From the Desk of the Chairman

Were Roman Gladiator matches scripted like in the WWE?

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Image: Pixabay

Gladiators were the primary form of entertainment during the Ancient Roman Empire. These powerful, awe-inspiring men-at-arms would fight to the death in what was seen as a very glamorous calling. It’s been a long-held belief among some people that Roman gladiators were merely long-standing criminals and slaves coerced into fighting. While it may be true that the initial ‘wave’ of gladiators tended to be those who were caught red-handed breaking the law, or had been conquered from other lands, the reality is that some of the latter Roman gladiators enjoyed a celebrity status.

While it’s true that many of the world’s biggest wrestlers from WWE have enjoyed celebrity status too, many have gone on to achieve A-list fame far quicker away from the wrestling ring than those who remain in it. You only have to look at ‘The Rock’ Dwayne Johnsonand Dave Bautista, whose Hollywood careers have set them up for long-term stardom. Many years before The Rock, Hulk Hogan was the wrestler on everyone’s lips, appearing in commercials and movies too in a bid to enhance his profile – with clothes on as opposed to solely pants!

Back to the Roman Empire, once some people realized just how exciting and thrilling gladiatorial battles could be, it soon became an absolute free-for-all of locals looking to sign up and become the next unbeatable gladiator, agreeing contracts voluntarily and even spending time at so-called training schools to try and hone their fighting craft before being unleashed into the white heat of battle and fight for cash prizes. This changing demographic saw gladiators become less about the blood and gore and more about the pre-battle build-up and intense promotion of duels.

More recently, the world has developed an undeniable fascination with Roman gladiators and the lengths they would go to achieve notoriety in Ancient Rome. At the turn of the Millennium, Ridley Scott’s Gladiator movie, starring Russell Crowe as general Maximus Decimus Meridius, captured the imagination of millions of viewers at the box office. Heart-broken by the murder of his father by a young upstart named Commodus, who takes to the throne and forces Maximus into slavery, Maximus sees no other way to avenge his father’s death than to fight his way up that gladiatorial ranks. HBO’s Game of Thrones must surely have used gladiatorial arenas as inspiration for Meereen’s fighting pits too. The Spartacus Gladiator video slot, that’s available to sample at VegasSlotsOnline, was another release inspired by a gladiator who led the major slave uprising against the Roman Republic.

Some gladiators had promoters, yes, you heard correctly

As being a gladiator became something of a profession rather than a punishment during the Roman Empire, it soon became apparent that gladiators required full-time support. Like WWE wrestlers, this arrived in the form of promoters. Promoters would train, feed and water their gladiators, teaching them all the tricks of the trade and building them up into marketable fighting machines. So valuable were some gladiators to their promoters that the latter would encourage fights to go ahead not for the kill but only to wound or severely injure their opponents, elongating their careers and the promoters’ potential prize income.

Some gladiatorial fights were as scripted as WWE

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Image: Pixabay

While some gladiator battles didn’t go on to end in a death, others were also heavily staged, particularly in the case of many Roman emperors. An article on History.com states that some fought under highly controlled conditions, even using dull blades on occasion so as not to encounter unnecessary injury. On occasion, emperors such as Commodus would prefer to attack animals rather than fellow gladiators in the arena – from the comfort of his raised platform, of course. There were also examples of Commodus entering gladiator duels that had been artificially arranged to give him an unfair advantage. He fought various raw, rookie fighters fresh out of training school, as well as random members of the gladiatorial arena audience, just to make him look strong and powerful.

In truth, there is a lot that wrestlers and gladiators have in common. Both have won fame and support from the middle and lower classes and have a tendency to become a symbol for the opposite sex. One could argue that WWE is merely the latest brand in a long-running saga of staged entertainment that’s been a winning formula through the generations and centuries.

After the NFL’s 100th regular season, we now know the Kansas City Chiefs will face the San Francisco 49ers for the Vince Lombardi Trophy in Super Bowl LIV.

The Chiefs were the first team to book their spot in that game as they overcame the Tennessee Titans 35-24. Quarterback Patrick Mahomes shone for the number two seed, scoring three touchdowns and throwing for 294 yards. Just like the Divisional Round against the Houston Texans, the Chiefs got off to a slow start at Arrowhead. Once they got going though, the Titans were unable to handle the hosts who are into the Super Bowl for the first time in 50 years.

This will be head coach Andy Reid’s first shot at the Vince Lombardi Trophy since he took over the franchise in 2013. He fell just one game short 12 months ago when the New England Patriots defeated them 37-31 in a classic encounter.

2018 NFL MVP Mahomes will be making his Super Bowl debut. Although he didn’t quite match the same numbers he put up in 2018, it was still an impressive year for the QB. He inspired his team to victory in their last six matches of the season to secure the number two seed in the AFC Championship.

The Chiefs were many people’s pick to win the AFC Championship, including with the WSN Podcast team, who also took them to cover the 7.5 point spread. They have opened up as the favorites with the bookmakers in the Super Bowl market.

San Francisco eyeing record-equalling sixth Super Bowl Crown

San Francisco 49ers go into Super Bowl LV one short of the New England Patriots and Pittsburgh Steelers when it comes to record number of wins in the game.

It has been some turnaround for the west coast franchise as they won just four games in 2018, with Jimmy Garoppolo's ACL injury playing a large part in that. Some smart draft picks, trades and excellent coaching have helped them transform into one of the best teams in the NFL.

Victories over divisional rivals Los Angeles Rams and Seattle Seahawks in week 16 and 17 respectively ensured that Kyle Shanahan’s team wrapped up the number one seed in the NFC Conference.

The 49ers took full advantage of playing in front of their home fans at the Levi’s Stadium when they beat the Minnesota Vikings 27-10 in the Divisional Roundof the playoffs. Their freshness from having a week off in the Wildcard Round showed in the fourth quarter.

The NFC West champions then proved too strong for the Green Bay Packers to lift the NFC Championship title. They got off to a flying start in that game as they led 27-0 at halftime before going on to complete a 37-20 victory.

San Francisco have run the ball very well in the postseason so far - Raheem Mostert rushed for 220 yards and four touchdowns against the Packers. Shanahan is likely to stick to that winning formula in the Super Bowl, while he also has one of the best defenses in the league to lean on in his attempt to stop the Chiefs.

It looks set to be an exciting showdown in Miami between two very good football teams.

We here at Notinhalloffame.com thought it would be fun to take a look at the major awards in North American team sports and see how it translates into Hall of Fame potential.

Needless to say, different awards in different sports yield hall of fame potential.  In basketball, the team sport with the least number of players on a roster, the dividend for greatness much higher.  In baseball, it is not as much as a great individual season does not have the same impact.

Last time, we looked at the Vezina Trophy in the NHL.  This time, we go back to the gridiron with the NFL AP MVP.

The award got off to a rocky start.  From 1957 to 1960, as it was disputed as the pre-1961 winners winning a Most Outstanding Player Award, and sources show multiple winners. In the years between 1958 to 1960.  For our purposes, we will use the single names, as shown by Pro Football Reference. In 1961, the AP MVP was clear, presenting a specific MVP Award, thus negating any confusion.

So how many MVPs have made the Pro Football Hall of Fame?

Let’s find out!

The following are the past players who have won the NFL AP MVP who are eligible for the Pro Football Hall of Fame and have been enshrined.

Jim Brown, Cleveland Browns, Running Back (1957)

Hard to start with a better player isn’t it?  This was Brown’s rookie year, and the product of Syracuse shot right out of the gate leading the NFL in Rushing Yards (942), Rushing Touchdowns (9), and Touchdowns (10), which was a precursor of the greatness to come.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1971.

Jim Brown, Cleveland Browns, Running Back (2) (1958)

The rookie season of Jim Brown was really good, but his sophomore season was groundbreaking.  The Running Back shattered the Rushing Yards mark with 1,527 (Steve Van Buren rushed for 1,146 in 1949) and his 17 Rushing Touchdowns were staggering for the era.  This would be the first of five seasons where he would lead the NFL in Yards from Scrimmage. Brown would also win the UPI MVP and NEA MVP this season.  It took only two years for us to have our first repeat winner.   Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1971.

Johnny Unitas, Baltimore Colts, Quarterback (1959)      

Johnny Unitas led the Baltimore Colts to the NFL Championship, and in his fourth season in the NFL, he would take his team to back-to-back titles.  This year, “Johnny U” led the NFL in Completions (193), Passing Yards (2,899), Touchdown Passes (32), and he was a First Team All-Pro for the second time.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1979.

Norm Van Brocklin, Philadelphia Eagles, Quarterback (1960)

Norm Van Brocklin was a grizzled veteran by this time, as he played for the Los Angeles Rams from 1949 to 1957, and he joined the Eagles in 1958.  A Champion with the Rams in 1951, the 1960 campaign would see him go 10-2, with 2,471 Yards, and 24 Touchdowns.  In what was his ninth Pro Bowl, he would go to his first and only First Team All-Pro, while also leading the Eagles to the NFL Championship.  This was his last year as a player, as he hoped to be named the team’s head coach after.  That didn’t happen, but he would take over as the HC for the Minnesota Vikings.  Van Brocklin retired with a record of 61-36-4 with 23,611 Yards and 173 Touchdowns.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1971.

Paul Hornung, Green Bay Packers, Halfback & Kicker (1961)

A former Heisman Trophy winner from Notre Dame, Paul Hornung played his entire with the Green Bay Packers, and in 1960, he rushed for 597 Yards.  The Packers would also win the NFL Championship that year, and he was also rewarded with the Bert Bell Award.  Hornung played until 1966, and won three more titles with Green Bay.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1986.

Jim Taylor, Green Bay Packers, Fullback (1962)

The MVP year of Jim Taylor made him the second straight Green Bay Packer to win the AP MVP.  The Fullback led the NFL in Rushing Yards (1,474), Rushing Touchdowns (19), and he was on the third of five straight Pro Bowls.  The Packers would win the NFL Championship and he would win four in total.  Taylor played until 1967 (his final year was in New Orleans), and he would accumulate 8,597 Rushing Yards with 81 Touchdowns.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1976.

Y.A. Tittle, New York Giants, Quarterback (1963)

In the 1950s, Y.A. Tittle was a four-time Pro Bowl selection with the San Francisco 49ers, and at the age of 34 in 1961, he was traded to the New York Giants.  There were many who thought he was washed up, but instead the next three seasons would see Tittle secure himself as a Hall of Famer.  A Pro Bowler in 1961, and 1962, Tittle would have the best year of his life in 1963, where he would lead the NFL in Completion Percentage (60.2), Touchdown Passes (36), Quarterback Rating (104.8), and threw for 3,145 Yards. He only played one more season, and after getting hurt in the second game, he was ineffective and followed his best year with his worst.  Overall, Tittle threw for 33,070 Yards and 242 Touchdowns.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1971.

Johnny Unitas, Baltimore Colts, Quarterback (2) (1964)

This season, Unitas took his team to the NFL Championship, though they would fall to the Cleveland Browns in an upset. Regardless, this was a stellar regular season for the “Golden Arm”, as Unitas was chosen for his third First Team All-Prom and he threw for 19 TDs against only 6 Interceptions.  Unitas also went 12-2 with 2,824 Yards.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1979.

Jim Brown, Cleveland Browns, Running Back (3) (1965)

After his second win, Brown remained the elite running back in football.  In 1963, he had his best season with a record setting a new record with 1,863 Rushing Yards. He didn’t win the AP MVP, but did win the UPI MVP, NEA MVP and Bert Bell Award. 1965 would be Brown’s last season in the NFL, as he would abruptly retire, and pursue a career in acting. Brown remains the only player to win the MVP in his first and final year in the NFL.  He was a Pro Bowl in all of his nine years, and a First Team All-Pro in eight of them.  This win also made him the first player to win the AP MVP three times.  Brown also won the Rushing Title in eight of those years. He left the game as the first player to rush for 10,000 Yards, was the all-time leader in Rushing Yards (12,312), Rushing Touchdowns (106), Touchdowns (126), and All-Purpose Yards (15,549). While those numbers have since been broken, he did retire at the top of his game, and many still consider him he be the greatest Running Back of all-time.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1971.

Bart Starr, Green Bay Packers, Quarterback (1966)

Joining the Green Bay Packers in 1956, Bart Starr would evolve into one of the best Quarterbacks of the game, and he would lead his star-laden team to NFL Championships in 1961, 1962 & 1965. In 1966, he would lead the NFL in Pass Completion (62.2), and had a TD-INT rate of 14-3.  He would take the Packers to another NFL Championship, and they would soundly defeat the Kansas City Chiefs in Super Bowl I.   How fitting is it that the QB of the first Super Bowl is also the first MVP in the Super Bowl Era?  Starr won his fifth NFL Championship and second Super Bowl the season after, and he retired in 1971, in a career spent entirely in the “Frozen Tundra”.  He would have 24,718 Passing Yard with 152 TDs over his career.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1977.

Johnny Unitas, Baltimore Colts, Quarterback (3) (1967)

Arguably, this is the last great season of Unitas’s career, who would play until 1973, with one forgettable year in San Diego. 1967 saw him go to his tenth Pro Bowl and fifth First Team All-Pro, both of which would be his last.  Unitas threw for 20 Touchdowns and 3,428 Yards, and for the first and only time in his career, he led the NFL in Completion Percentage (58.5).  When he retired, he had a record of 118-63-4, 40,239 Passing Yards and 290 Touchdowns. He is a member of the 1960s All-Decade Team, 75thAnniversary Team and 100thAnniversary Team. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1979.

Alan Page, Minnesota Vikings, Defensive Tackle(1971)

A member of the famed “Purple People Eaters” Defense of the Vikings in the 1970s, Alan Page was the first defensive player and the first Minnesota Viking to win the AP MVP.  This year, Page was chosen for his third straight First Team All-Pro, but was also in his third consecutive season where he would lead the NFL in Approximate Value.  He would also be named the Defensive Player of the Year.  Page would go on to be named to three more First Team All-Pros, and he would overall go to nine Pro Bowls.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1988.

O.J. Simpson, Buffalo Bills, Running Back (1973)

In 1973, O.J. Simpson would become the first Running Back to rush for the elusive 2,000 Rushing Yards mark, when he finished with 2,003.  Needless to say, that led the NFL, as did his 12 Rushing Touchdowns and 2,073 All-Purpose Yards.  He would also win the Offensive Player of the Year and the Bert Bell Award that year. Simpson was in year two of his five-year run of First Team All-Pros, where he would win the Rushing Title in four of those years.  Simpson played until 1979, and would have 11,236 Rushing Yards with 108 total Touchdowns.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1985.

Ken Stabler, Oakland Raiders, Quarterback (1974)

“The Snake”, Ken Stabler, would be in chosen for his second of four Pro Bowls this year, and he led the NFL in Touchdown Passes (26) with 2,469 Yards.  Stabler would play football until 1984, and would take the Raiders to a win in Super Bowl XI.  Overall, Stabler would throw for 27,938 Yards for 194 Touchdowns.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2016.

Fran Tarkenton, Minnesota Vikings, Quarterback(1975)

The best scrambling Quarterback of the 1970s, Fran Tarkenton would lead the NFL in Completions (273) and Touchdown Passes (25) with 2,994 Yards.   He would also win the Bert Bell Award this year.  This was his eighth of nine Pro Bowl Selections, and he would finish his career with 47,003 Yards and 342 Touchdowns, while also rushing for 3,674 Yards and another 32 TDs.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1986.

Walter Payton, Chicago Bears, Running Back (1977)

Walter Payton played his entire career with the Chicago Bears, and he would become one of the best Running Backs that the game ever saw.  1977, was his third season, and this year he would have personal highs with 1,852 Rushing Yards 1n 14 Rushing Touchdowns, both of which would lead the NFL.  Payton also led the NFL in Yards from Scrimmage with 2,121.  This would be the second of five First Team All-Pros for “Sweetness” who also was a nine-time Pro Bowl selection.  He would later win the Super Bowl with the Super Bowl Shuffle winning team, and he would retire in 1987 as the all-time leading rusher with 16,727 Yards.  He would also have another 4,538 Receiving Yards with 125 total Touchdowns.  Payton was so regarded for his philanthropy that he Man of the Year Award was renamed the Walter Payton Man of the Year.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1993.

Terry Bradshaw, Pittsburgh Steelers, Quarterback (1978)

You win a lot of games when you have as good a defense as Terry Bradshaw had with the Steel Curtain, but don’t mistake that for the Quarterback not doing his fair share.  Playing his entire career (1970-83) with Pittsburgh, Bradshaw won four Super Bowls, with 1978 being his third.  This season, he would lead the NFL in Touchdown Passes (28) with 2,915 Passing Yards.  He retired in 1983 with 27,989 Passing Yards and 212 TDs.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1989.

Earl Campbell, Houston Oilers, Running Back (1979)

Coming out of the University of Texas, Earl Campbell was the best Running Back in the first three years of his NFL career, all of which seeing him win the Rushing Title and Offensive Player of the Year.  1979 was the second of those seasons, and in addition to leading the NFL in Rushing Yards (1,697) and also first in Rushing Touchdowns (19).  He also won the Bert Bell Award.  Campbell would play until 1985 and would have 10,213 Yards from Scrimmage with 74 Touchdowns over his career.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1991.

Dan Marino, Miami Dolphins, Quarterback (1984)

Playing his entire career with the Miami Dolphins, this was the second season that Dan Marino was in the NFL.  This year, he shattered the Passing Yards record with 5,084, making him the first QB to hit the 5,000 mark.  He also threw for 48 Touchdowns, destroying Y.A. Tittle’s 36 in 1963. Marino was also first in Quarterback rating (108.9), Approximate Value (21), and Completions (362).  The Dolphin pivot would lead the NFL in Passing Yards four more times, and after he retired in 1999, he would have 61,361 Yards with 420 Touchdowns.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2005.  

Marcus Allen, Los Angeles Raiders, Running Back (1985)

Already a Super Bowl Champion two years before, Marcus Allen’s 1985 season was the best of his life.  The former USC Running Back would lead the NFL in Rushing Yards (1,759) and Yards from Scrimmage (2,314), and he had 14 Touchdowns.  Allen played for the Raiders until 1992, and he would then join the Kansas City Chiefs, where he played until he retired in 1997. Allen ended his career with 12,243 Rushing Touchdowns, 5,411 Passing Yards, 144 total Touchdowns and six Pro Bowls. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2003.

Lawrence Taylor, New York Giants, Linebacker (1986)

Arguably the greatest Linebacker of all time, Lawrence Taylor debuted in 1981, where he began a six-year streak of First Team All-Pro Selections.  This season, Taylor would lead the NFL in Quarterback Sacks (20.5) and won his third Defensive Player of the Year Award.  Taylor also won the Bert Bell Award.  He would take the Giants to a Super Bowl win this year, and again four years later.  Taylor played his entire career with the Giants, and would play in 10 Pro Bowls and recorded 132.5 Sacks over his career.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1999.

John Elway, Denver Broncos, Quarterback (1987)

John Elway was a great Quarterback, but this was a bit of a curious selection, as he lost the First Team All-Pro to Joe Montana of the San Francisco 49ers.  Elway took the Broncos to the Super Bowl (they lost to Washington) and he threw for 3,198 Passing Yards and 19 Touchdowns.  He would have better seasons than this, though he was a Pro Bowler this year, which was his second of what would be nine.  He would finally win his Super Bowls in the 1997 and 1998 season, and he retired after with 5,1475 Passing Yards, 300 Touchdown Passes and 33 Rushing Touchdowns.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2004.

Joe Montana, San Francisco 49ers, Quarterback (1989)

You would have thought that Joe Montana would have won an MVP by now considering that prior to 1989, he had already won three Super Bowls with five Pro Bowls and a First Team All-Pro.  “Joe Cool” also had already led the NFL in Touchdown passes twice and Completion Percentage four times.  This year, Montana would win his fourth Super Bowl, was again a First Team All-Pro and Pro Bowl, and he again led the league in Completion Percentage (70.2).  Montana also threw for 3,521 Passing Yards and 26 TDs.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2000.

Joe Montana, San Francisco 49ers, Quarterback (2) (1990)

While the Niners did not win the Super Bowl this year, Montana still had a great season and took San Francisco deep into the playoffs.  The Quarterback would go 14-1 with 3,944 Passing Yards and 26 TDs.  He missed the entire 1991 season due to an elbow injury, and Steve Young was anointed his successor.  He played two final seasons in the league with the Kansas City Chiefs, and retired in 1994.  He left the game with 40,551 Passing Yards and 273 Touchdown Passes.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2000.

Thurman Thomas, Buffalo Bills, Running Back (1991)

Along with Jim Kelly and Andre Reed, Thurman Thomas and the Buffalo Bills won four straight AFC Championships, with 1991 being in the middle of it.  From 1989 to 1992, Thomas would annually lead the NFL in Yards from Scrimmage, this year seeing the Running Back gain 2,038 with 12 Touchdowns.  He played with Buffalo until 1999, with one final season spent in Miami.  Thomas retired with 12,074 Rushing Yards, 4,458 Receiving Yards and 88 Touchdowns. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2007.

Steve Young, San Francisco 49ers, Quarterback (1992)

While Steve Young was the starting Quarterback for the 49ers in 1991, 1992 was the year where he proved he should be.  Young led the NFL in Completion Percentage (66.7), Touchdown Passes (25) and Quarterback Rating (107.0), and would go to his first of seven straight Pro Bowls.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2005.

Emmitt Smith, Dallas Cowboys, Running Back (1993)

Emmitt Smith and the Dallas Cowboys won the Super Bowl the year before, and in 1993 he won his third straight Rushing Title with 1,486 Yards.  Smith was also first in Yards from Scrimmage (1,900) and he also won the Bert Bell Award. Dallas would win the Super Bowl with Smith winning the Super Bowl MVP.  Smith would be named to the next two First Team All-Pros and secured a third Super Bowl ring two later, which coincided with his fourth Rushing Title.  The Running Back played for Dallas until 2002, and had two final seasons with the Arizona Cardinals before he called it a career in 2004. He retired with 18,355 Rushing Yards and 164 Rushing Touchdowns, which makes him first all-time.  Smith is also second all-time in All-Purpose Yards with 21,579.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2010.

Steve Young, San Francisco 49ers, Quarterback (2)(1994)

In 1993, Young was again a First Team All-Pro, and his third would be this season.  Young led the NFL in Completion Percentage (70.3), 35 Passing Touchdowns and QB Rating (112.8).  Young would also lead San Francisco to a Super Bowl win this year.  He would have three more seasons where he finished first in Completion Percentage, one more in Touchdown Passes, and two more in QB Rating.  Young played until 1999, and retired with 33,124 Passing Yards, 232 Touchdown Passes, 4,239 Rushing Yards and 43 Rushing TDs.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2005.

Brett Favre, Green Bay Packers, Quarterback (1995)

After four attempts (with no completions) for the Atlanta Falcons in 1992, Brett Favre joined the Green Bay Packers where he went to the Pro Bowl in both 1992 and 1993.  In 1995, “The Gunslinger” earned his third Pro Bowl, his first First Team All-Pro, and he would lead the NFL in Passing Yards (4,413), Touchdown Passes (38), and he also won the Bert Bell Award.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2016.

Brett Favre, Green Bay Packers (2), Quarterback(1996)

Favre had another phenomenal year where he went to Pro Bowl number four, First Team All-Pro number two, and again won the MVP and the Bert Bell Award.  Statistically, he led the NFL in Touchdown Passes (39) with 3,899 Passing Yards, and he would lead the Packers to a Super Bowl win.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2016.

Brett Favre, Green Bay Packers (3), Quarterback(1997)

Favre became the first player to win the AP MVP for the third straight season and he earned his fifth Pro Bowl and third First Team All-Pro.  The Quarterback again led the NFL in Touchdown Passes with 35 and had 3,867 Yards, and Green Bay would again return to the Super Bowl, though this time they would lose to the Denver Broncos.  Favre would have four more Pro Bowls with Green Bay, one with the Jets, and one with the Vikings and retired in 2010.  He would finish his career with 71,838 Passing Yards and 508 Touchdown Passes. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2016.

Barry Sanders, Detroit Lions, Running Back (1998)

Barry Sanders played his entire career with the Detroit Lions, debuting in 1989, where he won the Offensive Rookie of the Year Award and was a First Team All-Pro.  Sanders would also win the Bert Bell Award, and was the 1994 Offensive Player of the Year.  In 1997, he would again win that award, but would also capture the AP MVP and his second Bert Bell Award.  In 1997, Sanders won his fourth Rushing Title with a career-high 2,053 Rushing Yards. He also rushed for 11 Touchdowns, and was first overall in Yards from Scrimmage with 2,358.  Sanders played one more season, retiring in his prime at 30, and he was named to the Pro Bowl in all 10 of his years in the NFL.  He ended his career with 15,269 Rushing Yards, 2,921 Receiving Yards and 109 Touchdowns.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2004.

Terrell Davis, Denver Broncos, Running Back (1998)

From 1996 to 1998, Terrell Davis was a First Team All-Pro Selection, and this was his best year of them all.  T.D. anchored Denver to a Super Bowl win the year before, and would do so again this season where he won the Super Bowl MVP.  In the regular season, he won the Rushing Title with 2,008 Yards and led the NFL in Rushing Touchdowns with 21.  Davis would suffer a torn ACL and MCL the year after, and he was limited after that, retiring in 2001 with 7,607 career Rushing Yards.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2017.

Kurt Warner, St. Louis Rams, Quarterback (1999)

1999 was the improbable season ever for a Quarterback.  Kurt Warner went from Northern Iowa to bagging groceries to the Arena League and then to the NFL, where he won the back-up job to Trent Green, which in itself was a huge accomplishment.  Green would be injured in the preseason, and Warner was the starting QB, and he made the most of his opportunity.  The leader of the “Greatest Show on Turf”, Warner would throw for 4,353 Yards and lead the NFL in Completion Percentage (65.1), Touchdown Passes (41) and Quarterback Rating (109.2).  Warner would then lead the Rams to a Super Bowl Championship.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2017.

Marshall Faulk, St. Louis Rams, Running Back (2000)

Sandwiched between Kurt Warner’s MVPs was his Running Back, Marshall Faulk.  Faulk was with the Indianapolis Colts for the first five years of his career where he would go to three Pro Bowls and was the Offensive Rookie of the Year.  Faulk joined the Rams in 1999, and he helped Warner and the Rams win the Super Bowl and was the Offensive Player of the Year.  In his 2000 MVP season, Faulk led the NFL with 18 Rushing Touchdowns, 26 Total Touchdowns and had 2,189 Yards from Scrimmage. 2001 would see Faulk win the Bert Bell Award and the Offensive Player of the Year.  He played until 2005, accumulating six Pro Bowls, three First Team All-Pros, 12,279 Rushing Yards, 6,875 Passing Yards and 136 Touchdowns.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2011.

Kurt Warner, St. Louis Rams, Quarterback (2) (2001)

While Warner and the Rams did not win the Super Bowl, Warner had the best regular season of his career where he led the NFL in Completions (375), Completion Percentage (68.7), Passing Yards (4,830), Touchdown Passes (36) and Passer Rating (101.4).  He would later play one year for the Giants and five seasons for Arizona to close out his career in 2009.  He retired with 32,344 Passing Yards, 208 TDs, and the best story in sports.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2017.

LaDainian Tomlinson, San Diego Chargers, Running Back (2006)

Debuting in 2001, Tomlinson would have 1,236 Rushing Yards, which would be the least he would have until 2008.  In his MVP season, he would win his fourth of five Pro Bowls, second of three First Team All-Pro, and his first of two Rushing Titles with 1,815.  He would also lead the NFL in Rushing Touchdowns (28) and Touchdowns (31).  Tomlinson also won the PFWA MVP, NEA MVP, Bert Bell Award, Offensive Player of the Year and Walter Payton Man of the Year.  Damn, what a season!  Tomlinson played with the Chargers until 2009, and he would have two final seasons in football with the New York Jets.  His career ended with 13,684 Rushing Touchdowns, 4,772 Receiving Touchdowns and 153 Touchdowns.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2017.

The following are the players who have won the NFL AP MVP in the NFL who are eligible for the Pro Football Hall of Fame and have not been selected:

Earl Morrall, Baltimore Colts, Quarterback (1968)

Earl Morrall had one of the most inconsistent careers of any Quarterback, or for that matter any NFL player.  In 1968, he had been in the NFL for a dozen seasons and had stops in San Francisco, Pittsburgh, Detroit and New York.  Some seasons, he was a starter, some he was a backup, and he was positioned in the latter role, to play off the bench to Johnny Unitas.  Morrall would wind up taking over for Unitas, when he was injured in the last pre-season game, and Morrall responded with the best year of his career.  The Colts Quarterback would win 13 Games, and he led the NFL in Touchdown Passes with 26, and he also had 2,909 Passing Yards.  Morrall took the Colts to Super Bowl III, but he had a bad game and they lost to the Joe Namath and the New York Jets.  He would later play for the Miami Dolphins, again as a backup, but he would win two Super Bowl Rings in South Florida.  He retired in 1976, after 21 seasons, and he threw for 161 Touchdowns and 20,809 Passing Yards.  Eligible Since 1982.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Roman Gabriel, Los Angeles Rams, Quarterback (1969)

The first Filipino-American star in football, Roman Gabriel was the number one pick in the 1963 Draft, but he did not become the permanent starting Quarterback for the Rams until 1966.  He would ascend into the upper-tier of NFL pivots, and he went to the Pro Bowl each year from 1967 to 1969, and in ’69, he would lead the league in Touchdown Passes (24), and he also threw for 2,549 Yards. Gabriel would also win the Bert Bell Award this year.  Gabriel would later join the Philadelphia Eagles, winning the Comeback Player of the Year in 1973.  He played until 1977, and retired with 29,444 Passing Yards and 201 Touchdowns.  Eligible Since 1982.  Ranked #38 on Notinhalloffame.com.

John Brodie, San Francisco 49ers, Quarterback (1970)

John Brodie was one of the game’s early gunslingers, and prior to 1970, he would he would lead the NFL in Passing yards in both 1965 and 1968.  This season, he would do that for a third time with 2,941, and he was also first in Touchdown Passes with 24.  Brodie played his entire career with the San Francisco 49ers (1957-73) and he threw for 31,548 Yards and 214 Touchdowns.  Eligible Since 1982.  Ranked #25 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Larry Brown, Washington Redskins, Running Back(1972)

In the first four years of Larry Brown’s career, he was one of the better Running Backs in the NFL.  Brown, who had won the Rushing Title in 1970, would not do so in 1972, but would put up a career-high in Rushing Yards in 1972.  That season, he also had another 473 Receiving Yards, and was first in the league in Yards From Scrimmage (1,689).  Brown regressed after that, and he retired in 1975 with 8,360 Yards from Scrimmage with 55 TDs.  Eligible Since 1982.  Ranked #160 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Bert Jones, Baltimore Colts, Quarterback (1976) 

Bert Jones would have a nice career in the NFL, where he played for ten seasons, nine of which were in Baltimore.   1976 was his fourth season, and this would be his only Pro Bowl year.  Jones had an 11-3 record with 24 TDs and a league-leading 3,104 Passing Yards.  He played until 1982 and Jones would overall throw for 18,190 Yards and 124 Touchdowns.  Eligible Since 1988.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Brian Sipe, Cleveland Browns, Quarterback (1980)

Brian Sipe would play his entire 10-year career with the Browns, and it was in 1980, where he would go to his first and only Pro Bowl, which coincided with his MVP win.  He would throw for 30 Touchdowns with only 14 Interceptions, with 4,132 Passing Yards.  Sipe also led the NFL in Quarterback Rating (91.4).  He retired after 1983 with 23,713 Passing Yards and 154 Touchdown Passes. Eligible Since 1989.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Ken Anderson, Cincinnati Bengals, Quarterback (1981)

Ken Anderson is considered by most Bengals fans to be the most important player in franchise history, and the biggest Hall of Fame snub.  Anderson spent his entire career with the Bengals (1971-86) and in 1981, he would go to his third of four Pro Bowls and took Cincinnati to their first Super Bowl. In the regular season, Anderson threw for 29 Touchdowns and 3,754 Yards.  He played until1986, and retired with 32,838 Yards with 197 TDs.  Eligible Since 1982.  Ranked #12 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Mark Moseley, Washington Redskins, Place Kicker (1982)

Perhaps the unlikeliest AP MVP, Place Kicker, Mark Mosely, accomplished this feat in the strike-shortened 1982 season, making him the first Special Teams player to win this award.  This year, Moseley set a then record with a 95.2 Field Goal Percentage, and would kick two Field Goals in the Redskins Super Bowl win that year. Mosely played from 1970 to 1986, and is still the all-time leader in Points in the history of the Redskins’ franchise.  Eligible Since 1992.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Joe Theismann, Washington Redskins, Quarterback (1983)

It took a long time for Joe Theismann to become a star Quarterback, as he had to start in the CFL, was a Punt Returner as an NFL rookie, and was a backup for three years before becoming the starter in 1978 for. The Washington Redskins.  This season, Theismann threw for 3,714 Yards and 29 Touchdowns, and he would take Washington to their second straight Super Bowl, though this time they lost the big game. A gruesome leg injury at the hands of the Giants’ Lawrence Taylor would end his career, and Theismann retired with 25,206 Passing Yards and 160 Touchdowns.  Eligible Since 1991.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Boomer Esiason, Cincinnati Bengals, Quarterback (1988)

Much like Ken Anderson did before him, Boomer Esiason would take the Cincinnati Bengals to the Super Bowl, but like Anderson, his Bengals lost to Joe Montana and the San Francisco 49ers.  Regardless, this was a good season for Boomer, who was also named the PFWA MVP this season.  He threw for 3,572 Passing Yards with 28 Touchdowns, and he led the NFL in Passer Rating (97.4). Esiason was named to his second of what would be four Pro Bowls, and he played until 1997 with stops in New York with the Jets and Arizona, before playing his final season with the Bengals.  He retired with 37,920 Passing Yards with 247 Touchdowns.  Eligible Since 2003.  Ranked #86 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Rich Gannon, Oakland Raiders, Quarterback (2002)

This was year four of Rich Gannon’s four year run of Pro Bowls, and this season he would lead the NFL in Completions (418) and Passing Yards (4,689) while throwing for 26 Touchdowns.  He would get hurt the following season, and only played one more year before retiring in 2004 with 28,743 Passing Yards with 180 Touchdowns.  Eligible Since 2010.  Ranked #290 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Steve McNair, Tennessee Titans, Quarterback (2003)

McNair’s career began in 1995 when the Titans were still in Houston.  In 2003, he had his second Pro Bowl, and he led the NFL in Passer Rating (100.4).  He would throw for 24 Touchdowns and 3,215 Yards. McNair played until 2007, and would accumulate 31,304 Passing Yards with 174 TDs.  He also had 3,590 Rushing Yards and punched 37 attempts in the end zone.  Eligible Since 2013.  Ranked #111 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Shaun Alexander, Seattle Seahawks, Running Back (2005)

Alexander was a Pro Bowl for the third (and final) and he would lead the NFL in Rushing Yards (1,880), Rushing Touchdowns (27), and Touchdowns (28).  The Running Back also won the Offensive Player of the Year and the Bert Bell Award. He would play with the Seahawks until 2007, and had one final year with the Redskins before retiring.  He left the game with 9,453 Rushing Yards and 100 Rushing Touchdowns.  Eligible Since 2014.  Ranked #100 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Let’s update our tally, shall we?

Award in Question

Percentage of recipients who have entered the HOF

Percentage of recipients by year who have entered the HOF.

NBA MVP

100%

100%

NHL Norris

90.5%

96.4%

NBA All Star Game MVP

89.5%

91.7%

NHL Conn Smythe

74.2%

85.4%

NFL AP Offensive Player of the Year

73.1%

79.4%

NFL AP MVP

68.3%

74.0%

NHL Lady Byng

63.8%

76.0%

NFL Defensive Player of the Year

60.8%

71.1%

NFL Super Bowl MVP

60.6%

64.9%

NBA Defensive Player of the Year

58.3%

56.5%

NHL Vezina

57.1%

66.3%

NBA Rookie of the Year

56.5%

56.5%

MLB MVP

55.0%

60.2%

NFL Pro Bowl MVP

52.3%

54.8%

MLB Lou Gehrig Award

51.9%

51.9%

MLB Roberto Clemente Award

47.4%

47.4%

MLB/NL/AL Cy Young Award

44.4%

55.4%

MLB Babe Ruth Award

37.0%

39.3%

NHL Frank J. Selke Trophy

33.3%

36.7%

MLB Hutch Award

33.1%

33.1%

NFL Offensive Rookie of the Year

28.6%

28.6%

NHL Bill Masterton Memorial Trophy

27.9%

27.9%

MLB Edgar Martinez Award

26.7%

17.2%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Designated Hitter)

25.0%

30.8%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Shortstop)

23.5%

52.6%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove

21.7%

36.8%

NFL Defensive Rookie of the Year

20.6%

20.6%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Catcher)

20.0%

22.5%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Second Base)

18.8%

39.8%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Shortstop)

18.2%

35.1%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Pitcher)

18.2%

20.1%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Second Base)

16.7%

32.7%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Outfield)

16.7%

30.1%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Outfield)

15.7%

25.2%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Third Base)

14.3%

14.3%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Third Base)

13.6%

14.3%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (First Base)

13.6%

13.3%

MLB (NL/AL) Rookie of the Year

13.3%

13.3%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Catcher)

10.3%

15.2%

NBA Most Improved Player of the Year

5.3%

3.2%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (First Base)

3.8%

3.2%

NFL AP Comeback Player of the Year

0.0%

0.0%

So, who is up next?

The following are the players who have won the AP MVP in the NFL who have retired but have not met the mandatory years out of the game to qualify for the Pro Football Hall of Fame:

Peyton Manning, Indianapolis Colts, Quarterback (2003)

Peyton Manning was in his sixth season in the NFL, and he would have his fourth Pro Bowl year.  Manning would be named a First Team All-Pro for the first time, and he would lead the league in Completions (379), Completion Percentage (67.0), Passing Yards (4,267) and he would throw for 29 Touchdowns.  Manning also won the NEA MVP and Bert Bell Award this season.  He would co-win this award with Steve McNair  Eligible in 2021.

Peyton Manning, Indianapolis Colts, Quarterback (2) (2004)

Peyton Manning went back-to-back, also securing a First Team All-Pro and a fifth Pro Bowl.  Manning finished first in Touchdown Passes (49) and Quarterback Rating (121.1), and he threw for 4,557 Yards.  In this season, Manning would also win the PFWA MVP, NEA MVP, Offensive Player of the Year, and the Bert Bell Award. Eligible in 2021.

Peyton Manning, Indianapolis Colts, Quarterback (3) (2008)

In the years between his second and third MVP, Manning went to three Pro Bowls, another First Team All-Pro, and finally won the Super Bowl, where he was named the MVP of the game.  This season, he again was a First Team All-Pro and would lead the NFL in QBR (78.3).  The QB had 27 Touchdown Passes and 4,002 Yards.  Manning would also win the PFWA MVP this year.  Eligible in 2021.

Peyton Manning, Indianapolis Colts, Quarterback (4) (2009)

Peyton Manning became the first four-time MVP, and this was the fifth year he was a First Team All-Pro.  He threw for 4,500 Yards and 33 TDs this season.  The Quarterback also won the PFWA MVP this year. Eligible in 2021.

Peyton Manning, Denver Broncos, Quarterback (5)(2013)

It still seems strange to type Peyton Manning as a Denver Bronco, and he would have a monster regular season with a league-leading 450 Completions, 5,477 Passing Yards, 55 Touchdown Passes and a 80.9 QBR. He would also capture the PFWA MVP, Offensive Player of the Year and Bert Bell Award this season.  Manning played until 2015, and while he was not great, the Broncos defense allowed him to go on top as a Super Bowl Champion.  He retired with 71,940 Passing Yards and 539 Passing Touchdowns.  Eligible in 2021.

The following are the players who have won the AP MVP who are still active.

Tom Brady, New England Patriots, Quarterback (2007)

Tom Brady already won three Super Bowls (with two Super Bowl MVPs) before he secured his first AP MVP.  This was the year of the bittersweet season where the Pats entered the Super Bowl undefeated, only to lose to Eli Manning and the New York Giants.  Still, it was an incredible year, where the Patriots’ Quarterback led the league in Completion Percentage (68.9), Passing Yards (4,806), Touchdown Passes (50), Passer Rating (117.2) and QBR (88.5).  Brady also would win the PFWA MVP, NEA MVP, Bert Bell Award and Offensive Player of the Year this season.  42 Years Old, Playing for the New England Patriots.

Tom Brady, New England Patriots, Quarterback (2) (2010)

Brady would again lead the NFL in Touchdown Passes with 36, and was first in Passer Rating (111.0) and QBR (78.3).  He would also throw for 3,900 Yards, and only had four Interceptions.  This year Brady would also win the PFWA MVP and Offensive Player of the Year Award.  42 Years Old, Playing for the New England Patriots.

Aaron Rodgers, Green Bay Packers, Quarterback (2011)

This was Aaron Rodgers’ seventh season in the NFL but only his fourth as the Packers starter.  Rodgers won the Super Bowl the year before, and this season he would finish first in Passer Rating (122.5) and QBR (84.5), while throwing for 45 Touchdowns, and accumulating 4,643 Passing Yards.  He would also win the PFWA MVP and Bert Bell Award.  36 Years Old, Playing for the Green Bay Packers.

Adrian Peterson, Minnesota Vikings, Running Back (2012)

Adrian Peterson would be named to four First Team All-Pro selections, this being his third.  Peterson also won three Rushing Titles, with this season being the best one (and second), with him going for 2,097 Yards.  The Minnesota Viking also finished first in All-Purpose Yards with 2,314, and he secured 13 Touchdowns this year.  34 Years Old, Playing for the Washington Redskins.

Aaron Rodgers, Green Bay Packers, Quarterback (2) (2014)

Rodgers had another phenomenal year where he had a TD-INT record of 38-5, and threw for 4,381 Yards.  He would go to his fourth Pro Bowl this year, and also was named a First Team All-Pro for the second time.  Rodgers also won the PFWA MVP this year.  36 Years Old, Playing for the Green Bay Packers.

Cam Newton, Carolina Panthers, Quarterback (2015)

Cam Newton was the Offensive Rookie of the Year in 2011, and this season, in addition to his AP MVP, he also won the Bert Bell Award and was the Offensive Player of the Year.  Stat wise, Newton threw for 35 Touchdowns, 3,837 Yards, and rushed for 636 Yards and 10 TDs.  He took Carolina to the Super Bowl, but they lost to the Denver Broncos.  30 Years Old, Playing for the Carolina Panthers.

Matt Ryan, Atlanta Falcons, Quarterback (2016)

The first Atlanta Falcon to win the AP MVP, Matt Ryan would lead the NFL in Passer Rating (117.1) and QBR (79.4).  He would also throw for 4,944 Yards with 38 Touchdowns. This year, he would also win the Offensive Player of the Year and the Bert Bell Award.  Ryan would take the Falcons to the Super Bowl, but they lost to the New England Patriots.  34 Years Old, Playing for the Atlanta Falcons.

Tom Brady, New England Patriots, Quarterback (3) (2017)

In between his second and third MVP, Brady won his fourth and fifth Super Bowl.  Brady also captured the PFWA MVP this season. He would win his sixth Super Bowl the year after.   This season, he was first in Passing Yards (4,577) with 32 Touchdown Passes.  42 Years Old, Playing for the New England Patriots.

Patrick Mahomes, Kansas City Chiefs, Quarterback (2018)

After playing backup as a rookie, Patrick Mahomes took over the starting Quarterback job for the Chiefs and he instantly became one of the most exciting players in the NFL.  Mahomes would lead the NFL in Touchdown Passes (50) and QBR (80.4), and he would throw for 5,097 Yards.  This season, he would also win the Offensive Player of the Year and Bert Bell Award.  24 Years Old, Playing for the Kansas City Royals.

This yielded a high percentage as expected, which considering how difficult it is to win the NFL AP, makes complete sense.

So, what is up next?

Normally, we bounce around, but we are going to buck tradition, and stay with something very familiar, the Bert Bell Award, the MVP presented by the Maxwell Football Club.

As always, we thank you for your support, and look for that soon.

And then there were four.

The NFL Divisional Playoffs are over and oddsmakers are re-evaluating the chances of the teams that remain.  The hottest team going into the playoffs, the Baltimore Ravens were upset by the Tennessee Titans, and new favorites have emerged.

The San Francisco 49ers soundly defeated the Minnesota Vikings 27-10, where their rushing game and defense was strong.  The number one seed in the NFC have been the most balanced team through the season, and they are chasing their fourth Super Bowl.  As good as they have been in 2019, this is a team that went 4-12 in 2018and are full of players who have never been this far in the playoffs before.  49ers Quarterback, Jimmy Garoppolo, is only two wins away from leading his team to a Super Bowl win, which would fulfill the promise that has been pegged for him three years ago.

The Niners will host the Green Bay Packers, who defeated the Seattle Seahawks 28-24 in Lambeau.  Packers QB, Aaron Rodgers has a Super Bowl ring already, but despite the high profile and #2 seed of this team, they have not been considered a favorite to win it all. Rodgers and company bring more post-season experience than San Francisco does, and despite 13 regular season wins, they have to feel a little disrespected.  Defeating Seattle is that signature win that they needed, and they have a lot more to prove.

With the elimination of Baltimore, the Kansas City Chiefs are now the top remaining seed in the AFC.  The Chiefs made history with their comeback against the Houston Texans, and they have the 2018 MVP, Patrick Mahomes who is ready to ascend to the top of the Quarterback food chain.  Mahomes, along with Tyreke Hill and Travis Kelce are the triumvirate of the most explosive offense in the NFL, but their defense is suspect, meaning that every game is a shootout.  This is not always a recipe for a title, but it is for excitement.  If you want your heartbeat to race, this is the team you want to see in the Super Bowl!

Nobody (including us) had the Tennessee Titans making the AFC Championship Game.  The #6 seed first went to New England, and beat the defending Super Bowl Champions, and then went to Baltimore and knocked off the top seed Ravens.  Tennessee wasn’t lucky, they were better than both of those teams, and as they have nothing to lose, the Titans are the most dangerous team of the four. Their Quarterback, Ryan Tannehill, may not be a big name, but he is the hottest QB of the last two months, and with a blistering secondary, the Titans are the pick of the moment.

Regardless of who advances this weekend, we will be watching, and we are ready to place our bets.  

We here at Notinhalloffame.com thought it would be fun to take a look at the major awards in North American team sports and see how it translates into Hall of Fame potential.

Needless to say, different awards in different sports yield hall of fame potential.  In basketball, the team sport with the least number of players on a roster, the dividend for greatness much higher.  In baseball, it is not as much as a great individual season does not have the same impact.

Last time, we looked at the MVP in Major League Baseball.  This time, we go back to the rink with Vezina Trophy.

We here at Notinhalloffame.com thought it would be fun to take a look at the major awards in North American team sports and see how it translates into Hall of Fame potential.

Needless to say, different awards in different sports yield hall of fame potential.  In basketball, the team sport with the least number of players on a roster, the dividend for greatness much higher.  In baseball, it is not as much as a great individual season does not have the same impact.

Last time, we looked at the Bill Masterton Memorial Trophy in the National Hockey League.  This time, we finally get to the most important individual accolade in Major League Baseball, the MVP.

Before we rattle off the winners, let’s look at the history of the award first.

The first version of the award came in 1911, in which Hugh Chalmers of the Chalmers Automobile company would give an award to the “most important and useful player to the club and to the league”.  Chalmers discontinue the trophy after 1914, as it did not bring his company the overall recognition he desired.

In 1922, The American League brought back the MVP in 1922.  It was decided by eight writers, but they were only allowed to pick one player from each team and previous winners were declared ineligible.  Basically, if you are wondering why Babe Ruth only one MVP, that is why.  This trophy would last until 1928.

The National League began their own league MVP award in 1924, which would go on until 1929.  It did not have the same restrictions as their American League counterpart.

In 1931, the Baseball Writers’ Association of America revived the MVPs for both leagues, and their system of voting for ten players, with a weight system of 10 points to 1, remains in existence today.

So how many players have won the MVP have been enshrined to the Baseball Hall of Fame?

Let’s find out!

The following are the past players who have won the MVP in MLB who are eligible for the Baseball Hall of Fame and have been enshrined.

Ty Cobb, AL: Detroit Tigers (1911)

It is very hard to start this with a better player.  In this era, you can’t.  Ty Cobb was a baseball legend, and while he was widely disliked by other players, none of them could ever say that Cobb was not one of the best the game had ever seen. “The Georgia Peach” would have many great seasons, and this one might have been the best of them all.  He would win the Batting and Slugging Title with personal best of .419 and .620, and he also had the best (and his own career-high) in OPS of 1.086.  Cobb also led the AL and put forth career-highs in Runs Scored (147), Hits (248), Doubles (24), Triples (24) and Runs Batted In (127).  Cobb went on to win seven more Batting Titles and is the all-time leader in Batting Average with .366.  He would not be just named to the Baseball Hall of Fame, but it went in with the inaugural class.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1936.

Tris Speaker, AL: Boston Red Sox (1912)

This was Speaker’s sixth season in baseball, and it was his best one to date.  He would have a career-high 222 Hits with a .383 Batting Average.  He would lead the AL in Doubles (53), Home Runs (10), and On Base Percentage (.464).  He would later have an even much better season in 1916 (when there were no MVPs) with the Cleveland Indians leading all aspects of the Slash Line (.386/.470/.502). Speaker went on to have 3,514 Hits, 792 Doubles (more than anyone else) and a .345 Batting Average.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1937.

Walter Johnson, AL: Washington Senators (1913)

There is no doubt that Walter Johnson was one of the greatest Pitchers ever, and if there were Pitcher of the Year award in his time, he would have won a plethora of them.  As it stands, this was his first of two MVPs, and he would lead the AL in Wins (36), Earned Run Average (1.14), Innings Pitched (346.0), FIP (1.90), WHIP (0.780), H/9 (6.0), BB/9 (1.0) and Strikeouts (243).  “The Big Train” would go on to win 417 Games and 3,509 Strikeouts. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1939.

Eddie Collins, AL: Philadelphia Athletics (1914)

One of the greatest hitters in the history of the game, Eddie Collins had already won three World Series with the Philadelphia Athletics, and this was his last year (in his first run) with the team. In 1914, Collins would lead the AL in Runs Scored (122) for the third straight year, and he would bat .344 with 181 Hits.  He would accept a deal to the Chicago White Sox, where he helped them win the 1917 World Series.  Collins would accumulate 3,315 Hits with a .333 Batting Average.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1939.

Johnny Evers, NL: Boston Braves (1914)

Years after he was part of the triumvirate of the “Tinkers to Evers to Chance” infield that took the Chicago Cubs to two World Series Titles, he was double-crossed by Cubs Management.  In 1913, after electing to stay in Chicago after turning down a more lucrative contract with the upstart Federal League, the player/manager was dealt to the Boston Braves after he had helped sign all the Cubs to contracts.  With something to prove, Evers had what has to be considered his last productive season, batting .279 with a .390 OBP over 139 Games.  He would however, lead the Braves to a World Series win, and he batted .438 in the series.  Realistically, Evers probably should not have been the MVP on 1914, but nobody had more of a feel-good story that Evers did this year.  Evers would retire with 1,659 Hits.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1947.

George Sisler, AL: St. Louis Browns (1922)

George Sisler was one of the best hitters ever and is a wonderful selection for the return of the American League MVP award. Sisler, who won the Batting Title in 1920, won it again this year with a .420 Batting Average.  He would also lead the AL in Hits (246), Runs Scored (136), Triples (18) and Stolen Bases (51).  Sisler had to sit out 1923 due to Sinusitis but returned to play until 1930.  He would accumulate 2,812 Hits with a lifetime Batting Average of .344.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1939.

Babe Ruth, AL: New York Yankees (1923)

This was not the best season of Babe Ruth’s career, but he had so many great ones that it can be sometimes be hard to tell them apart.  In 1923, Ruth led the American League in Runs Scored (151), Home Runs (41), Runs Batted In (130), Walks (170), On Base Percentage (.545) and Slugging Percentage (.764).  He also had a Batting Average of .393, his career-high.  The Yankees would also win the World Series that year with Ruth batting .368 with three Home Runs.  If you are wondering why this was Ruth’s only MVP, remember this was during a time when a player could not become a repeat champion as we stated in our opening. Ruth would rightfully be a part of the first ever Baseball Hall of Fame Class and had 714 Home Runs.  Ruth is also baseball’s all-time leader in Slugging (.690) and OPS (1.164).  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1936.

Walter Johnson, AL: Washington Senators (2) (1924)

Walter Johnson would become the first repeat MVP in Baseball, and he would do it 12 years apart.  Unlike Ruth, Johnson won his first MVP under the previous rules of the inaugural version.  This meant that he was not considered a repeat champion, and was eligible for this incarnation.  Johnson would go 23-7 leading the AL in Wins, ERA (2.72), FIP (3.31) and WHIP (1.116). He would take the Senators to win the 1924 World Series, the only one of the legend’s career.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1939.

Dazzy Vance, NL: Brooklyn Dodgers (1924)

With the return of the National League MVP (the second incarnation), Dazzy Vance would have the best season of his career, capturing this prestigious award.  Vance would go 28-6, leading the NL in Wins, ERA (2.16), Strikeouts (262), FIP (2.64) and WHIP (1.022).  All of those were career-highs.  The Pitcher would go on to win 190 Games with 1,918 Strikeouts over his career.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1955.

Rogers Hornsby, NL: St. Louis Cardinals (1925)

Rogers Hornsby was the runner-up for the 1924 MVP, and in 1925, he would win his sixth straight Batting Title.  Hornsby had a Slash Line of .403/.489/.756, with the last component being a career-high.  The Second Baseman would also top the leader board with 39 Home Runs and 143 Runs Batted In. While he had a significant dip in production the year after, Hornsby would take the Cards to win the World Series. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1942.

Lou Gehrig, AL: New York Yankees (1927)

Lou Gehrig would win that honor three years into his tenure as the starting First Baseman with the New York Yankees.  He would have a Slash Line of 373/.474/.765 with 47 Home Runs.  He would lead the American League in Doubles (52) and Runs Batted In (173) and while it was not leading the AL, he had a career-high OPS of 1.240.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1939.

Paul Waner, NL: Pittsburgh Pirates (1927)

As a rookie, Paul Waner finished twelfth in MVP voting, and he would win the big award as a sophomore.  The Rightfielder would win his first of what would be three Batting Titles with a career-high .380.  He would also lead the National League in Hits (237), Triples (18), and Runs Batted In (131).  In the 1930s, Waner would have three top five finishes in MVP voting and would finish his career with 3,152 Hits and a .333 Batting Average.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1952.

Mickey Cochrane, AL: Philadelphia Athletics (1928)

Mickey Cochrane was in his fourth season in baseball, and the Athletics Catcher finished fourth in MVP voting the year before. Cochrane won this award mostly on his leadership and defensive skills, though he had a solid Slash Line for a 1920s Catcher of .293/.395/.464.  Realistically, in the modern era, he would not win this MVP, and his 1928 bWAR of 3.3 was not in the top ten.  Intangibles won it for him this year, but he had much better seasons ahead.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1947.

Jim Bottomley, NL: St. Louis Cardinals (1928)

Jim Bottomley would be the third different Cardinal in four seasons to win the MVP.  He would help the Cards win the World Series in 1926, and later in 1931, but 1928 was his best individual season.  The First Baseman would have a Slash Line of .325/.402/.628 with National League leading 20 Triples, 31 Home Runs and 136 Runs Batted In.  Bottomley would accumulate 2,313 Hits over his career.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1974.

Rogers Hornsby, NL: Chicago Cubs (2) (1929)

Rogers Hornsby would become the second player to win the MVP twice, and the first to win it with two different teams.  This was Hornsby’s first season with the Cubs after one year with the Boston Braves, one with the New York Giants and 12 with the Cardinals.  Hornsby led the NL with 156 Runs Scored and a .679 Slugging Percentage, and he would also bat 380, with 229 Hits, 39 Home Runs and 149 Runs Batted In.  This was the end of greatness for Hornsby, but he would continue to play until 1937.  He would retire with 2,930 Hits with a Slash Line of .358/.434/.577.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1942.

Lefty Grove, AL: Philadelphia Athletics (1931)

With a now AP voted MVP for both leagues, the first one in the American League went to Lefty Grove, who had helped the Philadelphia Athletics win the previous two World Series.  Grove had many great seasons, but this was his best one.  He would have a record of a 31 and 4, with his 31 Wins leading the league.  The southpaw also finished first in ERA (2.06), Strikeouts (175), FIP (3.01) and WHIP (1.077).  Grove would go on to win an even 300 Wins with 2,266 Strikeouts.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1947.

Frankie Frisch, NL: St. Louis Cardinals (1931)

The first MVP of the AP/Modern MVP is of course, a St. Louis Cardinal.  Frankie Frisch had previously finished third and second in previous votes, ad in 1931, he would bat .311 with 161 Hits, which was not his best year, and his 3.7 bWAR, while good, is not exactly MVP worthy.   Frisch would help the Cardinals win the World Series this year, which would be his third overall, after winning two with the New York Giants.  He would win his fourth with the Redbirds in 1934. He would overall accumulate 2,880 Hits with a .316 Batting Average.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1947.

Jimmie Foxx, AL: Philadelphia Athletics (1932)

The second Philadelphia Athletic in a row to win the modern MVP, following Lefty Grove.  By this time, Foxx had already won the World Series twice (1929 & 1930), but 1931 was his breakout to the hitting stratosphere.  Foxx had previously reached 30 Home Runs in the three earlier seasons, but he blasted 58 in 1932 with 169 Runs Batted In, both of which were league leading.  He would have a Slash Line of .364/.469/.749 with an OPS of 1.218.  Foxx would also for the first and only time lead the American League in Runs Scored with 151.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1951.

Chuck Klein, NL: Philadelphia Phillies (1932)

Chuck Klein was the first MVP from the Philadelphia Phillies, and he was the runner-up the season before.  In 1932, Klein would finish first in Runs Scored (152), Hits (226), Home Runs (38), Stolen Bases (20), Slugging Percentage (.646) and OPS (1.050), and he would also have an excellent Batting Average of .348 with 137 Runs Batted In.  Klein was the runner-up again for the National League MVP in 1933, and he went on to produce 2,076 Hits, 300 Home Runs with a .320 Batting Average.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1980.

Jimmie Foxx, AL: Philadelphia Athletics (2) (1933)

For the third year in a row, the American League MVP, went to a Philadelphia Athletic as Foxx also made personal history by being the first ever back-to-back MVP.  The slugger would win his second straight Home Run (48) and RBI Title (163), while capturing his first Batting Title (.356).  Foxx also would lead the AL in Slugging (.703) and OPS (1.153).  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1951.

Carl Hubbell, NL: New York Giants (1933)

Carl Hubbell posted his first of five straight 20 Win seasons, with this season seeing him win 23 Games with a 1.66 ERA, both of which would be National League leading.  Hubbell also was an inaugural All-Star, and would go into nine in total. He would also lead the league in FIP (2.53), WHIP (0.982) and SO/BB (3.22).  That year was especially magical as he would lead the New York Giants in a World Series win over the Washington Senators.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1947.

Mickey Cochrane, AL: Detroit Tigers (2) (1934)

Mickey Cochrane became the first Catcher to win the MVP twice, but much like his first win in 1928, there were other years where he should have been considered as opposed to the year he won it.  Cochrane would have a very good Slash Line of .320/.428/.412 with a 4.5 bWAR, but he was not in the top ten in Offensive, Defensive of Overall bWAR.  In the next season, he would help the Tigers win the World Series, his third overall. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1947.

Dizzy Dean, NL: St. Louis Cardinals (1934)

Dizzy Dean finished seventh in MVP voting in 1933, and in 1934, he would begin a three-year run of dominance in the National League.  Dean went 30-7 with a 2.66 ERA and a league-leading 195 Strikeouts.  He would hurl the Cardinals to a World Series title that year, and was the runner-up for the MVP in the two seasons that followed. Dean would overall go 150-83 in his career.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1953.

Hank Greenberg, AL: Detroit Tigers (1935)

Hank Greenberg would become the first player to win an MVP, without going to the All-Star Game.  In this season, Greenberg would lead the league in Home Runs (36) and Runs Batted In (168), and he would post a Slash Line of .328/.411/.628. More importantly, Greenberg would power the Tigers to a World Series win.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1956.

Gabby Hartnett, NL: Chicago Cubs (1935)

By this point in his career, Gabby Hartnett was a grizzle veteran who had played over a dozen seasons in the baseball, all with the Cubs.  The very respected Catcher batted .344, with a .949 OPS, and he was sixth in bWAR for Position Players.  This year , he would throw out 60% of all runners who tried to steal on him. Hartnett would later finish second in MVP voting in 1937.   Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1955.

Lou Gehrig, AL: New York Yankees (2) (1936)

This was Gehrig’s second MVP, the first one coming in the award’s earlier incarnation.  Since the MVP was reintroduced in 1931, he was in the top five in voting each year, and he would finish second in both 1931 and 1932. This season, he would lead the AL in Runs Scored (167), Home Runs (49), Walks (130), On Base Percentage (.478), Slugging Percentage (.696) with a Batting Average of 354.  You know the story where he had to take himself out of the game in early 1939, and it was revealed that he contracted ALS (later renamed Lou Gehrig’s Disease) and he was forced into retirement.  He was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame that year, and would pass away two years later.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1939.

Carl Hubbell, NL: New York Giants (2) (1936)

Carl Hubbell won his second MVP, the first coming in 1933.  He would finish ninth and sixth in the two seasons in-between.  This season, Hubbell won 26 Games with a 2.31 ERA, both of which would lead the National League.  He also finished number one in WHIP (1.059).  Hubbell would play until 1943, and he would finish with a record of 253-154 and a 2.98 ERA.   Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1947.

Charlie Gehringer, AL: Detroit Tigers (2) (1937)

Gehringer played his entire career with the Detroit Tigers, and in the five seasons before, he finished in the top five in MVP voting, which included a second place finish in 1934.  He had also previously helped the Tigers win the 1935 World Series. In ’37, Gehringer won his only Batting Title with a career-high .371, and he would also have a 7.4 bWAR, fourth in the AL.  Gehringer played until 1942, and would collect 2,839 Hits with 184 Home Runs.   Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1949.

Joe Medwick, NL: St. Louis Cardinals (1937)

Joe Medwick was the third St. Louis Cardinal in a seven-year period to win the National League MVP, and he was a former World Series Champion in 1934.  1937 was the season he won the Triple Crown, with 31 Home Runs, 154 Runs Batted In and a .374 Batting Average.  He would also lead the NL in Runs Scored (111), Hits (237), Doubles (56) and OPS (1.056).  The Outfielder would be smack dab in the middle of a seven-year run of consecutive All-Star Games, and he would have two more when he was with the Brooklyn Dodgers in the early 1940s and a tenth with the New York Giants.  Medwick played until 1948, and he would accumulate 2,471 Hits, 205 Home Runs and a .324 Batting Average.   Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1968.

Jimmie Foxx, AL: Boston Red Sox (3) (1938)

Jimmie Foxx made history as the first man to win the MVP three times, but this time he was with the Boston Red Sox, whereas the first two were as a Philadelphia Athletic.  This season, Foxx would have his second 50 Home Run Season (finishing precisely at 50), and won his third RBI Title with a personal best of 175. He would sweep first place in the Slash Line with a .349/.462/.704 stat.  This season was also number six of nine All-Star Games for the slugger.  Foxx finished second in MVP voting the season after and played until 1945.  He retired with 2,644 Hits, 534 Home Runs, 1,922 RBIs and a 1.038 OPS.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1951.

Ernie Lombardi, NL: Cincinnati Reds (1938)

Ernie Lombardi had always been a good hitting Catcher, but in 1938, he won the Batting Title with a .342 Average.  He would also have 19 Home Runs and his 6.0 bWAR was also a career-high.  Lombardi won a World Series with the Reds in 1940 and he played until 1947 and retired with 1,792 Hits, 190 Home Runs and a .306 Batting Average.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1986.

Joe DiMaggio, AL: New York Yankees (1939)

This was the fourth season of Joe DiMaggio’s career, and he was an All-Star in all of them.  The Outfielder would also finish with MVP votes in his first three seasons, eighth, second and sixth and in the last year of the 30s, he was considered the best in the American League.  DiMaggio won the Batting Title with a .381 Average and he would smash 30 Home Runs with 126 Runs Batted In.  He helped the Yankees win the World Series this year, and this was his fourth, making him four for four in World Series wins.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1955.

Hank Greenberg, AL: Detroit Tigers (2) (1940)

This was Greenberg’s second MVP win, with the last coming in 1935.  In between the wins, Greenberg would have two third place finishes (1937 & 1938). In 1940, the Detroit Tiger would lead the AL in Doubles (50), Home Runs (41), Runs Batted In (150), Slugging Percentage (.670) and OPS (1.103), and he would also bat .340.  Greenberg would play until 1947, and won his second World Series with Detroit in 1945.  He retired with 331 Home Runs and a lifetime OPS of 1.017.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1956.

Joe DiMaggio, AL: New York Yankees (2) (1941)

Entering year six of his Major League career, “Joltin” Joe DiMaggio would win his second MVP, with this coming off two years removed from his first.  He would finish third in the year between, keeping intact his run of top ten MVP placements.  DiMaggio’s 1941 stats saw him accumulate 30 Home Runs, 125 Runs Batted (league leading) and a .357 Batting Average.  He would also win the World Series this year, besting the Brooklyn Dodgers who were led by Dolph Camitti, the National League MVP.  This was also the year that DiMaggio would set a still unbroken record of 56 straight games with a hit.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1955.

Joe Gordon, AL: New York Yankees (1942)

Joe Gordon had been in the top ten in MVP voting before, but this was his first win.  An All-Star nine times, Gordon was a spectacular defensive player, who had decent offensive capabilities.  This season, he was second in Defensive bWAR, had 18 Home Runs, 103 Runs Batted In and batted .322.  While the Yankees did not win the World Series this year, Gordon would win four with the Bronx Bombers and one final one with the Cleveland Indians in 1948. He would play until 1950, and would accumulate 1,530 Hits with 253 Home Runs.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2009.

Stan Musial, NL: St. Louis Cardinals (1943)

World War II had broken out, and many of the players either volunteered or were drafted into military service.  This naturally alters the talent level in Baseball, and Musial himself would bypass MLB for the military in 1945.  In 1943, he was in baseball and was 22 years old. The future legend was poised for a breakout.  Stan “The Man” would lead the NL in Hits (220), Doubles (48), Triples (20), Batting Average (.357), On Base Percentage (.425) and Slugging Percentage (.562). The Cardinals would win the Pennant, but lost to the New York Yankees in the World Series.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1969.

Hal Newhouser, AL: Detroit Tigers (1944)

Hal Newhouser was an All-Star twice before 1944, but he had a losing record, and was not the beneficiary of a lot of run support.  This changed in 1944, when he had a breakout season, and he dropped his already good ERA with 2.22.  Newhouser would lead the American League in Wins (29), and Strikeouts (187).  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1992.

Hal Newhouser, AL: Detroit Tigers (2) (1945)

Newhouser went back-to-back in MVPs, which made him the only player to win two titles in the World War II era.  This season, he would again lead the AL in Wins (25), and for the first time he won the ERA Title (1.81).  The hurler would also finish atop the leaderboard in Innings Pitched (313.1), Strikeouts (212), FIP (2.45) and H/9 (6.9).  The most important aspect is that Newhouser would hurl the Tigers to a World Series won two Games.  Now we noted that Newhouser won his MVPs during the war-depleted Majors, but he went on to finish second the year after and ninth two years after in MVP voting, He would overall win 207 Games with 1,796 Strikeouts.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1992.

Ted Williams, AL: Boston Red Sox (1946)

Ted Williams debuted for in Baseball for the Boston Red Sox in 1939, and in 1941 and 1942, he was the runner-up for the American League MVP Award.  He served in the Military, and missed the 1943, 1944 and 1945 season, but he would not be denied the MVP in 1946.  The “Splendid Splinter” batted .342 with 38 Home Runs, 123 RBIs, and was league leading in On Base Percentage (.497) and Slugging Percentage (.667).  The career Red Sox Outfielder will be mentioned again! Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1966.

Stan Musial, NL: St. Louis Cardinals (2) (1946)

Stan Musial won his first MVP in 1943, and finished fourth in 1944.  He would miss the entire 1945 season due to military service, but he was ready to renascent to the top of the National League.  He would lead the National League in Runs Scored (124), Hits (228), Doubles (50), Triples (20), Batting Average (.365), Slugging Percentage (.587), and OPS (1.031)   Musial would also take St. Louis to their third World Series Championship in the decade. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1969.

Joe DiMaggio, AL: New York Yankees (3) (1947)

Like many of his peers, DiMaggio came back from military duty and returned to the elite.  This was a good season, where DiMaggio had 20 Home Runs with a Slash Line of .315/.391/.522, and would win his sixth World Series ring with the Yankees. Realistically, this should have gone to Ted Williams, who was a full 5.0 ahead of him in bWAR.  This was his last MVP win, though he had two more top ten finishes in MVP voting before retiring in 1951.  DiMaggio would have nine World Series Titles with 261 Home Runs and a .325 Batting Average.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1955.

Lou Boudreau, AL: Cleveland Indians (1948)

In 1948, Lou Boudreau was chosen for his seventh and final All-Star Game.  He had won the Batting Title in 1944 with a 327 season, but this year he would exceed that with a career-high .355 (though that did not earn him the Batting Title). He also posted personal bests in Hits (199), Home Runs (18), Runs Batted In (106), On Base Percentage (.453) and Slugging Percentage (.534).  Boudreau would take the Indians to a World Series Championship that year.  The Shortstop would play until 1952 and he retired with 1,779 Hits and a .295 lifetime Batting Average.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1970.

Stan Musial, NL: St. Louis Cardinals (3) (1948)

“The Man” won his third (and final) MVP with a career-high 135 Runs Scored, 230 Hits, 131 Runs Batted In, .376 Batting Average, .450 On Base Percentage and .702 Slugging Percentage; all of which were league leading.  While this was the last MVP for Musial, his dominance continued for another decade. He would land four more Batting Titles, and retired in 1963 with a lifetime Slash Line of /331/.417/.559.  He would have four more second place finishes in MVP voting, and five more top ten tallies.  While Musial never won a Home Run Title, he retired with 475 of them.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1969.

Ted Williams, AL: Boston Red Sox (2) (1949)

This was Williams’ second (and final) MVP award, and this year he would have 43 Home Runs and 159 RBIs, both of which would lead the American League and were personal bests.  He batted .343, with a league leading On Base Percentage (.490), and Slugging Percentage (.650).  Williams would have five more top ten MVP finishes and would retire in 1960 with 2,654 Hits and 521 Home Runs.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1966.

Jackie Robinson, NL: Brooklyn Dodgers (1949)

Jackie Robinson was not just the man who broke the color barrier.  He was the National League Rookie of the Year in 1947, and two years later he was the MVP, making him the first black player to win it.  The Infielder would post career-highs in Hits (203), Runs Batted In (124), Stolen Bases (37), Batting Average (.342) and Slugging Percentage (.528). He won the Batting Title and Stolen Base Title, and also had 16 Home Runs.  Robinson took the Dodgers to the World Series, though lost to the New York Yankees.  He would play until 1956, and would win that coveted World Series in 1955.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1962.

Phil Rizzuto, AL: New York Yankees (1950)

Phil Rizzuto’s strength was his defense.  On seven occasions, the Shortstop would finish in the top three in Defensive bWAR in the American League.  1950 was no exception, as he was second in that metric, but this was by far his best offensive season career-highs of Hits (200), Runs Scored (125), Home Runs (7), Runs Batted In (66), Batting Average (.324), On Base Percentage (.418) and Slugging Percentage (.439).  More importantly, he was part of the Yankees dynasty that won another World Series in 1950.  Overall, “Scooter” had 1,588 Hits and seven World Series rings.   Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1994.

Yogi Berra, AL: New York Yankees (1951)

Yogi Berra helped redefine the role of the Catcher, as he was equally adept helping with his bat as he was behind the plate. Berra was in his sixth season, and the New York Yankee was on his fourth consecutive All-Star Game.  Berra would bat .294 with 28 Home Runs and 124 RBIs, and remained a pillar on defense.  The Yanks went to the World Series, and would win marking the fourth championship of the Catcher’s career.   Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1972.

Roy Campanella, NL: Brooklyn Dodgers (1951)

What Yogi Berra was to American League Catchers, Roy Campanella was to those in the National League, so how fitting that they would win their first MVPs in the same season.  Campy had 33 Home Runs, 108 Runs Batted In, and a Slash Line of .325/.393/.590.  Of mixed-race (His mother was black, and his father was Italian), he became the first black Catcher to be named MVP.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1969.

Roy Campanella, NL: Brooklyn Dodgers (2) (1953)

Campanella won his first MVP in 1951, and in the year in between he finished tenth.  This season, he would put up career-high numbers in Home Runs (41), and Runs Batted In (142), with the latter being good enough to lead the American League.  Campy had a very good Slash Line of .312/.395/.611, and he would help the Dodgers win the National League Pennant.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1969.

Yogi Berra, AL: New York Yankees (2) (1954)

In the previous two seasons, which followed his first MVP, Yogi Berra finished fourth and second in MVP voting, and was still the consensus best Catcher in the American League.  His team, the Yankees would not win the American League Pennant (a rarity in that era), but Berra was still very good with 22 Home Runs, 125 Runs Batted In, and a Slash Line of .307/.367/.488.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1972.

Willie Mays, NL: New York Giants (1954)

Willie Mays debuted in 1951 and would promptly win the National Rookie of the Year Award.  He would miss 1953 due to military service, but when he returned, he immediately shot to baseball’s stratosphere as many suspected he would.  Mays won the Batting Title with a .345 Average, and was atop the leaderboard in Slugging Percentage (.667) and OPS (1.078).  Mays had excellent power numbers with 41 Home Runs and 110 Runs Batted In.  This year he would begin a streak of 19 consecutive All-Star Games.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1979.

Yogi Berra, AL: New York Yankees (3) (1955)

This was Berra’s second straight MVP, and his third in five seasons.  The popular Catcher again batted .272 with 27 Home Runs and 108 RBIs.  This was good, but his bWAR was half of what his teammate, Mickey Mantle had, which reflects how much writers valued any good hitting Catcher.  The Yankees would win the Pennant this year, but fell to the Brooklyn Dodgers.  Berra played until 1965 and would win 10 World Series Rings as a player.  He would also total 2,150 Hits and 358 Home Runs.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1972.

Roy Campanella, NL: Brooklyn Dodgers (3) (1955)

This was Campanella’s third MVP in five years, and as per usual, the Catcher had strong power numbers with 32 Home Runs, 107 RBIs and a .318 Batting Average.  Much like Berra, Campanella had a teammate who surpassed him quite a bit in traditional and advanced stats in Duke Snider, and like Berra, this shows the writer’s bias towards good hitting Catchers.  Campy and the Dodgers would finally beat the Yankees for the World Series, so this was an especially sweet year for the Catcher.  He would miss parts of the next two seasons due to injury, but a car accident would render him paralyzed from the shoulders down in 1958, and he was not able to play with the team when they relocated to Los Angeles. He would retire with 1,161 Hits and 242 Home Runs.   Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1969.

Mickey Mantle, AL: New York Yankees (1956)

Realistically, Mickey Mantle should have won this accolade last year, but he was not to be denied in what was an even more impressive season.  Mantle led the American League in Runs Scored (132), Home Runs (52), Runs Batted In (130), Slugging Percentage (.705), and he would win his lone Batting Title with a .353 Average.  Mantle took his Bronx Bombers to their rightful throne as the World Series Champions, this being his fourth ring.  A World Series and the Triple Crown?  What a year! Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1974.

Mickey Mantle, AL: New York Yankees (2) (1957)

Mantle’s 1957 was almost as good as his 1956, and doesn’t that say something!  His Home Run total went down to 34, but his Batting Average went up to .365, a career-high. He also had a personal best in OBP with .512, and he matched his 11.3 bWAR, which he had the season before. Mantle was now the most popular Yankee, a title that means a lot in Baseball.  New York would win the Pennant but went down to the Milwaukee Braves.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1974.

Hank Aaron, NL:  Milwaukee Brewers (1957)

Hank Aaron, the one-time home run king only won the MVP once, and this was the season that he hammered the Braves into a World Series win this year.  This season was the first of four Home Run Titles, and he would go deep 44 times. Aaron also led the National League in Runs Scored (118) and Runs Batted In (132), and he batted .322.  Aaron may never had won another MVP, but he had five third place finishes and another five top ten finishes.  “Hammerin’” Hank played until 1976, and he would have 3,771 Hits with 755 Home Runs, and 2,297 Runs Batted In, which is still an all-time Major League record.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1982.

Ernie Banks, NL:  Chicago Cubs (1958)

Known as “Mr. Cub”, Ernie Banks popular as he was good, which says a lot!  The Shortstop had twice finished in the top ten in MVP voting, and this year he would win his first Home Run (47) and RBI Title (129), while also leading the NL in Slugging Percentage (.614).  Banks also batted .313 this year, and he was on his fourth of what would be 11 All-Star Games.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1977.

Nellie Fox, AL:  Chicago White Sox (1959)

Nellie Fox had already established himself as a top tier Second Baseman in the American League, as he had already led the AL four times in Hits, and he was on his ninth straight All-Star Game.  Fox had also finished in the top ten in MVP voting three times, and he was a vital member of the “Go Go” Sox teams of the 50s. This season, he batted .306 with 191 Hits, and was a Gold Glove winner.  Fox went to three more All-Star Games and would collect 2,663 Hits over his career.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1997.

Ernie Banks, NL:  Chicago Cubs (2) (1959)

Banks was a back-to-back winner in MVP voting, and he would go deep 45 times with a .304 Batting Average.  The Chicago Cub would lead the NL in RBIs for the second straight year with a career-high 143.  He would finish fourth in MVP voting the following season, and win his second Home Run Title.  Banks never won a World Series, but in a career spent entirely at Wrigley, he would have 2,583 Hits with 512 Home Runs.  He would play until 1971.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1977.

Frank Robinson, NL:  Cincinnati Reds (1961)

Frank Robinson was the Rookie of the Year in 1956, and the Outfielder could do it all as a bona fide five tool baseball player. To date, Robinson had never had a season where he did not receive an MVP vote, and in 1961, he would finally finish first.  He would hit 37 Home Runs with 124 Runs Batted In, while batting .323.  His .611 Slugging Percentage and 1.015 OPS would lead the National League.  Robinson would take the Reds to the World Series in a losing effort against the New York Yankees.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1982.

Mickey Mantle, AL: New York Yankees (3) (1962)

The season after his exciting race with Roger Maris to 61 Home Runs, Mickey Mantle would win his third and final MVP.  The Outfielder won his first and only Gold Glove this year, and while he should not have won that accolade, his MVP was well earned with his 30 Home Runs and a Slash Line of .321/.486/.605.  Mantle would play until 1968 and he would be an All-Star sixteen times and won the World Series seven times, with this season being the seventh.  He retired with 2,415 Hits with 536 Home Runs.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1974.

Sandy Koufax, NL: Los Angeles Dodgers (1963)

Sandy Koufax is known for having two careers. The first half (1955-60) was largely uneventful, and the second half (1961-66), where he had “the Left Hand of God”. Koufax was an All-Star the previous two seasons, and in 1963, he would go 25-5, leading the NL in Wins, ERA (1.88), Shutouts (11), Strikeouts (306), FIP (1.85), WHIP (0.875) and SO/BB (5.28). He would of course win the Cy Young, and did so again in 1965 and 1966.  In those two years he would place second in MVP voting.  In 1963, he would also win the World Series, earning MVP honors, and accolade he would repeat in 1965.  Koufax retired with a 165-87 Record and 2,396 Strikeouts.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1972.

Brooks Robinson, AL: Baltimore Orioles (1964)

Brooks Robinson was regarded as one of the greatest defensive players that ever existed, and the Third Baseman was also an outstanding hitter.  Robinson would win the MVP in 1964, and he had career-highs with 194 Hits, 28 Home Runs, 118 Runs Batted In (led the league), .317 Batting Average, .368 OBP and .521 Slugging.  Robinson would later win two World Series Rings, and he won 16 Gold Gloves with 268 Home Runs and 2,848 Hits.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1974.

Willie Mays, NL: San Francisco Giants (2) (1965)

Over a decade after he won his first MVP, Mays and his Giants were now in San Francisco.  In between his first and second MVP, he was a contender for many of them, finishing in the top six in MVP voting in 10 of those 11 years.  His second MVP would see him blast 52 Home Runs, which would lead the National League, and was a personal high.  He would also finish first in On Base Percentage (.398), and Slugging Percentage (.645), and he would also have a 111 RBIs and a .317 Batting Average.  The Outfielder finished third in MVP voting the year after, and that would be the final season where Mays was in the top ten in MVP voting.  Mays ended his career in 1973 and would accumulate 3,283 Hits and 660 Home Runs.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1979.

Frank Robinson, AL:  Baltimore Orioles (2) (1966)

Frank Robinson made history as the first player to win the MVP in both the National League and American League.  Robinson was traded the year before when Cincinnati management felt that his best years were behind him, which was promptly proven wrong when he won the Triple Crown with 49 Home Runs, 122 RBIs and a .316 Batting Average.  He would also finish first in the AL in Runs Scored (122), On Base Percentage (.410), and Slugging Percentage (.637), and he was the MVP in the World Series, the first championship for the franchise in Baltimore.  Robinson would again make history by becoming the first black Manager in the Majors, and he would be the AL Manager of the Year in 1989.  As a player, Robinson retired with 2,943 Hits and 586 Home Runs and was a two-time World Series Champion as a player.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1982.

Roberto Clemente, NL:  Pittsburgh Pirates (1966)

Arguably the most important Latin American baseball player of all-time, Roberto Clemente was on his seventh straight All-Star Game appearance and the career Pirate had already won three Batting Titles.  He did not win his fourth in 1966 (he would win it in 1967) but as always, he put forth excellent offensive numbers by batting .317, and collecting 105 Runs, 202 Hits, 29 Home Runs and 119 RBIs.  Over the Puerto Rican legend’s career, he would have 12 All-Star seasons, 12 Gold Gloves and win two World Series Titles. Clemente’s career tragically ended after the 1972 season, when the plane that he was in crashed, killing all aboard. He was on his way to Nicaragua to aid in earthquake relief.  Clemente would record an even 3,000 Hits over his career.  He would be fast tracked into the Hall of Fame the year after.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1973.

Carl Yastrzemski, AL:  Boston Red Sox (1967)

If baseball fans in Boston weren’t convinced that Carl Yastrzemski was the face of the Red Sox, they were after this season. “Yaz” won the coveted Triple Crown with 44 Home Runs, 121 Runs Batted In and a .326 Batting Average, and he was also the league leader in Runs Scored (112), Hits (189), On Base Percentage (.418), and Slugging Percentage (622).  Playing his entire career with Boston, Yastrzemski would win three Batting Titles, five OBP Titles, three Slugging Titles and was an All-Star eighteen times. He retired in 1983 with 3,419 Hits and 452 Home Runs.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1989.

Orlando Cepeda, NL:  St. Louis Cardinals (1967)

Orlando Cepeda was the National League Rookie of the Year in 1958 when he was with the San Francisco Giants, and he would promptly go to the next six All-Star Games.  He was traded to the Cardinals in 1966, and in 1967, he was chosen for his seventh and last All-Star Game, but this year, he was part of an excellent team that won the World Series.  Cepeda had 25 Home Runs, and would lead the NL in RBIs (111), with a career-high .325 Batting Average.  There were others who could have been chosen for this, but there was no runaway candidate. Cepeda played until 1974, and he would retire with 2,351 Hits with 379 Home Runs.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1999.

Bob Gibson, NL:  St. Louis Cardinals (1968)

Before 1968, Bob Gibson had already won two World Series Rings with the St. Louis Cardinals, and he was the MVP in both of those championships.  In 1968, Gibson went 22-9 with an anemic ERA of 1.12, which of course was leading the National League.  Gibson also led all NL Pitchers in Shutouts (13), Strikeouts (268), FIP (1.77), WHIP (0.853), and H/9 (5.8).  The Cardinals won the Pennant, but Gibson was not able to will the Redbirds over the Detroit Tigers in the World Series this year.  Gibson would later win his second Cy Young in 1970, and he would retire with a record of 251-174 and 3,117 Strikeouts.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1981.

Harmon Killebrew, AL:  Minnesota Twins (1969)

Harmon Killebrew might be the greatest player in Minnesota Twins history, and if he is not, he is certainly the most iconic. “The Killer” would win his sixth (and final) Home Run Title, and he would tie his personal best with 49 taters. Killebrew would finish first in the AL with 140 RBIs, 145 Walks, and an OBP of .427, which also was personal bests. While overall, this may not have been the best year for Killebrew, it is hard to state that he should not have been an MVP at some point in his career.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1984.

Willie McCovey, NL:  San Francisco Giants (1969)

How good was Willie McCovey?  He was able to escape the shadow of Willie Mays.  In 1969, McCovey won his third Home Run Title (45) and second RBI Title (126), and he would also finish first in On Base Percentage (.453), Slugging Percentage (.656), and OPS (1.108).  McCovey would also bat .320, the highest of his career. He was third the in MVP voting the year before, and was ninth the season after.  He played until 1980, and would accumulate 2,211 Hits and 521 Home Runs.   Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1986. 

Johnny Bench, NL:  Cincinnati Reds (1970)

Two seasons removed from winning the Rookie of the Year, Johnny Bench won his first MVP.  The Reds Catcher would finish first in the National League in Home Runs (45), Runs Batted In (148), and he would have a Slash Line of .293/.345/587, with the Batting Average and Slugging Percentage being career-highs.  Bench would also earn his third of what would be ten straight Gold Gloves.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1989.

Joe Torre, NL: St. Louis Cardinals (1971)

In 1971, Joe Torre went to his seventh of nine All-Star Games, and he would have the best year of his career.  Torre would lead all National League batters in Hits (230), Runs Batted In (137) and Batting Average (.363), and he would have 24 Home Runs.  Playing at Third Base this year, Torre played until 1977, and would accumulate 2,343 Hits with 252 Home Runs.  As good as he was as a player, he would have a more successful career as a Manager where he would win four World Series rings with the New York Yankees.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2014 (as a manager).

Johnny Bench, NL:  Cincinnati Reds (2) (1972)

Just like in 1970, Johnny Bench would lead the NL in Home Runs (40) and RBIs (125), and this season he would bat .370 with a career-high in Walks (100) and On Base Percentage (.379).  In the next three years, Bench would finish in the top ten in MVP voting and he was in the middle of a thirteen-year run of All-Star Game appearances.  Bench would play his entire career with the Reds and helped them win two World Series Titles.  He retired in 1983 with 2,048 Hits and 389 Home Runs.   Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1989.

Reggie Jackson, AL:  Oakland Athletics (1973)

This was Reggie Jackson’s first time winning the Home Run Title, and he would do it again three other years.  Jackson would also lead the American League in Runs Scored (99), Runs Batted In (117), Slugging Percentage (.531) and OPS (.914), and this was also the second of three straight World Series Titles for Jackson and the Oakland A’s.  “Mr. October” would have five World Series rings in total with 563 Home Runs in his career.  Jackson would have six other years where he would finish in the top ten in MVP voting, which included a second-place finish in 1980.   Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1993.

Joe Morgan, NL:  Cincinnati Reds (1975)

By this time, Joe Morgan had already established himself as the best Second Baseman in Baseball, and he finished fourth and eighth in MVP voting in the last two years.  The Reds were ready to take over, and with previous MVPs Pete Rose and Johnny Bench, Morgan led “The Big Red Machine” to a Championship in 1975, and Morgan won not only the MVP, the Gold Glove, and he led the NL in On Base Percentage (.466) and OPS (.974).  Morgan also had 17 Home Runs with a .327 Batting Average.   Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1990.

Joe Morgan, NL:  Cincinnati Reds (2) (1976)

Joe Morgan did it again, doubling up as MVP and World Series Champion, and for the fourth time he would lead the National League in On Base Percentage (.444).  This season, he would also win the Slugging Title (.576), OPS Title (1.020), and would have career-highs in Home Runs (27), and Runs Batted In (111). Morgan was also an All-Star for the seventh of what would be ten times, and he secured his fourth (of five) Gold Gloves.  The Second Baseman played until 1984, and he would have 2,517 Hits with 268 Home Runs and 689 Stolen Bases.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1990.

Rod Carew, AL: Minnesota Twins (1977)

While Rod Carew had an MVP case in earlier seasons, he was not going to be denied in 1977.  The Panamanian finished in the top nine in MVP voting the last four seasons, and this year he won his sixth of seven Batting Titles.  It was not just a league-leading Batting Average, it was an incredible .388.  He also finished first in the AL in On Base Percentage (.449), OPS (1.019), Runs Scored (128), Hits (239) and Triples (16), and he would be named an All-Star in the first 18 of his 19 seasons in the Majors.  Carew played until 1985, and retired as a member of the 3,000 Hit Club with 3,053.  He would bat .328 over his career.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1991.

Jim Rice, AL: Boston Red Sox (1978)

Jim Rice finished fourth in MVP voting the year before, when he won his first Batting Title.  In 1978, Rice won his second (of three) Home Run crowns, and he did so with a career-high 46.  He would also lead the AL in Hits (213), Triples (15), RBIs (139), Slugging Percentage (.600), and OPS (.970), and he would Have a nice Batting Average of .315. Rice would go on to have three more top five finished in MVP voting and in a career spent entirely with the Red Sox, he would accumulate 2,452 Hits, 382 Home Runs and was an eight-time All-Star. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2009.

Willie Stargell, NL:  Pittsburgh Pirates (1979)

While Willie Stargell is a deserving Hall of Famer, this might be one of the worst MVP selections ever.  His 2.5 bWAR is the worst to date for any MVP, and his co-winner, Keith Hernandez, had more than triple what Stargell had.  This was the last good season of Stargell’s career, and he had been an All-Star seven times before, and was an MVP runner-up twice before in much better years.  Stargell did not even get to 120 Hits, though his 32 Home Runs and .281 Batting Average were decent, but not MVP worthy.  What Stargell did accomplish was win the World Series, which combined with sentiment propelled him to this honor.  He retired three years later with 2,232 Hits and 475 Home Runs.    Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1988.

George Brett, AL:  Kansas City Royals (1980)

While George Brett arguably should have won an MVP already, Brett’s 1980 season was exceptionally impressive.  The Royals’ Third Baseman led everyone in the AL in the Slash Line (.390/.454/.664), and he would have 24 Home Run with a career-high 118 Runs Batted In.  Brett only played 117 Games, but he would have a stellar bWAR of 9.4.  Largely because of Brett, The Royals would win the Pennant, though would lose to the Philadelphia Phillies.  Brett played his entire career in Kansas City where he would accumulate 3,154 Hits, 317 Home Runs, and a Batting Average of .309.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1999.

Mike Schmidt, NL:  Philadelphia Phillies (1980)

Mike Schmidt and the Philadelphia Phillies would finally make history as the Third Baseman would take the hard luck franchise to their first ever World Series Championship.  Schmidt was third in MVP voting in 1976, would win his fourth Home Run Title in 1980, with what would be a career-best of 48.  This was his first RBI Title, and his 121 ribbies was his personal best.  Schmidt would also lead the National League in Slugging Percentage (.624) and OPS (1.004). Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1999.

Rollie Fingers, AL:  Milwaukee Brewers (1981)

Rollie Fingers had already won three World Series Rings with the Oakland A’s, and here he was in his first season in Milwaukee winning the elusive Cy Young and MVP.  Fingers would lead the AL in Saves with 28, and had an exemplary ERA of 1.04, with a WHIP of 0.872.  The Brewers would go to the playoffs for the first time this year.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1992.

Mike Schmidt, NL:  Philadelphia Phillies (2) (1981)

In the strike-shortened 1981 season, Mike Schmidt maintained his elite status as the best Third Baseman in the National League. The career Philadelphia Phillie would win his fifth Home Run Crown (31), second RBI Title (91), and for the first time in his career would finish atop the National League in On Base Percentage (.435).  He was also first in Slugging (.644) and OPS (1.080).  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1999.

Robin Yount, AL:  Milwaukee Brewers (1982)

An All-Star for the second time in his career, Robin Yount would lead the American League in Hits (210), Doubles (46), Slugging Percentage (.578), and OPS (.957), and had a career-best in Batting Average (.331), Home Runs (29), and RBIs (114).  Yount would lead the Brewers to the American League Pennant, though Milwaukee would lose to the St. Louis Cardinals.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1999.

Cal Ripken, AL:  Baltimore Orioles (1983)

The legendary Shortstop won the Rookie of the Year the year before and in 1983 Cal Ripken cemented himself as the premier player at his position.  The career Baltimore Oriole would lead the AL in Runs Scored (121), Hits (211) and Doubles (47), with all of those numbers being his personal best.  Ripken had a Slash Line of .318/.371/.571 and he was named to the All-Star Game, a trend that he would continue until he retired in 2001.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2007.

Ryne Sandberg, NL:  Chicago Cubs (1984)

Ryne Sandberg had already established himself as an upper echelon Second Basemen in the National League, but this was the year that Phillies fans were beyond consolation over letting Sandberg go in a trade three years before.  The Second Baseman would finish first in Runs Scored (114) and Triples (19), and he would have a career-high .314 Batting Average.  Sandberg would have two more fourth place finishes in his career for the MVP and he would play until 1997 with 2,386 Hits and 282 Home Runs.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2005.

Mike Schmidt, NL:  Philadelphia Phillies (3) (1986)

Mike Schmidt made the rare three-time MVP club in 1986, and he was also earning his eighth (and final) Home Run Title this year, with his 37 dingers.  Schmidt would also lead the National League in RBIs (119), Slugging Percentage (.547), and OPS (.937), and he would play three more seasons, retiring in 1989. Schmidt retired with 12 All-Star Game appearances, 548 Home Runs and 2,234 Hits.  This is without a doubt the greatest Philadelphia Phillie ever, and the success they had in the 1980s does not happen without him.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1999.

Andre Dawson, NL:  Chicago Cubs (1987)

Andre Dawson joined the Chicago Cubs as a Free Agent in the era of collusion, and the Cubs got an MVP for a half a million dollars. “The Hawk” would lead the National League in Home Runs (49) and Runs Batted In (137), which were both career-highs. He would bat .287 that year. Dawson would belt 438 Home Rus and 2,774 Hits over his career.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2010.

Robin Yount, AL:  Milwaukee Brewers (2) (1989)

Robin Yount might not have had led any offensive category, but this was an excellent campaign.  Yount would have 21 Home Runs, 101 Runs, 103 RBIs, and a Slash Line of .318/.384/.511.  He played his entire career with the Brewers, accumulating an impressive 3,142 Hits, and 251 Home Runs.  Even though he was only a three-time All-Star, this was a star in every sense of the word and a worthy first ballot Hall of Fame inductee.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1999.

Rickey Henderson, AL Oakland Athletics (1990)

For the 10thtime in his career, Rickey Henderson won the Stolen Base Title, but he also matched his previous high of 28 Home Runs.  He would have career-highs in all aspects of the Slash Line (.325/.439/.577), and his OBP was good enough to lead the American League, which was the first time that happened.  The A’s would go to their third straight World Series, though they lost this year to the Cincinnati Reds.  Henderson played until 2003, and retires as the all-time leader in Runs Scored (2,295), and Stolen Bases (1,406).  He would also accumulate 3,055 Hits with a .401 On Base Percentage.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2009.

Cal Ripken, AL:  Baltimore Orioles (2) (1991)

While Cal Ripken did not lead the AL in any traditional metric, his 11.5 bWAR was far and away the best in the league.  Ripken would have his best power numbers with 34 Home Runs and 114 RBIS, and he also set a personal best with his .323 Batting Average.  Ripken was in the middle of the all-time record of 2,632 consecutive Games.  Over his career, Ripken would accrue 3,184 Hits with 431 Home Runs and 1,695 Runs Batted In.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2007.

Dennis Eckersley, AL:  Oakland Athletics (1992)

Dennis Eckersley was an integral part of Oakland’s three straight American League Pennants (1988-90), and this season “Eck” would lead the AL in Saves (51), Games Finished (65) and would also win the Cy Young.  For all intents and purposes, this was his last good year, and he played until 1998. His career was truly two halves, the first as a good starter, and his second as an elite reliever.  He retired with 197 Wins and 390 Saves.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2004.

Frank Thomas, AL:  Chicago White Sox (1993)

“The Big Hurt” was in the top ten in MVP voting the last two seasons, and in the 1993 season, he would belt 41 Home Runs with 128 Runs Batted In, and a Slash Line of .317/.426/.607.  None of these would lead any offensive category, but this was still an incredible offensive year that began a five-year run of All-Star runs.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2014.

Frank Thomas, AL:  Chicago White Sox (2) (1994)

Frank Thomas was excellent again with his bat, leading the American League in Runs Scored (106), On Base Percentage (.487), Slugging Percentage (.729), and OPS (1.217).  The last three of those were personal bests for the slugger.  Thomas would also bat a career-high .353 and 38 Home Runs and 101 RBIs.  He would go on to finish in the top eight in MVP voting in the next three seasons and was the runner-up in 2000.  He played until 2008 and would hammer 521 Home Runs with 1,704 RBIs.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2014.

Jeff Bagwell, NL:  Houston Astros (1994)

In the strike-shortened 1994 season, Jeff Bagwell planted his flag as an upper-echelon player.  He would lead the National League in Runs Scored (104), Runs Batted In (116), Slugging Percentage (.750) and OPS (1.201).  The former Rookie of the Year had 39 Home Runs with a .368 Batting Average that year.  Bagwell would go on to have five more top ten MVP finishes, and he would play his entire career with the Houston Astros retiring in 2005.  He would have 2,314 Hits with 449 Home Runs over his career. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2017.

Barry Larkin, NL:  Cincinnati Reds (1995)

Spending his entire career with the Cincinnati Reds, Barry Larkin was their Shortstop from 1986 to 2004.  Larkin was an 12-time All-Star, and this year was right in the middle of his career.  He would have 15 Home Runs and batted .319, which was a career-high.  Larkin would also win the Gold Glove and Silver Slugger this season, and he would retire winning three Gold Gloves and nine Silver Sluggers.  He also had 2,340 Hits with 198 Home Runs and 379 Stolen Bases over his career.   Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2012.

Ken Griffey, AL:  Seattle Mariners (1997)

The statistical argument can be stated that Ken Griffey Jr. was worthy of more than one MVP, but this was the one that he captured and thank God that he did.  This season, Griffey led all American League batters with 125 Runs Scored, 56 Home Runs, 147 Runs Batted In, and a Slugging Percentage of .646.  He would also bat .304.  “Junior” would win four Home Run Titles in his career, and was also in the top ten in MVP voting five other seasons.  He played until 2010, and would accumulate 2,781 Hits with 630 Home Runs.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2016.

Ivan Rodriguez, AL:  Texas Rangers (1999)

Ivan Rodriguez had already been considered for a few years to be the best Catcher in the American League.  1999 would see “Pudge” go to his eighth of what would be 14 All-Star Games, and he was also named a Silver Slugger and Gold Glove, of which he would have seven and thirteen respectively.  This season, he would bat .332 with a career-high 35 Home Runs and 113 Runs Batted In.  He would not lead the AL in any offensive category, but for a Catcher, his numbers were spectacular.   The Rangers made the playoffs that year, but were beaten by the New York Yankees in the American League Divisional Series.  Rodriguez would later lead the Florida Marlins to the World Series in 2003, where he was the NLCS MVP.  He played until 2011, and retired with 2,844 Hits and 311 Home Runs.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2017.

Chipper Jones, NL:  Atlanta Braves (1999)

Chipper Jones played his entire career with the Atlanta Braves, and in 1999 he would belt a career-high 45 Home Runs with 110 Runs Batted In, and a Slash Line of .319/.441/.633, which equated to a personal best OPS of 1.074.  While Jones would not lead the National League in any stat, his numbers were certainly fantastic.  Jones would be named to  eight All-Star Games, win two Silver Sluggers, and the 2008 Batting Title.  He retired in 2012 with 2,726 Hits and 468 Home Runs.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2018.

Vladimir Guerrero, AL:  Anaheim Angels (2004)

After eight seasons with the Montreal Expos, Vladimir Guerrero joined the Angels and continued to have one of the seasons that was expected from him.  Guerrero led the American League with 124 Runs Scored and had 39 Home Runs with 126 Runs Batted In.  The “Impaler” had a Slash Line of .337/.391/.598, and while advanced metrics would say that this was not the best year of his career, this was a player who was MVP worthy.  Guerrero played until the 2011 season and the nine-time All-Star and retired with 2,590 Hits and 449 Home Runs.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2018.

 

 

 

The following are the players who have won the MVP in MLB who are eligible for the Baseball Hall of Fame and have not been selected:

Frank Schulte, NL: Chicago Cubs (1911)

Helping the Chicago Cubs win the World Series in 1907 and 1908, Frank Schulte would have better seasons to come.  Schulte made history as the first player in the National League to win a version of their MVP in 1911, and he would lead the NL in Home Runs with 21, which was an incredible number for that time.  This year, he would become the first player ever to have at least 20 Doubles, Triples, Home Runs and Stolen Bases, and he would have a Slash Line of .300/.384/.534.  He would continue to play until 1918 and had 1,766 Hits over his career.  Unrankedon Notinhalloffame.com.

Larry Doyle, NL: New York Giants (1912)

One of the most popular players of his day, Larry Doyle finished third in MVP voting the season before.  This year he would bat .330 with 184 Hits.  In 1915, when there was no MVP award, Doyle would win his only Batting Title while also leading the National League in Hits (189) and Doubles (40).  He would accumulate 1,887 Hits over his career that was mostly spent with the New York Giants. Ranked #42 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Jake Daubert, NL: Brooklyn Dodgers (1913)

Jake Daubert was an underrated hitter in terms of history, but this was not the case in 1913, where he would win his first of two straight batting titles.  This year, Daubert would bat .350, which was his personal best.  He would also have a career-high of .405 in On Base Percentage. Daubert would accumulate 2,326 Hits, 165 Triples, 251 Stolen Bases and a .303 lifetime Batting Average.  Unrankedon Notinhalloffame.com.

Roger Peckinpaugh, AL: Washington Senators (1925)

This is a very strange choice, as while Roger Peckinpaugh was a very good defensive Shortstop, this award happened near the end of his career, and offensively.  This year, he only had 124 Hits, though he did have bat .294, the second highest of his career.  This was a good player but with a 2.6 bWAR, he is among the worst MVPs in Baseball history. He would have 1,876 Hits with a career Defensive bWAR of 25.0 over his career.  Unrankedon Notinhalloffame.com.

George Burns, AL: Cleveland Indians (1926)

George Burns would have the best season of his life this year and he would have a personal best of 216 Hits and 64 Doubles, both of which would lead the American League.  Burns would have a Slash Line that year of .358/.394/.494.  Over his career, he would win the World Series twice, one with Cleveland (1920) and one with the Philadelphia Athletics (1929). He would have 2,018 Hits with a .307 Batting Average over his career.  Unrankedon Notinhalloffame.com.

Bob O’Farrell, NL: St. Louis Cardinals (1926)

Bob O’Farrell was a highly regarded defensive Catcher, and he would become the first man at his position to win an MVP. He would have 144 Hits with a .293 Batting Average and he would help the Cardinals win the World Series that year. He played until 1935, and would have 1,120 career hits.  O’Farrell was on the ballot for three years, finishing as high as 2.4% in 1950.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Bucky Walters, NL: Cincinnati Reds (1939)

While Bucky Walters may have been an All-Star in 1937 when he was the Philadelphia Phillies, he truly arrived in 1939 as a member of the Cincinnati Reds.  Walters was the second Red in a row to win the MVP, and he would lead the National League in Wins (27), ERA (2.29), Innins Pitched (319) and WHIP (1.125).  He would finish third in MVP voting the following season and help Cincinnati win the World Series.  He would retire with 198 Wins.  Walters was on the ballot for fifteen years, finishing as high as 23.7% in 1968.  Ranked #64 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Frank McCormick, NL: Cincinnati Reds (1940)

For the third consecutive year, a Cincinnati Red won the National League MVP, and this year it was Frank McCormick, their First Baseman.  As you can imagine, this led to them winning the 1940 World Series. This was the third season in a row that McCormick would lead the NL in Hits, and he also finished number one in Doubles (44).  He would bat .309 this year with 19 Home Runs, and he finished in the top five in MVP voting the two years prior.  He would be named to nine All-Stars over his career, and he would accumulate 1,711 Hits with a .299 Batting Average.  McCormick was on the ballot for four years, finishing as high as 4.0% in 1964. Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Dolph Camilli, NL: Brooklyn Dodgers (1941)

Dolph Camilli had already proven himself to be a proven power hitter as the First Baseman had previously hit at least 23 or more Home Runs the last six years.  A popular player in Brooklyn, Camilli’s 1941 campaign would see him lead the NL in Home Runs (34) and Runs Batted In (120), both were personal highs.  He also batted .285 with a .407 On Base Percentage, which was on par from what should be expected by Camilli. The Dodgers would win the pennant that year, but lost to the New York Yankees.  He would play until 1945.  Camilli was on the ballot for four years, finishing as high as 1.5% in 1958. Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Mort Cooper, NL: St. Louis Cardinals (1942)

Cooper ascended to the ace of the Cardinals staff this year, and he would lead the NL in Wins (22), ERA (1.78), Shutouts (10), WHIP (0.987) and SO/BB (2.24).  While Cooper was not great in the World Series (which St. Louis won), he was a huge factor in their pennant win.  The pitcher remained in the league during World War II, and he would finish in the top ten in MVP voting on two more occasions.  Cooper remained in Baseball until 149, and he would retire with a 129-75 record.  Cooper was on the ballot for four years, finishing as high as 1.1% in 1958. Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Spud Chandler, AL: New York Yankees (1943)

Spud Chandler had a career season where he led the American League in Wins (20), ERA (1.64), FIP (2.30) and WHIP (0.992), and went to win the World Series by securing two Wins in the Fall Classic. This was by far the best season he would ever have, and he would win a third World Series Ring in 1947. Overall, Chandler won 109 Games in the Majors.  Chandler was on the ballot for five years, finishing as high as 3.0% in 1958.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Marty Marion, NL: St. Louis Cardinals (1944)

Arguably, this was a strange selection, as Marion was not the best hitter, and he would bat .267 with 6 Home Runs, and 135 Hits, which was a typical offensive season for him.  The Shortstop was nicknamed the “Octopus”, and he could always be counted on to be a wizard with the glove, and while advanced metrics were not known in 1944, Marion was the leader in Defensive bWAR with a whopping 3.6.  It is weird, in that the voters recognized this side of the game, which is rare.  Marion would take the Cardinals to the World Series win that year.  Marion was on the ballot for fifteen years, finishing as high as 40.0% in 1970.  Ranked #56 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Phil Cavarretta, NL: Chicago Cubs (1945)

Cavarretta’s best seasons in Major League Baseball did take place during World War II, so when he is criticized historically for not being a great player, you can see why that might be the case.  No matter.  In 1945 Cavarretta won the Batting Title (.355), On Base Percentage (.449), and he would help the Cubs win the National League Pennant.  He played until 1955, and would collect 1,977 Hits.  Cavarretta was on the ballot for fourteen years, finishing as high as 35.6% in 1975.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Bob Elliott, NL: Boston Braves (1947)

This was the first year that Elliott was with the Braves after eight years with the Pittsburgh Pirates.  Elliott had finished in the top ten in MVP voting three times before, but in ’47, he set career-highs in Batting Average (.317), Slugging Percentage (.517) and Runs Batted In (113), with a 22 Home Run Year.  Elliott played until 1953 and he would accumulate 2,061 Hits and 170 Home Runs.  Elliott was on the ballot for three years, finishing as high as 2.0% in 1964.  Ranked #95 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Jim Konstanty, NL: Philadelphia Phillies (1950)

Jim Konstanty might be the most unlikeliest player to have ever won the MVP Award.  First off, he had an average career at best prior to this win, and he went right back to that afterwards.  Second, Konstantu was a reliever, who didn’t start a single game in 1950.  That is common now, but in 1950, closers were not part of the baseball vernacular.  Regardless, the member of the Whiz Kids Phillies team that won the National League Pennant was excellent this season going 16-7 and leading the NL in Games Pitched (74), Games Finished (62) and Saves (22).  He was an All-Star this year, for the first and only time, and he would later make dubious history as the first MVP to not even appear on a Hall of Fame ballot.  Konstanty was eligible for the Hall of Fame in 1962 but was not on the ballot.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.    

Bobby Shantz, NL: Philadelphia Athletics (1952)

This was by far the best season by far for Bobby Shantz, who was an All-Star the previous season, but his ’52 year was so much better.  Shantz led the American League in 24 Wins, and also led the AL in WHIP (1.048), BB/9 (2.0), and SO/BB (2.41).  His Schantz 9.3 bWAR was higher than his closest competitor, Larry Doby by 2.1. He would later win the ERA Title in 1957, and a plethora of Gold Gloves, but realistically he was a Pitcher with one great season.  He would finish his career with a 119-99 record with 1,072 Strikeouts.  Shantz was on the ballot for five years, finishing as high as 2.3% in 1975.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Hank Sauer, NL: Chicago Cubs (1952)

While Hank Sauer had a good year, he likely should not have won this MVP, as Stan Musial, Robin Roberts and Jackie Robinson had much better bWARs, but this is not to say that Sauer’s ’52 was average.  The Chicago Cub had a great year with 37 Home Runs and 121 Runs Batted In.  That led the National League, and likely landed him the MVP.  He would also bat .270 that year, and this was his second of two All-Star Game appearances.  Sauer played until 1959 and would retire with 288 Home Runs.  Sauer was on the ballot for one year, and finished with 1.3% of the vote.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Al Rosen, AL: Cleveland Indians (1953)

A career Cleveland Indian, AL Rosen won the Home Run Title in 1950, and in 1952 was the leader in Runs Batted In.  In 1953, he did both.  He would post career-bests in those metrics (43 Home Runs) and (145 Runs Batted In) and in all three Slash Line components (.336/.422/.613).  His Slugging Percentage was also league leasing as was his OPS (1.034).  Rosen played three more seasons and finished his career with 1,063 Hits and 192 Home Runs.  Bauer was eligible for the Hall of Fame in 1962, but was not on the ballot.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Don Newcombe, NL: Brooklyn Dodgers (1956)

This was the first year of the Cy Young Award, which was designated to be given to the best Pitcher.  From 1956 to 1966, there was only one award given, and not one per league.  It only took one year for us to see the first dual winner of the MVP and Cy Young as Don Newcombe captured them both in 1956.  Newcombe was the Rookie of the Year in 1949 and he was already a two-time 20 Game winner, but he would secure 27 Wins in 1956 and led the NL in WHIP with 0.989.  That was the last great year he would have, and he would only have two more 10 Win Seasons. Newcombe played until 1960 and he retired with 149 Wins against 90 Losses.  Newcombe was on the ballot for fifteen years and finished as high as 15.3% in 1980.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Jackie Jensen, AL: Boston Red Sox (1958)

This was the best season of Jackie Jensen’s career, and while this should have gone to Mickey Mantle, Jensen did post good numbers for the Red Sox.  Jensen had 35 Home Runs and led the AL in Runs Batted in with 122.  He also had an excellent Slash Line of .286/.396/.535. Jensen was an All-Star for the third and final time this year and won the RBI Title the following season, but he would be out of the game two years after.  He retired with 199 Home Runs and 1,463 Hits.  Jensen was on the ballot for six years and finished as high as 1.1% in 1968.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Roger Maris, AL: New York Yankees (1960)

While most people think of Maris’ record breaking 1961 season, he was an MVP the season before in 1960 when he led the AL in Runs Batted In (112) and Slugging Percentage (.581).  He would have 39 Home Runs, won the Gold Glove, and helped the Yankees win the Pennant, though they would lose to the Pittsburgh Pirates.  Maris was on the ballot for fifteen years and finished as high as 43.1% in 1988.  Ranked #20 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Dick Groat, NL: Pittsburgh Pirates (1960)

The 1960 season was a magical one for the Pittsburgh Pirates as they were able to win the National League Pennant and go on to defeat the loaded dynasty of the New York Yankees.  The winning Home Run in the Series came from Bill Mazeroski, but the league MVP was Shortstop, Dick Groat, who won his only Batting Title with a .325 Average.  Groat likely won this due to the Pirates winning of the pennant, as Willie Mays and Hank Aaron arguably had a better year, but again, they did not win the Pennant in 1960.  Groat would go to five All-Star Games, won another World Series with the Pirates in 1964, and had 2,138 Hits over his career.  Groat was on the ballot for six years and finished as high as 1.8% in 1978.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Roger Maris, AL: New York Yankees (2) (1961)

This was the year where Roger Maris famously broke Babe Ruth’s single season Home Run record with 61, and he did against backlash from the league (the asterisk), and Yankees fans who wanted it to broken by Mickey Mantle.  Regardless, Roger Maris persevered and had the league leading 61 Home Runs, as well topping the American League leaderboard in Runs Scored (132) and Runs Batted In (141).  More importantly, the Yanks won the World Series.  New York would win the World Series again next year, but the power of Maris diminished and he would have only three more 20 Home Run seasons, finishing with 275 overall.  Maris was on the ballot for fifteen years and finished as high as 43.1% in 1988.  Ranked #20 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Maury Wills, NL: Los Angeles Dodgers (1962)

Maury Wills had won the previous two National League Stolen Base titles with tallies of 50 and 35, but the Los Angeles Dodger would set a new record with 104 thefts, making him the first player to ever exceed the 100 mark.  Wills would bat .299 with 130 Runs Scored and a league-leading 10 Triples.  Wills would win three more SB Titles, and went on to record 2,134 Hits and 586 Stolen Bases. Wills was on the ballot for fifteen years and finished as high as 40.6% in 1981.  Ranked #73 on Notinhalloffame.com

Elston Howard, AL: New York Yankees (1963)

For the fourth year in a row, a New York Yankee won the MVP, with Elston Howard being the third different player to earn this honor.  The Catcher was on his seventh of nine straight All-Star Games, and he had a career-high 28 Home Runs, batted .287, and won his first Gold Glove.  Howard played until 1968, and he would have 1,471 Hits with 167 Home Runs while winning four World Series Championships with the Yankees. Howard was on the ballot for fifteen years and finished as high as 20.7% in 1981.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Ken Boyer, NL: St. Louis Cardinals (1964)

Ken Boyer had another good season with 24 Home Runs, and a National League leading 119 Runs Batted In, which would be the only time he led in any major offensive stat.  He had previously batted over .300 five times, and came close with .295. Boyer and his St. Louis Cardinals would win the Pennant and the World Series.  Boyer had a good year, but in 20/20 hindsight, Willie Mays should have secured this award.  This year would however be the last of Boyer’s All-Star years, as he was not named to another one, and would retire after 1969.  He would have 2,143 Hits with 282 Home Runs over his career. Boyer was on the ballot for fifteen years and finished as high as 25.5% in 1988.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Zolio Versalles, AL: Minnesota Twins (1965)

From Cuba, we have the first ever Minnesota Twin to win the MVP.  Zolio Versalles is not considered historically to be a player you would expect to win an MVP, but this was a year where there was no clear-cut favorite, and Versalles’ career-high 7.2 bWAR (which was almost triple his second best) was more than adequate; especially in a season where the Twins won the Pennant.  The Cuban infielder led the AL in Runs Scored (126), Doubles (45), and Triples (12), and he would have 19 Home Runs with a .273 Batting Average.  He would become one of the few former MVPs who was not on a Hall of Fame ballot.   Although Versalles was Hall of Fame eligible in 1977, he was not on the ballot.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Denny McLain, AL: Detroit Tigers (1968)

We feel very safe stating that this is the last 30 Win season that will happen in the Majors, as Denny McLain’s 31 Wins won’t see an equal anytime soon…if ever.  McClain’s 1968 campaign would see him also win the Cy Young, strike out 280 batters, and take his Detroit Tigers to a World Series Championship.  McLain would win the Cy Young again in 1969 with a 24-9 season, but he would never come remotely close to anything like that again. Realistically, he would not even have a season that would be considered good again.  He would play until the 1972 season and retired with 131 Wins.   McLain was on the ballot for three years and finished as high as 0.7% in 1979.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Boog Powell, AL: Baltimore Orioles (1970)

While arguably the MVP this year should have been Boston’s Carl Yastrzemski, it was Boog Powell and the Baltimore Orioles that won the World Series this year.  Powell had already won a World Series Ring in 1966, and he was the runner-up for the MVP in 1969.  While he did not lead the American League in any category, he had great offensive numbers of 35 Home Runs, 114 RBIs, and a Slash Line of .297/.412/.459.  Powell played until 1977 and would blast 339 Home Runs.  Powell was on the ballot for one year and finished with 1.3% in 1983. Ranked #87 Notinhalloffame.com.

Vida Blue, AL: Oakland Athletics (1971)

Also winning the Cy Young this year, Vida Blue would go 24-8 with AL leading 1.82 ERA, 2.20 FIP and a 0.952 WHIP.  Blue would also throw for 301 Strikeouts. While he wasn’t a rookie, this was his first full season and his best one ever.  He would go on to win three World Series Rings, and finished in the Cy Young top ten voting four more times.  Blue would pitch until 1986, and retired with 209 Wins and 2,175 Strikeouts. Blue was on the ballot for four years and finished as high as 8.7% in 1993.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Dick Allen, AL: Chicago White Sox (1972)

Dick Allen only played three seasons with the Chicago White Sox, and was an All-Star in each of those years.  The first one was 1972, and he would lead the AL in Home Runs (37), Runs Batted In (113), Walks (99), On Base Percentage (.420), Slugging Percentage (.603) and OPS (1.023).  A former Rookie of the Year, Allen would retire after the 1977 season, and he would have 1,848 Hits and 351 Home Runs.  Allen was on the ballot for fourteen years and finished as high as 18.9% in 1996.  Ranked #23 Notinhalloffame.com.

Pete Rose, NL: Cincinnati Reds (1973)

Pete Rose had been generating hits for a decade and in 1973 he would lead the National League in that metric for the fifth time.  Rose would have 230 Hits, a career-high, and he would win his third Batting Title with a .338 Average.  After his MVP, he would anchor the Reds to two World Series Championships and he would go on to become the all-time leader in baseball with 4,256.  Rose has been declared ineligible for the Hall.  Ranked #1A Notinhalloffame.com.

Jeff Burroughs, AL: Texas Rangers (1974)

Based on advanced metrics, Jeff Burroughs should not have won the MVP as his sub-4.0 bWAR is one of the lowest to win the award. Regardless, Burroughs made franchise history as the first Ranger to win the honor.  He would lead the AL with 118 RBIs, and would have 25 Home Runs with a .301 Batting Average.  Burroughs was also an All-Star this season, and was again in 1978 as a member of the Atlanta Braves.  He played until 1985 and retired with 1,443 Hits and 240 Home Runs.  Blue was on the ballot for one year and finished with 0.2% in 1991. Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Steve Garvey, NL: Los Angeles Dodgers (1974)

Historically speaking, Mike Schmidt of the Philadelphia Phillies was the much better choice as he had more than double the 4.4 bWAR of Steve Garvey, but this was Garvey’s breakout season for a team that would win the National League Pennant.  Garvey had 200 Hits, which would be the first of five times that he would reach that number. He would also bat .304 with 21 Home Runs and 111 Runs Batted In.  Garvey would have four more seasons where he would finish in the top ten in MVP voting and he would play until 1987, where he would retire with 2,599 Hits and 211 Home Runs.  Garvey was on the ballot for fifteen years and finished as high as 42.6% in 1995.  Ranked #25 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Fred Lynn, AL: Boston Red Sox (1975)

This was another history making year for the MVP, as Fred Lynn’s win marked with the first time that a player won both the MVP and the Rookie of the Year in the same baseball campaign.  The Red Sox Outfielder would hit 21 Home Runs, batted .331 and led the AL in Slugging with .566.  This year, he would go to his first of nine straight All-Star Games. Incidentally, Lynn probably should have won this award in 1979, but that would go to Don Baylor.  He would retire in 1990 with 1,960 Hits and 306 Home Runs.  Lynn was on the ballot for two years and finished as high as 5.5% in 1996. Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Thurman Munson, AL: New York Yankees (1976)

Thurman Munson would become yet another Yankees Catcher to win the MVP, and this season he again batted over .300, with 17 Home Runs and 105 RBIs.  This was his fifth of seven All-Star Game appearances and in the two years that followed, he helped New York win the next two World Series Championships.  Munson was tragically killed when he crashed the plane he was piloting during an off-day in the 1979 season.  Munson would have 1,558 Hits over his shortened career. Munson was on the ballot for two years and finished as high as 5.5% in 1996.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

George Foster, NL: Cincinnati Reds (1977)

A testament to just how good the Cincinnati Reds were in the 1970s, George Foster was the fourth Red to win this accolade in this decade.  The runner-up behind his teammate, Joe Morgan in 1976, Foster would blast 52 Home Runs this year with 149 Runs Batted In, which was by far the best in the NL.  He was also first in Runs Scored (124), Slugging Percentage (.631) and OPS (1.013).  Foster again won the Home Run and RBI crown in 1978, and he was sixth in MVP voting. He would play until 1986 and would belt 348 Home Runs with 1,925 Hits.  Foster was on the ballot for four years and finished as high as 6.9% in 1993.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Dave Parker, NL: Pittsburgh Pirates (1978)

Prior to his MVP win, Dave Parker would have two third place finishes in MVP seasons, and this year, he won his second straight Batting Title with a .334 Average.  He also led the National League in Slugging Percentage (.585) and OPS (.979) and had 30 Home Runs with 117 Runs Batted In.  Parker would help lead Pittsburgh to a World Series Championship the year after.  Later in his career, Parker would have two more top-five MVP finishes when he was with the Cincinnati Reds.  Parker played until 1991, and would tabulate 2,712 Hits with 339 Home Runs.  Parker was on the ballot for fifteen years and finished as high as 24.5% in 1998.  Ranked #21 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Don Baylor, AL: California Angels (1979)

The first California Angel to win the MVP, Don Baylor arguably should not have won it as his 3.7 bWAR was less than half of George Brett and Fred Lynn.  Regardless, this was given to Baylor, who would lead the American League in Runs Batted In (139) and Runs Scored (120), and he would have a career-high 36 Home Runs and .296 Batting Average.  This was also the year that Baylor would be named an All-Star.  Baylor played until 1988, and would have 2,135 Hits with 338 Home Runs.  Baylor was on the ballot for two years and finished as high as 2.6% in both 1994 and 1995.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Keith Hernandez, NL: St. Louis Cardinals (1979)

Hernandez would share this MVP with Willie Stargell, thus marking the first and only time that the voting was tied.  Hernandez would win his lone batting title in 1979 with a .344 Average, and he was also first in Runs Scored (111).  The First Baseman was an All-Star for the first time, and would go again four more times.  He was also the Gold Glove winner for the second time, and would win a whopping 11 of them over his career.  He would later win a World Series with the Cardinals (1981), and with the New York Mets in 1986, and he retired in 1990 with 2,182 Hits.  Baylor was on the ballot for nine years and finished as high as 10.8% in both 1998.  Ranked #28 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Dale Murphy, NL: Atlanta Braves (1982)

This was a banner year for Dale Murphy who not only won the MVP, but also won his first Gold Glove and Silver Slugger Award. The Braves Outfielder would win his first of two straight 109 RBIs, and he would have 36 Home Runs and a Slash Line of .281/.378/.507.  Murphy was on the ballot for fifteen years and finished as high as 23.2% in both 2000.  Ranked #30 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Dale Murphy, NL: Atlanta Braves (2) (1983) 

Murphy would win this honor back-to-back and in his second win, not only did win his second RBI Title, but he finished first in Slugging Percentage (.540) and OPS (.933).  Murphy repeated his production of 36 Home Runs and he would bat .302. He would go on to win the next two Home Run Titles, and was in the top ten in MVP voting in both of those seasons. Murphy played until 1993, and would finish with 2,111 Hits and 398 Home Runs.  Murphy was on the ballot for fifteen years and finished as high as 23.2% in both 2000.  Ranked #30 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Willie Hernandez, AL: Detroit Tigers (1984)

This was a very good Tigers team, and after playing in the Majors since 1977, Willie Hernandez finally came into his own with one of the best relief campaigns ever in a Tigers uniform.  Hernandez led the American League in Games Pitched (80), Games Finished (68) and he had 32 Saves with 140.1 Innings Pitched.  The Tigers would win the World Series that year, and Hernandez was an All-Star this season and the two that followed.  He retired in 1989 with 147 Saves.  Hernandez was on the ballot for one year and finished with 0.4% in 1995.  Unranked on Notinalloffame.com.

Don Mattingly, AL: New York Yankees (1985)

While arguably Don Mattingly won the MVP in the wrong year (he had a much better 1986), this was a good season for the Yankees legend.  This season, “Donnie Baseball” led the American League in Doubles (48) and Runs Batted In (145), and had a career-high 35 Home Runs.  He would also have a Slash Line of .324/.371/.567.  He was the runner-up for the 1986 MVP, and he played until 1995.  He would accumulate 2,153 Hits, and is considered the greatest Yankee never to win a World Series Ring.  With this organization, it means a lot!  Mattingly was on the ballot for fifteen years and finished as high as 28.2% in 2001.  Ranked #40 on Notinalloffame.com.

Willie McGee, NL: St. Louis Cardinals (1985)

This was the best season of Willie McGee’s career, where he would lead the National League in bWAR (8.2), Hits (216), Triples (18) and Batting Average (.353).  This was his second All-Star of four, and the only year he would win the Silver Slugger. McGee and the St. Louis Cardinals would win the National League Pennant that year, but would lose to the Kansas City Royals that year.  McGee was on the ballot for two years and finished as high as 5.0% in 2005.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com

Roger Clemens, AL: Boston Red Sox (1986)

This was the break out season for Roger Clemens, who would also win the Cy Young this year.  The flamethrower would lead the AL in Wins (24), ERA (2.48), FIP (2.81), WHIP (0.969) and H/9 (6.3).  Clemens also threw for 128 Strikeouts.  The Red Sox won the American League Pennant that year, but lost to the New York Mets. He would go on to win six more Cy Youngs, win 354 Games and 4,672 Strikeouts.  Due to the PED association, he has yet to make the Baseball Hall of Fame. Clemens has been on the ballot for seven years and finished as high as 59.5% in 2019.  Ranked #1C on Notinalloffame.com.

George Bell, AL: Toronto Blue Jays (1987)

George Bell made history as the first player from the Toronto Blue Jays (and non-American team) to win the MVP.  Bell was in the top ten in MVP voting the two years before, and this year he finally went to his first All-Star Game, and would blast 47 Home Runs, with a league-leading 134 Runs Batted In.  He would bat .308 with a Slugging Percentage of .605.  Bell played until 1993, and would have 1,702 Hits and 265 Home Runs.  McGee was on the ballot for two years and finished as high as 5.0% in 2005.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com

Jose Canseco, AL: Oakland Athletics (1988)

Jose Canseco was the American League Rookie of the Year two years earlier, and in 1988, he was one of the most high-profile baseball players.  This was Canseco’s second of what would be seven All-Star Games, and he would win the Home Run and RBI Title with results of 42 and 142 respectively.  He batted .307 and won the Slugging Title with a .569 Percentage.  Oakland won the AL Pennant that year, and Canseco and the Athletics won the World Series the following season.  He played until 2001 and in his controversial career would blast 462 Home Runs.  McGee was on the ballot for one year and finished with 1.1% in 2007. Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com

Kirk Gibson, NL: Los Angeles Dodgers (1988)

This was the season where Kirk Gibson took the underdog Los Angeles Dodgers to the World Series, and on a gimpy leg hit a Home Run in his only World Series At Bat.  That was his second World Series win, as he won with the Detroit Tigers in 1984. In the regular season, Gibson had 25 Home Runs with a .290 Batting Average.  Gibson was on the ballot for one year and finished with 2.5% in 2001. Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com

Kevin Mitchell, NL: San Francisco Giants (1989)

Kevin Mitchell blasted his way into the MVP in 1989, after seemingly coming out of nowhere.  Mitchell had a National League leading 47 Home Runs, 127 RBIs, .635 Slugging Percentage and 1.023 OPS.  He would also bat a respectable .291.  Mitchell had good power numbers the next season too, but he would regress after. He played until 1998 and had 1,173 Hits and 234 Home Runs.  Mitchell was on the ballot for one years and finished with 0.4% in 2004.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com

Barry Bonds, NL: Pittsburgh Pirates (1990)

Buckle up as we have a lot of Barry Bonds to get to. His first MVP took place with the Pittsburgh Pirates where he had 33 Home Runs, 114 Runs Batted In and batted .301. He would lead the National League in Slugging Percentage (.565) and OPS (.970), and he was named to the All-Star Game for the first time.  Bonds is currently out of the Hall of Fame due to his name being associated with PEDs. Bonds has been on the ballot for seven years and finished as high as 59.1% in 2019.  Ranked #2 on Notinalloffame.com.

Terry Pendleton, NL: Atlanta Braves (1991)

After seven seasons with the St. Louis Cardinals, Terry Pendleton joined the Atlanta Braves, and he had the season of his life. He led the NL in Hits (187), and won the Batting Title (.319), and had a career-high of 22 Home Runs. The Braves would win the National League Pennant but lost in a seven-game thriller to the Minnesota Twins.  Pendleton was second in MVP voting the year after, and he played until 1998.  He retired with 1,897 Hits.  Pendleton was on the ballot for one and received 0.2% of the vote in 2004.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Barry Bonds, NL: Pittsburgh Pirates (2) (1992)

Bonds missed out on the 1991 MVP as he was the runner-up, but he would not be denied in 1992.  In what would be final season with the Pirates, Bonds smacked 34 Home Runs and for the first and only time would lead the NL in Runs Scored (109). He batted .311, and won his second OBP (.456) and Slugging Percentage Title (.624).  Bonds is currently out of the Hall of Fame due to his name being associated with PEDs.  Bonds has been on the ballot for seven years and finished as high as 59.1% in 2019.  Ranked #2 on Notinalloffame.com.

Barry Bonds, NL: San Francisco Giants (3) (1993)

Bonds signed with the San Francisco Giants as a Free Agent, and in his first year in the Bay Area he won his third MVP in four years. He would win his first Home Run Title (46), and shockingly, this was the only time he led the league in Runs Batted In (123).  He batted .336, and for the third time won the OBP (.458) and Slugging Title (.677).  Bonds is currently out of the Hall of Fame due to his name being associated with PEDs. Bonds has been on the ballot for seven years and finished as high as 59.1% in 2019.  Ranked #2 on Notinalloffame.com.

Mo Vaughn, AL: Boston Red Sox (1995)

Mo Vaughn may not have been the best selection as the American League MVP in 1995, as his 4.3 bWAR was much lower than some of the other players in the AL.  Regardless, Vaughn was the winner and he would lead the AL in Runs Batted In (126), while hammering 39 Home Runs and having a .300 Batting Average.  Vaughn was an All-Star this year, and would be again twice more.  He played until 2003 and retired with 1,620 Hits and 328 Home Runs.  Vaughn was on the ballot for one year and finished with 1.1% in 2009. Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Juan Gonzalez, AL: Texas Rangers (1996)

One of the most iconic Texas Rangers of all-time, Juan Gonzalez won his first of two MVPs in 1996, and prior to this year, he would win two Home Run Titles (1992 & 1993).  This year, he would have a career-high in taters with 47, and also had 144 RBIs with a .314 Batting Average.  As good as this was, his bWAR was under 4.0, and both Alex Rodriguez and Ken Griffey Jr. double this, meaning that “Juan Gone” was not the best choice this year.  Gonzalez was on the ballot for two years and finished as high as 5.2% in 2011.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Ken Caminiti, NL: San Diego Padres (1996)

Ken Kaminiti was the first MVP from the San Diego Padres, and this season he would post career-highs of 40 Home Runs, 130 Runs Batted IN, a .326 Batting Average and an OPS of 1.028.  None of his offensive stats were league leading, but his advanced stats and traditional stats place him in the hunt for this award. Caminiti was arguably a one-year winder as this was the only season where he would receive an MVP vote.  He played until 2001, and he was a three-time All-Star who retired with 1,710 Hits and 239 Home Runs.  Caminiti was on the ballot for one year and finished with 0.4% in 2007.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Juan Gonzalez, AL: Texas Rangers (2) (1998)

Juan Gonzalez won his second MVP in three years and this season he would lead all American League batters in Doubles (50), and Runs Batted In (157).  He would belt 45 Home Runs with a Slash Line of .318/.366/.630.  Like 1996, bWAR states that there were better candidates for the MVP like Alex Rodriguez or Derek Jeter, but if this was based only on power, this was not a terrible choice.  Gonzalez played until 2005, and had 1,936 Hits with 434 Home Runs.  Gonzalez was on the ballot for two years and finished as high as 5.2% in 2011.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Larry Walker, NL: Colorado Rockies (1997)

Larry Walker was the first Colorado Rockie to win the MVP, and while many believed that the “Coors Field Effect” was in full force, he nevertheless won this award.  The Canadian. Led the National League with 49 Home Runs, a .452 On Base Percentage, a .720 Slugging Percentage and an OPS of 1.172.  He also batted .366 this year.  Overall, he would be a five-time All-Star and would have 2,160 Hits with 383 Home Runs.   Walker has been on the ballot for nine years and finished as high as 54.6% in 2019.  Ranked #10 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Sammy Sosa, NL: Chicago Cubs (1998)

Sammy Sosa was at the height of his popularity in 1998, and this was the year that he and Mark McGwire chased Roger Maris’ single season home run record.  Both of them would break Roger Maris’ 61 Home Runs, McGwire finishing with 70 and Sosa with 66.  McGwire would actually have a higher OBP, Slugging Percentage and bWAR than Sosa, but Sosa had the higher Batting Average, and he would lead the National League in Runs Batted In with 158.  He would have five more top ten finishes in MVP voting, and played until 2007.  He would accumulate 2,408 Hits with 609 Home Runs. Sosa’s association with PEDs has done him no favors with Hall of Fame voters.   Sosa has been on the ballot for nine years and finished as high as 12.5% in 2013.  Ranked #29 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Jason Giambi, AL: Oakland Athletics (2000)

Jason Giambi finished eighth in MVP voting, and in 2000, he would begin his five-year streak of All-Star Games.  Giambi would blast a career-high 43 Home Runs and 137 Runs Batted In, and would lead the AL in On Base Percentage (.476).  Giambi would bat .333 this year with an OPS of 1.123. He would have similar stats the year after, but was denied the MVP to Ichiro Suzuki of the Seattle Mariners. Giambi was 5ththe following season, which was his first as a New York Yankee.  Giambi played until 2014, and he would total 2,010 Hits with 440 Home Runs. Giambi is on his first year of eligibility.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com. 

Jeff Kent, NL: San Francisco Giants (2000)

Jeff Kent would win the National League MVP instead of his teammate, Barry Bonds, who matched up with him very well statistically.  Kent was an All-Star for the second of five occasions and this year he would accumulate 33 Home Runs, 125 RBIs, and a Slash Line of .334/.424/.596; all of which would be career-highs.  Kent played until 2008, and would retire with 2,461 Hits and 377 Home Runs.  Giambi is on his first year of eligibility.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com. 

Barry Bonds, NL: San Francisco Giants (4) (2001)

This was his first MVP in eight years, but it was not like Bonds was not in the conversation.  In five of those years, he finished in the top eight, and was the runner-up in 2001.  This season began the era of unprecedented dominance by a hitter.  Forget the PEDs for a minute.  This time frame was the sickest ever by any hitter, and whether he was juicing or not, there were many in the league who was at this time. Bonds destroyed the single season Home Run record with 73 taters, and he had 137 Runs Batted In.  He batted .328, with National League leading .515 OBP, .863 Slugging Percentage and an OPS of 1.379.  Bonds is currently out of the Hall of Fame due to his name being associated with PEDs.  Bonds has been on the ballot for seven years and finished as high as 59.1% in 2019.  Ranked #2 on Notinalloffame.com.

Miguel Tejada, AL: Oakland Athletics (2002)

Miguel Tejada’s Oakland Athletics went to the 2002 Playoffs, which might be why he won the MVP over Alex Rodriguez or Jim Thome. Still, this was a good year for the Dominican, who would bat .308 with 34 Home Runs with 131 RBIs.  Tejada played until 2013, and had 2,407 Hits with307 Home Runs.  Tejada was on the ballot for one year and received 1.2% of the ballot in 2019.  Ranked #92 on Notinalloffame.com.

Barry Bonds, NL: San Francisco Giants (5) (2002)

Bonds was not going to hit 73 Home Runs, but everyone had decided that the best way to stop Bonds was not to pitch to him. He was intentionally walked 68 times, and still blasted 46 Home Runs with 110 Runs Batted In.  He won his first Batting Title with a .370 Average, and of course he led the NL in On Base Percentage (.582) and Slugging Percentage (.799).  Bonds is currently out of the Hall of Fame due to his name being associated with PEDs. Bonds has been on the ballot for seven years and finished as high as 59.1% in 2019.  Ranked #2 on Notinalloffame.com.

Barry Bonds, NL: San Francisco Giants (6) (2003)

In his third year of destruction, Bonds had 45 Home Runs and batted .341, with league leading .529 in On Base Percentage and a .749 Slugging Percentage.  Imagine how good he was at this time, when this was arguably his worst year of the four! Bonds is currently out of the Hall of Fame due to his name being associated with PEDs.  Bonds has been on the ballot for seven years and finished as high as 59.1% in 2019.  Ranked #2 on Notinalloffame.com.

Barry Bonds, NL: San Francisco Giants (7) (2004)

Barry Bonds was walked 232 times this season with 120 of them being intentional.  Those are single season records, which will never be touched.  He had 45 Home Runs, 101 Runs Batted In, and won his second Batting Title with a .362 Average.  He also set the single season record in OnBase Percentage with .609, a number that will likely never be topped.  Bonds missed most of 2005 due to injury and returned to approach nearly 500 Plate Appearances in the two years after.  That was 2007 when his contract with the Giants expired and no team decided to pursue Bonds as the was being targeted for PED use by the federal government. He ended his career with the all-time record in Home Runs (762) and Walks (2,558), and had 2,935 Hits with a career Slash Line of .298/.44/.607. Bonds is currently out of the Hall of Fame due to his name being associated with PEDs.  Bonds has been on the ballot for seven years and finished as high as 59.1% in 2019.  Ranked #2 on Notinalloffame.com.

Let’s update our tally, shall we?

Award in Question

Percentage of recipients who have entered the HOF

Percentage of recipients by year who have entered the HOF.

NBA MVP

100%

100%

NHL Norris

90.5%

96.4%

NBA All Star Game MVP

89.5%

91.7%

NHL Conn Smythe

74.2%

85.4%

NFL AP Offensive Player of the Year

73.1%

79.4%

NHL Lady Byng

63.8%

76.0%

NFL Defensive Player of the Year

60.8%

71.1%

NFL Super Bowl MVP

60.6%

64.9%

NBA Defensive Player of the Year

58.3%

56.5%

NBA Rookie of the Year

56.5%

56.5%

MLB MVP

55.0%

60.2%

NFL Pro Bowl MVP

52.3%

54.8%

MLB Lou Gehrig Award

51.9%

51.9%

MLB Roberto Clemente Award

47.4%

47.4%

MLB/NL/AL Cy Young Award

44.4%

55.4%

MLB Babe Ruth Award

37.0%

39.3%

NHL Frank J. Selke Trophy

33.3%

36.7%

MLB Hutch Award

33.1%

33.1%

NFL Offensive Rookie of the Year

28.6%

28.6%

NHL Bill Masterton Memorial Trophy

27.9%

27.9%

MLB Edgar Martinez Award

26.7%

17.2%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Designated Hitter)

25.0%

30.8%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Shortstop)

23.5%

52.6%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove

21.7%

36.8%

NFL Defensive Rookie of the Year

20.6%

20.6%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Catcher)

20.0%

22.5%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Second Base)

18.8%

39.8%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Shortstop)

18.2%

35.1%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Pitcher)

18.2%

20.1%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Second Base)

16.7%

32.7%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Outfield)

16.7%

30.1%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Outfield)

15.7%

25.2%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Third Base)

14.3%

14.3%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Third Base)

13.6%

14.3%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (First Base)

13.6%

13.3%

MLB (NL/AL) Rookie of the Year

13.3%

13.3%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Catcher)

10.3%

15.2%

NBA Most Improved Player of the Year

5.3%

3.2%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (First Base)

3.8%

3.2%

NFL AP Comeback Player of the Year

0.0%

0.0%

So, who is up next?

The following are the players who have won the MVP in Major League Baseball who have retired but have not met the mandatory years out of the game to qualify for the Baseball Hall of Fame:

Ichiro Suzuki, AL Seattle Mariners, (2001) 

Ichiro Suzuki was already a longtime superstar in Japan, and he signed with the Seattle Mariners for the 2001 season.  He became the first Japanese player to win an MVP, and the second player to win the MVP in the same season that he won the Rookie of the Year.  This season, he won his first of two Batting Titles, was the American League leader in Hits for the first of what would be seven times, and he also led the league in Stolen Bases.  This year also began his streak of ten All-Star Games.  Suzuki played until 2019, and amassed an incredible 3,089 Hits. Eligible for the Hall of Fame in 2025.

Alex Rodriguez, AL Texas Rangers, (2003) 

This was the third and final season that Alex Rodriguez was with the Texas Rangers, and by this point he had finished as the runner-up twice before, and based on advanced metrics, he probably should have won an MVP already.  A-Rod’s ’03 season would see him hammer 47 Home Runs and 118 Runs Batted In, and he led the AL in Slugging Percentage with .600.  The Infielder would win his second and last Gold Glove this year.  Eligible for the Hall of Fame in 2022.

Alex Rodriguez, AL New York Yankees (2) (2005) 

In his second season with the Yankees, Rodriguez would win his fourth Home Run Title (48), and would have 130 Runs Batted In. This would also be the fourth year he would lead the league in Runs Scored (124).  He also led the AL in Slugging Percentage (.610) and OPS (1.037). We have one more year of A-Rod to get to, so brace yourself!  Eligible for the Hall of Fame in 2022.

Justin Morneau, AL Minnesota Twins (2006) 

Justin Morneau would have his breakout season in 2006, and the Minnesota Twin First Baseman would put up career-best numbers in Home Runs (34), Runs Batted In (139), and Batting Average (.321).  He would be named to the All-Star Team in the next four years.  He played until 2016, and retired with 1,603 Hits and 247 Home Runs.  Eligible for the Hall of Fame in 2022.

Ryan Howard, NL Philadelphia Phillies (2006) 

Ryan Howard was the National League Rookie of the Year in 2005, and in 2006 he blasted a National League leading 58 Home Runs with 149 Runs Batted In.  He would also post career-bests in the Slash Line (.313/.425/.659).  Howard won the Home Run title again in 2008, and took the Phillies to a World Series win.  In a career spent entirely with the Phillies, Howard belted 382 Home Runs, but only had a career bWAR of 15.0 due to his horrible defense.  Eligible for the Hall of Fame in 2022.

Alex Rodriguez, AL New York Yankees (3) (2007) 

This was the third and final MVP for Alex Rodriguez and in terms of stats there was no better regular season for A-Rod.  This year, he would win his fifth and final Home Run Title with 564 taters, and set a personal high with 156 Runs Batted IN, which also led the American League.  His .648 Slugging Percentage an 1.067 OPS would also finish first in the AL, and again would be personal highs for Rodriguez.  While Rodriguez would be criticized for his post-season play, he would lead New York to a World Series Title in 2009.  Rodriguez played until 2016, and would accumulate 3,115 Hits with 696 Home Runs and ten Silver Sluggers.  As he was suspended for PED use, his Hall of Fame candidacy is in doubt. Eligible for the Hall of Fame in 2022.

Jimmy Rollins, NL Philadelphia Phillies (2007) 

For the second year in a row, a Philadelphia Phillie won the MVP, as Jimmy Rollins followed his teammate, Ryan Howard in winning this award.  Rollins batted .296 with 139 Runs, 20 Triples, 30 Home Runs and 94 RBIs, all of which were career-highs.  Rollins and Howard would lead the Phillies to a World Series win in 2008.  Rollins would play until 2016, and managed to collect 2,455 Hits with 231 Home Runs.  Eligible for the Hall of Fame in 2022.

Joe Mauer, AL Minnesota Twins (2009) 

Playing his entire career with the Minnesota Twins had two previous top ten finishes in MVP voting and would have another one following his 2009 win.  The six-time All-Star won his third Batting Title in 2009 (.365), and would also lead the American League batters in On Base Percentage (.444), Slugging Percentage (.587) and OPS (1.031), and he would give career-highs in Home Runs (28) and Runs Batted In (96).  Mauer played until 2018, and would have 2,123 Hits with a career Batting Average of .306.  Eligible for the Hall of Fame in 2024.

Josh Hamilton, AL Texas Rangers (2010) 

Josh Hamilton had a long road to the MVP as the highly touted prospect fell under the spell of drugs and alcohol.  It took him a while to get clean and he did not make the Majors until he was 26.  Hamilton joined the Texas Rangers in 2008, where he played five seasons and was an All-Star in each of them.  2010 was his best year where he won the Batting Title (.359), Slugging Title (.633) and OPS Title (1.044), and he would have 32 Home Runs and 100 RBIs.  Hamilton did not play the mandatory ten seasons for the Hall, so he is unlikely to find a place on the ballot unless they give him a Kirby Puckett exemption.  Eligible for the Hall of Fame in 2021 should they allow him on the ballot.

The following are the players who have won the MVP who are still active.

Albert Pujols, NL St. Louis Cardinals (2005)

After finishing in the top three in MVP voting in the three years before Albert Pujols finally won his first Most Valuable Player Award.  This season, he would lead the National League in Runs Scored with 129, and had 41 Home Runs with 117 RBIs.  The Cardinal also batted .330 with an OPS of 1.039.  40 Years Old, Playing for the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim.

Dustin Pedroia, AL Boston Red Sox (2008)

Dustin Pedroia won the 2007 Rookie of the Year and also won the World Series.  Pretty hard to top that, but Pedroia did by winning the American League MVP in 2008.  The Second Baseman finished first in the AL in Runs Scored (118), Hits (213) and Doubles (54), and he would bat .326 with 17 Home Runs.  He also won the Silver Slugger and Gold Glove this year.  36 Years Old, Playing for the Boston Red Sox.

Albert Pujols, NL St. Louis Cardinals (2) (2008)

In between his fist MVP and his second one, Albert Pujols was finished second and ninth respectively, and in this 37 Home Run campaign, he would lead the National League in Slugging Percentage (.653) and OPS (1.114).  The latter stat would be a career-best.  40 Years Old, Playing for the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim.

Albert Pujols, NL St. Louis Cardinals (3) (2009)

This was the first season where Albert Pujols would lead the National League in Home Runs with 47 Home Runs, and he would also have 135 Runs Batted In.  While batting .327, he would lead the NL in On Base Percentage with .443 and it was his third year finishing first in Slugging (.658) and OPS (1.101).  40 Years Old, Playing for the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim.

Joey Votto, NL Cincinnati Reds (2010)

The Canadian First Baseman already proved himself to be an excellent batter, and this season he would win the first of seven On-Base Percentage Titles and his lone Slugging Title.  He had career-highs in Home Runs (37) and Runs Batted In (113) and went to his first of six All-Star Games.  36 Years Old, Playing for the Cincinnati Reds.

Justin Verlander, AL Detroit Tigers (2011)

Justin Verlander’s Detroit Tigers would make the playoffs this year, and he would also win the first of two Cy Youngs. Verlander would later win the World Series with the Houston Astros in 2017.  This year he went 24-5 and won the ERA Title (2.40), WHIP Title (0.920) and led the league in Strikeouts (250).  36 Years Old, Playing for the Cincinnati Reds.

Ryan Braun, NL Milwaukee Brewers (2011)

Ryan Braun was the 2007 National League Rookie of the Year, and this year he would belt 33 Home Runs with 111 RBIs, and a Slash Line of .332/.397/.597.  His Slugging Percentage was league leading.  He would finish second in MVP voting the year after.  36 Years Old, Playing for the Milwaukee Brewers.

Miguel Cabrera, AL Detroit Tigers (2012)

Miguel Cabrera made history as the first Venezuelan to win the MVP.  This year he won his second Home Run Title (44), and second RBI Title (139), and also his second Batting Title (.330).  Cabrera would also lead the AL in Slugging Percentage (.606), and he took his Tigers to the World Series.  37 Years Old, Playing for the Detroit Tigers.

Buster Posey, NL San Francisco Giants (2012)

Buster Posey was the National League Rookie of the Year in 2010, the same season that he aided the Giants in winning the World Series. This year, he won the Batting Title (.336) with 24 Home Runs, 103 Runs Batted In, and a 408 On Base Percentage. Posey would go the All-Star Game this year (his first of six), and he won his second World Series Ring.  Two years later, Posey and Giants won the World Series again.  32 Years Old, Playing for the San Francisco Giants.

Miguel Cabrera, AL Detroit Tigers (2) (2013)

Cabrera went back-to-back with the MVP with another 44 Home Run Year, and his third Batting Title (.348).  Cabrera also led the AL with On Base Percentage (.442), Slugging (.636) and had the best OPS of his career (1.078).  Cabrera again took the Tigers to the playoffs.  37 Years Old, Playing for the Detroit Tigers.

Andrew McCutcheon, NL Pittsburgh Pirates (2013)

The MVP season of Andrew McCutcheon happened right in the middle of his five-year run of All-Star Games, and was also sandwiched between third place finished for the MVP.  This season, the Pirates Outfielder would have 21 Home Runs with 86 RBIS and a Slash Line of .317/.404/.508.  33 Years Old, Playing for the Philadelphia Phillies.

Mike Trout, AL Los Angeles Angels (2014)

Two seasons prior, Mike Trout won the Rookie of the Year, and was also the runner-up for the MVP.  He was the runner-up again last season, and he would finish first in 2014.  This year he would have 36 Home Runs with a Slash Line of .287/.377/.561.  He would also lead the AL in Runs Batted In with 111.  28 Years Old, Playing for the Los Angeles Angels.

Clayton Kershaw, NL Los Angeles Dodgers (2014)

Clayton Kershaw was already entrenched as the best Pitcher in the National League, and in 2014, he would win his third Cy Young in a four-year span.  This season, Kershaw went 21-3, and led the NL with a 1.77 ERA, the fourth year that he would win the ERA crown.  He would record 239 Strikeouts and had a WHIP of 0.857, which resulted in his fourth consecutive NL lead in that category.  32 Years Old, Playing for the Los Angeles Dodgers.

Josh Donaldson, AL Toronto Blue Jays (2015)

Josh Donaldson finished eighth in MVP voting the year before in what would be his last season in Oakland.  The Toronto Blue Jays would trade for him, and he would put forth his best year in Baseball.  The Third Baseman would lead the American League in Runs (122), and RBIs (123) and would also belt 41 Home Runs with a .297 Batting Average.  34 Years Old, Playing for the Atlanta Braves.

Bryce Harper, NL Washington Nationals (2015)

Bryce Harper was the 2012 Rookie of the Year, and three years later Harper would win the MVP with the Nationals.  He would finish first in the NL in Runs Scored (118), Home Runs (42), On Base Percentage (.460), Slugging Percentage (.649), and he batted .330.  He would also win the Silver Slugger in 2015. 27 Years Old, Playing for the Philadelphia Phillies.

Mike Trout, AL Los Angeles Angels (2) (2016)

After winning his first MVP in 2014, he was second in MVP voting in 2015, which was the third time that happened.  Trout again ascended to the top winning his first On Base Percentage Title (.441), while batting .315 and hitting 29 Home Runs with 100 Runs Batted In and 30 Stolen Bases.  He would also lead the league in Runs Scored (123).  28 Years Old, Playing for the Los Angeles Angels.

Kris Bryant, NL Chicago Cubs (2016)

Having a better first two years than Kris Bryant is pretty hard to do.  He won the Rookie of the Year Award in 2015, and was the MVP in 2016.  That season, he would finish first in Runs Scored (121), blasted 39 Home Runs and batted .292.  More importantly, he led the Chicago Cubs to their first World Series in over a century.  It doesn’t get better than that.  28 Years Old, Playing for the Chicago Cubs.

Jose Altuve, AL Houston Astros (2017)

2017 was a special season for Jose Altuve, who had already established himself as an MVP contender with a third place MVP finish in 2016.  In 2017, Altuve led the NL in Hits for the fourth year in a row, and he won his third Batting Title with a .346 metric.  Altuve had 24 Home Runs with a .410 OBP.  He would lead the Astros to their first World Series Championship.  30 Years Old, Playing for the Houston Astros.

Giancarlo Stanton, NL Miami Marlins (2017)

Giancarlo Stanton finished second in MVP voting in 2014, and in 2017 he had the eyes of the baseball world when he belted 59 Home Runs and 132 Runs Batted In, both of which would lead the NL.  Stanton would also bat .281 with a Slugging Percentage of .631.  This was his last season in Florida as he was traded to the New York Yankees in the off-season.  30 Years Old, Playing for the New York Yankees.

Mookie Betts, AL Boston Red Sox (2018)

Mookie Betts was sixth in MVP voting the year before and in 2018, he would win the MVP, with his first Batting Title (.346), Slugging Title (.640), and would blast 32 Home Runs.  Betts also won the Gold Glove, and Silver Slugger, and would lead his team to the World Series Championship.  27 Years Old, Playing for the Boston Red Sox.

Christian Yelich, NL Milwaukee Brewers (2018)

Christian Yelich was a very good player for the Miami Marlins, but in their restructuring, he was dealt to the Milwaukee Brewers.  Yelich responded with by winning he Batting Title (.326), Slugging Title (.598), and had 36 Home Runs and 110 RBIs.  He would take Milwaukee to the NLCS that year, and he was the runner-up for the MVP the season after.  28 Years Old, Playing for the Milwaukee Brewers.

Cody Bellinger, NL Los Angeles Dodgers (2019)

Cody Bellinger was the 2017 National League Rookie of the Year, and he would win the MVP, though arguably had Christian Yelich not gone injured late in the year, it likely would have gone to him.  Bellinger had 47 Home Runs, 115 RBIs, with a Slash Line of .305/.406/.629.  24 Years Old, Playing for the Los Angeles Dodgers.

Mike Trout, AL Los Angeles Angels (3) (2019)

In the two seasons between Mike Trout’s second and third MVP, he would finish fourth and second in MVP voting.  In 2019, Trout secured his fourth consecutive OBP Title (.438), and his third Slugging Title (.645).  This coincided with his fourth and third straight OPS title (1.083), and he was named an All-Star for the eighth consecutive year.   28 Years Old, Playing for the Los Angeles Angels.

The MVP has generated a few surprises, but for the most part, it is a great determiner of Hall of Fame potential.

We will go back to the ice and look at the Vezina Trophy, the award for the best goalie in the National Hockey League.

As always, we thank you for that support and look for that soon!

With two weeks to go in the NFL regular season the playoff picture is starting to take shape.  While 12 teams make the NFL post-season, the sportsbooks and online casino pa are looking fairly steady in their picks and it is safe to say that only seven of them appear to be considered top contenders to hoist the Lombardi Trophy in early February.

The team of the moment is the Baltimore Ravens.  Led by their Quarterback, and likely MVP, Lamar Jackson, the Ravens currently hold the NFL’s best record and are on a ten-game win streak. Baltimore had the most Pro Bowl selections with 12, and Jackson has already set the single-season rushing record by a QB.  While they have no glaring weakness, this is not a team with a top option in their receiving core, and their playoff performance last year left little to be desired.  Still, this is the team that most pundits feel should win the AFC Championship. But it won’t be easy.

The New England Patriots are closing in on their eleventh straight AFC East Title, and they are defending Super Bowl Champions, and have won three in the last five years.  While their Quarterback, Tom Brady, has shown the signs of age this season, this is the most successful football player ever, who is still paired with Head Coach, Bill Belichick.  There is no tandem in football that has more playoff savvy, and if any team can overcome a deficiency, it is New England.

Last year’s MVP, Quarterback, Patrick Mahomes will lead his Kansas City Chiefs back to the playoffs.  While everyone is in agreement that the Chiefs offense with Mahomes, Tight End, Travis Kelce, and Wide Receiver, Tyreke Hill are the most exciting, their defense has been mediocre, and they have to outshoot every opponent.  It makes for exciting football, but it is a recipe that rarely translates into a Super Bowl win.

The Buffalo Bills have also qualified for the playoffs, but as good as their defense is, their offense is not explosive enough to make it to the big game. Other AFC contenders include Pittsburgh, Tennessee and Houston, but all three have been inconsistent through the season, and will be lucky to win a game in the playoffs, let alone advance to Super Bowl LIV.

The NFC seems far more wide open.  Weeks ago, it appeared that the San Francisco 49ers had the inside track to represent the NFC.  They still might, but as of this writing, they are no longer leading their division, as the Seattle Seahawks hold that spot, but while the Niners have faltered of late, they are a balanced team with a lot to prove.

As for Seattle, while they aren’t “sleepless”, but many have been “sleeping” on them due to the focus on San Francisco.  Quarterback, Russell Wilson has already taken Seattle to two Super Bowls, winning one of them, and their week 17 game against the 49ers could decide the who gets the top seed.  No doubt that Seahawk’s head coach, Pete Carroll, still has a chip on his shoulder from losing on the last play of the game on Super Bowl XLIX.  

Another contender is the New Orleans Saints, who still feel robbed from the non-pass interference call that cost them a Super Bowl appearance last year. No team has more motivation to win it all than the Saints, and they would love to do it in the year where their Quarterback, Drew Brees overtook Peyton Manning as the all-time leader in Touchdown Passes.  Brees already has a Super Bowl Ring, but his biggest weapon, Wide Receiver, Michael Thomas does not.  He is a possible contender for the MVP, and if he does not win it, the chance to hold the Lombardi Trophy will be all the consolation he needs.

The NFC Central is still up for grabs, but most eyes are on the Green Bay Packers to take the division.  Green Bay’s QB, Aaron Rodgers, was just chosen for his eighth Pro Bowl, and while he has not received the attention he used to due to the emergence of Jackson, Mahomes and DeShaun Watson of the Houston Texans, he is without question the elite pivot in the division.  That division could still go the Minnesota Vikings, but despite them likely to return to the post-season, their Quarterback, Kirk Cousins is not considered to be at the level required in this era to win it all.

As for the NFC East, nobody (including us) thinks that the winner of the division, be it the Dallas Cowboys or Philadelphia Eagles will represent the conference.

The road to this year’s Super Bowl is far from clear, but as always it is fun. We will be watching and placing our bets.  We just won’t say on who!

I drink.  I know things.  

The more I drink, the smarter I feel, and rather than use this knowledge to solve climate change or the geopolitical situation in the Middle East, I choose instead to reflect on the pop culture of my youth.

With that I present to you my latest “10 Drunken Observations” column, which is today on the 1984 film, “Revenge of the Nerds”.

I was a kid when this first came out, so along with other college romp films, my view of what college life was severely skewed.  Also, since I myself was a nerd, how could I not love this film, just on the title alone?

I did, I still do, but this film aged so badly.

Crack open a cold one, and here are my 10 Drunken Observations.

Following on from a successful Major League Baseball two-game series in June this year, Bill DeWitt III, president of the St Louis Cardinals, has expressed his optimism about the future of the league in London. When asked about the future of the games on November 11th, DeWitt commented that “I think the first step is games over there. This is the second year back. I think if you see significant enthusiasm again, which you should, MLB might extend [the London Series] into a regular thing.”

Golden State Warriors or Boston Celtics: Who Has a Better Chance

The Golden State Warriors were outshined by the Los Angeles Lakers and the Los Angeles Clippers this offseason. Both in the media and on the NBA odds boards. With Kyrie gone –and a handful of others–  the Celtics got ignored as well.

Let’s compare the two teams and have a look at their odds to win the NBA title as well as the Eastern and Western Conference Championships and determine if they are getting too much love or too much shade. And of course, who is more worthy of the probability and odds given – remember to check this Intertops review before getting into the futures action.

Recent History

As of Monday, the Celtics are sitting just outside of the top-10 with regards to their offense. Boston is putting up 113.13 points per game and has managed to regain its status as one of the league’s elite defensive units. Currently, the Celtics are No. 5 in the league in points allowed at just 103.75 and are also No. 5 in the league in field goal percentage at 41.77. They are also in the top 10 – No. 8–  in free throw percentage. 

After losing their opening matchup loss against the Philadelphia 76ers, they have gone on a tear, smashing their way through the Toronto Raptors, Milwaukee Bucks, NY Knicks twice, the Charlotte Hornets, and San Antonio Spurs for seven straight wins.  

On Monday they host the Dallas Mavericks and are coming in as -3.5 point favorites. So if you are to believe the odds, they will increase their run to an 8-game winning streak before Tuesday. 

Even with Klay Thompson out for the foreseeable future, the Golden State Warriors started the season with decent odds to win the NBA title, albeit, behind the LA Clippers and LA Lakers. But the injury to Steph Curry has recently made the Golden State Warriors odds drop like a little kid holding a hot potato. Prior to the injury, the Warriors were around +1200 to win the Championship. However, now they have fallen to +5000 or 50 to 1. This is a huge drop. 

Faith in the Warriors has fallen so hard that they are coming into their Monday matchup against the Utah Jazz as double-digit underdogs. This is a complete role reversal for the Dubs. Their season start is almost the exact opposite of the Celtics. GSW has only won two games so far this season and is on a three-game losing streak. Even without the brothers splash … the Warriors offense isn’t terrible. They rank No. 14 for scoring in the NBA and are the best free-throw shooting team in the league. But they have no defensive identity at the moment. The Warriors rank No. 29th overall on defense, mostly due to their horrible road performances. At home they only marginally improve, allowing 120 per game for the 26th worst home defense in the league. So, it’s clear that Curry and Thompson provide more than just offensive fire-power. They give the Dubs leadership and fantastic perimeter defense.

Odds vs. Power Rankings

The Boston Celtics have taken the No. 6 spot on TeamRankings predictive power rankings. On the Las Vegas odds boards, they are No. 8 in line behind the Nuggets, Jazz, Rockets, Rockets, Sixers, Bucks, and both LAs. 

The Warriors are in 12th place on the NBA odds boards but the predictive algorithms have the Warriors way back at 21st. This makes sense given the fact that their overall defense scoring statistic is No. 29 in the league. So, how do we reconcile the fact that they have the 12th best odds on the board? Well, they are Golden State and Curry will be back, perhaps in time for a run at the playoffs. If they get into the post-season, who knows what happens. Still, I feel they are massively overvalued at the moment. Meanwhile, the Celtics are right about where they should be. Perhaps a tad bit undervalued given the fact that they keep winning. That said, there is a lot of season left, and both of these teams have lot to prove over the next few months.

With the announcement of the Modern Era candidates for the Baseball Hall of Fame, it is now time for us to look at the upcoming ballot for the Baseball Writers, who will be voting for the Class of 2020.

What we know so far, is that there is no way that this will be an empty class.  We have a sure-fire first ballot inductee in Derek Jeter, who with his 3,465 career Hits, a career Batting Average of .310 and five-time World Series Champion could become the second former player following Mariano Rivera, to receive a unanimous vote.  Should that happen, it will mark a back-to-back of two former New York Yankees teammates earning that distinction.

Last year, Curt Schilling received 60.9% of the vote last year in a very strong field (especially for pitchers) says Paruk from SportsBettingDime.com.  Less tainted by PEDS than the likes of Roger Clemens and Barry Bonds, Schilling should crack 75% if the outspoken Trump supporter doesn’t rub writers the wrong way in the next couple months.

As for Bonds and Clemens, they are both entering their eighth year of eligibility.  What once was thought as an impossible mountain to climb, the two stars both approached 60% last year.  While enshrinement this year seems unlikely, a continued rise could bode well for them in the next two years.

As for us, the one we are looking at the most is Larry Walker.  The Canadian slugger seemed to have no chance for Cooperstown a year ago, but he rocketed from 34.1% to 54.6% last year, and with him facing his final year of eligibility, we could see the first player inducted with a Colorado Rockies cap.

One thing, we know for sure is that we will be paying attention!a

 

We here at Notinhalloffame.com thought it would be fun to take a look at the major awards in North American team sports and see how it translates into Hall of Fame potential.

Needless to say, different awards in different sports yield hall of fame potential.  In basketball, the team sport with the least number of players on a roster, the dividend for greatness much higher.  In baseball, it is not as much as a great individual season does not have the same impact.

After the last three focused on awards issued in the NFL, we are returning to the National Hockey League and the Bill Masterton Memorial Trophy.

This is a very unique award that does not necessarily reflect on-ice accomplishments.  It was created to honor Bill Masterton of the Minnesota North Stars, who died on January 15, 1968 after sustaining an injury during a game.  The Award is given to the player who best exemplifies the quality of perseverance, sportsmanship and dedication to hockey.  Each NHL team nominates one player from their team for the accolade.

Generally, the player who wins this award usually comes back from a serious injury or any other ailment that could be career-threatening.  

So how many players have won the Bill Masterton Memorial Trophy have been enshrined to the Hockey Hall of Fame?

Let’s find out!

The following are the past players who have won the Bill Masterton Memorial Award in the NHL who are eligible for the Hockey Hall of Fame and have been enshrined.

Jean Ratelle, New York Rangers (1971)

Ratelle was one of the cleanest players in hockey and was also one of the classiest.  This was like a lifetime achievement award, even though his career was only in the mid-way mark.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1985.

Bobby Clarke, Philadelphia Flyers (1972)

Considering Bobby Clarke was only 22 when he won this, it would not start a trend where young players would win the Masterton. In 1972, Clarke was a rising star and had overcome diabetes to play at a high level.  He would become an elite player shortly after and also a three-time Hart Trophy winner and two-time Stanley Cup Champion.  Clarke also became the first Bill Masterton Memorial Trophy winner who would also win the Hart at one time in his career.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1987.

Henri Richard, Montreal Canadiens (1974)

This was viewed as a bit of a lifetime achievement award for Henri Richard’s whose career was nearing the end.  “The Pocket Rocket” would end up winning a whopping 11 Stanley Cups in a career spent entirely with Montreal.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1979.

Rod Gilbert, New York Rangers (1976)

Gilbert played his entire career with the Rangers and this was near the end of it.  The forward scored 1,021 Points and he overcame a back injury early in his career. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1982.

Serge Savard, Montreal Canadiens (1979)

Serge Savard won his eight Stanley Cup with the Habs this year and he was also a Second Team All-Star this year, the only time he earned this honor.  The Defenseman was the first Bill Masterton Memorial Award winner to be named a post season NHL All-Star.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1986.

Lanny McDonald, Calgary Flames (1983)

McDonald was one of the most popular players with fans and teammates alike and this was his greatest season in terms of stats. McDonald would score 66 Goals and 98 Points, both career-highs and he would be named a Second Team All-Star, which was the first time he earned a post season All-Star accolade.  In his final season, he would win the Stanley Cup with the Flames.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1992.

Brad Park, Detroit Red Wings (1984)

This was Brad Park’s first season in Detroit, and his penultimate campaign in the NHL.  He was one the more beloved players in the league, and was still a strong performer as he had 58 Points this year.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1988.

Mario Lemieux, Pittsburgh Penguins (1993)

Choosing Mario Lemieux had to be the easiest decision in this award’s history.  Lemieux came back to hockey after contracting Hodgkin’s lymphoma, and despite missing 22 Games, he would win the Hart Trophy. Ted Lindsay Award and Art Ross Trophy. No other player who won the Bill Masterton award has a year this good in the same campaign.   Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1997.

Cam Neely, Boston Bruins (1994)

Cam Neely had injury upon injury pile up and he only played 22 Games in 1991-92 and 1992-93 combined.  He came during this year and scored 50 Goals, while only playing 49 Games and he would be named a Second Team All-Star.  He would only be able to play 89 Games more in the NHL and he had to retire at the age of 30.  Neely went down in history as one of the most popular Bruins players ever, which says a lot when you think of all the legends who wore the “B”.   Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2005.

Pat LaFontaine, Buffalo Sabres (1995)

In the year prior, Pat LaFontaine suffered a severe concussion and the post-concussion syndrome forced him to miss most of that season and this season.  He returned to play 22 Games and scored 27 Points.  LaFontaine would later suffer more concussions and would be forced to retire in 1998.   Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2005.

Steve Yzerman, Detroit Red Wings (2003)

By this point in his career, Steve Yzerman had already won three Stanley Cups but he suffered a massive knee injury, and would have a knee realignment done.  The Red Wing would come back to play 16 Games this year.  Yzerman would play two more seasons and would score 1,755 Points in his Hall of Fame career.   Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2009.

Teemu Selanne, Mighty Ducks of Anaheim (2006)

This was a true comeback year for Teemu Selanne in every sense of the word.  Selanne recovered from knee surgery to have a 90 Point campaign, which was the first time he reached that plateau in seven years.  Selanne would have a 94 point year the season after and would take the Ducks to win the Stanley Cup   Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2017.

 

The following are the players who have won the Bill Masterton Memorial Award in the NHL who are eligible for the Hockey Hall of Fame and have not been selected:

Claude Provost, Montreal Canadiens (1968)

Claude Provost was one of the best two-way players of his day, and in 1968, he was nearing the end of his career.  This year, Provost had won his eighth of nine Stanley Cups, and he would play two more seasons in the NHL  Ranked #12 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Ted Hampson, Oakland Seals (1969)

After an injury riddled 1967-68 season, Oakland Seals’ Team Captain, Ted Hampson responded with the best year of his career with a 75 Point outage.  He would later win the Paul Deneau Award in the WHA as that league’s most gentlemanly player.  Hampson combined NHL/WHA career would see him accumulate 556 Points.  Unrankedon Notinhalloffame.com

Pit Martin, Chicago Blackhawks (1970)

While Pit Martin was not the best player on the Chicago Blackhawks, he was the heartbeat of the team.  Martin helped Chicago go from worst to first that year and he would score 63 Points as well post his first (of three) 30 Goal seasons. Ranked #126on Notinhalloffame.com.

Lowell McDonald, Pittsburgh Penguins (1973)

Lowell McDonald only played 10 Games in the year before due to severe cartilage damage to his knees.  The 1972-73 Season campaign saw the Penguin score 75 Points, which was then a record for him.  He would score 390 Points over 506 NHL Games.  Unrankedon Notinhalloffame.com

Don Luce, Buffalo Sabres (1975)

This was the best season that Don Luce ever had as his 33 Goals and 76 Points were a career-high.  Luce scored 526 Points over his career and he would finish in the top ten in Frank J. Selke Award three times.  This was the only award that Luce would win.  Unrankedon Notinhalloffame.com

Ed Westfall, New York Islanders (1977)

Westfall would win this award for being one of the great on-ice leaders of the game, and this occurred late in his career. Westfall won two Stanley Cups earlier with the Boston Bruins.  Unrankedon Notinhalloffame.com

Butch Goring, Los Angeles Kings (1978)

Goring would win this based on carving out a successful NHL career despite being slight in stature.  Goring would win the Lady Byng Trophy, making him the first Masterton winner to secure a second award in the same year.  He would later join the New York Islanders and would win four Stanley Cups.  Ranked #38 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Al MacAdam, Minnesota North Stars (1980)

MacAdam was a gritty player who in 1979-80 would post his best career numbers.  That year he would 42 Goals, 51 Assists and 93 Points, all career-highs, as was his +36. Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com

Blake Dunlop, St. Louis Blues (1981)

This was Dunlop’s breakout year, where had 67 Assists and 87 Points, both of which were career-highs.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com

Glenn Resch, Colorado Rockies (1982)

The Colorado Rockies of the NHL were never any good, but Glenn Resch brought them respectability.  He had previously been a Second Team All-Star twice and a two-time Stanley Cup Champion with the New York Islanders.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com

Anders Hedberg, New York Rangers (1985)

Anders Hedberg became the first European to win this award and he was an initial trailblazer for showing the NHL that Swedish players could compete at an elite level in North America.  This was Hedberg’s final season in the NHL, and he would score 51 Points, and 855 in the NHL and WHA combined.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com

Charlie Simmer, Boston Bruins (1986)

Charlie Simmer scored 60 Points this year and he remained a good NHL sniper despite having extensive ligament damage.  He was a former two-time First Team All-Star and would put the puck in the net 342 times over his career.  Ranked #112 on Notinhalloffame.com

Doug Jarvis, Hartford Whalers (1987)

This was a special season where Doug Jarvis would break the record of consecutive games of 915 Games.  He would eventually play 964 Games in a row.  Ranked #70 on Notinhalloffame.com

Bob Bourne, Los Angeles Kings (1988)

This was the final season of Bob Bourne’s career, and 14thoverall.  Bourne had previously won four Stanley Cups with the New York Islanders and would score 582 Points overall.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com

Tim Kerr, Philadelphia Flyers (1989)

From 1983-84 to 1986-87, Tim Kerr was a 50 Goal scorer but in 1987-88, he was only able to play eight games due to knee and shoulder issues.  He bounced back this season to score 48 Goals.  Ranked #67 on Notinhalloffame.com

Gord Kluzak, Boston Bruins (1990)

Gord Kluzak was the first overall draft pick in 1982, and for the first few years the blueliner was the shutdown blueliner they expected him to be.  Sadly, he suffered knee injury after knee injury and in 1988-89 he was only able to play three Games.  This year, he fought back, but knee surgeries held him to only eight games, but the fact that he played at all was bordered on miraculous.  He played two more games and after his tenth knee surgery, he had to call it a career.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com

Dave Taylor, Los Angeles Kings (1991)

Dave Taylor spent all of his 17 years in the National Hockey League with the Los Angeles Kings.  This was year 14.  Taylor was one of the most respected players in hockey and he also won the King Clancy Award this year, making him the first to win both in the same season.  Ranked #20 on Notinhalloffame.com

Mark Fitzpatrick, New York Islanders (1992)

Mark Fitzpatrick missed most of the previous campaign due to Eosinophilia-myalgia, a potentially fatal neural disease.  He would come back to play 30 games in net for the Isles this year.  He would play until the 1999-00 Season.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com

Gary Roberts, Calgary Flames (1996)

Gary Roberts would suffer nerve issues with his neck that caused him to miss most of the 1994-95 season and he was only able to play 35 Games this year.  In what could have been a career ending injury, Roberts continued to play more than a decade more until he was 42.  Ranked #74 on Notinhalloffame.com

Tony Granato, San Jose Sharks (1997)

Tony Granato would have a head injury in a game on January of 1996 that was so bad that he suffered bleeding in the left lobe of his brain.  He would come back to hockey after brain surgery where the Shark would have a 40 Point campaign.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com

Jamie McLennan, St. Louis Blues (1998)

Jamie McLennan was playing for the New York Islanders and he would suffer from bacterial meningitis that would be life threatening.  McLennan missed a lot of time and he would come back to the NHL with St. Louis where he played 30 Games with a 2.17 GAA.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com

John Cullen, Tampa Bay Lightning (1999)

The career of John Cullen seemed to end when he contacted non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma in 1997.  The Center had to sit out the 1997-98 season but he managed to come back to the NHL and was in four Games for the Lightning that year, before he would retire for good.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com

Kan Daneyko, New Jersey Devils (2000)

Ken Daneyko did not come back from an injury, but he did battle alcoholism, which likely kept him in the NHL.  Daneyko had a long career in hockey, with all 20 seasons being served in a New Jersey Devils jersey.  He would win three Stanley Cups over his career.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com

Adam Graves, New York Rangers (2001)

We have used the term “Lifetime Achievement Award” in relation to this particular accolade, and we will use it again for Adam Graves’ 2001 Masterton win.  The Left Wing was a grizzled vet by this time and had previously won the Stanley Cup with the New York Rangers in 1994.  Ranked #72 on Notinhalloffame.com

Saku Koivu, Montreal Canadiens (2002)

Saku Koivu was diagnosed with Burkitt’s lymphoma in September before the season, and it was expected that he would miss the entire year.  Koivu shocked everyone by returning with three games left in the year and he would also participate in the playoffs.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com

Brian Berard, Chicago Blackhawks (2004)

In 1997, Brian Berard was the Calder Trophy in 1997 and would later suffer an injury to his eye.  Berard would be legally blind in one eye and he won this award due to his perseverance to continue to play.  This season would see Berard score a career high 47 Points.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com

Jason Blake, Toronto Maple Leafs (2008)

Jason Blake would be diagnosed with chronic myelogenous leukemia but would play the entire year.  He would have 52 Points this campaign.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com

Steve Sullivan, Nashville Predators (2009)

After having a 60 Point year in 2006-07, Steve Sullivan would later have issues that would cause him to miss a year and parts of two others due to fragmented disc and groin issues.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com

Jose Theodore, Washington Capitals (2010)

Jose Theodore was a surprise winner of the Hart Trophy and Vezina in 2002, and this was his best year since that campaign.  This year, Theodore had to deal with the death of his young son due to the complications of a premature birth.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com

Ian Laperriere, Philadelphia Flyers (2011)

In the 2010 playoffs, Laperriere blocked a shot with his face that resulted in post-concussion syndrome.  He would not play this year, and for that matter ever again. This would make him the first player to win this after his career was technically over.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com

Josh Harding, Minnesota Wild (2013)

Josh Harding would come back after being diagnosed with multiple sclerosis in the off-season, and would manage to play in five regular season games and the playoffs.  Harding played in 29 Games the following season and he would lead the NHL in Save Percentage (.933) and Goals Against Average (1.66).  That was the last year for Harding as he had a broken foot to begin the 2014-15 season, and after issues with his MS came up, he never played in the NHL again.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com

Let’s update our tally, shall we?

Award in Question

Percentage of recipients who have entered the HOF

Percentage of recipients by year who have entered the HOF.

NBA MVP

100%

100%

NHL Norris

90.5%

96.4%

NBA All Star Game MVP

89.5%

91.7%

NHL Conn Smythe

74.2%

85.4%

NFL AP Offensive Player of the Year

73.1%

79.4%

NHL Lady Byng

63.8%

76.0%

NFL Defensive Player of the Year

60.8%

71.1%

NFL Super Bowl MVP

60.6%

64.9%

NBA Defensive Player of the Year

58.3%

56.5%

NBA Rookie of the Year

56.5%

56.5%

NFL Pro Bowl MVP

52.3%

54.8%

MLB Lou Gehrig Award

51.9%

51.9%

MLB Roberto Clemente Award

47.4%

47.4%

MLB/NL/AL Cy Young Award

44.4%

55.4%

MLB Babe Ruth Award

37.0%

39.3%

NHL Frank J. Selke Trophy

33.3%

36.7%

MLB Hutch Award

33.1%

33.1%

NFL Offensive Rookie of the Year

28.6%

28.6%

NHL Bill Masterton Memorial Trophy

27.9%

27.9%

MLB Edgar Martinez Award

26.7%

17.2%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Designated Hitter)

25.0%

30.8%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Shortstop)

23.5%

52.6%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove

21.7%

36.8%

NFL Defensive Rookie of the Year

20.6%

20.6%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Catcher)

20.0%

22.5%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Second Base)

18.8%

39.8%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Shortstop)

18.2%

35.1%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Pitcher)

18.2%

20.1%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Second Base)

16.7%

32.7%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Outfield)

16.7%

30.1%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Outfield)

15.7%

25.2%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Third Base)

14.3%

14.3%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Third Base)

13.6%

14.3%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (First Base)

13.6%

13.3%

MLB (NL/AL) Rookie of the Year

13.3%

13.3%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Catcher)

10.3%

15.2%

NBA Most Improved Player of the Year

5.3%

3.2%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (First Base)

3.8%

3.2%

NFL AP Comeback Player of the Year

0.0%

0.0%

So, who is up next?

The following are the players who have won the Bill Masterton Memorial Trophy in the National Hockey League who have retired but have not met the mandatory years out of the game to qualify for the Pro Football Hall of Fame:

Dominic Moore, New York Rangers, (2014)

Moore returned to the NHL after taking 18 months off to tend to his wife, Katie, who was battling a rare form of liver cancer. She would pass away in January of 2013. Moore returned to the league with the New York Rangers playing 73 Games.  Eligible for the Hall of Fame in 2021.

The following are the players who have won the Bill Masterton Memorial Trophy who are still active.

Phil Kessel, Boston Bruins, (2007)

Phil Kessel became the first player to win the Bill Masterton Memorial Trophy as a rookie.  Kessel contracted testicular cancer, and missed 12 Games this year. He still managed to have a 29 Point year.  32 Years Old, Playing for the Arizona Coyotes.

Max Pacioretty, Montreal Canadiens, (2012)

In the 2010-11 season, Max Pacioretty was knocked out of a game with a concussion and a fractured vertebra.  He returned with his first 60 Point season.  30 Years Old, Playing for the Vegas Golden Knights.

Devan Dubynk, Minnesota Wild, (2015)

Devan Dubynk was carving out a decent career, though it was unremarkable.  He had played 171 Games in net for the Edmonton Oilers and was traded to the Nashville Predators in 2014 but only played there for two Games.  The Goalie signed with the Arizona Coyotes, where he played for 19 Games and had a 2.72 Goals Against Average, and was traded midseason to the Minnesota Wild.  Dubynk then wet on fire, taking them to the playoffs, where he went 27-9-2 with a 1.78 GAA.  He would be named an All-Star and was a Second Team All-Star that year.  He has since gone to two more All-Stars with Minnesota.  33 Years Old, Playing for the Minnesota Wild.

Jaromir Jagr, Pittsburgh Penguins, (2016)

How was Jaromir Jagr still playing in the NHL, and at a level where he scored 66 Points.  How is that not showing off a dedication to hockey?  47 Years Old, Playing for HC Kladno in the Czech League.

Craig Anderson, Ottawa Senators,(2017)

Anderson had a rough personal year as he had taken some time off mid-season, where he had tend to his wife who was diagnosed with cancer.  He returned and took the Senators to a surprise conference Final.  38 Years Old, Playing for the Ottawa Senators.

Brian Boyle, New Jersey Devils,(2018)

Brian Boyle was diagnosed with myeloid leukemia in training camp, which caused him to miss the start of the season.  Boyle returned in November and had a 23 Point season.  35 Years Old, Playing for the Florida Panthers.

Robin Lehner, New York Islanders,(2019)

Robin Lehner went public in the off-season about his battles with alcoholism and bi-polar disorder.  He came back with a career-high 2.13 Goals Against Average over 46 Games.  He would also win the William M. Jennings Award, making him the first to do win the Jennings and Masterton in the same year.  28 Years Old, Playing for the Chicago Blackhawks.

As you can see, the Bill Masterton Memorial Trophy does not go to the same person twice, and we don’t expect that will change in the future.

We will go back to the diamond and the most important individual award they have, the MVP.

As always, we thank you for that support and look for that soon!

Anybody who follows football at all knows that there is nothing quite as exciting as college football rivalries. The adrenaline is pumping not only for the teams playing, but also for the fans watching on the sidelines or at home. No matter which college team you root for when it comes time for those matches against your team’s all-time rivals, it is “game on.”

We here at Notinhalloffame.com thought it would be fun to take a look at the major awards in North American team sports and see how it translates into Hall of Fame potential.

Needless to say, different awards in different sports yield hall of fame potential.  In basketball, the team sport with the least number of players on a roster, the dividend for greatness much higher.  In baseball, it is not as much as a great individual season does not have the same impact.

Our focus now shifts towards the AP Comeback Player of the Year Award in the NFL.  Relatively speaking, this is a new award, so there won’t be too many players to dissect here.  How many of these winners made the Pro Football Hall of Fame?

Let’s find out!

The following are the past players who have won the AP Comeback Player of the Year in the NFL who are eligible for the Pro Football Hall of Fame and have been enshrined.

None.

The following are the players who have won the AP Comeback Player of the Year in the NFL who are eligible for the Pro Football Hall of Fame and have not been selected:

Doug Flutie, Buffalo Bills, Quarterback (1998)

The first winner of this award did not come back from injury.  He came back from Canada.  Doug Flutie was the hero whose Hail Mary won the Orange Bowl for Boston College against Miami.  The Quarterback was considered too short for the NFL and he would play in the USFL and Canada, though he would have stints in the NFL with Chicago and New England, though his run with the Patriots ended in 1989.  A decade later, he was signed by the Buffalo Bills and at age 36, he would play in 13 Games and throw for 2,711 Yards, 20 Touchdowns and go to the Pro Bowl.  Unrankedon Notinhalloffame.com.

Bryant Young, San Francisco 49ers, Defensive Tackle (1999)

Bryant Young suffered a severe broken leg late in 1998 and a metal rod had to be placed to assist his healing.  Young would return in 1999 with an 11.0 Sack season and a selection to the Pro Bowl.  He would play until 2007 and would record 89.5 Sacks in total.  Unrankedon Notinhalloffame.com.

Joe Johnson, New Orleans Saints, Defensive End(2000)

Joe Johnson was a Pro Bowler for the Saints in 1998, but a knee injury kept him out of the entire 1999 Season.  The Defensive End would come back in 2000 with his second (and final) Pro Bowl Selection and he would have a career-high 12.0 Sacks this year.  Unrankedon Notinhalloffame.com.

Garrison Hearst, San Francisco 49ers, Running Back (2001)

Garrison Hearst rushed for over 1,500 Yards in 1998, but he had to sit out two years due to Avascular Necrosis.  Many thought Hearst was done for good, but he returned in 2001 to the Niners and would rush for 1,206 Yards and go to his second (and final) Pro Bowl.  Unrankedon Notinhalloffame.com.

Tommy Maddox, Pittsburgh Steelers, Quarterback(2002)

Tommy Maddox played in the NFL from 1992 to 1995 with three different teams but the backup saw limited action and actually left football.  He came back in the Arena League in 2000, and then would be the MVP in the lone season of the XFL.  That was enough to make him desirable to the NFL again and he was signed by the Pittsburgh Steelers as their backup.  He would become their starter in 2002 and threw for 2,836 Yards and 20 TDs.  He would play until 2005.  Unrankedon Notinhalloffame.com.

Jon Kitna, Cincinnati Bengals, Quarterback (2003)

Jon Kitna was not coming back from injury or another league, but rather had one of the best years of his career.  He would throw for 3,591 Yards and a career-high 26 Touchdowns.  He played until 2011 and would overall throw for 29,745 Yards.  Unrankedon Notinhalloffame.com.

Tedy Bruschi, New England Patriots, Linebacker(2005)

In 2004, Tedy Bruschi went to his first (and only) Pro Bowl.  Shortly after the Pro Bowl Game, Bruschi suffered a minor stroke and partial paralysis. He announced that he would miss the 2005 season, but that wouldn’t be the case.  The Linebacker returned in October and played nine Games for the Patriots that year.  He would co-win this award Steve Smith of the Carolina Panthers  Unrankedon Notinhalloffame.com.

Chad Pennington, New York Jets, Quarterback (2006)

In 2005, Chad Pennington suffered multiple injuries and was only able to play in three Games.  2006 was a much different season as he started all 16 Games for the Jets and would throw for 3,352 Yards and 17 Touchdowns.  Unrankedon Notinhalloffame.com.

Greg Ellis, Dallas Cowboys, Linebacker (2007)

A ruptured Achilles ended Ellis’ 2006 Season after nine games, and he would return in 2007 with his best year ever. Ellis would go to the Pro Bowl for the only time and he had a career-high 12.5 Sacks.  Unrankedon Notinhalloffame.com.

Chad Pennington, Miami Dolphins, Quarterback (2) (2008)

After winning this award in 2006, Pennington had a bad 2007 beset with injuries and poor play.  He was released by the Jets (who had signed Brett Favre) and Pennington would join the Miami Dolphins as a Free Agent.  He would take Miami to the Playoffs and would throw for a career-high of 3,653 Passing Yards.  Sure enough, he would suffer shoulder problems and would only play four more games in his career.  To date, Pennington is the only repeat winner of this award.  Unrankedon Notinhalloffame.com.

Let’s update our tally, shall we?

Award in Question

Percentage of recipients who have entered the HOF

Percentage of recipients by year who have entered the HOF.

NBA MVP

100%

100%

NHL Norris

90.5%

96.4%

NBA All Star Game MVP

89.5%

91.7%

NHL Conn Smythe

74.2%

85.4%

NFL AP Offensive Player of the Year

73.1%

79.4%

NHL Lady Byng

63.8%

76.0%

NFL Defensive Player of the Year

60.8%

71.1%

NFL Super Bowl MVP

60.6%

64.9%

NBA Defensive Player of the Year

58.3%

56.5%

NBA Rookie of the Year

56.5%

56.5%

NFL Pro Bowl MVP

52.3%

54.8%

MLB Lou Gehrig Award

51.9%

51.9%

MLB Roberto Clemente Award

47.4%

47.4%

MLB/NL/AL Cy Young Award

44.4%

55.4%

MLB Babe Ruth Award

37.0%

39.3%

NHL Frank J. Selke Trophy

33.3%

36.7%

MLB Hutch Award

33.1%

33.1%

NFL Offensive Rookie of the Year

28.6%

28.6%

MLB Edgar Martinez Award

26.7%

17.2%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Designated Hitter)

25.0%

30.8%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Shortstop)

23.5%

52.6%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove

21.7%

36.8%

NFL Defensive Rookie of the Year

20.6%

20.6%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Catcher)

20.0%

22.5%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Second Base)

18.8%

39.8%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Shortstop)

18.2%

35.1%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Pitcher)

18.2%

20.1%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Second Base)

16.7%

32.7%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Outfield)

16.7%

30.1%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Outfield)

15.7%

25.2%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Third Base)

14.3%

14.3%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Third Base)

13.6%

14.3%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (First Base)

13.6%

13.3%

MLB (NL/AL) Rookie of the Year

13.3%

13.3%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Catcher)

10.3%

15.2%

NBA Most Improved Player of the Year

5.3%

3.2%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (First Base)

3.8%

3.2%

NFL AP Comeback Player of the Year

0.0%

0.0%

So, who is up next?

The following are the players who have won the AP Comeback Player of the Year Award in the National Football League who have retired but have not met the mandatory years out of the game to qualify for the Pro Football Hall of Fame:

Steve Smith, Carolina Panthers, Wide Receiver (2005)

In the first game of the 2004 Season, Smith would break his leg and would be out for the season.  He would return in 2005 and put forth the best season of his career with an NFL leading 103 Receptions, 1,563 Receiving Yards, and 12 Receiving Touchdowns.  He would be named a First Team All-Pro this year.  Smith was the co-winner of this award with Tedy Bruschi of the New England Patriots.  Smith is eligible for the Hall of Fame in 2022.

Michael Vick, Philadelphia Eagles, Quarterback (2010)

Due to his involvement in a dog fighting ring, Michael Vick was suspended for the 2007 and 2008 seasons, most of which was spent while incarcerated.  The Quarterback would return in 2009 to the Philadelphia Eagles as Donovan McNabb’s backup and in 2010 he began the year backing up Kevin Kolb.  Vick won the starting job after Kolb was knocked out with a concussion and he would go on to have an excellent season.  He would throw for 3,018 Yards with 21 Touchdowns and would rush for another 676 Yards and 9 Touchdowns.  He would go to his fourth Pro Bowl and was also named the Bert Bell Award winner.  Vick is eligible for the Hall of Fame in 2021.

Peyton Manning, Denver Broncos, Quarterback (2012)

Who else could it be?  Peyton Manning missed the entire 2011 campaign due to neck surgery and the Colts gad drafted Andrew Luck to replace him.  Manning would sign with the Denver Broncos and picked up right where he left off.  Named a First Team All-Pro and a Pro Bowler, Manning threw for 4,659 Yards and 37 Touchdowns.  He is the first player to be named a First Team All-Pro while winning the AP Comeback Player of the Year.  Manning is eligible for the Hall of Fame in 2021.

Rob Gronkowski, Denver Broncos, Tight End (2014)

Ron Gronkowski was the first Tight End to win he AP Comeback Player of the Year Award and the New England Patriot recovered incredibly from a torn ACL and MCL from December of the year previous.  “Gronk” would be named a First Team All-Pro, win the Super Bowl and would secure 82 catches for 1,124 Yards and 12 Touchdowns. Gronkowski is eligible for the Hall of Fame in 2024.

Jordy Nelson, Green Bay Packers, Wide Receiver(2016)

Jordy Nelson was a Pro Bowl Selection in 2014 but would have to sit out 2015 due to a torn ACL.  Nelson returned in 2016 to record 1,257 Receiving Yards and an NFL leading 14 Touchdown Receptions.  Nelson is eligible for the Hall of Fame in 2024.

Andrew Luck, Indianapolis Colts, Quarterback (2018)

Andrew Luck had to sit out the entire 2017 season due to issues with his throwing shoulder and he returned in 2018 to secure his fourth Pro Bowl.  He would throw for 4,593 Yards and 39 Touchdowns  Luck would shockingly retire during the 2019 training camp.  Nelson is eligible for the Hall of Fame in 2024.

The following are the players who have won the AP Comeback Player of the Year Award who are still active.

Drew Brees, San Diego Chargers, Quarterback (2004)

It is hard to believe now, but Drew Brees was struggling to keep his starting Quarterback job in 2003 when he was with the San Diego Chargers.  This was his rebound year as he was holding off the 1stRound Pick, Philip Rivers from taking his job.  In 2003, Brees would throw for 3,159 Yards and 27 Touchdowns.  He would be named to his first Pro Bowl.  40 Years Old, Playing for the New Orleans Saints.

Tom Brady, New England Patriots, Quarterback (2009)

Tom Brady only played in one game in 2008 due to a torn ACL and MCL.  He returned to the exact form you would expect throwing for 4,398 Yards and 28 Touchdowns and going to his fifth Pro Bowl.  42 Years Old, Playing for the New England Patriots.

Matthew Stafford, Detroit Lions, Quarterback (2011)

An injured shoulder limited Matthew Stafford to only three games in 2010, but he returned in 2011 and threw for 5,038 Yards and 41 Touchdowns, both of which are career-highs as of this writing.  31 Years Old, Playing for the Detroit Lions.

Philip Rivers, San Diego Chargers, Quarterback (2013)

Philip Rivers performed well in 2012 but the perception was not that it was not good enough.  In 2013, he did better than the year before with an NFL leading 69.5 Completion Percentage.  He would also throw for 4,478 Yards and 32 Touchdowns.  38 Years Old, Playing for the Los Angeles Chargers.

Eric Berry, Kansas City Chiefs, Strong Safety (2015)

Eric Berry was diagnosed with Hodgkin’s lymphoma in 2014 after having been named to the Pro Bowl three times.  Berry returned as a First Team All-Pro and recorded 77 Tackles for the Chiefs in 2015.  31 Years Old, Currently a Free Agent.

Keenan Allen, Los Angeles Chargers, Wide Receiver (2017)

In the 2016 season opener, Keenan Allen suffered a torn ACL and would miss the rest of the year.  The Wide Receiver would return to have what is his best year to date. Allen would made his first Pro Bowl and post a career-high 1,393 Receiving Yards.  27 Years Old, Playing for the Los Angeles Chargers.

For the first time we have an award that has generated NO Hall of Famers, but this won’t always be the case with Manning, Brees and Brady as Hall of Fame locks.

We are going to back to the NHL and look at the Bill Masterton Award.

As always, we thank you for that support and look for that soon!

Welcome to a new feature on Notinhalloffame.com, where I, the Committee Chairman come up with random pop culture lists of drunken ramblings.  

This is the kind of useless tripe that I excel at, though it did nothing to help me with high school English Class, nor did it impress any of the ladies, but as a middle-aged married guy, who still consumes alcoholic beverages that rivals anyone on Celebrity Rehab, I can say with full Joe Walsh meaning that “Life’s Been Good To Me So Far”.

After my M*A*S*H nonsense, I am going to switch over to the animated world and focus on the Smurfs.  Roughly twenty-five years ago (damn, I’m old) I came up with the realization that those blue creatures had red tendencies as they were clearly Communists.  I told that someone who I worked with, and he said, “Oh, you saw that online too?”

This was the internet’s early days, and I hadn’t saw that.   Since that time, I have seen others who came up with the same conclusion.  Basically, this was my long-winded caveat of saying that I apologize if I am not exactly breaking new ground, but in my defense, everything I am about to barf out now were my initial observations.

Without further ado, here are my ten drunken observations on how the Smurfs were commies.

1.All Smurfs lived in the same size mushroom house as everyone else. You have all seen mushrooms!  You may think I am under a mushroom-like influence right now, but I swear it is only hops and barley.  Mushrooms come in different sizes, but they had to find the one field where every one is the same size so nobody felt bitter about having a smaller house?  Some of those Smurfs deserved bigger houses.  Handy Smurf did all the work in designing those homes but he didn’t even create a basement in his own house, when surely, he could.  Every house had to be equal, regardless of what you contributed to the society, so a load like Lazy Smurf, who did absolutely nothing gets the same reward as a superstar like Handy.  

Sounds like Communism to me.

  1. Smurfs had one role that appeared to be designated for them early in life.Some of them weren’t particularly good at what they were assigned to be but if that is what you were, that is what you had to be for the rest of your life. Sometimes it works out, like Handy, who must have been excellent at Lego as a kid, really was adept at architecture and lived up to his name.   Hefty Smurf really was the strongest and he seemed to be the only one who owned any weights so that one worked out but what of some of the others:

Brainy Smurf had a lot of inventions, but many of his plans backfired leading one to question how smart he was in the first place.  Because, he was diagnosed as nearsighted early in life and had to wear glasses, he just adopted what was expected of him and he read a lot.  Jokey Smurf had only one joke; the exploding box.  He wasn’t funny at all!  But, he had the distinct laugh, so it was decided for him that he was the prankster of the bunch, which sucked for the rest of the Smurfs, because he couldn’t make any of them laugh! Clumsy Smurf’s job was only to be a clutz.  He might not be the most co-ordinated Smurf, but when you are told that all of your life it becomes a self-fulfilling prophecy.  If one of the other Smurfs helped him out and got him a hat that wasn’t one size too big, he might see better and not trip so much.  They can’t do that, because that is what Clumsy is supposed to be, and changing his role, changes the society.  Lazy Smurf got the best end of the deal.  They expected him to do shit and he gets an equal share of everything.

Maybe it was Grouchy Smurf, because he was allowed to be an asshole and nobody begrudged him for it.

Sounds like Communism to me.

  1. Smurfs had no currency. Smurfs didn’t use the barter system.They all worked (or didn’t work if that was your designation).  Capitalism didn’t exist.  

Sounds like Communism to me. 

  1. The Smurfs would sing while they work or marched and it was always the same happy upbeat song with a lot of “la-las” in it.This was telling the community to be “happy in their work”.Art isn’t exactly encouraged in Communist societies so of course you only hear them sing one song.  There may have been Painter Smurf, but his art was only portraits, and it wasn’t very creative.  Painter Smurf’s art glorified all things Smurfy!

Sounds like Communism to me.

  1. Smurfs had no traditional family structure.In later episodes, Baby Smurf was introduced after he was brought from the stork, so he had no actual father or mother.Presumably, none of the Smurfs do, so none of them are actually related. 

Why is this important? 

The father of Communism, Karl Marx was against the family unit and stated that it was the way that wealthy passed on their property, thus keeping the class system intact. Smurfs own no property and since they have no blood relation, they wouldn’t favor one over the other.  This is why the Smurfs value Smurfdom above all, just like Marx intended.

Sounds like Communism to me.

  1. Independent thought wasn’t encouraged.As I stated before, Painter Smurf claimed to be artistic, but he wasn’t.With the exception of Papa Smurf (I will get to him later), everyone wears the same stock clothes of the same shaped white hat and white pants.  Sure, they could dress it up a bit, but how many times do you see a bunch of Smurfs running around where you can’t distinguish between one Smurf from another. How many of these Smurfs were named “Random Smurf”?  

Sounds like Communism to me.

  1. Communist Russia (and pretty much Russia now) was homophobic.Vanity Smurf was clearly gay.Going back to an earlier point, Vanity may have been a cute baby Smurf, but most of them all look the same and beyond a pink flower on his hat, could you really tell him apart from “Random Smurf”?  

I will tell you what happened in the Smurf Village.  Papa Smurf figured out early from his somewhat effeminate voice that Vanity might be interested in the other Smurfs in ways that weren’t considered “Smurfy”.  I guarantee that you that what he did was hand him a mirror and convinced him that the only one he should love was himself.  This caused a chain reaction where Vanity expressed self-love, and subconsciously repressed his homosexual feelings.  

Oh, and yes when I mean self-love, I guarantee that the mirror wasn’t the only thing he held tight with his left hand.

Homophobia?

Sounds like Communism to me.

  1. The Soviet Bloc was not just known for its homophobia but for its hatred of the Jewish faith.Who hated the Smurfs?  Gargamel. What did he look like?  A caricature of the perceived “hook-nosed Jew”, Gargamel wanted to capture and kill all the Smurfs and eat them.  He was viewed as evil, ugly and stupid.  How hard is it to find a mushroom field that was clearly only a few miles from his house?  Especially considering he actually did find it on occasion and couldn’t remember where the hell what it was.    

Not only that, he had a cat named Azreal.  Azreal? Isreal?  Coincidence?

Sounds like Communism to me.

  1. Look at the politics in the Smurf Village.Why was it decided that Papa Smurf was their leader?Is it just because he is the oldest?  That is not the worst reason as he is certainly presented as the wisest but who chose him?  Did Papa Smurf win an election?  How long has he been the leader?  Can he be kicked out if he does something incompetent or gets dementia?  If Papa Smurf passes on, or no longer wants to lead, who takes over?  Brainy Smurf seems to think it is him, but would that happen?  Papa Smurf seems to have no succession plan (that we know of) as most real world dictators seem to lack.  It probably would be Brainy as he seems to kiss Papa’s ass the most but how many episodes ended with the other Smurfs kicking Brainy out of the village for being a condescending dipshit?

Once Papa Smurf dies, I predict total Smurf anarchy.

Sounds like Communism to me.

  1. The most obvious one of all is Papa Smurf.The elder statesman of the Smurf Village didn’t have to wear white, as he wore red.  Hmmm.  Red. It wasn’t just red but a very similar shade of the Soviet Flag.  Papa Smurf had a nice bushy beard, very similar to Karl Marx.  What Papa Smurf said was the gospel and it wasn’t questioned. He had absolute authority over the rest of the Smurfs and it was never questioned.  It was considered Smurf Law.  What more could legendary left-wing leaders long for?  They wanted what Papa Smurf created.

Sounds like Communism to me.

This ends my second drunken list, and no worries as I have just restocked my fridge. Hopefully my third one isn’t one that is in twenty-five other corners of the world wide web.

Maybe the next one will only be replicated in twenty of them.

We here at Notinhalloffame.com thought it would be fun to take a look at the major awards in North American team sports and see how it translates into Hall of Fame potential.

Needless to say, different awards in different sports yield hall of fame potential.  In basketball, the team sport with the least number of players on a roster, the dividend for greatness much higher.  In baseball, it is not as much as a great individual season does not have the same impact.

Since we just did the NFL Offensive Player of the Year, the natural for us to look the Defensive Player of the Year Award.  Unlike the OPOY, this was created a year earlier in 1971, but it will it generate the same level of Hall of Famers?

Let’s find out!

The following are the past players who have won the AP Defensive Player of the Year in the NFL who are eligible for the Pro Football Hall of Fame and have been enshrined.

Alan Page, Minnesota Vikings, Defensive Tackle(1971)

A great place to start for this award is the “Purple People Eaters”, so this begins with Alan Page.  Playing at Defensive Tackle, 1971 was the third of three straight First Team All-Pro Selections and league lead in Approximate Value.  As the first AP Defensive Player of the Year, he also became the first to win both the DPOY and the AP MVP Award.  Afterwards, Page began another three-year run of First Team All-Pro Selections in 1973. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1988.

Joe Greene, Pittsburgh Steelers, Defensive Tackle (1972)

“Mean” Joe Greene was going to his fourth Pro Bowl in 1972 and this year he began his first of three consecutive First Team All-Pros. He had 11 “unofficial” Sacks and this was also the season that the Steelers had truly established themselves as Super Bowl contenders.  That doesn’t happen without Greene.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1987.

Joe Greene, Pittsburgh Steelers, Defensive Tackle (2) (1974)

Greene becomes the first repeat winner of the Defensive Player of the Year and it was also his third of three consecutive First Team All-Pro Selections.  “Mean” Joe and the Steelers dynasty would also win the first of what would be four Super Bowls in the 1970s.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1987.

Mel Blount, Pittsburgh Steelers, Cornerback (1975)

A Steeler wins this for the second year in a row, and you can see how the “Steel Curtain” defense was the best in football. This year’s winner was Mel Blount, who at Cornerback had a league leading 11 Interceptions and would be named a First Team All-Pro.  He would earn that honor again in 1981.  Blount and the Steelers won their second Super Bowl that year.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1989.

Jack Lambert, Pittsburgh Steelers, Linebacker (1976)

You know that you had one of the greatest defensive corps ever when you win the DPOY in three different seasons with three different players!  Oh, and all of them went to the Pro Football Hall of Fame!  The third straight Steeler was Jack Lambert, who was a six-time First Team All-Pro and this was his first one.  Like Greene and Blount, Lambert would help Pittsburgh win four Super Bowls. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1989.

Lee Roy Selmon, Tampa Bay Buccaneers, Defensive End (1979)

Lee Roy Selmon was one of the only things that the Bucs had in their early days.  Drafted 1stOverall in 1976, Selmon broke out in 1979 with his DPOY year and would begin a sting of six straight Pro Bowls.  Selmon was forced to retire in 1984 due to back issues. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1995.

Lawrence Taylor, New York Giants, Linebacker (1981)

Lawrence Taylor changed Linebacking forever and he was by far the most dominating defensive player of the 1980s.  L.T. became the first player to win the Defensive Rookie of the Year in the same season as winning the DPOY.  He would also begin his streak of 10 straight Pro Bowls. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1999.

Lawrence Taylor, New York Giants, Linebacker (2) (1982)

Taylor repeated winning the DPOY, making him the first player to win the award twice in his first two years.  The Linebacker was also named a First Team All-Pro for the second of what would be eight times.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1999.

Kenny Easley, Seattle Seahawks, Strong Safety (1984)

The career of Kenny Easley spanned only seven seasons and this was right smack dab in the middle of it.  Easley was on his second of three straight First Team All-Pros and this was also his third of five Pro Bowls.  He would finish first in Interceptions with 10 this year.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2017.

Mike Singletary, Chicago Bears, Linebacker (1985)

Mike Singletary was an absolute star on the Bears Defense and this was the year of the “Super Bowl Shuffle”.  Singletary was in his third of what would be ten consecutive Pro Bowls and he was also awarded his second of six straight First Team All-Pros. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1998.

Lawrence Taylor, New York Giants, Linebacker (3) (1986)

This is arguably the greatest defensive season by any player in the history of the National Football League.  Taylor would also win the AP MVP, PFWA MVP and the Bert Bell Award.  He would lead the league in Sacks with 20.5 and this was his sixth of eight First Team All-Pro Selections.  The Giants would win Super Bowl XXI that year.  Taylor would become the first player to win the DPOY three times.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1999.

Reggie White, Philadelphia Eagles, Defensive End (1987)

The “Minister of Defense” was on year two of his six-year run as a First Team All-Pro.  White was a beast on the pass rush where he would have a career-high of 21.0 Quarterback Sacks, which led the NFL.  White’s 21 Sacks were especially impressive considering he did that in 12 Games. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2006.

Mike Singletary, Chicago Bears, Linebacker (2)(1988)

Singletary’s run of dominance continues with his fifth of seven First Team All-Pros, and his sixth of ten straight Pro Bowls.  He would equal his career-high of 18 in Approximate Value.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1998.

Bruce Smith, Buffalo Bills, Defensive End (1990)

This was Smith’s third First Team All-Pro Selection and he was also coming off of his fourth Pro Bowl.  Smith secured 19.0 Sacks for the Bills and this was the year that began four consecutive trips to the Super Bowl.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2009.

Cortez Kennedy, Seattle Seahawks, Defensive Tackle (1992)

Kennedy’s DPOY win came early in his career and it began a three-year streak of First Team All-Pro Selections.  The Defensive Tackle would spend his entire career with the Seattle Seahawks and would go to eight Pro Bowls, this being his second. He would have a career-high 14.0 Sacks this year.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2012.

Rod Woodson, Pittsburgh Steelers, Cornerback (1993)

Woodson was on year five of a six-year stretch of consecutive Pro Bowls and he would go to 11 in total.  The Cornerback was also chosen for his fourth of what turned out to be six First Team All Pros.  Eight of his 71 Interceptions would happen in 1993.  Woodson would later win a Super Bowl with the Baltimore Ravens.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2009.

Deion Sanders, San Francisco 49ers, Cornerback(1994)

After five years with the Atlanta Falcons, Deion Sanders signed with the San Francisco 49ers and would play there for only one season, and what a year it was!  Sanders secured his third straight First Team All-Pro, fourth consecutive Pro Bowls and would lead the NFL in Interception Return Yards (303).  He also helped San Francisco win the Super Bowl. Following this, Sanders won another Super Bowl with Dallas and went to another four Pro Bowls and as chosen for three more First Team All-Pros.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2011.

Bruce Smith, Buffalo Bills, Defensive End (2) (1996)

The Bills were no longer the AFC kings, but were still a playoff team, much of which could be attributed to Bruce Smith. The Defensive End would be named to his fourth of five straight First Team All-Pros and this was his eighth of none. He would have 13.5 Sacks and would lead the NFL in Forced Fumbles with five.  Smith also went to 10 Pro Bowls over his career.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2009.

Reggie White, Green Bay Packers, Defensive End (2) (1998)

Reggie White won his second Defensive of Player of the Year 11 years after he won his first one making this the largest gap for this award.  White was a great player in between those two wins.  White won his Super Bowl with Green Bay two years prior and 1998 was the end of an era as this ended his run of 13 straight Pro Bowls and this was his eighth and final First Team All-Pro.  White retired after but returned for one more year with the Carolina Panthers.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2006.

Warren Sapp, Tampa Bay Buccaneers, Defensive Tackle (1999)

1999 would usher in a four-year run of First Team All-Pros and this was year three of seven consecutive Pro Bowls.  He would record 12.5 Quarterback Sacks this year. Sapp would later anchor the Bucs to a win at Super Bowl XXXVII.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2013.

Ray Lewis, Baltimore Ravens, Defensive Tackle (2000)

This was an incredible year for Ray Lewis who would lead the NFL in Approximate Value (23) and led the potent Ravens defense to their Super Bowl win.  Lewis was untouchable this year.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2018.

Michael Strahan, New York Giants, Defensive End (2001)

Michael Strahan would set the single season Sack record of 22.5 and he also led the NFL in Forced Fumbles (6).  This was his third of four First Team All-Pros for Strahan who would play his entire career with the Giants.  He would later win the Super Bowl in the 2007 season.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2014.

Derrick Brooks, Tampa Bay Buccaneers, Linebacker(2002)

Derrick Brooks went to 11 Pro Bowls and this year was his sixth.  In terms of First Team All-Pro Selections, this was number three of five.  The powerful Linebacker led the Bucs to a Super Bowl this year.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2014.

Ray Lewis, Baltimore Ravens, Defensive Tackle (2) (2003)

This was the second and last DPOY win for Ray Lewis but he had a lot left to accomplish in a career spent exclusively with Baltimore.  2003 would see Lewis go to his fourth of seven First Team All-Pros and it was also his sixth of 13 Pro Bowls.  He would win another Super Bowl with the Ravens in his final year in 2012.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2018.

Ed Reed, Baltimore Ravens, Free Safety (2004)

For the second straight year, the Baltimore Ravens had a Defensive Player of the Year winner, and following Ray Lewis we have Ed Reed.  Reed would lead the NFL in Interceptions three times, this being the first one and he would also finish first in Interception Return Yards.  This was Reed’s first of what would be five First Team All-Pros and he would also go to nine Pro Bowls over his career.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2019.

Brian Urlacher, Chicago Bears, Linebacker (2005)

Brian Urlacher was selected for four First Team All-Pros with 2005 being his third.  The Linebacker had 6.0 Sacks and 121 Tackles and was a Pro Bowler for the fifth time.  He would be chosen for three more after in a career that remained in Chicago.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2018.

Jason Taylor, Miami Dolphins, Defensive End (2006)

Jason Taylor went to three First Team All-Pros and this was his third year.  He would also be a six-time Pro Bowl Selection and would have 139.5 Sacks in his career.  He would have 13.5 of them this year.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2017.

The following are the players who have won the AP Defensive Player of the Year in the NFL who are eligible for the Pro Football Hall of Fame and have not been selected:

Dick Anderson, Miami Dolphins, Free Safety (1973)

This was the third time that Anderson would have a season of 8 Interceptions, but the first time that he led the NFL in that category.  The Free Safety and member of Miami’s “No Name Defense” has won their second straight Super Bowl this year, and this was also his second straight First Team All-Pro Selection.  Unrankedon Notinhalloffame.com.

Harvey Martin, Dallas Cowboys, Defensive End (1977)

Harvey Martin went to four straight Pro Bowls, and 1977 was the best of that stretch (1976-79).  The Defensive End would earn First Team All-Pro accolades.  That year was magical for Martin as he would help Dallas win the Super Bowl and was the Co-MVP with Randy White.  Unrankedon Notinhalloffame.com.

Randy Gradishar, Denver Broncos, Linebacker (1978)

Randy Gradishar was the leader of the “Orange Crush” Defense of the Broncos and he was on his second straight First Team All-Pro Selection.  This would be the third of seven Pro Bowl Selections for Gradishar.  Ranked #4 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Lester Hayes, Oakland Raiders, Cornerback (1980)

Hayes was in his fourth year with the Raiders, and this was his first of five straight Pro Bowls.  Hates, who was also a First Team All-Pro also led the league in Interceptions (13) and Interception Return Yards (273).  The Raiders would win the Super Bowl that year, and three years later he helped them win it all again.  Ranked #25 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Doug Betters, Miami Dolphins, Defensive End (1983)

Doug Betters is the unlikeliest Defensive Player of the Year winner ever.  This is not because he the career Miami Dolphin didn’t earn it.  He did, it is just that he never played nearly as good before or after in 1983.  This was the only season where he went to the Pro Bowl, was an All-Pro and had an Approximate Value that was higher than 8.  It was 20 by the way in 1983!  He recorded 16.0 Sacks that year.  Unrankedon Notinhalloffame.com.

Keith Millard, Minnesota Vikings, Defensive Tackle (1989)

Millard would have two great years in his career (the second in 1988) and this was the first of them.  Millard would have 18.0 Sacks and would lead the league in Approximate Value the season before with 20. This would be also one of two seasons where he was a First Team All-Pro.  Unrankedon Notinhalloffame.com.

Pat Swilling, New Orleans Saints, Linebacker (1991)

Swilling was a First Team All-Pro this year and would be again the year after.  This was his third of five Pro Bowls and in 1991 he would lead the NFL in Quarterback Sacks (17.0) and Approximate Value (23).  Ranked #77 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Bryce Paup, Buffalo Bills, Linebacker (1995)

Paup was in his first season in Buffalo, and it was easily his best one.  The Outside Linebacker led the NFL in Quarterback Sacks with 17.5 and he was a Pro Bowl Selection four times.  This was his only First Team All-Pro nod. Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com

Dana Stubblefield, San Francisco 49ers, Defensive Tackle (1997)

Stubblefield was the Defensive Rookie of the Year in 1993, won the Super Bowl in 1994 and won the DPOY in 1997.  This year, he would earn his only First Team All-Pro and land his third Pro Bowl.  Stubblefield would play six more seasons in the NFL but never had a season close to this again.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com

Bob Sanders, Indianapolis Colts, Strong Safety(2007)

When you look at the career of Bob Sanders, you would see that he had only two full seasons; this was the second of them. The Strong Safety was a First Team All-Pro for the second and last time in his career and he would be a Super Bowl Champion in 2005.  Overall, his career was inconsistent, and he will go down as one of the more unlikely winners of the Defensive Player of the Year Award.   Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com

Troy Polamalu, Pittsburgh Steelers, Strong Safety (2010)

By 2010, Polamalu had already helped the Steelers win two Super Bowls.  The Strong Safety would go his third First Team All-Pro of what would be four, and this would be also his seventh of eight Pro Bowls.  He would have seven Interceptions with 63 Tackles this year.  Ranked #8 on Notinhalloffame.com

 

Let’s update our tally, shall we?

Award in Question

Percentage of recipients who have entered the HOF

Percentage of recipients by year who have entered the HOF.

NBA MVP

100%

100%

NHL Norris

90.5%

96.4%

NBA All Star Game MVP

89.5%

91.7%

NHL Conn Smythe

74.2%

85.4%

NFL AP Offensive Player of the Year

73.1%

79.4%

NHL Lady Byng

63.8%

76.0%

NFL Defensive Player of the Year

60.8%

71.1%

NFL Super Bowl MVP

60.6%

64.9%

NBA Defensive Player of the Year

58.3%

56.5%

NBA Rookie of the Year

56.5%

56.5%

NFL Pro Bowl MVP

52.3%

54.8%

MLB Lou Gehrig Award

51.9%

51.9%

MLB Roberto Clemente Award

47.4%

47.4%

MLB/NL/AL Cy Young Award

44.4%

55.4%

MLB Babe Ruth Award

37.0%

39.3%

NHL Frank J. Selke Trophy

33.3%

36.7%

MLB Hutch Award

33.1%

33.1%

NFL Offensive Rookie of the Year

28.6%

28.6%

MLB Edgar Martinez Award

26.7%

17.2%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Designated Hitter)

25.0%

30.8%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Shortstop)

23.5%

52.6%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove

21.7%

36.8%

NFL Defensive Rookie of the Year

20.6%

20.6%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Catcher)

20.0%

22.5%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Second Base)

18.8%

39.8%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Shortstop)

18.2%

35.1%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Pitcher)

18.2%

20.1%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Second Base)

16.7%

32.7%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Outfield)

16.7%

30.1%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Outfield)

15.7%

25.2%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Third Base)

14.3%

14.3%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Third Base)

13.6%

14.3%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (First Base)

13.6%

13.3%

MLB (NL/AL) Rookie of the Year

13.3%

13.3%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Catcher)

10.3%

15.2%

NBA Most Improved Player of the Year

5.3%

3.2%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (First Base)

3.8%

3.2%

So, who is up next?

The following are the players who have won the Defensive Player of the Year Award in the National Football League who have retired but have not met the mandatory years out of the game to qualify for the Pro Football Hall of Fame:

James Harrison, Pittsburgh Steelers, Linebacker(2008)

The Linebacker they call “Deebo” had his first of two First Team All-Pro Selections in 2008.  He would lead the NFL in Forced Fumbles (7) and Approximate Value (19). Harrison would secure 16.0 Sacks this year and would win his second Super Bowl Ring the following season.  Harrison is eligible for the Hall of Fame in 2023.

Charles Woodson, Green Bay Packers, Cornerback(2009)

Woodson had two streaks of greatness, and this was in his second run.  2009 saw Woodson secure his sixth of eight Pro Bowls and second of third First Team All-Pros and he was the NFL leader in Interceptions with nine.  Woodson is eligible for the Hall of Fame in 2021.

The following are the players who have won the Defensive Player of the Year Award who are still active.

Terrell Suggs, Baltimore Ravens, Linebacker (2011)

Suggs was the third Raven in a ten-year period to win the Defensive Player of the Year Award.  This was the first time that Suggs was a First Team All-Pro and he would record a career-high 14.0 Sacks.  He would also lead the NFL with seven Forced Fumbles.  36 Years Old, Playing for the Arizona Cardinals.

J.J. Watt, Houston Texans, Defensive End (2012)

This was Watt’s second season in the NFL and he would lead the NFL in Quarterback Sacks with 20.5 and Tackles for Loss (39). The Defensive End would also finish first in Approximate Value (19).  This season would begin a four-year run of Pro Bowls and First Team All-Pros and the establishment of one of the most dominating defensive players of the modern era. 30 Years Old, Playing for the Arizona Cardinals.

Luke Kuechly, Carolina Panthers, Linebacker (2013)

Luke Kuechly was the Defensive Rookie of the Year in 2012, would become the Defensive Player of the Year in the season that followed.  The Middle Linebacker would be chosen for his first First Team All-Pro and Pro Bowl, the latter being a current seven-year streak.  28 Years Old, Playing for the Carolina Panthers.

J.J. Watt, Houston Texans, Defensive End (2) (2014)

2014 was year three of his four year run of dominance and this was the best of them all.  Watt repeated his 20.5 Sack performance of 2012 (though he did not lead the NFL) and he would again finish atop the leaderboard in Forced Fumbles (29) and Approximate Value (22).  Watt was so good that he would win the AP MVP and the Bert Bell Award.  30 Years Old, Playing for the Arizona Cardinals.

J.J. Watt, Houston Texans, Defensive End (3) (2015)

Watt reached rarified air with his third DPOY as he joined Lawrence Taylor as the second player to win this award a third time. The Texan would again lead the NFL in Sacks (17.5), Tackles for Loss (29) and Approximate Value (21).  When looking at those three DPOY wins, how many overall Wins by the Texans do not occur if J.J. Watt doesn’t exist?  30 Years Old, Playing for the Arizona Cardinals.

Khalil Mack, Oakland Raiders, Linebacker (2016)

Mack was chosen for his second First Team All Pro and Pro Bowl in 2016.  He would net 11.0 Sacks this season.  28 Years Old, Playing for the Chicago Bears.

Aaron Donald, Los Angeles Rams, Defensive Tackle (2017)

Aaron Donald was the 2014 Defensive Rookie of the Year, and he just built right upon it.  In 2017, Donald was chosen for his third straight First Team All-Pro and fourth consecutive Pro Bowl.  He would have 10.5 Sacks this year.  28 Years Old, Playing for the Los Angeles Rams.

Aaron Donald, Los Angeles Rams, Defensive Tackle (2) (2018)

Donald had an even better DPOY than his win in the year previous as he would lead the NFL in Sacks (20.5) and Tackles for Loss (25). 28 Years Old, Playing for the Los Angeles Rams.

It certainly appears that like the OPOY, the Defensive Player of the Year Award is a huge springboard to Canton immortality.

We are stick with the gridiron and look at the AP Comeback Player of the Year.

As always, we thank you for that support and look for that soon!

Anyone who is interested in NFL betting online or simply watching football for fun will be happy that the new season is underway. Summer can seem a long time as a football fan, and all supporters will be glad that the action has kicked off once more. Two sets of fans who will be especially looking forward to how this campaign pans out are those who follow the New England Patriots and Los Angeles Rams.

We here at Notinhalloffame.com thought it would be fun to take a look at the major awards in North American team sports and see how it translates into Hall of Fame potential.

Needless to say, different awards in different sports yield hall of fame potential.  In basketball, the team sport with the least number of players on a roster, the dividend for greatness much higher.  In baseball, it is not as much as a great individual season does not have the same impact.

For our next selection we return to the National Football League after a long absence with a major accolade in the Offensive Player of the Year. Considering this is a very important award, it is a little surprising that this has only been in existence since 1972.  Not surprising, is that with the exception of Jerry Rice, it has only gone to Quarterbacks and Running Backs; basically, the sexy skill positions of football. Frankly, we don’t think we will ever see an Offensive Lineman win this regardless of how impressive a season he has. 

So, how many Offensive Players of the Year have been enshrined in the Pro Football Hall of Fame?

Let’s find out!

The following are the past players who have won the AP Offensive Player of the Year in the NFL who are eligible for the Pro Football Hall of Fame and have been enshrined.

O.J. Simpson, Buffalo Bills, Running Back (1973)

Who else could possibly win it in 1973?  O.J. Simpson made history as the first player to exceed 2,000 Rushing Yards (2,003), and while he now has company in the 2,000 club, it is still exclusive company.  This was Simpson’s second rushing title and he would win it two more times (1975 & 1976).  He would also win the Bert Bell Award and the AP MVP. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1985. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1985.

Ken Stabler, Oakland Raiders, Quarterback (1974)

Stabler was a First Team All-Pro in 1974, and was chosen for the Pro Bowl for the second year in a row.  The Quarterback threw for 2,469 Yards and a league leading 26 Touchdowns.  He would have a record of 11-2 this year and was also named the AP MVP.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2016.

Fran Tarkenton, Minnesota Vikings, Quarterback(1975)

Prior to this year, “Scrambling” Fran Tarkenton was chosen for seven Pro Bowls and 1975 was his eighth.  This was the first and only year that he would be named a First Team All-Pro and would the NFL in Touchdown Passes with 25.  The Minnesota Viking would also be named the AP MVP, PFWA MVP and the Bert Bell Award Winner.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1986.

Walter Payton, Chicago Bears, Running Back (1977)

This was Payton’s third season in the NFL, and the only one where he would win the Rushing Title with 1,852 Yards and lead the NFL in Rushing Touchdowns (14).  Payton would have eight more years where he would have 1,200 or more yards on the ground and he retired with 16,726, which as of this writing is second all-time.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1985.

Earl Campbell, Houston Oilers, Running Back (1978)

Campbell was a rookie in 1978 and the number one pick from Texas lived up to the hype.  Campbell had a league leading 1,450 Rushing Yards and he punched 13 into the end zone.  He would also win the AP Offensive Rookie of the Year and was named the PFWA MVP.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1985.

Earl Campbell, Houston Oilers, Running Back (2) (1979)

The Houston Oiler made history as the first ever repeat winner of the Offensive Player of the Year, and he would again win the Rushing Title with increased production of 1,697 Yards.  This time, Campbell would also finish atop the leaderboard in Rushing Touchdowns (19) and he repeated his PFWA MVP while adding the AP Player of the Year and Bert Bell Award.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1985.

Earl Campbell, Houston Oilers, Running Back (3) (1980)

Making waves as the first ever repeat winner of the Offensive Player of the Year, Campbell set a new standard with his third straight win.  Campbell again raised his game by setting a career high 1,934 Rushing Yards with his 13 Rushing TDs leading the NFL.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1985.

Dan Fouts, San Diego Chargers, Quarterback (1982)

Fouts was on his fourth straight year of leading the NFL in Passing Yards and he would throw for 2,883 in the strike-shortened campaign of 1982.  The Quarterback would be invited to the fourth of what would be six Pro Bowls and he would also lead in Touchdown Passes with 17.  He would also win the PFWA MVP.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1993.

Dan Marino, Miami Dolphins, Quarterback (1984)

Marino turned the football world on its head by becoming the first Quarterback to throw for over 5,000 Yards (5,084) and would also throw for a then record 48 Touchdown passes.  He would take Miami to the Super Bowl (they didn’t win) and he would also win the PFWA and AP MVP as well as the Bert Bell Award.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2005.

Marcus Allen, Los Angeles Raiders, Running Back (1985)

Marcus Allen had without a doubt the best regular season of his career with an NFL leading and career-high 1,759 Rushing Yards and 2,314 Yards From Scrimmage.  Allen, who had previously propelled the Raiders to a Super Bowl win, was also in 1985 named the AP and PFWA MVP.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2003.

Eric Dickerson, Los Angeles Rams, Running Back(1986)

Eric Dickerson easily could have been considered a contender for this award in 1983 and/or 1984, but it would have to wait until 1986 before he won the Offensive Player of the Year.  This year would see Dickerson win his third Rushing Title with 1,821 Yards and it would be his third of five First Team All-Pro Selections. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1999.

Jerry Rice, San Francisco 49ers, Wide Receiver(1987)

We think we can agree that of this writing the greatest Wide Receiver of all-time is Jerry Rice.  Whether you agree with that or not, Rice made history in 1987 as he first Wide Receiver to win the Offensive Player of the Year and he did so with 22 Touchdown Receptions, which set a record at the time (since eclipsed by Randy Moss).  As we all know, this was only the beginning for Rice who was in the second of 11 straight Pro Bowls.  Rice also won the PFWA MVP and the Bert Bell Award.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2010.

Joe Montana, San Francisco 49ers, Quarterback (1989)

How loaded were the San Francisco 49ers in late 80s?  Montana was the third different 49er to win the Offensive Player of the Year following Jerry Rice and Roger Craig.  In this season, Montana would lead the NFL in Completion Percentage (70.2) while throwing for 3,521 Yards and 26 Touchdowns and more importantly he would win his fourth Super Bowl.  The legendary Quarterback would also win the AP MVP as well as the Bert Bell Award.   Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2000.

Warren Moon, Houston Oilers, Quarterback (1990)

At age 34, Warren Moon proved that he should have been in the NFL years before after having to prove himself as a black Quarterback in the Canadian Football League.  Moon would lead all passers with 4,689 Yards and 33 Touchdown Passes.   Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2006.

Thurman Thomas, Buffalo Bills, Running Back (1991)

Thurman Thomas would lead the NFL in Yards From Scrimmage four years in a row, and in 1991 it was the third of that streak. Thomas was a First Team All-Pro for the second and last time this season and he would also be selected as the AP and PFWA MVP.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2007.

Steve Young, San Francisco 49ers, Quarterback (1992)

Steve Young replicated what his predecessor did (Joe Montana) by winning the Offensive Player of the Year.  Young would be chosen this year for his first of seven Pro Bowls and he was the NFL leader in Completion Percentage (66.7) and Touchdown Passes (25).  He would also capture the AP MVP, PFWA MVP and the Bert Bell Award.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2005.

Jerry Rice, San Francisco 49ers, Wide Receiver (2) (1993)

This was the fourth of six seasons where Rice would lead the NFL in Receiving Yards (1,503) and the final one of six where he was at the top in Receiving Touchdowns (15).  This would be the only major individual award that Rice would win in 1993.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2010.

Barry Sanders, Detroit Lions, Running Back (1994)

Sanders would win the Rushing Title for the second time with 1,883 Yards and would also finish atop the Yards From Scrimmage leaderboard with 2,166 Yards.  This was his third First Team All-Pro Selection.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2004.

Brett Favre, Green Bay Packers, Quarterback (1995)

Surprisingly, this was the only time that Brett Favre would win this award.  In 1995, Favre would lead the NFL in Passing Yards (4,413) and Touchdown Passes (38), the former being a career high.  In this season he would win the AP MVP, PFWA MVP and Bert Bell Award and took the Packers to a Super Bowl win the following year.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2016.

Terrell Davis, Denver Broncos, Running Back (1996)

This year began Davis’ three years of dominance in the AFC running game and he would rush for 1,538 Yards and catch another 36 passes for 310 Yards.  He would be named a First Team All-Pro for the first of three straight seasons.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2017.

Barry Sanders, Detroit Lions, Running Back (2)(1997)

This was Sanders’ second Offensive Player of the Year Award, and he would shatter the accomplishments of his first win. The Lions Running Back rushed for a career high 2,058 Yards joining the exclusive “2,000 Club” and his 2,358 Yards From Scrimmage was easily the best in the NFL.  Sanders also won the AP MVP, PFWA MVP and the Bert Bell Award.  This would be his sixth and last First Team All-Pro Selection.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2004.

Terrell Davis, Denver Broncos, Running Back (2) (1998)

We will argue (and have often) that this is the season that put Terrell Davis in the Hall of Fame.  In 1998, T.D., rushed for a league leading 2,008 Yards and 21 Touchdowns and led the Broncos to their second consecutive Super Bowl win.  In ’98, Davis also won the AP and PFWA MVP Awards. After this season, injuries would decimate him but that three-year stint was so good that Canton could not ignore him. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2017.

Marshall Faulk, St. Louis Rams, Running Back (1999)

Marshall Faulk began his run of three First Team All-Pro Selections and this would be his first year in St. Louis after five seasons with the Indianapolis Colts.  Faulk was the ground attack for what would be “The Greatest Show on Turf” and in 1999, he would rush for 1,381 Yards, catch 87 passes for another 1,048 Yards and led the NFL with 2,429 Yards from Scrimmage.  Faulk would win the Super Bowl that year. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2011.

Marshall Faulk, St. Louis Rams, Running Back (2) (2000)

Faulk would again exceed 1,300 Rushing Yards, though he would not hit the 1,000 Receiving Yard mark, landing at “only” 830. Faulk would however have more Touchdowns than the previous season, as his 18 Rushing Touchdowns (league leading) and another 8 from the air, which totaled 26, again a league leading. Faulk would also win the AP and PFWA MVP.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2011.

Marshall Faulk, St. Louis Rams, Running Back (3) (2001)

Faulk became the second player since Earl Campbell to win the Offensive Player of the Year Award, and like the former Houston Oiler, he did it consecutively.  Faulk put up his fourth straight 2,000 plus Yards From Scrimmage year and again led the NFL in Touchdowns with 21.  He would also win the PFWA MVP and the Bert Bell Award.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2011.

LaDainian Tomlinson, San Diego Chargers, Running Back (2006)

By this time, LaDainian Tomlinson had already established himself as an elite NFL Running Back and he would win his first Rushing Title with 1,815 Yards and his second Rushing Touchdown title with a career high 28 Touchdowns.  He would have another three TDs for 31 total.  In 2006, he would also win the AP MVP, PFWA MVP, Walter Payton Man of the Year and the Bert Bell Award.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2017.

The following are the players who have won the AP Offensive Player of the Year in the NFL who are eligible for the Pro Football Hall of Fame and have not been selected:

Larry Brown, Washington Redskins, Running Back(1972)

This was the last great year of Larry Brown’s career and this would be his fourth straight and final Pro Bowl and we would set a career high with 1,216 Rushing Yards and his 1,689 Yards From Scrimmage would lead the NFL.  Brown also would lead the league in Approximate Value and would win the AP MVP and Bert Bell Award.  Unrankedon Notinhalloffame.com.

Bert Jones, Baltimore Colts, Quarterback (1976)

Bert Jones had only one Pro Bowl Season, and needless to say it was in 1976.  Jones led the NFL with 3,104 Passing Yards and had an 11-3 season.  He threw for 24 Touchdowns, which was a career high.  He would also win the AP MVP.  Unrankedon Notinhalloffame.com.

Ken Anderson, Cincinnati Bengals, Quarterback (1981)

Anderson would throw for career highs of 3,754 Passing Yards, 29 Touchdowns and a league leading 98.4 Quarterback Rating and he was on his third of what would be four Pro Bowls.  He would take the Bengals to their first Super Bowl, albeit in a losing effort to the San Francisco 49ers.  He would also win the AP MVP, the PFWA MVP and the Bert Bell Award.  Ranked #12 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Joe Theismann, Washington Redskins, Quarterback (1983)

The year after Theismann Quarterbacked the Redskins to the Super Bowl, Theismann had the best regular season of his career with career highs in Passing Yards (3,714) and Touchdown Passes (29).  This year, Theismann would also win the PFWA and AP MVP.  Unrankedon Notinhalloffame.com.

Roger Craig, San Francisco 49ers, Running Back(1988)

Craig was an absolute beast at Running Back in 1988 and he would lead the National Football League in Yards from Scrimmage with 2,036 Yards.  This was three years after he became the first ever player to eclipse four digits in Rushing and Receiving Yards.  He would go on to have 13,100 Yards from Scrimmage over his career.  Ranked #6 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Priest Holmes, Kansas City Chiefs, Running Back (2002)

Holmes was in the middle of a three-year run of three straight Pro Bowls and First Team All-Pro Selections and in this season he would rush for 1,615 Yards an NFL leading 21 Touchdowns.  He would also have another 687 Receiving Yards, which would tally 2,287 Yards From Scrimmage, his career high.  Unrankedon Notinhalloffame.com.

Jamal Lewis, Baltimore Ravens, Running Back (2003)

While Jamal Lewis had many good seasons in the National Football League, there was one that was unquestionably incredible. That season (2003), Lewis would join the very exclusive 2,000 Yard Rushing Club (2,066) and he would also win the PFWA MVP.  Unrankedon Notinhalloffame.com.

Shaun Alexander, Seattle Seahawks, Running Back (2005)

Shaun Alexander led the NFL in Rushing Yard (1,880) and Rushing Touchdowns (27) and this was easily the best season of his career. It was also his last decent season. Forgetting that, Alexander would in 2005 also win the AP and PFWA MVP and the Bert Bell Award.  Unrankedon Notinhalloffame.com.

Let’s update our tally, shall we?

Award in Question

Percentage of recipients who have entered the HOF

Percentage of recipients by year who have entered the HOF.

NBA MVP

100%

100%

NHL Norris

90.5%

96.4%

NBA All Star Game MVP

89.5%

91.7%

NHL Conn Smythe

74.2%

85.4%

NFL AP Offensive Player of the Year

73.1%

79.4%

NHL Lady Byng

63.8%

76.0%

NFL Super Bowl MVP

60.6%

64.9%

NBA Defensive Player of the Year

58.3%

56.5%

NBA Rookie of the Year

56.5%

56.5%

NFL Pro Bowl MVP

52.3%

54.8%

MLB Lou Gehrig Award

51.9%

51.9%

MLB Roberto Clemente Award

47.4%

47.4%

MLB/NL/AL Cy Young Award

44.4%

55.4%

MLB Babe Ruth Award

37.0%

39.3%

NHL Frank J. Selke Trophy

33.3%

36.7%

MLB Hutch Award

33.1%

33.1%

NFL Offensive Rookie of the Year

28.6%

28.6%

MLB Edgar Martinez Award

26.7%

17.2%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Designated Hitter)

25.0%

30.8%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Shortstop)

23.5%

52.6%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove

21.7%

36.8%

NFL Defensive Rookie of the Year

20.6%

20.6%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Catcher)

20.0%

22.5%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Second Base)

18.8%

39.8%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Shortstop)

18.2%

35.1%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Pitcher)

18.2%

20.1%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Second Base)

16.7%

32.7%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Outfield)

16.7%

30.1%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Outfield)

15.7%

25.2%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Third Base)

14.3%

14.3%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Third Base)

13.6%

14.3%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (First Base)

13.6%

13.3%

MLB (NL/AL) Rookie of the Year

13.3%

13.3%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Catcher)

10.3%

15.2%

NBA Most Improved Player of the Year

5.3%

3.2%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (First Base)

3.8%

3.2%

So, who is up next?

The following are the players who have won the Offensive Player of the Year Award in the National Football League who have retired but have not met the mandatory years out of the game to qualify for the Pro Football Hall of Fame:

Peyton Manning, Indianapolis Colts, Quarterback(2004)

This was the second of Peyton Manning’s seven First Team All-Pro Selections and he would do so by throwing a league-leading 49 Touchdown Passes on 4,557 Yards.  The OPOY was one of many awards that the Colts Quarterback would collect in 2004 as he was also the PFWA MVP, AP MVP and the Bert Bell Award winner.  Manning is eligible for the Hall of Fame in 2021.

Chris Johnson, Tennessee Titans, Running Back(2009)

The 2,006 Rushing Yards would bring Chris Johnson to the exclusive 2G   Rushing Club, but while he wasn’t expected to repeat it, he never came very close.  No matter.  In this season, Johnson also led the NFL in Yards From Scrimmage with 2,509 Yards.  Johnson is eligible for the Hall of Fame in 2023.

Peyton Manning, Denver Broncos, Quarterback (2)(2013)

Manning was in his second season with the Denver Broncos and he would set a career-high with 5,477 Passing Yards and 55 Touchdown Passes.  This year would be his seventh and final First Team All-Pro and he would also win the AP MVP, PFWA MVP and the Bert Bell Award.  Manning is eligible for the Hall of Fame in 2021.

DeMarco Murray, Dallas Cowboys, Running Back(2014)

Murray would lead the NFL in Rushing Yards (1,845), Rushing Touchdowns (13) and Yards From Scrimmage (2,261).  This would be his only season as a First Team All-Pro and he would retire with 9,339 Yards From Scrimmage.  Johnson is eligible for the Hall of Fame in 2023.

The following are the players who have won the Offensive Player of the Year Award who are still active.

Tom Brady, New England Patriots, Quarterback (2007)

In 2007, Tom Brady would lead the NFL in Passing Yards with a career high 4,806 and 50 Touchdown Passes.  By this time, Brady already has won three Super Bowls and in 2007, he would win the AP and PFWA MVP as well as the Bert Bell Award. 41 Years Old, Playing for the New England Patriots.

Drew Brees, New Orleans Saints, Quarterback (2008)

Brees threw for his first 5,000 Yard Season (5,069) and this was the first time that he led the NFL in Touchdown Passes (34). This was the season that cemented Brees as a bona fide elite Quarterback in the National Football League.  40 Years Old, Playing for the New Orleans Saints.

Tom Brady, New England Patriots, Quarterback (2) (2010)

Brady returns to this accolade with an NFL leading 36 Touchdown Passes.  This was also his second First Team All-Pro Selection and he would also win the AP and PFWA MVP.  41 Years Old, Playing for the New England Patriots.

Drew Brees, New Orleans Saints, Quarterback (2) (2011)

In 2011, Brees threw for a career-highs of 5,476 Yards and 46 Touchdown Passes and took the Saints to a 13-3 record.  The Quarterback was also chosen for his seventh Pro Bowl.  40 Years Old, Playing for the New Orleans Saints.

Adrian Peterson, Minnesota Vikings, Running Back (2012)

This was the season where Adrian Peterson would become one of the members of the 2,000 Rushing Yard Club with a season of 2,097 Yards.  A.P. was not surprisingly also the NFL leader in Yards From Scrimmage (2,314) and the Running Back would also win the AP and PFWA MVP and the Bert Bell Award.  This season would see him also make his third of four First Team All-Pros.  34 Years Old, Playing for the Washington Redskins.

Cam Newton, Carolina Panthers, Quarterback (2015)

Newton would take the Panthers to the Super Bowl that season and he would earn what is to date his first First Team All-Pro Selection. Newton threw for 3,837 Yards and 35 Touchdowns and also rushed for another 636 Yards and 10 TDs.  Newton would also be awarded the AP MVP, PFWA MVP and Bert Bell Award.  31 Years Old, Playing for the Carolina Panthers.

Matt Ryan, Atlanta Falcons, Quarterback (2016)

Ryan set career-highs with 4,944 Passing Yards and 38 Touchdown Passes and to date this is the only First Team All-Pro Selection. He would also win the AP MVP, PFWA MVP and the Bert Bell Award.  34 Years Old, Playing for the Atlanta Falcons.

Todd Gurley, Los Angeles Rams, Running Back (2017)

Gurley was a First Team All-Pro for the first time in his career, and he would lead the NFL in Rushing Touchdowns with 13.  He would also top the NFL with 2,093 Yards From Scrimmage, 19 Touchdowns and an Approximate Value of 19.  25 Years Old, Playing for the Los Angeles Rams.

Patrick Mahomes, Kansas City Chiefs, Quarterback (2018)

In his first season as a starting Quarterback, Mahomes shattered all lofty expectations with a league leading 50 Touchdown passes on 5,097 Passing Yards.  He would also be named the AP and PFWA Player of the Year.  24 Years Old, Playing for the Kansas City Chiefs.

It certainly appears that the Offensive Player of the Year Award is a huge springboard to Canton immortality.

How do you do the Offensive Player of the Year without going to the defensive side of the same idea?  That is what we are doing next!

As always, we thank you for that support and look for that soon!





Welcome to a new feature on Notinhalloffame.com, where I, the Committee Chairman, come up with random pop-culture lists of drunken ramblings.  

This is the kind of useless tripe that I excel at, though it did nothing to help me with high school English class, nor did it impress any of the ladies, but as a middle-aged married guy, who still consumes alcoholic beverages that rivals anyone on Celebrity Rehab, I can say with full Joe Walsh meaning that "Life's Been Good To Me So Far".

With that all being said, here is the first one, which was created after binge-watching all eleven seasons of M*A*S*H.   I did this with the help of local Barbadian beer and rum. I have ten musings while watching the show that only comes with an increased blood alcohol level.

Before I do that, I am ignoring the most obvious observations, the most glaring of which being that the Korean War lasted two and a half years and M*A*S*H ran for 11 seasons.  Yeah, this led to continuity errors as when they occasionally mentioned dates or actual events both Henry Blake and Sherman Potter would have been the commanding officer for.  Every season, the sitcom had a Christmas episode, and in an early episode where they are looking for a Rabbi, Hawkeye and Trapper refer to (Duke) Forrest, who Hawkeye recalled left two years ago.  Hell, when Potter arrived, they said it was September of 1952, and they did one episode that went from New Year's to New Year's that spanned the entire year of 1951!  If we are to believe the timeline, this is some severe Rick and Morty parallel universe shit that no amount of booze can help me comprehend.

Another obvious one was the recycling of Asian-American actors.  I know that it was a different time, but you can't tell me that there weren't enough of them so that they did not have to regurgitate the same people.  I will grant that watching Mako in anything is good, but he played four different officers over two countries.  It wasn't just him as  an actor named Richard Lee Sung was in eleven various episodes, never playing the same role. 

I have more.

Byron Chung was in seven episodes (again playing seven different roles), and you may have seen him as Jin's dad in Lost.  Soon Tek-Oh, who was the evil Colonel in Missing in Action 2, was in it five times (five different roles).   For what it's worth, he was in four different Magnum P.I. episodes and again never playing the same character.

For those of you under 20, I am referring to the original Magnum P.I. and not this reboot where the lead character has no mustache!

I don't know why I bothered typing that earlier sentence.  Nobody under 20 knows what M*A*S*H is so nobody from that demographic clicked here.

Here are my ten drunken observations of M*A*S*H:

1. Hawkeye treated Radar like shit.Now he treated a lot of people horribly, and most have them deserved it, but without Radar, many of his plans could not have occurred.  Besides that, picking on Radar was low-hanging fruit.  He was also especially condescending, mainly when the company clerk spoke to a patient and tried to help.   Hawkeye would get on his high horse and not so subtly relate to Radar who was the surgeon and who was the Corporal.  I wager that when they reunited in the States (if they did), he still enforced that hierarchy.  

Oh, and I know there were times when Hawkeye successfully acted as Radar's older brother/father figure, but often it was because he did something to bring him down in the first place.  Oh, and that final salute that he gave Radar before shipping out does not make up for his overall dickishness.  

2. Jamie Farr was 38 years old when he was cast as Corporal Klinger, thus making his 49 when the show ended.Wasn't he way too old from the beginning to play a corpsman? So was Johnny Haymer, who played Supply Sgt. Zale.   He was 53 when he was first cast!  More often than not, the wounded soldiers who were shown as casualties were young, why not the enlisted men behind the lines?  The average age of the 4077th must have been close to 40…especially by the series end in '83.

3. There is not one plotline involving Father Mulcahey that was interesting.He holds the distinction of being my least favorite billed character in one of my top 100 television shows, and yes, I have counted 100.  The only time I got a remote chuckle was in the show's pilot where the priest won a date for two to Tokyo with the appropriately named Lt. Dish. Incidentally, that episode, Mulcahey was played by another actor, and not the mopey looking William Christopher who would adopt the role in all other episodes.

4. M*A*S*H may have had the most annoying laugh track of any sitcom.I don't know this for sure, but I am convinced they recycled the same five "laughs" over and over again

5. "Hot Lips" really hit the wall following the seventh season.No wonder Lt. Colonel Donald Penobscott dumper her expanding mommy ass in the seventh season. I think (not coincidentally) this is also why the nurses would become progressively less hot.

6. Radar's voice was rarely heard on the public address speaker but was the only one shown visually making the announcements.Who was that guy?

7. The best guest star was unquestionably Edward Winter as an intelligence officer, Colonel Flagg.The worst was Robert Alda (Alan Alda's real dad) as Dr. Anthony Borelli. Hawkeye was sanctimonious enough…two Aldas was unbearable…which brings me to…

8. Now it may seem I hate Hawkeye.I don't detest him at all.  He is the guy that I want to party with in the early episodes of the show. Sanctimonious Hawkeye is a drag, and the latter half of the series saw that happen as often as a Three's Company misunderstanding.  

9. How many times did Hawkeye operate while legally drunk? The answer is probably as many times as I wrote a chapter drunk.

10.The most underrated character in all of sitcom history is Charles Emerson Winchester III.He arrived at the perfect time to replace Major Burns who left the show knowing that the persona he created had no redeemable qualities and it could not grow with how the show was progressing.  Winchester fit in perfectly, and David Ogden Stiers correctly earned two consecutive Emmy nominations, though he lost (and I have no problem with this) to Taxi stars.   He lost to Danny DeVito and Christopher Lloyd for their portrayals of Louie DePalma and Reverend Jim Ignatowski respectively.  

If (When) I drink more, I am confident I can puke out ten more of these, but this will have to do for now.

Look for more of these soon, as my beer fridge is full.

Step by Step Guide on How to Become A Sports Betting Professional

As fun as it may sound to bet on sports for a living, nothing about being a sports betting professional is easy or stress-free. Professional sports betting requires a lot of hard work and can be incredibly stressful. 

That said, for the right person, professional sports betting can be the ultimate, rewarding career. But it’s certainly not something you should rush into just because you’re bored with your usual work routine. If you think you have what it takes, pay close attention to this guide on how to become a professional sports better.

Step 1: Gain A Thorough Understanding of Betting on Sports

Whether you are a complete beginner or have a little experience, it’s important to start with the basics. To make the most educated bets, you have to have a thorough knowledge of the subjects you are betting on. In the case of sports betting, you need to research and develop in-depth understanding of how sports betting is conducted, as well as the various sports you will be betting on. 

Many popular US sportsbooks offer guides and tutorials that can help you to become more familiar with betting practices and the way sports betting is conducted. Some sites even provide free advice for increasing your chances of winning. 

Step 2: Money Management

Before you start making bets, it’s important for you to properly manage your bankroll. Money management is essential to becoming a successful sports betting professional. Determine how much of your own money you can afford to set aside specifically for betting. Then, decide ahead of time how much you can stake on your bets. Making these decisions before you get started can help you avoid making disastrous financial decisions.

Additionally, when first starting out as a sports better, no matter how seriously it’s taken, it’s recommended that you don’t immediately quit your regular job. It can take a while to get started as a professional sports better and the last thing you want it to dig yourself a financial hole. Before you give up your job, consider the inconsistent income that comes with sports betting, as well as all the bills you still have to pay. Wait until you can truly rely on your winnings from sports betting before quitting your job and betting on sports full-time.

Step 3: Understand the Risks

Becoming a professional sports better comes with its own set of risks. If it were easy, everyone would do it. When it comes to betting on sports, especially in a professional setting, you can and will lose real money that you can’t immediately get back. Additionally, being a professional sports better doesn’t typically provide a consistent flow of income. You may go through periods where you win big, or you may experience a frustrating losing streak. It’s all part of the process, but you should be aware of the risks beforehand. 

Step 4: Know Where to Place Your Bets

One of the most important decisions you will make as a professional sports better is where to place your bets.  There are so many sportsbooks to choose from, it can be overwhelming trying to figure out which one is right for you. Do a bit of research into online sportsbooks to see what they have to offer, as well as what other customers are saying about them. 

Many popular online casinos support sports betting and with the numerous bonuses and rewards they offer you could get a great head start by choosing the right site on which to place your bets. Consider some of the top online casinos with sports betting and pay close attention to how to unlock a casino welcome bonus so you get started right away with real money.

Step 5: Practice, Practice, Practice

Especially if you are just starting out, understand that it may take some time before you truly understand how things operate and feel comfortable placing different types of bets. Professional sports betters find a method that works best for them and then stick with it. The more you practice, the better understanding you will gain of what method and which types of bets are most beneficial for you. 

Step 6: Control Your Emotions

Think with your head, not your heart. There’s nothing wrong with being passionate about what you do, but to be a successful sports better, you need to be able to think logically and leave emotions out of it. To do this, you should identify your own emotional weaknesses and take note of how they influence your bets. 

For example, perhaps you tend to pull for the underdogs, feeling the need to give them the benefit of the doubt. Logically speaking, an underdog is less likely to win. So unless your bet is backed by real logic, betting on a team or a person just because you “feel” for them, isn’t a good idea. 

Step 7: Never Stop Learning

When it comes to professional sports betting, the hard work never ends. As fun as it can be, to be a true professional, you can never get too comfortable. Athletics are always changing and evolving, which means you must always be open and willing to learn more and adjust as time goes on. 

Join a community where you can talk to and learn from other sports betters. Keep up with any relevant news and information, as it is released, because you never know what effect it can have on your bets. 

Additionally, continue learning from your own experiences. Consider how things have gone in the past and what you could have or should have done differently to get a better result. To become a truly successful professional sports better, you should never stop learning.