and Double Plays Turned.   Eligible for the Hall of Fame in 2018.

Orlando Hudson, NL Arizona Diamondbacks (3) (2007)

2.0 dWAR.  2.0 is an excellent number for a year in regards of Defensive bWAR yet it did not yield Hudson to the top of any defensive statistic amongst the National League Second Basemen.   Eligible for the Hall of Fame in 2018.

Placido Polanco, AL Detroit Tigers (2007)

1.6 dWAR.  Polanco almost always had a good season with his glove and 2007 was no different.  The Detroit Tiger would lead the AL Second Basemen in Fielding Percentage.  Eligible for the Hall of Fame in 2019.

Orlando Hudson, NL Arizona Diamondbacks (4) (2009)

0.9 dWAR.  Orlando Hudson won four Gold Gloves and while a case could be made for the first three, he had no business winning his fourth and final one.  Still, it can’t be disputed that Hudson had a good career in Major League Baseball predominantly defensively.  Eligible for the Hall of Fame in 2018.

Placido Polanco, AL Detroit Tigers (2) (2009)

0.9 dWAR.  While Polanco will go down in history as a very good defensive player, this wasn’t the best year he produced.  He would however lead the AL Second Basemen in Fielding Percentage.  Eligible for the Hall of Fame in 2019.

Placido Polanco, NL Philadelphia Phillies (3) (2011)

1.2 dWAR.  In what would be his third and final Gold Glove win, we have a player who finished in the top ten in Defensive bWAR six times, but he did not win the Gold Glove in any of them.  There is nothing wrong with Placido Polanco winning three Gold Gloves, just not in the years he won them.  Eligible for the Hall of Fame in 2019.

The following are the players who have won the Gold Glove at Second Base who are still active.

Dustin Pedroia, AL Boston Red Sox (2008)

1.8 dWAR.  Not only did Dustin Pedroia win his first Gold Glove this year, but he went to his first All Star Game, won his first Silver Slugger, he was also named the American League MVP.  Pedroia finished 9th overall in Defensive bWAR though he would not lead in the American League Second Baseman in any category.  33 Years Old, Playing for the Boston Red Sox.

Brandon Phillips, NL Cincinnati Reds (2008)

1.6 dWAR.  Brandon Phillips would have a good season but would only lead the National League Shortstops in Fielding Percentage.  36 Years Old, Playing for the Atlanta Braves.

Robinson Cano, AL New York Yankees (2010)

2.2 dWAR.  In 2007, Robinson Cano finished first in Defensive bWAR but did not win the Gold Glove.  He did however finish fifth in that stat in 2010 and would win his first Gold Glove.  Cano would lead in Assists, Putouts, Double Plays Turned and Fielding Percentage.  He would also finish third in MVP voting.  34 Years Old, Playing for the Seattle Mariners.

Brandon Phillips, NL Cincinnati Reds (2) (2010)

1.4 dWAR.  This would be the first of three All Star appearances for Phillips.  This year, he would lead in Assists.  36 Years Old, Playing for the Atlanta Braves.

Dustin Pedroia, AL Boston Red Sox (2) (2011)

2.3 dWAR.  Pedroia would finish 6th overall in Defensive bWAR and would lead in Fielding Percentage.  He would also finish second in Total Zone Runs.  33 Years Old, Playing for the Boston Red Sox.

Brandon Phillips, NL Cincinnati Reds (3) (2011)

1.1 dWAR.  Phillips still had a more than respectable Defensive bWAR, but this year he did not lead in any defensive category.  36 Years Old, Playing for the Atlanta Braves.

Robinson Cano, AL New York Yankees (2) (2012)

1.9 dWAR.  Cano would again finish in the top ten in Defensive bWAR, this year finishing tenth.  Cano would lead in Putouts and Range Factor per Game.  34 Years Old, Playing for the Seattle Mariners.

Darwin Barney, NL Chicago Cubs (2012)

3.6 dWAR.  Also named a NL Wilson Defensive Award winner, Barney would lead everyone in the NL in Defensive bWAR.  He also led in Putouts, Total Zone Runs and Fielding Percentage.  31 Years Old, Playing for the Toronto Blue Jays.

Dustin Pedroia, AL Boston Red Sox (3) (2013)

2.2 dWAR.  This time Pedroia would finish third overall in Defensive bWAR in the AL.  This season he would also lead in Total Zone Runs, the third time he would do so.  33 Years Old, Playing for the Boston Red Sox.

Brandon Phillips, NL Cincinnati Reds (4) (2013)

0.4 dWAR.  In what was his last Gold Glove, Phillips has no case for winning this award.  Granted he led in Assists and Putouts but he also spent the most time in the field than any other National League Second Baseman.  36 Years Old, Playing for the Atlanta Braves.

Dustin Pedroia, AL Boston Red Sox (4) (2014)

2.5 dWAR.  Pedroia would finish 5th in the AL in Defensive bWAR.  He would lead in Fielding Percentage and finish second in Total Zone Runs.  33 Years Old, Playing for the Boston Red Sox.

D.J. LeMahieu, NL Colorado Rockies (2014)

2.2 dWAR.  Finishing 7th overall in the NL in Defensive bWAR, D.J. LeMahieu would also lead in Double Plays Turned, Range factor per Game and finished second in Total Zone Runs.  28 Years Old, Playing for the Colorado Rockies.

Jose Altuve, AL Houston Astros (2015)

0.8 dWAR.  Altuve is a great player and this was to date his best defensive season.  Although his Defensive bWAR is not spectacular, he did lead the American League Second Baseman in Total Zone Runs and Fielding Percentage.  27 Years Old.  Playing for the Houston Astros

Dee Gordon, NL Miami Marlins (2015)

1.8 dWAR.  This was an excellent season for Gordon as not only did he win his first Gold Glove he also captured his first Silver Slugger and Batting Title.  Gordon would lead the National League Second Basemen in Fielding Percentage.  29 Years Old.  Playing for the Miami Marlins

Ian Kinsler, AL Detroit Tigers (2016)

1.7 dWAR.  In the previous two seasons, Kinsler would have Defensive bWARs of 2.9 and 2.6 finishing first and third respectively.  While he didn’t finish in the top ten in that statistic in 2016, this was still a very good season for Kinsler as he would still lead in Range Factor per Game.  35 Years Old.  Playing for the Detroit Tigers

Dee Gordon, NL Miami Marlins (2015)

1.8 dWAR.  This was an excellent season for Gordon as not only did he win his first Gold Glove he also captured his first Silver Slugger and Batting Title.  Gordon would lead the National League Second Basemen in Fielding Percentage.  29 Years Old.  Playing for the Houston Astros

Joe Panik, NL San Francisco Giants (2016)

0.6 dWAR.  While this was not reflected in his Defensive bWAR, Panik would lead in Total Zone Runs and Fielding Percentage.  27 Years Old.  Playing for the San Francisco Giants

This is a considerably higher Hall of Fame yield than what happened at First Base, and realistically with the premium that defense is held for that position it should be.

We will continue around the diamond and tackle Shortstop next.
Looking back at the Super Bowl recent history the New England Patriots have are now on the doorsteps of becoming the most legendary team in the NFL and a strong favorite to win once more the next Super Bowl in 2018.

In 2017 they faced the Atlanta Falcons with a horrible first half being down by over 20 points. A tremendous comeback gave them a 34-28 overtime victory to win their 5th Super Bowl title in a league were no clear favorites have existed over time, but this seems to be changing with the Patriots consistent Super Bowl appearances and favoritism.
This was a day that I dreaded to see, even though I knew it was inevitable.

Standing in the checkout line at Trader Joe's, I looked at the BBC News website on my phone to see what was happening in the world. The inevitable had happened.

"How you doin' today?" the young woman asked as she pulled in my cart.
We here at Notinhalloffame.com thought it would be fun to take a look at the major awards in North American team sports and see how it translates into Hall of Fame potential.

Needless to say, different awards in different sports yield hall of fame potential.  In basketball, the team sport with the least amount of players on a roster, the dividend for greatness much higher.  In baseball, it is not as much as a great individual season does not have the same impact.

We are now taking a look at the Gold Glove Award, given annually to the best defensive player in MLB in each respective position.

This will take awhile, so be patient with us!

We have just tackled the Catcher position, so up next is First Base, which we suspect will be more controversial.



The following are the past players who have won the Gold Glove at First Base who are eligible for the Baseball Hall of Fame and have been enshrined.



Eddie Murray, AL Baltimore Orioles (1982)

-0.5 dWAR.  By this time, Eddie Murray had already established himself as one of the game’s premier hitters and he would later become one of the few players to accumulate 3,000 Hits and 500 Home Runs.  However, this was not his best defensive year though he did lead in Fielding Percentage.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2003.

Eddie Murray, AL Baltimore Orioles (2) (1983)

0.0 dWAR.  Murray would finish 4th in Total Zone Runs by American League First Basemen but far more importantly the Orioles won a World Series.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2003.

Eddie Murray, AL Baltimore Orioles (3) (1984)

0.1 dWAR.  This season Murray would lead in Putouts, Assists, Double Plays Turned and Range Factor per Game.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2003.



The following are the players who have won the Gold Glove at First Base who are eligible for the Baseball Hall of Fame and have not been selected:



Gil Hodges, ML Brooklyn Dodgers (1957)

-0.4 dWAR.  Hmmm.  With all due respect to Hodges, this is not off to a great start as Hodges was an average defender at best.  This was his last All Star Game appearance and he did lead the NL First Baseman in Putouts, but realistically, Hodges was known far more for his bat.  Was on the ballot for fifteen years and finished as high as 63.4% in 1983, his final year of eligibility.   Ranked #11 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Vic Power, AL Kansas City Athletics/Cleveland Indians (1958)

0.2 dWAR.  Power realistically had an average season with his glove, but was coming off a season where he led the AL in Triples and finished 15th in MVP voting.  Was on the ballot for two years and finished as high as 0.8% in 1972.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com

Gil Hodges, NL Los Angeles Dodgers (2) (1958)

-0.7 dWAR.  Again, this is not a season where Hodges should have won this accolade.  He did bit lead in any defensive matric.  Was on the ballot for fifteen years and finished as high as 63.4% in 1983, his final year of eligibility.   Ranked #11 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Vic Power, AL Cleveland Indians (2) (1959)

0.0 dWAR.  Power would make his third All Star Team and led all American League First Basemen in Assists, Putouts, Total Zone Runs and Fielding Percentage.  Was on the ballot for two years and finished as high as 0.8% in 1972.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com

Gil Hodges, NL Los Angeles Dodgers (3) (1959)

-0.6 dWAR.  Three Gold Gloves, three seasons with a negative Defensive bWAR.  Hodges would however win his second World Series Award. Hodges has the misfortune of being the player with the most accumulated votes who has not entered the Baseball Hall of Fame.  Was on the ballot for fifteen years and finished as high as 63.4% in 1983, his final year of eligibility.  Ranked #11 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Vic Power, AL Cleveland Indians (3) (1960)

0.9 dWAR.  Power would go to his fourth and final All Star Game this year and again lead in Putouts and Assists.  He would also lead in Double Plays Turned and have his biggest total in Total Zone Runs (18), enough for third in the AL.  Was on the ballot for two years and finished as high as 0.8% in 1972.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com

Bill White, NL St. Louis Cardinals (1960)

-1.2 dWAR.  Bill White would have good seasons defensively with the glove but this wasn’t one of them.  He did however lead in Double Plays Turned.  Was on the ballot for three years, finishing as high as 1.9% in 1975.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.   

Vic Power, AL Cleveland Indians (4) (1961)

-0.7 dWAR.  This was not a great year for Power defensively but he did lead in Assists.  Was on the ballot for two years and finished as high as 0.8% in 1972.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com

Bill White, NL St. Louis Cardinals (2) (1961)

-0.3 dWAR.  This season, White would lead in Total Zone Runs and notably went to his third All Star Game.  He would be named to five in total.  Was on the ballot for three years, finishing as high as 1.9% in 1975.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.   

Vic Power, AL Minnesota Twins (5) (1962)

0.2 dWAR.  Power would lead the American League First Basemen in Assists and Total Zone Runs.  Was on the ballot for two years and finished as high as 0.8% in 1972.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com

Bill White, NL St. Louis Cardinals (3) (1962)

0.0 dWAR.  For the second season in a row, White would lead the NL First Basemen in Total Zone Runs.  He would finish 13th in MVP voting.  Was on the ballot for three years, finishing as high as 1.9% in 1975.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.   

Vic Power, AL Minnesota Twins (6) (1963)

-0.8 dWAR.  We are guessing voters just picked who they were familiar with as Power was not worthy here at all.  Was on the ballot for two years and finished as high as 0.8% in 1972.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com

Bill White, NL St. Louis Cardinals (4) (1963)

-0.5 dWAR.  White did not lead in any defensive category, but his offensive game was strong with a career high 200 Hits and 27 Home Runs.  He finished 7th in MVP voting.  Was on the ballot for three years, finishing as high as 1.9% in 1975.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.   

Vic Power, AL Minnesota Twins/Los Angeles Angels (7) (1964)

-0.2 dWAR.  This was Power’s last full season in the Majors and part of it was in the National League with the Philadelphia Phillies.  You would think voters could have done much better here.  Was on the ballot for two years and finished as high as 0.8% in 1972.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com

Bill White, NL St. Louis Cardinals (5) (1964)

0.4 dWAR.  This was the best season overall of Bill White’s career.  He finished 3rd in MVP voting and won the World Series.  He would finish 2nd in Total Zone Runs (though doubled what he did in the two years previously where he led in that category) and was the National League First Baseman leader in Fielding Percentage   Was on the ballot for three years, finishing as high as 1.9% in 1975.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.   

Joe Pepitone, AL New York Yankees (1965)

-0.4 dWAR.  Pepitone led the American League First Basemen in Range Factor per Game and Fielding Percentage.  This was his third season as an All Star. Was on the ballot for one year in 1979 but did not receive any votes.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com

Bill White, NL St. Louis Cardinals (6) (1965)

0.4 dWAR.  For the fourth time in his career, Bill White would lead in Total Zone Runs.  Was on the ballot for three years, finishing as high as 1.9% in 1975.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.   

Joe Pepitone, AL New York Yankees (2) (1966)

-0.4 dWAR.  Pepitone would again lead the AL First Baseman in Range Factor per Game and Fielding Percentage.  Was on the ballot for one year in 1979 but did not receive any votes.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com

Bill White, NL Philadelphia Phillies (7) (1966)

0.2 dWAR.  This would be the final time that Bill White would win the Gold Glove and the last that he would lead in Total Zone Runs.  He would also lead in Assists and Fielding Percentage.  While White’s overall Defensive bWAR was -3.2 there were certainly Gold Gloves that he did earn.  Was on the ballot for three years, finishing as high as 1.9% in 1975.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.   

George Scott, AL Boston Red Sox (1967)

-0.5 dWAR.  While Scott had a negative dWAR, he did lead the AL First Basemen in Putouts and Double Plays Turned.  He also led them in Errors.   Was on the ballot for two year in 1979 receiving 0.2% of the vote in 1986.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com

Wes Parker, NL Los Angeles Dodgers (1967)

-1.0 dWAR.  Parker would lead in Fielding Percentage but he did nothing remarkable this season and wasn’t even in the top ten Defensive Games Played at First.  Why did he win this?  Did not play the minimum number of years to be Hall of Fame eligible.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.   

George Scott, AL Boston Red Sox (2) (1968)

-0.4 dWAR.  Wow.  This year Scott batted .176 and had a -3.0 Offensive WAR.  Defensively he was in the negative too. He did not lead in any defensive category and this year should not have won any award.  He was lucky to even be on the team!  Was on the ballot for two year in 1979 receiving 0.2% of the vote in 1986.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com

Wes Parker, NL Los Angeles Dodgers (2) (1968)

-0.4 dWAR.  This was almost a carbon copy of the previous year as Parker would lead in Fielding Percentage but again was not in the top ten in Games Played Defensively at First Base.  Again, we ask who votes for this?  Did not play the minimum number of years to be Hall of Fame eligible.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.   

Joe Pepitone, AL New York Yankees (3) (1969)

-0.5 dWAR.  This was the third year that Joe Pepitone would win the Gold Glove with a negative bWAR.  He would however lead in Putouts, Assists, Range Factor per Game and Fielding Percentage.  Was on the ballot for one year in 1979 but did not receive any votes.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com

Wes Parker, NL Los Angeles Dodgers (3) (1969)

-0.6 dWAR.  Should we just give up on this?  This is a guy who did not make mistakes but did nothing to enhance the position and rob runs.  Again, he was not even in the top ten in Defensive Games Played at First Base and this year he didn’t even lead in Fielding Percentage.   Did not play the minimum number of years to be Hall of Fame eligible.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.   

Jim Spencer, AL California Angels (1970)

-0.7 dWAR.  Here is another curious choice for the Gold Glove.  With a negative Defensive bWAR, Spencer still led in Putouts, Double Plays Turned and Fielding Percentage.  Was on the ballot for one year in 1988 but did not receive any votes.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com

Wes Parker, NL Los Angeles Dodgers (4) (1970)

0.0 dWAR.  This was as good as it got defensively for Parker.  This year, he actually finished 1st in Defensive Games Played, and not surprisingly this led to leading in Putouts.  He would also again lead in Fielding Percentage and this year led in Range Factor per Game and finished second in Total Zone Runs.  OK, Wes, we will give you this one.  Did not play the minimum number of years to be Hall of Fame eligible.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.   

George Scott, AL Boston Red Sox (3) (1971)

0.6 dWAR.  Scott would lead the First Basemen in the American League in Total Zone Runs.  Was on the ballot for two year in 1979 receiving 0.2% of the vote in 1986.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com

Wes Parker, NL Los Angeles Dodgers (5) (1971)

-0.3 dWAR.  Parker again finished at the top in Fielding Percentage and was second in Games Played Defensively and Total Zone Runs.   Did not play the minimum number of years to be Hall of Fame eligible.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.   

George Scott, AL Milwaukee Brewers (4) (1972)

0.2 dWAR.  Scott would again lead in Total Zone Runs, albeit with a much lower total than the year previous.  Was on the ballot for two year in 1979 receiving 0.2% of the vote in 1986.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com

Wes Parker, NL Los Angeles Dodgers (6) (1972)

-0.5 dWAR.  This would be Wes Parker’s final season in the MLB and he would again lead in Fielding Percentage, but nothing else.  Parker was not a star hitter either, so this was realistically an average player who was fortunate to get six Gold Gloves.  To his defense, it should be noted that he committed very few errors, but again, this is someone who did his job, never more.  Did not play the minimum number of years to be Hall of Fame eligible.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.   

George Scott, AL Milwaukee Brewers (5) (1973)

0.8 dWAR.  This would be the third straight year that George Scott would lead in Total Zone Runs.  This season he would also lead in Assists.  Was on the ballot for two year in 1979 receiving 0.2% of the vote in 1986.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com

Mike Jorgenson, NL Montreal Expos (1973)

-0.5 dWAR.  This was the only individual award that Mike Jorgenson would win in MLB and while he may not have been the best choice, this was not a banner year for First Basemen in the National League.  Jorgenson would lead in Range Factor and Fielding Percentage.  He was on the ballot for one year in 1991 and received 0.2% of the vote.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.   

George Scott, AL Milwaukee Brewers (6) (1974)

0.8 dWAR.  This would be the fourth and final time that Scott would have the most Total Zone Runs.  He would also lead in Assists, Putouts, Double Plays Turned, Range Factor per Game and Fielding Percentage.  Was on the ballot for two year in 1979 receiving 0.2% of the vote in 1986.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com

Steve Garvey, NL Los Angeles Dodgers (1974)

-1.0 dWAR.  Steve Garvey would have his breakout year, smacking 200 Hits, Batting .312 and winning the MVP.  This did not mean he was a great defender as he wasn’t really.  He did lead the NL in Putouts and Range Factor per Game.  He was on the ballot fifteen years finishing as high as 42.2% in 1995.  Ranked #34 on Notinhalloffame.com.   

George Scott, AL Milwaukee Brewers (7) (1975)

-1.6 dWAR.  Negative -1.6!  Not only did he not have the most Total Zone Runs amongst American League First Basemen, he was not even in the top ten!  This year he did have hi best offensive season, winning the Home Run Title and he finished 8th in MVP voting.  Was on the ballot for two year in 1979 receiving 0.2% of the vote in 1986.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com

Steve Garvey, NL Los Angeles Dodgers (2) (1975)

-0.4 dWAR.  Garvey would go to his second of what would be eight straight All Star Games (10 in total) and again had a good year at the plate.  Garvey would lead the NL First Basemen in Putouts and Fielding Percentage.  He was on the ballot fifteen years finishing as high as 42.2% in 1995.  Ranked #34 on Notinhalloffame.com.   

George Scott, AL Milwaukee Brewers (8) (1976)

0.1 dWAR.  Scott did not win any Defensive category but did finish 2nd in Total Zone Runs.  Overall, George Scott won eight Gold Gives while having a career Defensive WAR of -1.8.  Was on the ballot for two year in 1979 receiving 0.2% of the vote in 1986.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com

Steve Garvey, NL Los Angeles Dodgers (3) (1976)

-0.6 dWAR.  Finishing 6th in MVP Voting.  Lather rinse repeat.  Lots of hits, good average, lousy OBP and playing in the most games at First leading to a natural lead in Putouts.  He did again lead in Fielding Percentage.  He was on the ballot fifteen years finishing as high as 42.2% in 1995.  Ranked #34 on Notinhalloffame.com.   

Jim Spencer, AL Chicago White Sox (2) (1977)

-0.8 dWAR.  This makes no sense at all.  Spencer was not even in the top ten amongst AL First Basemen in ANY defensive metric.  Overall, Spencer had a -9.6 Defensive bWAR over his career.  Was on the ballot for one year in 1988 but did not receive any votes.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com

Steve Garvey, NL Los Angeles Dodgers (4) (1977)

-0.4 dWAR.  Garvey again finished 6th in MVP Voting.  Garvey led in Putouts, Range Factor per Game and Fielding Percentage.  Garvey did not make many errors at First but also took no chances and did not exactly increase the overall defensive range.  That was the par for the course however to win this award.  He was on the ballot fifteen years finishing as high as 42.2% in 1995.  Ranked #34 on Notinhalloffame.com.   

Chris Chambliss, AL New York Yankees (1978)

-0.2 dWAR.  A former AL Rookie of the Year (with the Cleveland Indians) Chris Chambliss won this award in his second straight year winning the World Series in Gotham.  He did not lead in any category defensively and it can be speculated that he won this award because he was a New York Yankee.  Was on the ballot for one year in 1994 but did not receive any votes.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Keith Hernandez, NL St. Louis Cardinals (1978)

-0.6 dWAR.  There would be many Gold Gloves that Keith Hernandez would earn but the first one wasn’t one of them.  Hernandez did not lead in any defensive category and was not in the top ten in Total Zone Runs.  He was on the ballot nine years finishing as high as 10.8% in 1998.  Ranked #53 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Cecil Cooper, AL Milwaukee Brewers (1979)

-1.1 dWAR.  Cecil Cooper emerged as an offensive star in Milwaukee, but that was not really the case with his glove.  He did not lead any American League First Basemen in any Defensive category and wasn’t really close.  Was on the ballot for one year in 1993 but did not receive any votes.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Keith Hernandez, NL St. Louis Cardinals (2) (1979)

0.4 dWAR.  This would be the best season of Hernandez career as he would win the National League MVP, lead the NL in Batting Average and Runs Scored.  He would have a very good season defensively leading the National League First Basemen in Putouts, Assists, Double Plays Turned, Range Factor per Game and Total Zone Runs.  He was on the ballot nine years finishing as high as 10.8% in 1998.  Ranked #53 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Cecil Cooper, AL Milwaukee Brewers (2) (1980)

-0.1 dWAR.  This was a better year with the glove and Copper would lead in Assists, Double Plays Turned and Fielding Percentage.  He would finish fifth in MVP voting.  Was on the ballot for one year in 1993 but did not receive any votes.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Keith Hernandez, NL St. Louis Cardinals (3) (1980)

0.2 dWAR.  Hernandez would finish 11th in MVP voting and led in Double Plays Turned and Total Zone Runs.  He was on the ballot nine years finishing as high as 10.8% in 1998.  Ranked #53 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Mike Squires, AL Chicago White Sox (1981)

-0.7 dWAR.  This was the only individual award that Squires would win in his career.  We are not sure why he even won this one.  He was never on the ballot despite being eligible in 1991.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Keith Hernandez, NL St. Louis Cardinals (4) (1981)

0.2 dWAR.  This was another good year for Keith Hernandez, both with his bat and his glove.  He would lead in Putouts, Double Plays Turned, Total Zone Runs and Range Factor per Game.  He was on the ballot nine years finishing as high as 10.8% in 1998.  Ranked #53 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Keith Hernandez, NL St. Louis Cardinals (5) (1982)

0.2 dWAR.  The most important thing for Hernandez this year is that his Cardinals won the World Series.  He would again lead in Putouts, Total Zone Runs and Range Factor per Game while once more putting up good offense.  He was on the ballot nine years finishing as high as 10.8% in 1998.  Ranked #53 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Keith Hernandez, NL St. Louis Cardinals/New York Mets (6) (1983)

0.8 dWAR.  The Cardinals (ok, really Whitey Herzog) wanted him Keith Hernandez gone and the Mets were more than happy to oblige.  Hernandez would actually finish first in Errors, but his overall metrics were incredible for his defense.  Once again he led National League First Basemen in Putouts, Double Plays Turned, Total Zone Runs and Range Factor per Game.  This seasons (16) would be the highest of his career and he finished 4th overall in the National League.  He was on the ballot nine years finishing as high as 10.8% in 1998.  Ranked #53 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Keith Hernandez, NL New York Mets (7) (1984)

0.1 dWAR.  With a lot to prove, Keith Hernandez would finish 2nd in MVP voting.  He would lead in Assists and Total Zone Runs.  He would also win his second Silver Slugger.  He was on the ballot nine years finishing as high as 10.8% in 1998.  Ranked #53 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Don Mattingly, AL New York Yankees (1985)

-0.9 dWAR.  This was the year that “Donnie Baseball” took over Gotham and won the American League MVP Award.  He would win the RBI Title and lead the AL First Basemen in Double Plays Turned and Fielding Percentage but this was a player who did not even finish in the top ten in Total Zone Runs.  He was on the ballot for fifteen years finishing as high as 28.2% in 2001.  Ranked #54 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Keith Hernandez, NL New York Mets (8) (1985)

0.6 dWAR.  Finishing 8th in NL MVP voting, Hernandez would again lead in Assists and Total Zone Runs amongst the National League First Basemen.  Overall in the NL he finished 4th in Total Zone Runs.  Hernandez would also lead in Fielding Percentage, the first time he would so.  He was on the ballot nine years finishing as high as 10.8% in 1998.  Ranked #53 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Don Mattingly, AL New York Yankees (2) (1986)

-0.8 dWAR.  Mattingly would finish 2nd in MVP voting while winning the Slugging and OPS Titles.  He would lead in Putouts and Fielding Percentage but again did not finish in the top ten in Total Zone Runs amongst AL First Basemen.  He was on the ballot for fifteen years finishing as high as 28.2% in 2001.  Ranked #54 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Keith Hernandez, NL New York Mets (9) (1986)

0.1 dWAR.  The most important thing this year for Keith Hernandez is that the New York Mets would win their second World Series.  He would also finish 4th in MVP voting, and led in Fielding Percentage, whole finishing second in Total Zone Runs.  He was on the ballot nine years finishing as high as 10.8% in 1998.  Ranked #53 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Don Mattingly, AL New York Yankees (3) (1987)

0.1 dWAR.  Amazingly, this would be the only season where he would have a positive Defensive bWAR.  Mattingly would lead in Fielding Percentage this year.  He was on the ballot for fifteen years finishing as high as 28.2% in 2001.  Ranked #54 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Keith Hernandez, NL New York Mets (10) (1987)

-0.4 dWAR.  Hernandez would lead in Assists but was clearly on the decline.  This would be his last year going to the All Star Game.  He was on the ballot nine years finishing as high as 10.8% in 1998.  Ranked #53 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Don Mattingly, AL New York Yankees (4) (1988)

-0.6 dWAR.  Mattingly did not come close to winning any defensive metric among American League First Basemen.  He was on the ballot for fifteen years finishing as high as 28.2% in 2001.  Ranked #54 on Notinhalloffame.com

Keith Hernandez, NL New York Mets (11) (1988)

-0.4 dWAR.  This was the last Gold Glove for Keith Hernandez and like the first one he won, he didn’t earn this one.  Still, in most of the seasons that Hernandez won the Gold Glove he was very much deserving and if you have been reading this from the beginning you know we have quite a winner in comparison to everything else we have been seeing.  Actually, has anyone even been close?  He was on the ballot nine years finishing as high as 10.8% in 1998.  Ranked #53 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Don Mattingly, AL New York Yankees (5) (1989)

-0.9 dWAR.  Was Don Mattingly given this award at the start of the season?  Again, he did not threaten to lead in any defensive category.  He was on the ballot for fifteen years finishing as high as 28.2% in 2001.  Ranked #54 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Andres Galarraga, NL Montreal Expos (1989)

-1.1 dWAR.  Sigh.  Why did “The Big Cat” win this one?  Like many other we have discussed, Galarraga had no business winning this award and did not finish first in any defensive category, nor did he finish in the top ten in Total Zone Runs.  He was on the ballot one year in 2010 finishing with 4.1% of the vote.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Mark McGwire, AL Oakland Athletics (1990)

0.3 dWAR.  I know what you are thinking.  Mark McGwire is not known for his defense at all, but this year he wasn’t that bad and better than many of the other winners around him.  McGwire led the AL First Basemen in Putouts and Total Zone Runs.  He was on the ballot for ten years finishing as high as 23.6% in 2008.  Ranked #15 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Andres Galarraga, NL Montreal Expos (2) (1990)

-0.3 dWAR.  Well, at least he did better than the year before.  Galarraga didn’t win any defensive metric again, but at least was in the top ten in Total Zone Runs.  He was on the ballot one year in 2010 finishing with 4.1% of the vote.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Don Mattingly, AL New York Yankees (6) (1991)

-0.3 dWAR.  This was actually a much better defensive campaign.  Mattingly finished second in Total Zone Runs and was the leader in Double Plays Turned.  He was on the ballot for fifteen years finishing as high as 28.2% in 2001.  Ranked #54 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Will Clark, NL San Francisco Giants (1991)

-0.8 dWAR.  This would be the only Gold Glove that Will Clark would win, and frankly he shouldn’t have won it.  While offensively, he led the NL in Slugging Percentage and finished 4th in MVP voting, defensively he did nothing special.  Again, this is a case of a player who was low in Errors, but had no range.  He did lead in Fielding Percentage and Double Plays Turned but did not finish in the top ten in Total Zone Runs.  This is an underrated player overall, but mostly for his bat.  He was on the ballot one year in 2010 finishing with 4.1% of the vote.  Ranked #61 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Don Mattingly, AL New York Yankees (7) (1992)

-0.4 dWAR.  This year, Don Mattingly would lead the First Basemen in the American League in Total Zone Runs and in Fielding Percentage.  He was on the ballot for fifteen years finishing as high as 28.2% in 2001.  Ranked #54 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Mark Grace, NL Chicago Cubs (1992)

-0.1 dWAR.  Grace may have finished with a negative Defensive bWAR but he did however finish first in Putouts, Assists, Total Zone Runs and Range Factor per Game.  He was on the ballot for one year in 2009 and finished with 4.1% of the vote.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Don Mattingly, AL New York Yankees (8) (1993)

-0.3 dWAR.  Don Mattingly’s offense was sliding, but this was an up year with his glove.  For the second time he would lead in Ranger Factor per Game and again led in Fielding Percentage.  He was on the ballot for fifteen years finishing as high as 28.2% in 2001.  Ranked #54 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Mark Grace, NL Chicago Cubs (2) (1993)

0.2 dWAR.  Grace would put up better defensive numbers and would lead the National League First Basemen in Putouts, Double Plays Turned, Total Zone Runs and Range Factor per Game.  He was on the ballot for one year in 2009 and finished with 4.1% of the vote.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Don Mattingly, AL New York Yankees (9) (1994)

-0.1 dWAR.  This would be the ninth and final Gold Glove of Mattingly’s career and it was one of the better ones as he would again win the Fielding Percentage Title among the American League First Basemen and again in Range Factor per Game.  Mattingly would overall have a negative Defensive bWAR of -6.3.  Mattingly did not make many mistakes but he did not do anything exceptional at all with his glove.  This was not a player who should have won so nine Gold Gloves, and perhaps not even one.  He was on the ballot for fifteen years finishing as high as 28.2% in 2001.  Ranked #54 on Notinhalloffame.com.

J.T. Snow, AL California Angels (1995)

-2.0 dWAR.  Snow may not have had a lot of errors, but he did absolutely nothing exceptional at First Base.  He did not even finish in the top ten in Range Factor per Game or Total Zone Runs.  Horrible choice!  He was on the ballot for one year in 2014 and finished with 0.4% of the vote.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com

Jeff Bagwell, NL Houston Astros (1995)

-0.1 dWAR.  Jeff Bagwell isn’t in the Hall of Fame yet? (As of this writing).  Hopefully this changes soon.  This season, Bagwell would lead in Assists and Double Plays Turned.  It wasn’t a spectacular defensive season, but it was decent for him.  Perhaps his bat shadowed his actual ability as this year he would also win the MVP, the Silver Slugger, The RBI Title and led in bWAR for Position Players.  He was on the ballot for one year in 2014 and finished with 0.4% of the vote.  Ranked #5 on Norinhalloffame.com.

Mark Grace, NL Chicago Cubs (3) (1995)

-0.2 dWAR.  Mark Grace would finish 13th in MVP voting, the highest of his career and the fourth and final time he received votes.  He likely should have not have won a Gold Glove as he did not lead in any Defensive Statistic.  He was on the ballot for one year in 2009 and finished with 4.1% of the vote.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

J.T. Snow, AL California Angels (2) (1996)

-0.8 dWAR.  See above.  Again, there was nothing special about Snow’s defensive skills and he again did not finish in the top ten in Range Factor per Game or Total Zone Runs.  He was on the ballot for one year in 2014 and finished with 0.4% of the vote.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com

Mark Grace, NL Chicago Cubs (4) (1996)

0.1 dWAR.  While Mark Grace did not lead in any defensive measure, he did have a double digit finish in Total Zone Runs and only committed 4 Errors.  He was on the ballot for one year in 2009 and finished with 4.1% of the vote.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Rafael Palmeiro, AL Baltimore Orioles (1997)

0.1 dWAR.  Palmeiro is one of the few players to have 3,000 Hits and 500 Home Runs but he was far more known for his wagging finger in front of congress.  Palmeiro did not lead in any category but had a decent defensive season.  He was on the ballot for four years and finished as high as 12.6% of the vote in 2012.  Ranked #23 on Notinhalloffame.com.

J.T. Snow, NL San Francisco Giants (3) (1997)

-1.4 dWAR.  Snow was in a different league, similar results.  A negative Defensive bWAR without leading in any defensive category.  He was on the ballot for one year in 2014 and finished with 0.4% of the vote.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com

Rafael Palmeiro, AL Baltimore Orioles (2) (1998)

0.7 dWAR.  Palmeiro would lead the American League First Basemen in Putouts, Total Zone Runs and Range Factor per Game.  He earned this award, unlike what would happen next season..  He was on the ballot for four years and finished as high as 12.6% of the vote in 2012.  Ranked #23 on Notinhalloffame.com.

J.T. Snow, NL San Francisco Giants (4) (1998)

-0.6 dWAR.  This year was significantly better as he would lead in Fielding Percentage and Total Range Factor per Game.  He was on the ballot for one year in 2014 and finished with 0.4% of the vote.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com

Rafael Palmeiro, AL Texas Rangers (3) (1999)

-1.1 dWAR.  This is the worst recipient period.  Palmeiro played most of the year at Designated Hitter and actually won the Edgar Martinez Award as the DH of the year.  This win proved that most of the voters paid zero attention to the defensive side of the ball.  Needless to say, Palmeiro was not in the running to lead any defensive category.  By the way, he earned a bonus for winning this.  He was on the ballot for four years and finished as high as 12.6% of the vote in 2012.  Ranked #23 on Notinhalloffame.com.

J.T. Snow, NL San Francisco Giants (5) (1999)

-0.7 dWAR.  Once again, J.T. Snow won a Gold Glove without winning a defensive metric.  Who voted here?  He was on the ballot for one year in 2014 and finished with 0.4% of the vote.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com

John Olerud, AL Seattle Mariners (2000)

0.3 dWAR.  Prior to this, Olerud had won two World Series Titles with the Toronto Blue Jays.  This year, he would lead the AL First Basemen in Assists, Total Zone Runs and Fielding Percentage.  He was on the ballot for one year and received 0.7% of the vote in 2011. Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

J.T. Snow, NL San Francisco Giants (6) (2000)

-1.2 dWAR.  This is the sixth and last of J.T. Snow’s undeserving Gold Gloves.  There was no defensive metric win, nor was there a top ten finish in Total Zone Runs.  For what it is worth in 2003, he would lead in Total Zone Runs and had a 0.2 Defensive bWAR.  Of course that year he did not win a Gold Glove.  It is also worth mentioning that his career Defensive bWAR was -11.1.  He was on the ballot for one year in 2014 and finished with 0.4% of the vote.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com

Doug Mientkiewicz, AL Minnesota Twins (2001)

-0.8 dWAR.  There is no doubt that this would be the best season of Doug Minetkiewicz’s career, offensively anyway.   Defensively he led in Fielding Percentage but did not come close to leading in any other defensive metric.  He was not on the ballot despite being eligible in 2015.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

John Olerud, AL Seattle Mariners (2) (2002)

-0.6 dWAR.  Sandwiched in between his 2000 and 2002 Gold Glove, Olerud went to the All Star Game.  While this was a down year for Olerud defensively in comparison to his previous (and next) Gold Glove win, he did lead in Double Plays Turned.  He was on the ballot for one year and received 0.7% of the vote in 2011. Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

John Olerud, AL Seattle Mariners (3) (2003)

0.4 dWAR.  John Olerud would only lead in Assists but he finished in the top three in Double Plays Turned, Range Factor per Game and Total Zone Runs.  He was on the ballot for one year and received 0.7% of the vote in 2011. Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Derrek Lee, NL Florida Marlins (2003)

-1.8 dWAR.  Huh?  Derrek Lee would win a World Series with the Marlins, but his glove wasn’t a big part of that.  He did not finish in the top ten in Total Zone Runs, or Range Factor per Game.  His only grace here is that he did commit a lot of errors, but this was a horrible choice.  He was on the ballot for one year in 2017 but did not receive any votes.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com

Darin Erstad, AL Anaheim Angels (2004)

0.2 dWAR.  Erstad had already won two Gold Gloves as an Outfielder, though he did not do anything of note to win this one, though after Palmeiro’s final one, we know the bar was set pretty low for First Basemen defensively.  He was on the ballot for one year and received 0.2% of the vote in 2015. Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Derrek Lee, NL Chicago Cubs (2) (2005)

-0.5 dWAR.  Lee would go to the All Star Game for the first time and had a great season with the bat, leading the NL in Hits, Batting Average, OPS and finished 3rd in MVP voting.  Defensively, he led in Assists, but again was nothing special.  At least it was better than the first time he won the Gold Glove.  He was on the ballot for one year in 2017 but did not receive any votes.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com

Derrek Lee, NL Chicago Cubs (3) (2007)

-0.9 dWAR.  An All star for the second and final time, Lee was again great with his bat with a .317 Batting Average.  The glove was again mediocre with no top ten finish in Total Zone Runs and Range Factor per Game.  Lee did not deserve any of these Gold Gloves.  He was on the ballot for one year in 2017 but did not receive any votes.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com



Let’s update our tally shall we?



Award in Question

Percentage of recipients who have entered the HOF

Percentage of recipients by year who have entered the HOF.

NBA MVP

100%

100%

NHL Norris

90.5%

96.4%

NBA All Star Game MVP

89.5%

91.7%

NHL Conn Smythe

74.2%

85.4%

NHL Lady Byng

63.8%

76.0%

NFL Super Bowl MVP

60.6%

64.9%

NBA Defensive Player of the Year

58.3%

56.5%

NBA Rookie of the Year

56.5%

56.5%

MLB/NL/AL Cy Young Award

44.4%

55.4%

NHL Frank J. Selke Trophy

33.3%

36.7%

NFL Offensive Rookie of the Year

28.6%

28.6%

MLB Edgar Martinez Award

26.7%

17.2%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Designated Hitter)

25.0%

30.8%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Shortstop)

23.5%

52.6%

NFL Defensive Rookie of the Year

20.6%

20.6%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Catcher)

20.0%

22.5%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Pitcher)

18.2%

20.1%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Second Base)

16.7%

32.7%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Outfield)

15.7%

25.2%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Third Base)

13.6%

14.3%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (First Base)

13.6%

13.3%

MLB (NL/AL) Rookie of the Year

13.3%

13.3%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Catcher)

10.3%

15.2%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (First Base)

3.8%

3.2%





So who is up next?



The following are the players who have won the Gold Glove at First Base who have retired but have not met the mandatory years out of the game to qualify for the Baseball Hall of Fame:



Todd Helton, NL Colorado Rockies (2001)

-0.3 dWAR.  By this point, Todd Helton had already established himself as one of the game’s best hitters but he had a much better season defensively the year before this one.  He still led in Total Zone Runs amongst National League First Basemen but went from 18 to 7 from 2000 to 2001.  In this season, he also led in Fielding Percentage.  Eligible for the Hall of Fame in 2019.

Todd Helton, NL Colorado Rockies (2) (2002)

0.2 dWAR.  This was the third season in a row where Todd Helton would lead in Total Zone Runs amongst the National League First Basemen.  He would also lead in Putouts, Assists and Double Plays Turned.  Eligible for the Hall of Fame in 2019.

Todd Helton, NL Colorado Rockies (3) (2004)

0.3 dWAR.  In 2003, Helton had a negative Defensive bWAR of -1.8.  Thankfully, he didn’t win the Gold Glove that year!  Helton’s third and final Gold Glove would only see him lead defensively in Assists, but he did finish second in Total Zone Runs.  Eligible for the Hall of Fame in 2019.

Mark Teixeira, AL Texas Rangers (2005)

0.4 dWAR.  This would be Mark Teixeira’s first great season in MLB and also his first All Star Game appearance.  Teixeira, who also won the Silver Slugger would lead all of the American League, would lead in Putouts and Fielding Percentage for American League First Basemen.  Eligible for the Hall of Fame in 2022.

Mark Teixeira, AL Texas Rangers (2) (2006)

-0.1 dWAR.  Teixeira would not be as good defensively as he was the year previously, but did lead the AL First Basemen in Putouts.  Eligible for the Hall of Fame in 2022.

Kevin Youkilis, AL Boston Red Sox (2007)

0.4 dWAR.  Kevin Youkilis, “The Greek God of Walks” would win his lone Gold Glove this year where he would also lead the AL First Basemen in Fielding Percentage.  Youkilis would later win the World Series the season after.  Eligible for the Hall of Fame in 2019.

Carlos Pena, AL Tampa Bay Rays (2008)

0.8 dWAR.  Pena would be an All Star (for the first and only time) in the year that followed and in 2008 he would lead American League First Basemen in Fielding Percentage.  Eligible for the Hall of Fame in 2020.

Mark Teixeira, AL New York Yankees (3) (2009)

-0.7 dWAR.  Teixeira would win the World Series this year in his firs t season in the Bronx, but this was not a Gold Glove season.  Offensively however, he was spectacular, winning the Home Run and RBI Title and he finished 2nd in MVP Voting.  Eligible for the Hall of Fame in 2022.

Mark Teixeira, AL New York Yankees (4) (2010)

-0.3 dWAR.  Again, Teixeira was really a star with his bat, and this win is questionable.  Eligible for the Hall of Fame in 2022.

Mark Teixeira, AL New York Yankees (5) (2012)

1.0 dWAR.  In terms of dbWAR, this was his best defensive season.  Teixeira would lead in Fielding Percentage.  Eligible for the Hall of Fame in 2022.

Adam LaRoche, NL Washington Nationals (2012)

0.0 dWAR.  LaRoche finished 6th in MVP voting, the best of his career and while he was an even in Defensive bWAR, he did lead in Total Zone Runs.  Eligible for the Hall of Fame in 2021.





The following are the players who have won the Gold Glove at First Base who are still active.

Albert Pujols, NL St. Louis Cardinals (2006)

0.8 dWAR.  Albert Pujols is a bona fide future Hall of Famer and was a three time MVP.  He was a runner-up for the award this year.  This season, he led the National League First Basemen in Total Zone Runs and Range Factor per Game, but the following year he had a 2.2 Defensive bWAR and DEFINITELY should have won it that year.  37 Years Old, Playing for the Anaheim Angels.

Adrian Gonzalez, NL San Diego Padres (2008)

-1.0 dWAR.  There would be years where Adrian Gonzalez would deserve the Gold Glove. This wasn’t one of them.  34 Years Old, Playing for the Los Angeles Dodgers.

Adrian Gonzalez, NL San Diego Padres (2) (2009)

0.6 dWAR.  This year was much better defensively as he would lead the American League First Basemen in Total Zone Runs.  34 Years Old, Playing for the Los Angeles Dodgers.

Joey Votto, NL Cincinnati Reds (2010)

-0.6 dWAR.  Votto blossomed offensively and was a MVP the year before, though defensively that wasn’t the case.  Otto did however leas the NL First Basemen in Assists and Putouts.  32 Years Old, Playing for the Cincinnati Reds.

Adrian Gonzalez, AL Boston Red Sox (3) (2011)

0.3 dWAR.  This was the first season that Adrian Gonzalez won the Gold Glove in the American League and he finished 7th in MVP voting.  Gonzalez would lead in Assists and Total Zone Runs.  34 Years Old, Playing for the Los Angeles Dodgers.

Albert Pujols, NL St. Louis Cardinals (2) (2011)

0.1 dWAR.  2007 should have been Pujols’ second Gold Glove.  As it turned out it was 2011 and this not a Gold Glove caliber season, though he did lead the NL in Double Plays Turned and Total Zone Runs.  37 Years Old, Playing for the Anaheim Angels.

Eric Hosmer, AL Kansas City Royals (2013)

-0.5 dWAR.  Hosmer would have an excellent offensive season with his first .300 season but committed the most errors amongst American League First Basemen.  27 Years Old, Playing for the Kansas City Royals.

Paul Goldschmidt, NL Arizona Diamondbacks (2013)

0.3 dWAR.  This was the first season that Paul Goldschmidt became an All Star and he would finish second in MVP voting this season.  He would lead the NL in Total Zone Runs and Range Factor per Game.  This was his arrival year!  29 Years Old, Playing for the Arizona Diamondbacks.

Eric Hosmer, AL Kansas City Royals (2) (2014)

-0.3 dWAR.  Hosmer led in absolutely no defensive metric, nor did he finish in the top ten in Total Zone Runs.  27 Years Old, Playing for the Kansas City Royals.

Adrian Gonzalez, NL Los Angeles Dodgers (4) (2014)

0.2 dWAR.  Gonzalez led the NL First Basemen in Putouts and Assists and finished second in Total Zone Runs.  34 Years Old, Playing for the Los Angeles Dodgers.

Eric Hosmer, AL Kansas City Royals (3) (2015)

-0.9 dWAR.  Hosmer had a lousy Defensive bWAR but did lead in Assists, Putouts and Double Plays Turned.  However, he did not make the top ten in Total Zone Runs.  27 Years Old, Playing for the Kansas City Royals.

Paul Goldschmidt, NL Arizona Diamondbacks (2) (2015)

0.9 dWAR.  Off and on.  The season before, Goldschmidt had a negative bWAR, but he rebounded this season.  He would again finish second in MVP voting.  He would again lead in Range Factor per Game by First Basemen in the National League.  29 Years Old, Playing for the Arizona Diamondbacks.

Mitch Moreland, AL Texas Rangers (2016)

0.0 dWAR.  This is the first individual award of Moreland’s MLB career.  He would lead in Double Plays Turned and Fielding Percentage and finished second in Total Zone Runs.  31 Years Old, Playing for the Boston Red Sox.

Anthony Rizzo, NL Chicago Cubs (2016)

This was the season where the Cubs FINALLY broke through!  Rizzo finished 4th in MVP voting (and did so the season before) and this was the first season where he would lead the NL First Basemen in Assists and Total Zone Runs.  27 Years Old, Playing for the Chicago Cubs.



This is our lowest yield yet, but this should grow with Helton and Pujols.  It really can’t get worse!

We will continue around the diamond and tackle Second Base next.

Here we are in the National Football League playoffs but for us that it means it is time to discuss the potential class of the 2017 Pro Football Hall of Fame.  The Finalists have been announced, and along with regular contributor, Spheniscus, we will go back and forth with each candidate and openly debate as to which player would be a worthy Pro Football Hall of Fame inductee.
Here we are in the National Football League playoffs but for us that it means it is time to discuss the potential class of the 2017 Pro Football Hall of Fame.  The Finalists have been announced, and along with regular contributor, Spheniscus, we will go back and forth with each candidate and openly debate as to which player would be a worthy Pro Football Hall of Fame inductee.
Here we are in the National Football League playoffs but for us that it means it is time to discuss the potential class of the 2017 Pro Football Hall of Fame.  The Finalists have been announced, and along with regular contributor, Spheniscus, we will go back and forth with each candidate and openly debate as to which player would be a worthy Pro Football Hall of Fame inductee.

Committee Chairman: Spheniscus, here is one I really like in Kevin Mawae, but I wonder if I am in the minority here.  I think what works against him is the teams he played for were not high profile or often any good.  He played for Seattle for four years where they were mediocre and the Titans, who while good, is not a team who network executives wanted to put in the night game.  He did have a great run in the middle of his career with some good Jets teams, but even though we are talking about New York City, isn’t that really the home of the Giants?
Here we are in the National Football League playoffs but for us that it means it is time to discuss the potential class of the 2017 Pro Football Hall of Fame.  The Finalists have been announced, and along with regular contributor, Spheniscus, we will go back and forth with each candidate and openly debate as to which player would be a worthy Pro Football Hall of Fame inductee.

Committee Chairman: Spheniscus, we go to a team I am sure you are familiar with Jason Taylor, the former Dancing with the Stars contestant and Miami Dolphin.  Taylor is a member of the 100 Sack Club and Defensive Player of the Year.  I think Taylor is getting in, but I think they are going to put him on the backburner for one year.  Thoughts on Taylor’s Hall of Fame candidacy and why so many NFL players go on DWTS? 
Here we are in the National Football League playoffs but for us that it means it is time to discuss the potential class of the 2017 Pro Football Hall of Fame.  The Finalists have been announced, and along with regular contributor, Spheniscus, we will go back and forth with each candidate and openly debate as to which player would be a worthy Pro Football Hall of Fame inductee.

Committee Chairman: Spheniscus, this is the third time that Kurt Warner has made the Finalists but this time he is the best (and only Quarterback) in this group.  His main target, Isaac Bruce is also here and as poetic as it is for them to both go in together, it won’t happen.  There is an unspoken hierarchy here, and Warner has it over Bruce.  My initial thought is one Ram going in and 18 camera shots at Brenda Warner during the induction ceremony.