From the Desk of the Chairman

With the announcement of the Modern Era candidates for the Baseball Hall of Fame, it is now time for us to look at the upcoming ballot for the Baseball Writers, who will be voting for the Class of 2020.

What we know so far, is that there is no way that this will be an empty class.  We have a sure-fire first ballot inductee in Derek Jeter, who with his 3,465 career Hits, a career Batting Average of .310 and five-time World Series Champion could become the second former player following Mariano Rivera, to receive a unanimous vote.  Should that happen, it will mark a back-to-back of two former New York Yankees teammates earning that distinction.

Last year, Curt Schilling received 60.9% of the vote last year in a very strong field (especially for pitchers) says Paruk from SportsBettingDime.com.  Less tainted by PEDS than the likes of Roger Clemens and Barry Bonds, Schilling should crack 75% if the outspoken Trump supporter doesn’t rub writers the wrong way in the next couple months.

As for Bonds and Clemens, they are both entering their eighth year of eligibility.  What once was thought as an impossible mountain to climb, the two stars both approached 60% last year.  While enshrinement this year seems unlikely, a continued rise could bode well for them in the next two years.

As for us, the one we are looking at the most is Larry Walker.  The Canadian slugger seemed to have no chance for Cooperstown a year ago, but he rocketed from 34.1% to 54.6% last year, and with him facing his final year of eligibility, we could see the first player inducted with a Colorado Rockies cap.

One thing, we know for sure is that we will be paying attention!a

 

We here at Notinhalloffame.com thought it would be fun to take a look at the major awards in North American team sports and see how it translates into Hall of Fame potential.

Needless to say, different awards in different sports yield hall of fame potential.  In basketball, the team sport with the least number of players on a roster, the dividend for greatness much higher.  In baseball, it is not as much as a great individual season does not have the same impact.

After the last three focused on awards issued in the NFL, we are returning to the National Hockey League and the Bill Masterton Memorial Trophy.

This is a very unique award that does not necessarily reflect on-ice accomplishments.  It was created to honor Bill Masterton of the Minnesota North Stars, who died on January 15, 1968 after sustaining an injury during a game.  The Award is given to the player who best exemplifies the quality of perseverance, sportsmanship and dedication to hockey.  Each NHL team nominates one player from their team for the accolade.

Generally, the player who wins this award usually comes back from a serious injury or any other ailment that could be career-threatening.  

So how many players have won the Bill Masterton Memorial Trophy have been enshrined to the Hockey Hall of Fame?

Let’s find out!

The following are the past players who have won the Bill Masterton Memorial Award in the NHL who are eligible for the Hockey Hall of Fame and have been enshrined.

Jean Ratelle, New York Rangers (1971)

Ratelle was one of the cleanest players in hockey and was also one of the classiest.  This was like a lifetime achievement award, even though his career was only in the mid-way mark.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1985.

Bobby Clarke, Philadelphia Flyers (1972)

Considering Bobby Clarke was only 22 when he won this, it would not start a trend where young players would win the Masterton. In 1972, Clarke was a rising star and had overcome diabetes to play at a high level.  He would become an elite player shortly after and also a three-time Hart Trophy winner and two-time Stanley Cup Champion.  Clarke also became the first Bill Masterton Memorial Trophy winner who would also win the Hart at one time in his career.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1987.

Henri Richard, Montreal Canadiens (1974)

This was viewed as a bit of a lifetime achievement award for Henri Richard’s whose career was nearing the end.  “The Pocket Rocket” would end up winning a whopping 11 Stanley Cups in a career spent entirely with Montreal.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1979.

Rod Gilbert, New York Rangers (1976)

Gilbert played his entire career with the Rangers and this was near the end of it.  The forward scored 1,021 Points and he overcame a back injury early in his career. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1982.

Serge Savard, Montreal Canadiens (1979)

Serge Savard won his eight Stanley Cup with the Habs this year and he was also a Second Team All-Star this year, the only time he earned this honor.  The Defenseman was the first Bill Masterton Memorial Award winner to be named a post season NHL All-Star.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1986.

Lanny McDonald, Calgary Flames (1983)

McDonald was one of the most popular players with fans and teammates alike and this was his greatest season in terms of stats. McDonald would score 66 Goals and 98 Points, both career-highs and he would be named a Second Team All-Star, which was the first time he earned a post season All-Star accolade.  In his final season, he would win the Stanley Cup with the Flames.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1992.

Brad Park, Detroit Red Wings (1984)

This was Brad Park’s first season in Detroit, and his penultimate campaign in the NHL.  He was one the more beloved players in the league, and was still a strong performer as he had 58 Points this year.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1988.

Mario Lemieux, Pittsburgh Penguins (1993)

Choosing Mario Lemieux had to be the easiest decision in this award’s history.  Lemieux came back to hockey after contracting Hodgkin’s lymphoma, and despite missing 22 Games, he would win the Hart Trophy. Ted Lindsay Award and Art Ross Trophy. No other player who won the Bill Masterton award has a year this good in the same campaign.   Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1997.

Cam Neely, Boston Bruins (1994)

Cam Neely had injury upon injury pile up and he only played 22 Games in 1991-92 and 1992-93 combined.  He came during this year and scored 50 Goals, while only playing 49 Games and he would be named a Second Team All-Star.  He would only be able to play 89 Games more in the NHL and he had to retire at the age of 30.  Neely went down in history as one of the most popular Bruins players ever, which says a lot when you think of all the legends who wore the “B”.   Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2005.

Pat LaFontaine, Buffalo Sabres (1995)

In the year prior, Pat LaFontaine suffered a severe concussion and the post-concussion syndrome forced him to miss most of that season and this season.  He returned to play 22 Games and scored 27 Points.  LaFontaine would later suffer more concussions and would be forced to retire in 1998.   Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2005.

Steve Yzerman, Detroit Red Wings (2003)

By this point in his career, Steve Yzerman had already won three Stanley Cups but he suffered a massive knee injury, and would have a knee realignment done.  The Red Wing would come back to play 16 Games this year.  Yzerman would play two more seasons and would score 1,755 Points in his Hall of Fame career.   Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2009.

Teemu Selanne, Mighty Ducks of Anaheim (2006)

This was a true comeback year for Teemu Selanne in every sense of the word.  Selanne recovered from knee surgery to have a 90 Point campaign, which was the first time he reached that plateau in seven years.  Selanne would have a 94 point year the season after and would take the Ducks to win the Stanley Cup   Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2017.

 

The following are the players who have won the Bill Masterton Memorial Award in the NHL who are eligible for the Hockey Hall of Fame and have not been selected:

Claude Provost, Montreal Canadiens (1968)

Claude Provost was one of the best two-way players of his day, and in 1968, he was nearing the end of his career.  This year, Provost had won his eighth of nine Stanley Cups, and he would play two more seasons in the NHL  Ranked #12 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Ted Hampson, Oakland Seals (1969)

After an injury riddled 1967-68 season, Oakland Seals’ Team Captain, Ted Hampson responded with the best year of his career with a 75 Point outage.  He would later win the Paul Deneau Award in the WHA as that league’s most gentlemanly player.  Hampson combined NHL/WHA career would see him accumulate 556 Points.  Unrankedon Notinhalloffame.com

Pit Martin, Chicago Blackhawks (1970)

While Pit Martin was not the best player on the Chicago Blackhawks, he was the heartbeat of the team.  Martin helped Chicago go from worst to first that year and he would score 63 Points as well post his first (of three) 30 Goal seasons. Ranked #126on Notinhalloffame.com.

Lowell McDonald, Pittsburgh Penguins (1973)

Lowell McDonald only played 10 Games in the year before due to severe cartilage damage to his knees.  The 1972-73 Season campaign saw the Penguin score 75 Points, which was then a record for him.  He would score 390 Points over 506 NHL Games.  Unrankedon Notinhalloffame.com

Don Luce, Buffalo Sabres (1975)

This was the best season that Don Luce ever had as his 33 Goals and 76 Points were a career-high.  Luce scored 526 Points over his career and he would finish in the top ten in Frank J. Selke Award three times.  This was the only award that Luce would win.  Unrankedon Notinhalloffame.com

Ed Westfall, New York Islanders (1977)

Westfall would win this award for being one of the great on-ice leaders of the game, and this occurred late in his career. Westfall won two Stanley Cups earlier with the Boston Bruins.  Unrankedon Notinhalloffame.com

Butch Goring, Los Angeles Kings (1978)

Goring would win this based on carving out a successful NHL career despite being slight in stature.  Goring would win the Lady Byng Trophy, making him the first Masterton winner to secure a second award in the same year.  He would later join the New York Islanders and would win four Stanley Cups.  Ranked #38 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Al MacAdam, Minnesota North Stars (1980)

MacAdam was a gritty player who in 1979-80 would post his best career numbers.  That year he would 42 Goals, 51 Assists and 93 Points, all career-highs, as was his +36. Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com

Blake Dunlop, St. Louis Blues (1981)

This was Dunlop’s breakout year, where had 67 Assists and 87 Points, both of which were career-highs.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com

Glenn Resch, Colorado Rockies (1982)

The Colorado Rockies of the NHL were never any good, but Glenn Resch brought them respectability.  He had previously been a Second Team All-Star twice and a two-time Stanley Cup Champion with the New York Islanders.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com

Anders Hedberg, New York Rangers (1985)

Anders Hedberg became the first European to win this award and he was an initial trailblazer for showing the NHL that Swedish players could compete at an elite level in North America.  This was Hedberg’s final season in the NHL, and he would score 51 Points, and 855 in the NHL and WHA combined.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com

Charlie Simmer, Boston Bruins (1986)

Charlie Simmer scored 60 Points this year and he remained a good NHL sniper despite having extensive ligament damage.  He was a former two-time First Team All-Star and would put the puck in the net 342 times over his career.  Ranked #112 on Notinhalloffame.com

Doug Jarvis, Hartford Whalers (1987)

This was a special season where Doug Jarvis would break the record of consecutive games of 915 Games.  He would eventually play 964 Games in a row.  Ranked #70 on Notinhalloffame.com

Bob Bourne, Los Angeles Kings (1988)

This was the final season of Bob Bourne’s career, and 14thoverall.  Bourne had previously won four Stanley Cups with the New York Islanders and would score 582 Points overall.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com

Tim Kerr, Philadelphia Flyers (1989)

From 1983-84 to 1986-87, Tim Kerr was a 50 Goal scorer but in 1987-88, he was only able to play eight games due to knee and shoulder issues.  He bounced back this season to score 48 Goals.  Ranked #67 on Notinhalloffame.com

Gord Kluzak, Boston Bruins (1990)

Gord Kluzak was the first overall draft pick in 1982, and for the first few years the blueliner was the shutdown blueliner they expected him to be.  Sadly, he suffered knee injury after knee injury and in 1988-89 he was only able to play three Games.  This year, he fought back, but knee surgeries held him to only eight games, but the fact that he played at all was bordered on miraculous.  He played two more games and after his tenth knee surgery, he had to call it a career.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com

Dave Taylor, Los Angeles Kings (1991)

Dave Taylor spent all of his 17 years in the National Hockey League with the Los Angeles Kings.  This was year 14.  Taylor was one of the most respected players in hockey and he also won the King Clancy Award this year, making him the first to win both in the same season.  Ranked #20 on Notinhalloffame.com

Mark Fitzpatrick, New York Islanders (1992)

Mark Fitzpatrick missed most of the previous campaign due to Eosinophilia-myalgia, a potentially fatal neural disease.  He would come back to play 30 games in net for the Isles this year.  He would play until the 1999-00 Season.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com

Gary Roberts, Calgary Flames (1996)

Gary Roberts would suffer nerve issues with his neck that caused him to miss most of the 1994-95 season and he was only able to play 35 Games this year.  In what could have been a career ending injury, Roberts continued to play more than a decade more until he was 42.  Ranked #74 on Notinhalloffame.com

Tony Granato, San Jose Sharks (1997)

Tony Granato would have a head injury in a game on January of 1996 that was so bad that he suffered bleeding in the left lobe of his brain.  He would come back to hockey after brain surgery where the Shark would have a 40 Point campaign.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com

Jamie McLennan, St. Louis Blues (1998)

Jamie McLennan was playing for the New York Islanders and he would suffer from bacterial meningitis that would be life threatening.  McLennan missed a lot of time and he would come back to the NHL with St. Louis where he played 30 Games with a 2.17 GAA.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com

John Cullen, Tampa Bay Lightning (1999)

The career of John Cullen seemed to end when he contacted non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma in 1997.  The Center had to sit out the 1997-98 season but he managed to come back to the NHL and was in four Games for the Lightning that year, before he would retire for good.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com

Kan Daneyko, New Jersey Devils (2000)

Ken Daneyko did not come back from an injury, but he did battle alcoholism, which likely kept him in the NHL.  Daneyko had a long career in hockey, with all 20 seasons being served in a New Jersey Devils jersey.  He would win three Stanley Cups over his career.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com

Adam Graves, New York Rangers (2001)

We have used the term “Lifetime Achievement Award” in relation to this particular accolade, and we will use it again for Adam Graves’ 2001 Masterton win.  The Left Wing was a grizzled vet by this time and had previously won the Stanley Cup with the New York Rangers in 1994.  Ranked #72 on Notinhalloffame.com

Saku Koivu, Montreal Canadiens (2002)

Saku Koivu was diagnosed with Burkitt’s lymphoma in September before the season, and it was expected that he would miss the entire year.  Koivu shocked everyone by returning with three games left in the year and he would also participate in the playoffs.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com

Brian Berard, Chicago Blackhawks (2004)

In 1997, Brian Berard was the Calder Trophy in 1997 and would later suffer an injury to his eye.  Berard would be legally blind in one eye and he won this award due to his perseverance to continue to play.  This season would see Berard score a career high 47 Points.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com

Jason Blake, Toronto Maple Leafs (2008)

Jason Blake would be diagnosed with chronic myelogenous leukemia but would play the entire year.  He would have 52 Points this campaign.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com

Steve Sullivan, Nashville Predators (2009)

After having a 60 Point year in 2006-07, Steve Sullivan would later have issues that would cause him to miss a year and parts of two others due to fragmented disc and groin issues.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com

Jose Theodore, Washington Capitals (2010)

Jose Theodore was a surprise winner of the Hart Trophy and Vezina in 2002, and this was his best year since that campaign.  This year, Theodore had to deal with the death of his young son due to the complications of a premature birth.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com

Ian Laperriere, Philadelphia Flyers (2011)

In the 2010 playoffs, Laperriere blocked a shot with his face that resulted in post-concussion syndrome.  He would not play this year, and for that matter ever again. This would make him the first player to win this after his career was technically over.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com

Josh Harding, Minnesota Wild (2013)

Josh Harding would come back after being diagnosed with multiple sclerosis in the off-season, and would manage to play in five regular season games and the playoffs.  Harding played in 29 Games the following season and he would lead the NHL in Save Percentage (.933) and Goals Against Average (1.66).  That was the last year for Harding as he had a broken foot to begin the 2014-15 season, and after issues with his MS came up, he never played in the NHL again.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com

Let’s update our tally, shall we?

Award in Question

Percentage of recipients who have entered the HOF

Percentage of recipients by year who have entered the HOF.

NBA MVP

100%

100%

NHL Norris

90.5%

96.4%

NBA All Star Game MVP

89.5%

91.7%

NHL Conn Smythe

74.2%

85.4%

NFL AP Offensive Player of the Year

73.1%

79.4%

NHL Lady Byng

63.8%

76.0%

NFL Defensive Player of the Year

60.8%

71.1%

NFL Super Bowl MVP

60.6%

64.9%

NBA Defensive Player of the Year

58.3%

56.5%

NBA Rookie of the Year

56.5%

56.5%

NFL Pro Bowl MVP

52.3%

54.8%

MLB Lou Gehrig Award

51.9%

51.9%

MLB Roberto Clemente Award

47.4%

47.4%

MLB/NL/AL Cy Young Award

44.4%

55.4%

MLB Babe Ruth Award

37.0%

39.3%

NHL Frank J. Selke Trophy

33.3%

36.7%

MLB Hutch Award

33.1%

33.1%

NFL Offensive Rookie of the Year

28.6%

28.6%

NHL Bill Masterton Memorial Trophy

27.9%

27.9%

MLB Edgar Martinez Award

26.7%

17.2%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Designated Hitter)

25.0%

30.8%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Shortstop)

23.5%

52.6%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove

21.7%

36.8%

NFL Defensive Rookie of the Year

20.6%

20.6%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Catcher)

20.0%

22.5%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Second Base)

18.8%

39.8%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Shortstop)

18.2%

35.1%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Pitcher)

18.2%

20.1%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Second Base)

16.7%

32.7%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Outfield)

16.7%

30.1%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Outfield)

15.7%

25.2%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Third Base)

14.3%

14.3%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Third Base)

13.6%

14.3%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (First Base)

13.6%

13.3%

MLB (NL/AL) Rookie of the Year

13.3%

13.3%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Catcher)

10.3%

15.2%

NBA Most Improved Player of the Year

5.3%

3.2%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (First Base)

3.8%

3.2%

NFL AP Comeback Player of the Year

0.0%

0.0%

So, who is up next?

The following are the players who have won the Bill Masterton Memorial Trophy in the National Hockey League who have retired but have not met the mandatory years out of the game to qualify for the Pro Football Hall of Fame:

Dominic Moore, New York Rangers, (2014)

Moore returned to the NHL after taking 18 months off to tend to his wife, Katie, who was battling a rare form of liver cancer. She would pass away in January of 2013. Moore returned to the league with the New York Rangers playing 73 Games.  Eligible for the Hall of Fame in 2021.

The following are the players who have won the Bill Masterton Memorial Trophy who are still active.

Phil Kessel, Boston Bruins, (2007)

Phil Kessel became the first player to win the Bill Masterton Memorial Trophy as a rookie.  Kessel contracted testicular cancer, and missed 12 Games this year. He still managed to have a 29 Point year.  32 Years Old, Playing for the Arizona Coyotes.

Max Pacioretty, Montreal Canadiens, (2012)

In the 2010-11 season, Max Pacioretty was knocked out of a game with a concussion and a fractured vertebra.  He returned with his first 60 Point season.  30 Years Old, Playing for the Vegas Golden Knights.

Devan Dubynk, Minnesota Wild, (2015)

Devan Dubynk was carving out a decent career, though it was unremarkable.  He had played 171 Games in net for the Edmonton Oilers and was traded to the Nashville Predators in 2014 but only played there for two Games.  The Goalie signed with the Arizona Coyotes, where he played for 19 Games and had a 2.72 Goals Against Average, and was traded midseason to the Minnesota Wild.  Dubynk then wet on fire, taking them to the playoffs, where he went 27-9-2 with a 1.78 GAA.  He would be named an All-Star and was a Second Team All-Star that year.  He has since gone to two more All-Stars with Minnesota.  33 Years Old, Playing for the Minnesota Wild.

Jaromir Jagr, Pittsburgh Penguins, (2016)

How was Jaromir Jagr still playing in the NHL, and at a level where he scored 66 Points.  How is that not showing off a dedication to hockey?  47 Years Old, Playing for HC Kladno in the Czech League.

Craig Anderson, Ottawa Senators,(2017)

Anderson had a rough personal year as he had taken some time off mid-season, where he had tend to his wife who was diagnosed with cancer.  He returned and took the Senators to a surprise conference Final.  38 Years Old, Playing for the Ottawa Senators.

Brian Boyle, New Jersey Devils,(2018)

Brian Boyle was diagnosed with myeloid leukemia in training camp, which caused him to miss the start of the season.  Boyle returned in November and had a 23 Point season.  35 Years Old, Playing for the Florida Panthers.

Robin Lehner, New York Islanders,(2019)

Robin Lehner went public in the off-season about his battles with alcoholism and bi-polar disorder.  He came back with a career-high 2.13 Goals Against Average over 46 Games.  He would also win the William M. Jennings Award, making him the first to do win the Jennings and Masterton in the same year.  28 Years Old, Playing for the Chicago Blackhawks.

As you can see, the Bill Masterton Memorial Trophy does not go to the same person twice, and we don’t expect that will change in the future.

We will go back to the diamond and the most important individual award they have, the MVP.

As always, we thank you for that support and look for that soon!

Anybody who follows football at all knows that there is nothing quite as exciting as college football rivalries. The adrenaline is pumping not only for the teams playing, but also for the fans watching on the sidelines or at home. No matter which college team you root for when it comes time for those matches against your team’s all-time rivals, it is “game on.”

We here at Notinhalloffame.com thought it would be fun to take a look at the major awards in North American team sports and see how it translates into Hall of Fame potential.

Needless to say, different awards in different sports yield hall of fame potential.  In basketball, the team sport with the least number of players on a roster, the dividend for greatness much higher.  In baseball, it is not as much as a great individual season does not have the same impact.

Our focus now shifts towards the AP Comeback Player of the Year Award in the NFL.  Relatively speaking, this is a new award, so there won’t be too many players to dissect here.  How many of these winners made the Pro Football Hall of Fame?

Let’s find out!

The following are the past players who have won the AP Comeback Player of the Year in the NFL who are eligible for the Pro Football Hall of Fame and have been enshrined.

None.

The following are the players who have won the AP Comeback Player of the Year in the NFL who are eligible for the Pro Football Hall of Fame and have not been selected:

Doug Flutie, Buffalo Bills, Quarterback (1998)

The first winner of this award did not come back from injury.  He came back from Canada.  Doug Flutie was the hero whose Hail Mary won the Orange Bowl for Boston College against Miami.  The Quarterback was considered too short for the NFL and he would play in the USFL and Canada, though he would have stints in the NFL with Chicago and New England, though his run with the Patriots ended in 1989.  A decade later, he was signed by the Buffalo Bills and at age 36, he would play in 13 Games and throw for 2,711 Yards, 20 Touchdowns and go to the Pro Bowl.  Unrankedon Notinhalloffame.com.

Bryant Young, San Francisco 49ers, Defensive Tackle (1999)

Bryant Young suffered a severe broken leg late in 1998 and a metal rod had to be placed to assist his healing.  Young would return in 1999 with an 11.0 Sack season and a selection to the Pro Bowl.  He would play until 2007 and would record 89.5 Sacks in total.  Unrankedon Notinhalloffame.com.

Joe Johnson, New Orleans Saints, Defensive End(2000)

Joe Johnson was a Pro Bowler for the Saints in 1998, but a knee injury kept him out of the entire 1999 Season.  The Defensive End would come back in 2000 with his second (and final) Pro Bowl Selection and he would have a career-high 12.0 Sacks this year.  Unrankedon Notinhalloffame.com.

Garrison Hearst, San Francisco 49ers, Running Back (2001)

Garrison Hearst rushed for over 1,500 Yards in 1998, but he had to sit out two years due to Avascular Necrosis.  Many thought Hearst was done for good, but he returned in 2001 to the Niners and would rush for 1,206 Yards and go to his second (and final) Pro Bowl.  Unrankedon Notinhalloffame.com.

Tommy Maddox, Pittsburgh Steelers, Quarterback(2002)

Tommy Maddox played in the NFL from 1992 to 1995 with three different teams but the backup saw limited action and actually left football.  He came back in the Arena League in 2000, and then would be the MVP in the lone season of the XFL.  That was enough to make him desirable to the NFL again and he was signed by the Pittsburgh Steelers as their backup.  He would become their starter in 2002 and threw for 2,836 Yards and 20 TDs.  He would play until 2005.  Unrankedon Notinhalloffame.com.

Jon Kitna, Cincinnati Bengals, Quarterback (2003)

Jon Kitna was not coming back from injury or another league, but rather had one of the best years of his career.  He would throw for 3,591 Yards and a career-high 26 Touchdowns.  He played until 2011 and would overall throw for 29,745 Yards.  Unrankedon Notinhalloffame.com.

Tedy Bruschi, New England Patriots, Linebacker(2005)

In 2004, Tedy Bruschi went to his first (and only) Pro Bowl.  Shortly after the Pro Bowl Game, Bruschi suffered a minor stroke and partial paralysis. He announced that he would miss the 2005 season, but that wouldn’t be the case.  The Linebacker returned in October and played nine Games for the Patriots that year.  He would co-win this award Steve Smith of the Carolina Panthers  Unrankedon Notinhalloffame.com.

Chad Pennington, New York Jets, Quarterback (2006)

In 2005, Chad Pennington suffered multiple injuries and was only able to play in three Games.  2006 was a much different season as he started all 16 Games for the Jets and would throw for 3,352 Yards and 17 Touchdowns.  Unrankedon Notinhalloffame.com.

Greg Ellis, Dallas Cowboys, Linebacker (2007)

A ruptured Achilles ended Ellis’ 2006 Season after nine games, and he would return in 2007 with his best year ever. Ellis would go to the Pro Bowl for the only time and he had a career-high 12.5 Sacks.  Unrankedon Notinhalloffame.com.

Chad Pennington, Miami Dolphins, Quarterback (2) (2008)

After winning this award in 2006, Pennington had a bad 2007 beset with injuries and poor play.  He was released by the Jets (who had signed Brett Favre) and Pennington would join the Miami Dolphins as a Free Agent.  He would take Miami to the Playoffs and would throw for a career-high of 3,653 Passing Yards.  Sure enough, he would suffer shoulder problems and would only play four more games in his career.  To date, Pennington is the only repeat winner of this award.  Unrankedon Notinhalloffame.com.

Let’s update our tally, shall we?

Award in Question

Percentage of recipients who have entered the HOF

Percentage of recipients by year who have entered the HOF.

NBA MVP

100%

100%

NHL Norris

90.5%

96.4%

NBA All Star Game MVP

89.5%

91.7%

NHL Conn Smythe

74.2%

85.4%

NFL AP Offensive Player of the Year

73.1%

79.4%

NHL Lady Byng

63.8%

76.0%

NFL Defensive Player of the Year

60.8%

71.1%

NFL Super Bowl MVP

60.6%

64.9%

NBA Defensive Player of the Year

58.3%

56.5%

NBA Rookie of the Year

56.5%

56.5%

NFL Pro Bowl MVP

52.3%

54.8%

MLB Lou Gehrig Award

51.9%

51.9%

MLB Roberto Clemente Award

47.4%

47.4%

MLB/NL/AL Cy Young Award

44.4%

55.4%

MLB Babe Ruth Award

37.0%

39.3%

NHL Frank J. Selke Trophy

33.3%

36.7%

MLB Hutch Award

33.1%

33.1%

NFL Offensive Rookie of the Year

28.6%

28.6%

MLB Edgar Martinez Award

26.7%

17.2%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Designated Hitter)

25.0%

30.8%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Shortstop)

23.5%

52.6%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove

21.7%

36.8%

NFL Defensive Rookie of the Year

20.6%

20.6%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Catcher)

20.0%

22.5%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Second Base)

18.8%

39.8%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Shortstop)

18.2%

35.1%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Pitcher)

18.2%

20.1%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Second Base)

16.7%

32.7%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Outfield)

16.7%

30.1%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Outfield)

15.7%

25.2%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Third Base)

14.3%

14.3%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Third Base)

13.6%

14.3%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (First Base)

13.6%

13.3%

MLB (NL/AL) Rookie of the Year

13.3%

13.3%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Catcher)

10.3%

15.2%

NBA Most Improved Player of the Year

5.3%

3.2%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (First Base)

3.8%

3.2%

NFL AP Comeback Player of the Year

0.0%

0.0%

So, who is up next?

The following are the players who have won the AP Comeback Player of the Year Award in the National Football League who have retired but have not met the mandatory years out of the game to qualify for the Pro Football Hall of Fame:

Steve Smith, Carolina Panthers, Wide Receiver (2005)

In the first game of the 2004 Season, Smith would break his leg and would be out for the season.  He would return in 2005 and put forth the best season of his career with an NFL leading 103 Receptions, 1,563 Receiving Yards, and 12 Receiving Touchdowns.  He would be named a First Team All-Pro this year.  Smith was the co-winner of this award with Tedy Bruschi of the New England Patriots.  Smith is eligible for the Hall of Fame in 2022.

Michael Vick, Philadelphia Eagles, Quarterback (2010)

Due to his involvement in a dog fighting ring, Michael Vick was suspended for the 2007 and 2008 seasons, most of which was spent while incarcerated.  The Quarterback would return in 2009 to the Philadelphia Eagles as Donovan McNabb’s backup and in 2010 he began the year backing up Kevin Kolb.  Vick won the starting job after Kolb was knocked out with a concussion and he would go on to have an excellent season.  He would throw for 3,018 Yards with 21 Touchdowns and would rush for another 676 Yards and 9 Touchdowns.  He would go to his fourth Pro Bowl and was also named the Bert Bell Award winner.  Vick is eligible for the Hall of Fame in 2021.

Peyton Manning, Denver Broncos, Quarterback (2012)

Who else could it be?  Peyton Manning missed the entire 2011 campaign due to neck surgery and the Colts gad drafted Andrew Luck to replace him.  Manning would sign with the Denver Broncos and picked up right where he left off.  Named a First Team All-Pro and a Pro Bowler, Manning threw for 4,659 Yards and 37 Touchdowns.  He is the first player to be named a First Team All-Pro while winning the AP Comeback Player of the Year.  Manning is eligible for the Hall of Fame in 2021.

Rob Gronkowski, Denver Broncos, Tight End (2014)

Ron Gronkowski was the first Tight End to win he AP Comeback Player of the Year Award and the New England Patriot recovered incredibly from a torn ACL and MCL from December of the year previous.  “Gronk” would be named a First Team All-Pro, win the Super Bowl and would secure 82 catches for 1,124 Yards and 12 Touchdowns. Gronkowski is eligible for the Hall of Fame in 2024.

Jordy Nelson, Green Bay Packers, Wide Receiver(2016)

Jordy Nelson was a Pro Bowl Selection in 2014 but would have to sit out 2015 due to a torn ACL.  Nelson returned in 2016 to record 1,257 Receiving Yards and an NFL leading 14 Touchdown Receptions.  Nelson is eligible for the Hall of Fame in 2024.

Andrew Luck, Indianapolis Colts, Quarterback (2018)

Andrew Luck had to sit out the entire 2017 season due to issues with his throwing shoulder and he returned in 2018 to secure his fourth Pro Bowl.  He would throw for 4,593 Yards and 39 Touchdowns  Luck would shockingly retire during the 2019 training camp.  Nelson is eligible for the Hall of Fame in 2024.

The following are the players who have won the AP Comeback Player of the Year Award who are still active.

Drew Brees, San Diego Chargers, Quarterback (2004)

It is hard to believe now, but Drew Brees was struggling to keep his starting Quarterback job in 2003 when he was with the San Diego Chargers.  This was his rebound year as he was holding off the 1stRound Pick, Philip Rivers from taking his job.  In 2003, Brees would throw for 3,159 Yards and 27 Touchdowns.  He would be named to his first Pro Bowl.  40 Years Old, Playing for the New Orleans Saints.

Tom Brady, New England Patriots, Quarterback (2009)

Tom Brady only played in one game in 2008 due to a torn ACL and MCL.  He returned to the exact form you would expect throwing for 4,398 Yards and 28 Touchdowns and going to his fifth Pro Bowl.  42 Years Old, Playing for the New England Patriots.

Matthew Stafford, Detroit Lions, Quarterback (2011)

An injured shoulder limited Matthew Stafford to only three games in 2010, but he returned in 2011 and threw for 5,038 Yards and 41 Touchdowns, both of which are career-highs as of this writing.  31 Years Old, Playing for the Detroit Lions.

Philip Rivers, San Diego Chargers, Quarterback (2013)

Philip Rivers performed well in 2012 but the perception was not that it was not good enough.  In 2013, he did better than the year before with an NFL leading 69.5 Completion Percentage.  He would also throw for 4,478 Yards and 32 Touchdowns.  38 Years Old, Playing for the Los Angeles Chargers.

Eric Berry, Kansas City Chiefs, Strong Safety (2015)

Eric Berry was diagnosed with Hodgkin’s lymphoma in 2014 after having been named to the Pro Bowl three times.  Berry returned as a First Team All-Pro and recorded 77 Tackles for the Chiefs in 2015.  31 Years Old, Currently a Free Agent.

Keenan Allen, Los Angeles Chargers, Wide Receiver (2017)

In the 2016 season opener, Keenan Allen suffered a torn ACL and would miss the rest of the year.  The Wide Receiver would return to have what is his best year to date. Allen would made his first Pro Bowl and post a career-high 1,393 Receiving Yards.  27 Years Old, Playing for the Los Angeles Chargers.

For the first time we have an award that has generated NO Hall of Famers, but this won’t always be the case with Manning, Brees and Brady as Hall of Fame locks.

We are going to back to the NHL and look at the Bill Masterton Award.

As always, we thank you for that support and look for that soon!

Welcome to a new feature on Notinhalloffame.com, where I, the Committee Chairman come up with random pop culture lists of drunken ramblings.  

This is the kind of useless tripe that I excel at, though it did nothing to help me with high school English Class, nor did it impress any of the ladies, but as a middle-aged married guy, who still consumes alcoholic beverages that rivals anyone on Celebrity Rehab, I can say with full Joe Walsh meaning that “Life’s Been Good To Me So Far”.

After my M*A*S*H nonsense, I am going to switch over to the animated world and focus on the Smurfs.  Roughly twenty-five years ago (damn, I’m old) I came up with the realization that those blue creatures had red tendencies as they were clearly Communists.  I told that someone who I worked with, and he said, “Oh, you saw that online too?”

This was the internet’s early days, and I hadn’t saw that.   Since that time, I have seen others who came up with the same conclusion.  Basically, this was my long-winded caveat of saying that I apologize if I am not exactly breaking new ground, but in my defense, everything I am about to barf out now were my initial observations.

Without further ado, here are my ten drunken observations on how the Smurfs were commies.

1.All Smurfs lived in the same size mushroom house as everyone else. You have all seen mushrooms!  You may think I am under a mushroom-like influence right now, but I swear it is only hops and barley.  Mushrooms come in different sizes, but they had to find the one field where every one is the same size so nobody felt bitter about having a smaller house?  Some of those Smurfs deserved bigger houses.  Handy Smurf did all the work in designing those homes but he didn’t even create a basement in his own house, when surely, he could.  Every house had to be equal, regardless of what you contributed to the society, so a load like Lazy Smurf, who did absolutely nothing gets the same reward as a superstar like Handy.  

Sounds like Communism to me.

  1. Smurfs had one role that appeared to be designated for them early in life.Some of them weren’t particularly good at what they were assigned to be but if that is what you were, that is what you had to be for the rest of your life. Sometimes it works out, like Handy, who must have been excellent at Lego as a kid, really was adept at architecture and lived up to his name.   Hefty Smurf really was the strongest and he seemed to be the only one who owned any weights so that one worked out but what of some of the others:

Brainy Smurf had a lot of inventions, but many of his plans backfired leading one to question how smart he was in the first place.  Because, he was diagnosed as nearsighted early in life and had to wear glasses, he just adopted what was expected of him and he read a lot.  Jokey Smurf had only one joke; the exploding box.  He wasn’t funny at all!  But, he had the distinct laugh, so it was decided for him that he was the prankster of the bunch, which sucked for the rest of the Smurfs, because he couldn’t make any of them laugh! Clumsy Smurf’s job was only to be a clutz.  He might not be the most co-ordinated Smurf, but when you are told that all of your life it becomes a self-fulfilling prophecy.  If one of the other Smurfs helped him out and got him a hat that wasn’t one size too big, he might see better and not trip so much.  They can’t do that, because that is what Clumsy is supposed to be, and changing his role, changes the society.  Lazy Smurf got the best end of the deal.  They expected him to do shit and he gets an equal share of everything.

Maybe it was Grouchy Smurf, because he was allowed to be an asshole and nobody begrudged him for it.

Sounds like Communism to me.

  1. Smurfs had no currency. Smurfs didn’t use the barter system.They all worked (or didn’t work if that was your designation).  Capitalism didn’t exist.  

Sounds like Communism to me. 

  1. The Smurfs would sing while they work or marched and it was always the same happy upbeat song with a lot of “la-las” in it.This was telling the community to be “happy in their work”.Art isn’t exactly encouraged in Communist societies so of course you only hear them sing one song.  There may have been Painter Smurf, but his art was only portraits, and it wasn’t very creative.  Painter Smurf’s art glorified all things Smurfy!

Sounds like Communism to me.

  1. Smurfs had no traditional family structure.In later episodes, Baby Smurf was introduced after he was brought from the stork, so he had no actual father or mother.Presumably, none of the Smurfs do, so none of them are actually related. 

Why is this important? 

The father of Communism, Karl Marx was against the family unit and stated that it was the way that wealthy passed on their property, thus keeping the class system intact. Smurfs own no property and since they have no blood relation, they wouldn’t favor one over the other.  This is why the Smurfs value Smurfdom above all, just like Marx intended.

Sounds like Communism to me.

  1. Independent thought wasn’t encouraged.As I stated before, Painter Smurf claimed to be artistic, but he wasn’t.With the exception of Papa Smurf (I will get to him later), everyone wears the same stock clothes of the same shaped white hat and white pants.  Sure, they could dress it up a bit, but how many times do you see a bunch of Smurfs running around where you can’t distinguish between one Smurf from another. How many of these Smurfs were named “Random Smurf”?  

Sounds like Communism to me.

  1. Communist Russia (and pretty much Russia now) was homophobic.Vanity Smurf was clearly gay.Going back to an earlier point, Vanity may have been a cute baby Smurf, but most of them all look the same and beyond a pink flower on his hat, could you really tell him apart from “Random Smurf”?  

I will tell you what happened in the Smurf Village.  Papa Smurf figured out early from his somewhat effeminate voice that Vanity might be interested in the other Smurfs in ways that weren’t considered “Smurfy”.  I guarantee that you that what he did was hand him a mirror and convinced him that the only one he should love was himself.  This caused a chain reaction where Vanity expressed self-love, and subconsciously repressed his homosexual feelings.  

Oh, and yes when I mean self-love, I guarantee that the mirror wasn’t the only thing he held tight with his left hand.

Homophobia?

Sounds like Communism to me.

  1. The Soviet Bloc was not just known for its homophobia but for its hatred of the Jewish faith.Who hated the Smurfs?  Gargamel. What did he look like?  A caricature of the perceived “hook-nosed Jew”, Gargamel wanted to capture and kill all the Smurfs and eat them.  He was viewed as evil, ugly and stupid.  How hard is it to find a mushroom field that was clearly only a few miles from his house?  Especially considering he actually did find it on occasion and couldn’t remember where the hell what it was.    

Not only that, he had a cat named Azreal.  Azreal? Isreal?  Coincidence?

Sounds like Communism to me.

  1. Look at the politics in the Smurf Village.Why was it decided that Papa Smurf was their leader?Is it just because he is the oldest?  That is not the worst reason as he is certainly presented as the wisest but who chose him?  Did Papa Smurf win an election?  How long has he been the leader?  Can he be kicked out if he does something incompetent or gets dementia?  If Papa Smurf passes on, or no longer wants to lead, who takes over?  Brainy Smurf seems to think it is him, but would that happen?  Papa Smurf seems to have no succession plan (that we know of) as most real world dictators seem to lack.  It probably would be Brainy as he seems to kiss Papa’s ass the most but how many episodes ended with the other Smurfs kicking Brainy out of the village for being a condescending dipshit?

Once Papa Smurf dies, I predict total Smurf anarchy.

Sounds like Communism to me.

  1. The most obvious one of all is Papa Smurf.The elder statesman of the Smurf Village didn’t have to wear white, as he wore red.  Hmmm.  Red. It wasn’t just red but a very similar shade of the Soviet Flag.  Papa Smurf had a nice bushy beard, very similar to Karl Marx.  What Papa Smurf said was the gospel and it wasn’t questioned. He had absolute authority over the rest of the Smurfs and it was never questioned.  It was considered Smurf Law.  What more could legendary left-wing leaders long for?  They wanted what Papa Smurf created.

Sounds like Communism to me.

This ends my second drunken list, and no worries as I have just restocked my fridge. Hopefully my third one isn’t one that is in twenty-five other corners of the world wide web.

Maybe the next one will only be replicated in twenty of them.

We here at Notinhalloffame.com thought it would be fun to take a look at the major awards in North American team sports and see how it translates into Hall of Fame potential.

Needless to say, different awards in different sports yield hall of fame potential.  In basketball, the team sport with the least number of players on a roster, the dividend for greatness much higher.  In baseball, it is not as much as a great individual season does not have the same impact.

Since we just did the NFL Offensive Player of the Year, the natural for us to look the Defensive Player of the Year Award.  Unlike the OPOY, this was created a year earlier in 1971, but it will it generate the same level of Hall of Famers?

Let’s find out!

The following are the past players who have won the AP Defensive Player of the Year in the NFL who are eligible for the Pro Football Hall of Fame and have been enshrined.

Alan Page, Minnesota Vikings, Defensive Tackle(1971)

A great place to start for this award is the “Purple People Eaters”, so this begins with Alan Page.  Playing at Defensive Tackle, 1971 was the third of three straight First Team All-Pro Selections and league lead in Approximate Value.  As the first AP Defensive Player of the Year, he also became the first to win both the DPOY and the AP MVP Award.  Afterwards, Page began another three-year run of First Team All-Pro Selections in 1973. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1988.

Joe Greene, Pittsburgh Steelers, Defensive Tackle (1972)

“Mean” Joe Greene was going to his fourth Pro Bowl in 1972 and this year he began his first of three consecutive First Team All-Pros. He had 11 “unofficial” Sacks and this was also the season that the Steelers had truly established themselves as Super Bowl contenders.  That doesn’t happen without Greene.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1987.

Joe Greene, Pittsburgh Steelers, Defensive Tackle (2) (1974)

Greene becomes the first repeat winner of the Defensive Player of the Year and it was also his third of three consecutive First Team All-Pro Selections.  “Mean” Joe and the Steelers dynasty would also win the first of what would be four Super Bowls in the 1970s.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1987.

Mel Blount, Pittsburgh Steelers, Cornerback (1975)

A Steeler wins this for the second year in a row, and you can see how the “Steel Curtain” defense was the best in football. This year’s winner was Mel Blount, who at Cornerback had a league leading 11 Interceptions and would be named a First Team All-Pro.  He would earn that honor again in 1981.  Blount and the Steelers won their second Super Bowl that year.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1989.

Jack Lambert, Pittsburgh Steelers, Linebacker (1976)

You know that you had one of the greatest defensive corps ever when you win the DPOY in three different seasons with three different players!  Oh, and all of them went to the Pro Football Hall of Fame!  The third straight Steeler was Jack Lambert, who was a six-time First Team All-Pro and this was his first one.  Like Greene and Blount, Lambert would help Pittsburgh win four Super Bowls. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1989.

Lee Roy Selmon, Tampa Bay Buccaneers, Defensive End (1979)

Lee Roy Selmon was one of the only things that the Bucs had in their early days.  Drafted 1stOverall in 1976, Selmon broke out in 1979 with his DPOY year and would begin a sting of six straight Pro Bowls.  Selmon was forced to retire in 1984 due to back issues. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1995.

Lawrence Taylor, New York Giants, Linebacker (1981)

Lawrence Taylor changed Linebacking forever and he was by far the most dominating defensive player of the 1980s.  L.T. became the first player to win the Defensive Rookie of the Year in the same season as winning the DPOY.  He would also begin his streak of 10 straight Pro Bowls. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1999.

Lawrence Taylor, New York Giants, Linebacker (2) (1982)

Taylor repeated winning the DPOY, making him the first player to win the award twice in his first two years.  The Linebacker was also named a First Team All-Pro for the second of what would be eight times.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1999.

Kenny Easley, Seattle Seahawks, Strong Safety (1984)

The career of Kenny Easley spanned only seven seasons and this was right smack dab in the middle of it.  Easley was on his second of three straight First Team All-Pros and this was also his third of five Pro Bowls.  He would finish first in Interceptions with 10 this year.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2017.

Mike Singletary, Chicago Bears, Linebacker (1985)

Mike Singletary was an absolute star on the Bears Defense and this was the year of the “Super Bowl Shuffle”.  Singletary was in his third of what would be ten consecutive Pro Bowls and he was also awarded his second of six straight First Team All-Pros. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1998.

Lawrence Taylor, New York Giants, Linebacker (3) (1986)

This is arguably the greatest defensive season by any player in the history of the National Football League.  Taylor would also win the AP MVP, PFWA MVP and the Bert Bell Award.  He would lead the league in Sacks with 20.5 and this was his sixth of eight First Team All-Pro Selections.  The Giants would win Super Bowl XXI that year.  Taylor would become the first player to win the DPOY three times.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1999.

Reggie White, Philadelphia Eagles, Defensive End (1987)

The “Minister of Defense” was on year two of his six-year run as a First Team All-Pro.  White was a beast on the pass rush where he would have a career-high of 21.0 Quarterback Sacks, which led the NFL.  White’s 21 Sacks were especially impressive considering he did that in 12 Games. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2006.

Mike Singletary, Chicago Bears, Linebacker (2)(1988)

Singletary’s run of dominance continues with his fifth of seven First Team All-Pros, and his sixth of ten straight Pro Bowls.  He would equal his career-high of 18 in Approximate Value.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1998.

Bruce Smith, Buffalo Bills, Defensive End (1990)

This was Smith’s third First Team All-Pro Selection and he was also coming off of his fourth Pro Bowl.  Smith secured 19.0 Sacks for the Bills and this was the year that began four consecutive trips to the Super Bowl.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2009.

Cortez Kennedy, Seattle Seahawks, Defensive Tackle (1992)

Kennedy’s DPOY win came early in his career and it began a three-year streak of First Team All-Pro Selections.  The Defensive Tackle would spend his entire career with the Seattle Seahawks and would go to eight Pro Bowls, this being his second. He would have a career-high 14.0 Sacks this year.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2012.

Rod Woodson, Pittsburgh Steelers, Cornerback (1993)

Woodson was on year five of a six-year stretch of consecutive Pro Bowls and he would go to 11 in total.  The Cornerback was also chosen for his fourth of what turned out to be six First Team All Pros.  Eight of his 71 Interceptions would happen in 1993.  Woodson would later win a Super Bowl with the Baltimore Ravens.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2009.

Deion Sanders, San Francisco 49ers, Cornerback(1994)

After five years with the Atlanta Falcons, Deion Sanders signed with the San Francisco 49ers and would play there for only one season, and what a year it was!  Sanders secured his third straight First Team All-Pro, fourth consecutive Pro Bowls and would lead the NFL in Interception Return Yards (303).  He also helped San Francisco win the Super Bowl. Following this, Sanders won another Super Bowl with Dallas and went to another four Pro Bowls and as chosen for three more First Team All-Pros.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2011.

Bruce Smith, Buffalo Bills, Defensive End (2) (1996)

The Bills were no longer the AFC kings, but were still a playoff team, much of which could be attributed to Bruce Smith. The Defensive End would be named to his fourth of five straight First Team All-Pros and this was his eighth of none. He would have 13.5 Sacks and would lead the NFL in Forced Fumbles with five.  Smith also went to 10 Pro Bowls over his career.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2009.

Reggie White, Green Bay Packers, Defensive End (2) (1998)

Reggie White won his second Defensive of Player of the Year 11 years after he won his first one making this the largest gap for this award.  White was a great player in between those two wins.  White won his Super Bowl with Green Bay two years prior and 1998 was the end of an era as this ended his run of 13 straight Pro Bowls and this was his eighth and final First Team All-Pro.  White retired after but returned for one more year with the Carolina Panthers.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2006.

Warren Sapp, Tampa Bay Buccaneers, Defensive Tackle (1999)

1999 would usher in a four-year run of First Team All-Pros and this was year three of seven consecutive Pro Bowls.  He would record 12.5 Quarterback Sacks this year. Sapp would later anchor the Bucs to a win at Super Bowl XXXVII.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2013.

Ray Lewis, Baltimore Ravens, Defensive Tackle (2000)

This was an incredible year for Ray Lewis who would lead the NFL in Approximate Value (23) and led the potent Ravens defense to their Super Bowl win.  Lewis was untouchable this year.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2018.

Michael Strahan, New York Giants, Defensive End (2001)

Michael Strahan would set the single season Sack record of 22.5 and he also led the NFL in Forced Fumbles (6).  This was his third of four First Team All-Pros for Strahan who would play his entire career with the Giants.  He would later win the Super Bowl in the 2007 season.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2014.

Derrick Brooks, Tampa Bay Buccaneers, Linebacker(2002)

Derrick Brooks went to 11 Pro Bowls and this year was his sixth.  In terms of First Team All-Pro Selections, this was number three of five.  The powerful Linebacker led the Bucs to a Super Bowl this year.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2014.

Ray Lewis, Baltimore Ravens, Defensive Tackle (2) (2003)

This was the second and last DPOY win for Ray Lewis but he had a lot left to accomplish in a career spent exclusively with Baltimore.  2003 would see Lewis go to his fourth of seven First Team All-Pros and it was also his sixth of 13 Pro Bowls.  He would win another Super Bowl with the Ravens in his final year in 2012.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2018.

Ed Reed, Baltimore Ravens, Free Safety (2004)

For the second straight year, the Baltimore Ravens had a Defensive Player of the Year winner, and following Ray Lewis we have Ed Reed.  Reed would lead the NFL in Interceptions three times, this being the first one and he would also finish first in Interception Return Yards.  This was Reed’s first of what would be five First Team All-Pros and he would also go to nine Pro Bowls over his career.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2019.

Brian Urlacher, Chicago Bears, Linebacker (2005)

Brian Urlacher was selected for four First Team All-Pros with 2005 being his third.  The Linebacker had 6.0 Sacks and 121 Tackles and was a Pro Bowler for the fifth time.  He would be chosen for three more after in a career that remained in Chicago.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2018.

Jason Taylor, Miami Dolphins, Defensive End (2006)

Jason Taylor went to three First Team All-Pros and this was his third year.  He would also be a six-time Pro Bowl Selection and would have 139.5 Sacks in his career.  He would have 13.5 of them this year.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2017.

The following are the players who have won the AP Defensive Player of the Year in the NFL who are eligible for the Pro Football Hall of Fame and have not been selected:

Dick Anderson, Miami Dolphins, Free Safety (1973)

This was the third time that Anderson would have a season of 8 Interceptions, but the first time that he led the NFL in that category.  The Free Safety and member of Miami’s “No Name Defense” has won their second straight Super Bowl this year, and this was also his second straight First Team All-Pro Selection.  Unrankedon Notinhalloffame.com.

Harvey Martin, Dallas Cowboys, Defensive End (1977)

Harvey Martin went to four straight Pro Bowls, and 1977 was the best of that stretch (1976-79).  The Defensive End would earn First Team All-Pro accolades.  That year was magical for Martin as he would help Dallas win the Super Bowl and was the Co-MVP with Randy White.  Unrankedon Notinhalloffame.com.

Randy Gradishar, Denver Broncos, Linebacker (1978)

Randy Gradishar was the leader of the “Orange Crush” Defense of the Broncos and he was on his second straight First Team All-Pro Selection.  This would be the third of seven Pro Bowl Selections for Gradishar.  Ranked #4 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Lester Hayes, Oakland Raiders, Cornerback (1980)

Hayes was in his fourth year with the Raiders, and this was his first of five straight Pro Bowls.  Hates, who was also a First Team All-Pro also led the league in Interceptions (13) and Interception Return Yards (273).  The Raiders would win the Super Bowl that year, and three years later he helped them win it all again.  Ranked #25 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Doug Betters, Miami Dolphins, Defensive End (1983)

Doug Betters is the unlikeliest Defensive Player of the Year winner ever.  This is not because he the career Miami Dolphin didn’t earn it.  He did, it is just that he never played nearly as good before or after in 1983.  This was the only season where he went to the Pro Bowl, was an All-Pro and had an Approximate Value that was higher than 8.  It was 20 by the way in 1983!  He recorded 16.0 Sacks that year.  Unrankedon Notinhalloffame.com.

Keith Millard, Minnesota Vikings, Defensive Tackle (1989)

Millard would have two great years in his career (the second in 1988) and this was the first of them.  Millard would have 18.0 Sacks and would lead the league in Approximate Value the season before with 20. This would be also one of two seasons where he was a First Team All-Pro.  Unrankedon Notinhalloffame.com.

Pat Swilling, New Orleans Saints, Linebacker (1991)

Swilling was a First Team All-Pro this year and would be again the year after.  This was his third of five Pro Bowls and in 1991 he would lead the NFL in Quarterback Sacks (17.0) and Approximate Value (23).  Ranked #77 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Bryce Paup, Buffalo Bills, Linebacker (1995)

Paup was in his first season in Buffalo, and it was easily his best one.  The Outside Linebacker led the NFL in Quarterback Sacks with 17.5 and he was a Pro Bowl Selection four times.  This was his only First Team All-Pro nod. Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com

Dana Stubblefield, San Francisco 49ers, Defensive Tackle (1997)

Stubblefield was the Defensive Rookie of the Year in 1993, won the Super Bowl in 1994 and won the DPOY in 1997.  This year, he would earn his only First Team All-Pro and land his third Pro Bowl.  Stubblefield would play six more seasons in the NFL but never had a season close to this again.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com

Bob Sanders, Indianapolis Colts, Strong Safety(2007)

When you look at the career of Bob Sanders, you would see that he had only two full seasons; this was the second of them. The Strong Safety was a First Team All-Pro for the second and last time in his career and he would be a Super Bowl Champion in 2005.  Overall, his career was inconsistent, and he will go down as one of the more unlikely winners of the Defensive Player of the Year Award.   Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com

Troy Polamalu, Pittsburgh Steelers, Strong Safety (2010)

By 2010, Polamalu had already helped the Steelers win two Super Bowls.  The Strong Safety would go his third First Team All-Pro of what would be four, and this would be also his seventh of eight Pro Bowls.  He would have seven Interceptions with 63 Tackles this year.  Ranked #8 on Notinhalloffame.com

 

Let’s update our tally, shall we?

Award in Question

Percentage of recipients who have entered the HOF

Percentage of recipients by year who have entered the HOF.

NBA MVP

100%

100%

NHL Norris

90.5%

96.4%

NBA All Star Game MVP

89.5%

91.7%

NHL Conn Smythe

74.2%

85.4%

NFL AP Offensive Player of the Year

73.1%

79.4%

NHL Lady Byng

63.8%

76.0%

NFL Defensive Player of the Year

60.8%

71.1%

NFL Super Bowl MVP

60.6%

64.9%

NBA Defensive Player of the Year

58.3%

56.5%

NBA Rookie of the Year

56.5%

56.5%

NFL Pro Bowl MVP

52.3%

54.8%

MLB Lou Gehrig Award

51.9%

51.9%

MLB Roberto Clemente Award

47.4%

47.4%

MLB/NL/AL Cy Young Award

44.4%

55.4%

MLB Babe Ruth Award

37.0%

39.3%

NHL Frank J. Selke Trophy

33.3%

36.7%

MLB Hutch Award

33.1%

33.1%

NFL Offensive Rookie of the Year

28.6%

28.6%

MLB Edgar Martinez Award

26.7%

17.2%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Designated Hitter)

25.0%

30.8%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Shortstop)

23.5%

52.6%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove

21.7%

36.8%

NFL Defensive Rookie of the Year

20.6%

20.6%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Catcher)

20.0%

22.5%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Second Base)

18.8%

39.8%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Shortstop)

18.2%

35.1%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Pitcher)

18.2%

20.1%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Second Base)

16.7%

32.7%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Outfield)

16.7%

30.1%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Outfield)

15.7%

25.2%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Third Base)

14.3%

14.3%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Third Base)

13.6%

14.3%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (First Base)

13.6%

13.3%

MLB (NL/AL) Rookie of the Year

13.3%

13.3%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Catcher)

10.3%

15.2%

NBA Most Improved Player of the Year

5.3%

3.2%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (First Base)

3.8%

3.2%

So, who is up next?

The following are the players who have won the Defensive Player of the Year Award in the National Football League who have retired but have not met the mandatory years out of the game to qualify for the Pro Football Hall of Fame:

James Harrison, Pittsburgh Steelers, Linebacker(2008)

The Linebacker they call “Deebo” had his first of two First Team All-Pro Selections in 2008.  He would lead the NFL in Forced Fumbles (7) and Approximate Value (19). Harrison would secure 16.0 Sacks this year and would win his second Super Bowl Ring the following season.  Harrison is eligible for the Hall of Fame in 2023.

Charles Woodson, Green Bay Packers, Cornerback(2009)

Woodson had two streaks of greatness, and this was in his second run.  2009 saw Woodson secure his sixth of eight Pro Bowls and second of third First Team All-Pros and he was the NFL leader in Interceptions with nine.  Woodson is eligible for the Hall of Fame in 2021.

The following are the players who have won the Defensive Player of the Year Award who are still active.

Terrell Suggs, Baltimore Ravens, Linebacker (2011)

Suggs was the third Raven in a ten-year period to win the Defensive Player of the Year Award.  This was the first time that Suggs was a First Team All-Pro and he would record a career-high 14.0 Sacks.  He would also lead the NFL with seven Forced Fumbles.  36 Years Old, Playing for the Arizona Cardinals.

J.J. Watt, Houston Texans, Defensive End (2012)

This was Watt’s second season in the NFL and he would lead the NFL in Quarterback Sacks with 20.5 and Tackles for Loss (39). The Defensive End would also finish first in Approximate Value (19).  This season would begin a four-year run of Pro Bowls and First Team All-Pros and the establishment of one of the most dominating defensive players of the modern era. 30 Years Old, Playing for the Arizona Cardinals.

Luke Kuechly, Carolina Panthers, Linebacker (2013)

Luke Kuechly was the Defensive Rookie of the Year in 2012, would become the Defensive Player of the Year in the season that followed.  The Middle Linebacker would be chosen for his first First Team All-Pro and Pro Bowl, the latter being a current seven-year streak.  28 Years Old, Playing for the Carolina Panthers.

J.J. Watt, Houston Texans, Defensive End (2) (2014)

2014 was year three of his four year run of dominance and this was the best of them all.  Watt repeated his 20.5 Sack performance of 2012 (though he did not lead the NFL) and he would again finish atop the leaderboard in Forced Fumbles (29) and Approximate Value (22).  Watt was so good that he would win the AP MVP and the Bert Bell Award.  30 Years Old, Playing for the Arizona Cardinals.

J.J. Watt, Houston Texans, Defensive End (3) (2015)

Watt reached rarified air with his third DPOY as he joined Lawrence Taylor as the second player to win this award a third time. The Texan would again lead the NFL in Sacks (17.5), Tackles for Loss (29) and Approximate Value (21).  When looking at those three DPOY wins, how many overall Wins by the Texans do not occur if J.J. Watt doesn’t exist?  30 Years Old, Playing for the Arizona Cardinals.

Khalil Mack, Oakland Raiders, Linebacker (2016)

Mack was chosen for his second First Team All Pro and Pro Bowl in 2016.  He would net 11.0 Sacks this season.  28 Years Old, Playing for the Chicago Bears.

Aaron Donald, Los Angeles Rams, Defensive Tackle (2017)

Aaron Donald was the 2014 Defensive Rookie of the Year, and he just built right upon it.  In 2017, Donald was chosen for his third straight First Team All-Pro and fourth consecutive Pro Bowl.  He would have 10.5 Sacks this year.  28 Years Old, Playing for the Los Angeles Rams.

Aaron Donald, Los Angeles Rams, Defensive Tackle (2) (2018)

Donald had an even better DPOY than his win in the year previous as he would lead the NFL in Sacks (20.5) and Tackles for Loss (25). 28 Years Old, Playing for the Los Angeles Rams.

It certainly appears that like the OPOY, the Defensive Player of the Year Award is a huge springboard to Canton immortality.

We are stick with the gridiron and look at the AP Comeback Player of the Year.

As always, we thank you for that support and look for that soon!

Anyone who is interested in NFL betting online or simply watching football for fun will be happy that the new season is underway. Summer can seem a long time as a football fan, and all supporters will be glad that the action has kicked off once more. Two sets of fans who will be especially looking forward to how this campaign pans out are those who follow the New England Patriots and Los Angeles Rams.

We here at Notinhalloffame.com thought it would be fun to take a look at the major awards in North American team sports and see how it translates into Hall of Fame potential.

Needless to say, different awards in different sports yield hall of fame potential.  In basketball, the team sport with the least number of players on a roster, the dividend for greatness much higher.  In baseball, it is not as much as a great individual season does not have the same impact.

For our next selection we return to the National Football League after a long absence with a major accolade in the Offensive Player of the Year. Considering this is a very important award, it is a little surprising that this has only been in existence since 1972.  Not surprising, is that with the exception of Jerry Rice, it has only gone to Quarterbacks and Running Backs; basically, the sexy skill positions of football. Frankly, we don’t think we will ever see an Offensive Lineman win this regardless of how impressive a season he has. 

So, how many Offensive Players of the Year have been enshrined in the Pro Football Hall of Fame?

Let’s find out!

The following are the past players who have won the AP Offensive Player of the Year in the NFL who are eligible for the Pro Football Hall of Fame and have been enshrined.

O.J. Simpson, Buffalo Bills, Running Back (1973)

Who else could possibly win it in 1973?  O.J. Simpson made history as the first player to exceed 2,000 Rushing Yards (2,003), and while he now has company in the 2,000 club, it is still exclusive company.  This was Simpson’s second rushing title and he would win it two more times (1975 & 1976).  He would also win the Bert Bell Award and the AP MVP. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1985. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1985.

Ken Stabler, Oakland Raiders, Quarterback (1974)

Stabler was a First Team All-Pro in 1974, and was chosen for the Pro Bowl for the second year in a row.  The Quarterback threw for 2,469 Yards and a league leading 26 Touchdowns.  He would have a record of 11-2 this year and was also named the AP MVP.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2016.

Fran Tarkenton, Minnesota Vikings, Quarterback(1975)

Prior to this year, “Scrambling” Fran Tarkenton was chosen for seven Pro Bowls and 1975 was his eighth.  This was the first and only year that he would be named a First Team All-Pro and would the NFL in Touchdown Passes with 25.  The Minnesota Viking would also be named the AP MVP, PFWA MVP and the Bert Bell Award Winner.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1986.

Walter Payton, Chicago Bears, Running Back (1977)

This was Payton’s third season in the NFL, and the only one where he would win the Rushing Title with 1,852 Yards and lead the NFL in Rushing Touchdowns (14).  Payton would have eight more years where he would have 1,200 or more yards on the ground and he retired with 16,726, which as of this writing is second all-time.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1985.

Earl Campbell, Houston Oilers, Running Back (1978)

Campbell was a rookie in 1978 and the number one pick from Texas lived up to the hype.  Campbell had a league leading 1,450 Rushing Yards and he punched 13 into the end zone.  He would also win the AP Offensive Rookie of the Year and was named the PFWA MVP.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1985.

Earl Campbell, Houston Oilers, Running Back (2) (1979)

The Houston Oiler made history as the first ever repeat winner of the Offensive Player of the Year, and he would again win the Rushing Title with increased production of 1,697 Yards.  This time, Campbell would also finish atop the leaderboard in Rushing Touchdowns (19) and he repeated his PFWA MVP while adding the AP Player of the Year and Bert Bell Award.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1985.

Earl Campbell, Houston Oilers, Running Back (3) (1980)

Making waves as the first ever repeat winner of the Offensive Player of the Year, Campbell set a new standard with his third straight win.  Campbell again raised his game by setting a career high 1,934 Rushing Yards with his 13 Rushing TDs leading the NFL.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1985.

Dan Fouts, San Diego Chargers, Quarterback (1982)

Fouts was on his fourth straight year of leading the NFL in Passing Yards and he would throw for 2,883 in the strike-shortened campaign of 1982.  The Quarterback would be invited to the fourth of what would be six Pro Bowls and he would also lead in Touchdown Passes with 17.  He would also win the PFWA MVP.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1993.

Dan Marino, Miami Dolphins, Quarterback (1984)

Marino turned the football world on its head by becoming the first Quarterback to throw for over 5,000 Yards (5,084) and would also throw for a then record 48 Touchdown passes.  He would take Miami to the Super Bowl (they didn’t win) and he would also win the PFWA and AP MVP as well as the Bert Bell Award.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2005.

Marcus Allen, Los Angeles Raiders, Running Back (1985)

Marcus Allen had without a doubt the best regular season of his career with an NFL leading and career-high 1,759 Rushing Yards and 2,314 Yards From Scrimmage.  Allen, who had previously propelled the Raiders to a Super Bowl win, was also in 1985 named the AP and PFWA MVP.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2003.

Eric Dickerson, Los Angeles Rams, Running Back(1986)

Eric Dickerson easily could have been considered a contender for this award in 1983 and/or 1984, but it would have to wait until 1986 before he won the Offensive Player of the Year.  This year would see Dickerson win his third Rushing Title with 1,821 Yards and it would be his third of five First Team All-Pro Selections. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1999.

Jerry Rice, San Francisco 49ers, Wide Receiver(1987)

We think we can agree that of this writing the greatest Wide Receiver of all-time is Jerry Rice.  Whether you agree with that or not, Rice made history in 1987 as he first Wide Receiver to win the Offensive Player of the Year and he did so with 22 Touchdown Receptions, which set a record at the time (since eclipsed by Randy Moss).  As we all know, this was only the beginning for Rice who was in the second of 11 straight Pro Bowls.  Rice also won the PFWA MVP and the Bert Bell Award.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2010.

Joe Montana, San Francisco 49ers, Quarterback (1989)

How loaded were the San Francisco 49ers in late 80s?  Montana was the third different 49er to win the Offensive Player of the Year following Jerry Rice and Roger Craig.  In this season, Montana would lead the NFL in Completion Percentage (70.2) while throwing for 3,521 Yards and 26 Touchdowns and more importantly he would win his fourth Super Bowl.  The legendary Quarterback would also win the AP MVP as well as the Bert Bell Award.   Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2000.

Warren Moon, Houston Oilers, Quarterback (1990)

At age 34, Warren Moon proved that he should have been in the NFL years before after having to prove himself as a black Quarterback in the Canadian Football League.  Moon would lead all passers with 4,689 Yards and 33 Touchdown Passes.   Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2006.

Thurman Thomas, Buffalo Bills, Running Back (1991)

Thurman Thomas would lead the NFL in Yards From Scrimmage four years in a row, and in 1991 it was the third of that streak. Thomas was a First Team All-Pro for the second and last time this season and he would also be selected as the AP and PFWA MVP.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2007.

Steve Young, San Francisco 49ers, Quarterback (1992)

Steve Young replicated what his predecessor did (Joe Montana) by winning the Offensive Player of the Year.  Young would be chosen this year for his first of seven Pro Bowls and he was the NFL leader in Completion Percentage (66.7) and Touchdown Passes (25).  He would also capture the AP MVP, PFWA MVP and the Bert Bell Award.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2005.

Jerry Rice, San Francisco 49ers, Wide Receiver (2) (1993)

This was the fourth of six seasons where Rice would lead the NFL in Receiving Yards (1,503) and the final one of six where he was at the top in Receiving Touchdowns (15).  This would be the only major individual award that Rice would win in 1993.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2010.

Barry Sanders, Detroit Lions, Running Back (1994)

Sanders would win the Rushing Title for the second time with 1,883 Yards and would also finish atop the Yards From Scrimmage leaderboard with 2,166 Yards.  This was his third First Team All-Pro Selection.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2004.

Brett Favre, Green Bay Packers, Quarterback (1995)

Surprisingly, this was the only time that Brett Favre would win this award.  In 1995, Favre would lead the NFL in Passing Yards (4,413) and Touchdown Passes (38), the former being a career high.  In this season he would win the AP MVP, PFWA MVP and Bert Bell Award and took the Packers to a Super Bowl win the following year.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2016.

Terrell Davis, Denver Broncos, Running Back (1996)

This year began Davis’ three years of dominance in the AFC running game and he would rush for 1,538 Yards and catch another 36 passes for 310 Yards.  He would be named a First Team All-Pro for the first of three straight seasons.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2017.

Barry Sanders, Detroit Lions, Running Back (2)(1997)

This was Sanders’ second Offensive Player of the Year Award, and he would shatter the accomplishments of his first win. The Lions Running Back rushed for a career high 2,058 Yards joining the exclusive “2,000 Club” and his 2,358 Yards From Scrimmage was easily the best in the NFL.  Sanders also won the AP MVP, PFWA MVP and the Bert Bell Award.  This would be his sixth and last First Team All-Pro Selection.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2004.

Terrell Davis, Denver Broncos, Running Back (2) (1998)

We will argue (and have often) that this is the season that put Terrell Davis in the Hall of Fame.  In 1998, T.D., rushed for a league leading 2,008 Yards and 21 Touchdowns and led the Broncos to their second consecutive Super Bowl win.  In ’98, Davis also won the AP and PFWA MVP Awards. After this season, injuries would decimate him but that three-year stint was so good that Canton could not ignore him. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2017.

Marshall Faulk, St. Louis Rams, Running Back (1999)

Marshall Faulk began his run of three First Team All-Pro Selections and this would be his first year in St. Louis after five seasons with the Indianapolis Colts.  Faulk was the ground attack for what would be “The Greatest Show on Turf” and in 1999, he would rush for 1,381 Yards, catch 87 passes for another 1,048 Yards and led the NFL with 2,429 Yards from Scrimmage.  Faulk would win the Super Bowl that year. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2011.

Marshall Faulk, St. Louis Rams, Running Back (2) (2000)

Faulk would again exceed 1,300 Rushing Yards, though he would not hit the 1,000 Receiving Yard mark, landing at “only” 830. Faulk would however have more Touchdowns than the previous season, as his 18 Rushing Touchdowns (league leading) and another 8 from the air, which totaled 26, again a league leading. Faulk would also win the AP and PFWA MVP.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2011.

Marshall Faulk, St. Louis Rams, Running Back (3) (2001)

Faulk became the second player since Earl Campbell to win the Offensive Player of the Year Award, and like the former Houston Oiler, he did it consecutively.  Faulk put up his fourth straight 2,000 plus Yards From Scrimmage year and again led the NFL in Touchdowns with 21.  He would also win the PFWA MVP and the Bert Bell Award.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2011.

LaDainian Tomlinson, San Diego Chargers, Running Back (2006)

By this time, LaDainian Tomlinson had already established himself as an elite NFL Running Back and he would win his first Rushing Title with 1,815 Yards and his second Rushing Touchdown title with a career high 28 Touchdowns.  He would have another three TDs for 31 total.  In 2006, he would also win the AP MVP, PFWA MVP, Walter Payton Man of the Year and the Bert Bell Award.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2017.

The following are the players who have won the AP Offensive Player of the Year in the NFL who are eligible for the Pro Football Hall of Fame and have not been selected:

Larry Brown, Washington Redskins, Running Back(1972)

This was the last great year of Larry Brown’s career and this would be his fourth straight and final Pro Bowl and we would set a career high with 1,216 Rushing Yards and his 1,689 Yards From Scrimmage would lead the NFL.  Brown also would lead the league in Approximate Value and would win the AP MVP and Bert Bell Award.  Unrankedon Notinhalloffame.com.

Bert Jones, Baltimore Colts, Quarterback (1976)

Bert Jones had only one Pro Bowl Season, and needless to say it was in 1976.  Jones led the NFL with 3,104 Passing Yards and had an 11-3 season.  He threw for 24 Touchdowns, which was a career high.  He would also win the AP MVP.  Unrankedon Notinhalloffame.com.

Ken Anderson, Cincinnati Bengals, Quarterback (1981)

Anderson would throw for career highs of 3,754 Passing Yards, 29 Touchdowns and a league leading 98.4 Quarterback Rating and he was on his third of what would be four Pro Bowls.  He would take the Bengals to their first Super Bowl, albeit in a losing effort to the San Francisco 49ers.  He would also win the AP MVP, the PFWA MVP and the Bert Bell Award.  Ranked #12 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Joe Theismann, Washington Redskins, Quarterback (1983)

The year after Theismann Quarterbacked the Redskins to the Super Bowl, Theismann had the best regular season of his career with career highs in Passing Yards (3,714) and Touchdown Passes (29).  This year, Theismann would also win the PFWA and AP MVP.  Unrankedon Notinhalloffame.com.

Roger Craig, San Francisco 49ers, Running Back(1988)

Craig was an absolute beast at Running Back in 1988 and he would lead the National Football League in Yards from Scrimmage with 2,036 Yards.  This was three years after he became the first ever player to eclipse four digits in Rushing and Receiving Yards.  He would go on to have 13,100 Yards from Scrimmage over his career.  Ranked #6 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Priest Holmes, Kansas City Chiefs, Running Back (2002)

Holmes was in the middle of a three-year run of three straight Pro Bowls and First Team All-Pro Selections and in this season he would rush for 1,615 Yards an NFL leading 21 Touchdowns.  He would also have another 687 Receiving Yards, which would tally 2,287 Yards From Scrimmage, his career high.  Unrankedon Notinhalloffame.com.

Jamal Lewis, Baltimore Ravens, Running Back (2003)

While Jamal Lewis had many good seasons in the National Football League, there was one that was unquestionably incredible. That season (2003), Lewis would join the very exclusive 2,000 Yard Rushing Club (2,066) and he would also win the PFWA MVP.  Unrankedon Notinhalloffame.com.

Shaun Alexander, Seattle Seahawks, Running Back (2005)

Shaun Alexander led the NFL in Rushing Yard (1,880) and Rushing Touchdowns (27) and this was easily the best season of his career. It was also his last decent season. Forgetting that, Alexander would in 2005 also win the AP and PFWA MVP and the Bert Bell Award.  Unrankedon Notinhalloffame.com.

Let’s update our tally, shall we?

Award in Question

Percentage of recipients who have entered the HOF

Percentage of recipients by year who have entered the HOF.

NBA MVP

100%

100%

NHL Norris

90.5%

96.4%

NBA All Star Game MVP

89.5%

91.7%

NHL Conn Smythe

74.2%

85.4%

NFL AP Offensive Player of the Year

73.1%

79.4%

NHL Lady Byng

63.8%

76.0%

NFL Super Bowl MVP

60.6%

64.9%

NBA Defensive Player of the Year

58.3%

56.5%

NBA Rookie of the Year

56.5%

56.5%

NFL Pro Bowl MVP

52.3%

54.8%

MLB Lou Gehrig Award

51.9%

51.9%

MLB Roberto Clemente Award

47.4%

47.4%

MLB/NL/AL Cy Young Award

44.4%

55.4%

MLB Babe Ruth Award

37.0%

39.3%

NHL Frank J. Selke Trophy

33.3%

36.7%

MLB Hutch Award

33.1%

33.1%

NFL Offensive Rookie of the Year

28.6%

28.6%

MLB Edgar Martinez Award

26.7%

17.2%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Designated Hitter)

25.0%

30.8%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Shortstop)

23.5%

52.6%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove

21.7%

36.8%

NFL Defensive Rookie of the Year

20.6%

20.6%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Catcher)

20.0%

22.5%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Second Base)

18.8%

39.8%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Shortstop)

18.2%

35.1%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Pitcher)

18.2%

20.1%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Second Base)

16.7%

32.7%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Outfield)

16.7%

30.1%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Outfield)

15.7%

25.2%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Third Base)

14.3%

14.3%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Third Base)

13.6%

14.3%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (First Base)

13.6%

13.3%

MLB (NL/AL) Rookie of the Year

13.3%

13.3%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Catcher)

10.3%

15.2%

NBA Most Improved Player of the Year

5.3%

3.2%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (First Base)

3.8%

3.2%

So, who is up next?

The following are the players who have won the Offensive Player of the Year Award in the National Football League who have retired but have not met the mandatory years out of the game to qualify for the Pro Football Hall of Fame:

Peyton Manning, Indianapolis Colts, Quarterback(2004)

This was the second of Peyton Manning’s seven First Team All-Pro Selections and he would do so by throwing a league-leading 49 Touchdown Passes on 4,557 Yards.  The OPOY was one of many awards that the Colts Quarterback would collect in 2004 as he was also the PFWA MVP, AP MVP and the Bert Bell Award winner.  Manning is eligible for the Hall of Fame in 2021.

Chris Johnson, Tennessee Titans, Running Back(2009)

The 2,006 Rushing Yards would bring Chris Johnson to the exclusive 2G   Rushing Club, but while he wasn’t expected to repeat it, he never came very close.  No matter.  In this season, Johnson also led the NFL in Yards From Scrimmage with 2,509 Yards.  Johnson is eligible for the Hall of Fame in 2023.

Peyton Manning, Denver Broncos, Quarterback (2)(2013)

Manning was in his second season with the Denver Broncos and he would set a career-high with 5,477 Passing Yards and 55 Touchdown Passes.  This year would be his seventh and final First Team All-Pro and he would also win the AP MVP, PFWA MVP and the Bert Bell Award.  Manning is eligible for the Hall of Fame in 2021.

DeMarco Murray, Dallas Cowboys, Running Back(2014)

Murray would lead the NFL in Rushing Yards (1,845), Rushing Touchdowns (13) and Yards From Scrimmage (2,261).  This would be his only season as a First Team All-Pro and he would retire with 9,339 Yards From Scrimmage.  Johnson is eligible for the Hall of Fame in 2023.

The following are the players who have won the Offensive Player of the Year Award who are still active.

Tom Brady, New England Patriots, Quarterback (2007)

In 2007, Tom Brady would lead the NFL in Passing Yards with a career high 4,806 and 50 Touchdown Passes.  By this time, Brady already has won three Super Bowls and in 2007, he would win the AP and PFWA MVP as well as the Bert Bell Award. 41 Years Old, Playing for the New England Patriots.

Drew Brees, New Orleans Saints, Quarterback (2008)

Brees threw for his first 5,000 Yard Season (5,069) and this was the first time that he led the NFL in Touchdown Passes (34). This was the season that cemented Brees as a bona fide elite Quarterback in the National Football League.  40 Years Old, Playing for the New Orleans Saints.

Tom Brady, New England Patriots, Quarterback (2) (2010)

Brady returns to this accolade with an NFL leading 36 Touchdown Passes.  This was also his second First Team All-Pro Selection and he would also win the AP and PFWA MVP.  41 Years Old, Playing for the New England Patriots.

Drew Brees, New Orleans Saints, Quarterback (2) (2011)

In 2011, Brees threw for a career-highs of 5,476 Yards and 46 Touchdown Passes and took the Saints to a 13-3 record.  The Quarterback was also chosen for his seventh Pro Bowl.  40 Years Old, Playing for the New Orleans Saints.

Adrian Peterson, Minnesota Vikings, Running Back (2012)

This was the season where Adrian Peterson would become one of the members of the 2,000 Rushing Yard Club with a season of 2,097 Yards.  A.P. was not surprisingly also the NFL leader in Yards From Scrimmage (2,314) and the Running Back would also win the AP and PFWA MVP and the Bert Bell Award.  This season would see him also make his third of four First Team All-Pros.  34 Years Old, Playing for the Washington Redskins.

Cam Newton, Carolina Panthers, Quarterback (2015)

Newton would take the Panthers to the Super Bowl that season and he would earn what is to date his first First Team All-Pro Selection. Newton threw for 3,837 Yards and 35 Touchdowns and also rushed for another 636 Yards and 10 TDs.  Newton would also be awarded the AP MVP, PFWA MVP and Bert Bell Award.  31 Years Old, Playing for the Carolina Panthers.

Matt Ryan, Atlanta Falcons, Quarterback (2016)

Ryan set career-highs with 4,944 Passing Yards and 38 Touchdown Passes and to date this is the only First Team All-Pro Selection. He would also win the AP MVP, PFWA MVP and the Bert Bell Award.  34 Years Old, Playing for the Atlanta Falcons.

Todd Gurley, Los Angeles Rams, Running Back (2017)

Gurley was a First Team All-Pro for the first time in his career, and he would lead the NFL in Rushing Touchdowns with 13.  He would also top the NFL with 2,093 Yards From Scrimmage, 19 Touchdowns and an Approximate Value of 19.  25 Years Old, Playing for the Los Angeles Rams.

Patrick Mahomes, Kansas City Chiefs, Quarterback (2018)

In his first season as a starting Quarterback, Mahomes shattered all lofty expectations with a league leading 50 Touchdown passes on 5,097 Passing Yards.  He would also be named the AP and PFWA Player of the Year.  24 Years Old, Playing for the Kansas City Chiefs.

It certainly appears that the Offensive Player of the Year Award is a huge springboard to Canton immortality.

How do you do the Offensive Player of the Year without going to the defensive side of the same idea?  That is what we are doing next!

As always, we thank you for that support and look for that soon!





Welcome to a new feature on Notinhalloffame.com, where I, the Committee Chairman, come up with random pop-culture lists of drunken ramblings.  

This is the kind of useless tripe that I excel at, though it did nothing to help me with high school English class, nor did it impress any of the ladies, but as a middle-aged married guy, who still consumes alcoholic beverages that rivals anyone on Celebrity Rehab, I can say with full Joe Walsh meaning that "Life's Been Good To Me So Far".

With that all being said, here is the first one, which was created after binge-watching all eleven seasons of M*A*S*H.   I did this with the help of local Barbadian beer and rum. I have ten musings while watching the show that only comes with an increased blood alcohol level.

Before I do that, I am ignoring the most obvious observations, the most glaring of which being that the Korean War lasted two and a half years and M*A*S*H ran for 11 seasons.  Yeah, this led to continuity errors as when they occasionally mentioned dates or actual events both Henry Blake and Sherman Potter would have been the commanding officer for.  Every season, the sitcom had a Christmas episode, and in an early episode where they are looking for a Rabbi, Hawkeye and Trapper refer to (Duke) Forrest, who Hawkeye recalled left two years ago.  Hell, when Potter arrived, they said it was September of 1952, and they did one episode that went from New Year's to New Year's that spanned the entire year of 1951!  If we are to believe the timeline, this is some severe Rick and Morty parallel universe shit that no amount of booze can help me comprehend.

Another obvious one was the recycling of Asian-American actors.  I know that it was a different time, but you can't tell me that there weren't enough of them so that they did not have to regurgitate the same people.  I will grant that watching Mako in anything is good, but he played four different officers over two countries.  It wasn't just him as  an actor named Richard Lee Sung was in eleven various episodes, never playing the same role. 

I have more.

Byron Chung was in seven episodes (again playing seven different roles), and you may have seen him as Jin's dad in Lost.  Soon Tek-Oh, who was the evil Colonel in Missing in Action 2, was in it five times (five different roles).   For what it's worth, he was in four different Magnum P.I. episodes and again never playing the same character.

For those of you under 20, I am referring to the original Magnum P.I. and not this reboot where the lead character has no mustache!

I don't know why I bothered typing that earlier sentence.  Nobody under 20 knows what M*A*S*H is so nobody from that demographic clicked here.

Here are my ten drunken observations of M*A*S*H:

1. Hawkeye treated Radar like shit.Now he treated a lot of people horribly, and most have them deserved it, but without Radar, many of his plans could not have occurred.  Besides that, picking on Radar was low-hanging fruit.  He was also especially condescending, mainly when the company clerk spoke to a patient and tried to help.   Hawkeye would get on his high horse and not so subtly relate to Radar who was the surgeon and who was the Corporal.  I wager that when they reunited in the States (if they did), he still enforced that hierarchy.  

Oh, and I know there were times when Hawkeye successfully acted as Radar's older brother/father figure, but often it was because he did something to bring him down in the first place.  Oh, and that final salute that he gave Radar before shipping out does not make up for his overall dickishness.  

2. Jamie Farr was 38 years old when he was cast as Corporal Klinger, thus making his 49 when the show ended.Wasn't he way too old from the beginning to play a corpsman? So was Johnny Haymer, who played Supply Sgt. Zale.   He was 53 when he was first cast!  More often than not, the wounded soldiers who were shown as casualties were young, why not the enlisted men behind the lines?  The average age of the 4077th must have been close to 40…especially by the series end in '83.

3. There is not one plotline involving Father Mulcahey that was interesting.He holds the distinction of being my least favorite billed character in one of my top 100 television shows, and yes, I have counted 100.  The only time I got a remote chuckle was in the show's pilot where the priest won a date for two to Tokyo with the appropriately named Lt. Dish. Incidentally, that episode, Mulcahey was played by another actor, and not the mopey looking William Christopher who would adopt the role in all other episodes.

4. M*A*S*H may have had the most annoying laugh track of any sitcom.I don't know this for sure, but I am convinced they recycled the same five "laughs" over and over again

5. "Hot Lips" really hit the wall following the seventh season.No wonder Lt. Colonel Donald Penobscott dumper her expanding mommy ass in the seventh season. I think (not coincidentally) this is also why the nurses would become progressively less hot.

6. Radar's voice was rarely heard on the public address speaker but was the only one shown visually making the announcements.Who was that guy?

7. The best guest star was unquestionably Edward Winter as an intelligence officer, Colonel Flagg.The worst was Robert Alda (Alan Alda's real dad) as Dr. Anthony Borelli. Hawkeye was sanctimonious enough…two Aldas was unbearable…which brings me to…

8. Now it may seem I hate Hawkeye.I don't detest him at all.  He is the guy that I want to party with in the early episodes of the show. Sanctimonious Hawkeye is a drag, and the latter half of the series saw that happen as often as a Three's Company misunderstanding.  

9. How many times did Hawkeye operate while legally drunk? The answer is probably as many times as I wrote a chapter drunk.

10.The most underrated character in all of sitcom history is Charles Emerson Winchester III.He arrived at the perfect time to replace Major Burns who left the show knowing that the persona he created had no redeemable qualities and it could not grow with how the show was progressing.  Winchester fit in perfectly, and David Ogden Stiers correctly earned two consecutive Emmy nominations, though he lost (and I have no problem with this) to Taxi stars.   He lost to Danny DeVito and Christopher Lloyd for their portrayals of Louie DePalma and Reverend Jim Ignatowski respectively.  

If (When) I drink more, I am confident I can puke out ten more of these, but this will have to do for now.

Look for more of these soon, as my beer fridge is full.

Step by Step Guide on How to Become A Sports Betting Professional

As fun as it may sound to bet on sports for a living, nothing about being a sports betting professional is easy or stress-free. Professional sports betting requires a lot of hard work and can be incredibly stressful. 

That said, for the right person, professional sports betting can be the ultimate, rewarding career. But it’s certainly not something you should rush into just because you’re bored with your usual work routine. If you think you have what it takes, pay close attention to this guide on how to become a professional sports better.

Step 1: Gain A Thorough Understanding of Betting on Sports

Whether you are a complete beginner or have a little experience, it’s important to start with the basics. To make the most educated bets, you have to have a thorough knowledge of the subjects you are betting on. In the case of sports betting, you need to research and develop in-depth understanding of how sports betting is conducted, as well as the various sports you will be betting on. 

Many popular US sportsbooks offer guides and tutorials that can help you to become more familiar with betting practices and the way sports betting is conducted. Some sites even provide free advice for increasing your chances of winning. 

Step 2: Money Management

Before you start making bets, it’s important for you to properly manage your bankroll. Money management is essential to becoming a successful sports betting professional. Determine how much of your own money you can afford to set aside specifically for betting. Then, decide ahead of time how much you can stake on your bets. Making these decisions before you get started can help you avoid making disastrous financial decisions.

Additionally, when first starting out as a sports better, no matter how seriously it’s taken, it’s recommended that you don’t immediately quit your regular job. It can take a while to get started as a professional sports better and the last thing you want it to dig yourself a financial hole. Before you give up your job, consider the inconsistent income that comes with sports betting, as well as all the bills you still have to pay. Wait until you can truly rely on your winnings from sports betting before quitting your job and betting on sports full-time.

Step 3: Understand the Risks

Becoming a professional sports better comes with its own set of risks. If it were easy, everyone would do it. When it comes to betting on sports, especially in a professional setting, you can and will lose real money that you can’t immediately get back. Additionally, being a professional sports better doesn’t typically provide a consistent flow of income. You may go through periods where you win big, or you may experience a frustrating losing streak. It’s all part of the process, but you should be aware of the risks beforehand. 

Step 4: Know Where to Place Your Bets

One of the most important decisions you will make as a professional sports better is where to place your bets.  There are so many sportsbooks to choose from, it can be overwhelming trying to figure out which one is right for you. Do a bit of research into online sportsbooks to see what they have to offer, as well as what other customers are saying about them. 

Many popular online casinos support sports betting and with the numerous bonuses and rewards they offer you could get a great head start by choosing the right site on which to place your bets. Consider some of the top online casinos with sports betting and pay close attention to how to unlock a casino welcome bonus so you get started right away with real money.

Step 5: Practice, Practice, Practice

Especially if you are just starting out, understand that it may take some time before you truly understand how things operate and feel comfortable placing different types of bets. Professional sports betters find a method that works best for them and then stick with it. The more you practice, the better understanding you will gain of what method and which types of bets are most beneficial for you. 

Step 6: Control Your Emotions

Think with your head, not your heart. There’s nothing wrong with being passionate about what you do, but to be a successful sports better, you need to be able to think logically and leave emotions out of it. To do this, you should identify your own emotional weaknesses and take note of how they influence your bets. 

For example, perhaps you tend to pull for the underdogs, feeling the need to give them the benefit of the doubt. Logically speaking, an underdog is less likely to win. So unless your bet is backed by real logic, betting on a team or a person just because you “feel” for them, isn’t a good idea. 

Step 7: Never Stop Learning

When it comes to professional sports betting, the hard work never ends. As fun as it can be, to be a true professional, you can never get too comfortable. Athletics are always changing and evolving, which means you must always be open and willing to learn more and adjust as time goes on. 

Join a community where you can talk to and learn from other sports betters. Keep up with any relevant news and information, as it is released, because you never know what effect it can have on your bets. 

Additionally, continue learning from your own experiences. Consider how things have gone in the past and what you could have or should have done differently to get a better result. To become a truly successful professional sports better, you should never stop learning. 

We here at Notinhalloffame.com thought it would be fun to take a look at the major awards in North American team sports and see how it translates into Hall of Fame potential.

Needless to say, different awards in different sports yield hall of fame potential.  In basketball, the team sport with the least number of players on a roster, the dividend for greatness much higher.  In baseball, it is not as much as a great individual season does not have the same impact.

For our next selection we look at the Hutch Award.  This award is given annually to the player who “best exemplifies the fighting spirit and competitive desire” of Fred Hutchinson. Hutchinson was a former player and manager who died in 1964 after a long battle with lung cancer.  This award was created a year later by his friends and reporters who covered him to honor his memory.

So, how many Hutch Award winners have been enshrined in the Baseball Hall of Fame?

Let’s find out!

*Please note that as statistics are not as relevant for this award so as opposed to how we normally list players, we will simply just list the winners as opposed to go into that year’s accomplishments.  This is the same position that we took with the Roberto Clemente Award.

The following are the past players who have won the Hutch Award in the MLB who are eligible for the Baseball Hall of Fame and have been enshrined.

Mickey Mantle, New York Yankees (1965)

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1974.

Sandy Koufax, Los Angeles Dodgers (1966)

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1972.

Carl Yastrzemski, Boston Red Sox (1967)

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1989.

Al Kaline, Detroit Tigers (1969)

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1980.

Joe Torre, St. Louis Cardinals (1971)

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2014.

Willie McCovey, San Francisco Giants(1977)

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1986.

Willie Stargell, Pittsburgh Pirates(1978)

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1988.

Lou Brock, St. Louis Cardinals(1979)

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1985.

George Brett, Kansas City Royals(1980)

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1999.

Johnny Bench, Cincinnati Reds(1981)

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1989.

Paul Molitor, Milwaukee Brewers(1987)

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2004.

Andre Dawson, Boston Red Sox(1994)

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2010.

Trevor Hoffman, San Diego Padres(2004)

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2018.

Craig Biggio, Houston Astros(2005)

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2015.

The following are the players who have won the Hutch Award in MLB who are eligible for the Baseball Hall of Fame and have not been selected:

Pete Rose, Cincinnati Reds (1968)

Rose has been banned from the Baseball for gambling and the Baseball Hall of Fame has not allowed him on the ballot.  Ranked #1A on Notinhalloffame.com

Tony Conigliaro, Boston Red Sox (1970)

Conigliaro did not play the mandatory ten seasons to qualify for the Baseball Hall of Fame.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Bobby Tolan, Cincinnati Reds (1972)

Tolan was on the ballot for one year in 1985 but he did not receive any votes.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

John Hiller, Detroit Tigers (1973)

Hiller was on the ballot for one year and received 2.6% of the vote.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Danny Thompson, Minnesota Twins (1974)

Thompson did not play the mandatory ten seasons to qualify for the Baseball Hall of Fame.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Gary Nolan, Cincinnati Reds (1975)

Nolan was on the ballot for one year in 1983 but he did not receive any votes.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Tommy John, Los Angeles Dodgers (1976)

John was on the ballot for 15 years and finished as high as 31.7% in 2009.  Ranked #12 Notinhalloffame.com.

Andre Thornton, Cleveland Indians (1982)

Thornton was on the ballot for one year in 1993 and received 0.5% of the vote.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Ray Knight, New York Mets (1983)

Knight was on the ballot for one year in 1994 and received 0.2% of the vote.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Don Robinson, Pittsburgh Pirates (1984)

Although Robinson was eligible for the Hall of Fame in 1998, he was not on the ballot.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Rick Reuschel, Pittsburgh Pirates (1985)

Reuschel was on the ballot for one year in 1997 and received 0.4% of the vote.  Ranked #93 Notinhalloffame.com.

Dennis Leonard, Kansas City Royals (1986)

Leonard was on the ballot for one year in 1992 and received 0.2% of the vote.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Ron Oester, Cincinnati Reds (1988)

Although Oester was eligible for the Hall of Fame in 1996, he was not on the ballot.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Dave Dravecky, San Francisco Giants (1989)

Dravecky did not play the mandatory ten years to qualify for the Hall of Fame.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Sid Bream, Pittsburgh Pirates (1990)

Although Bream was eligible for the Hall of Fame in 2000, he was not on the ballot.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Bill Wegman, Milwaukee Brewers (1991)

Although Wegman was eligible for the Hall of Fame in 2001, he was not on the ballot.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Carney Lansford, Oakland Athletics (1992)

Lansford was on the ballot for one year in 1998 and received 0.6% of the vote.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

John Olerud, Toronto Blue Jays (1993)

Olerud was on the ballot for one year in 2011 and received 0.7% of the vote.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Jim Abbott, Chicago White Sox (1995)

Abbott was on the ballot for one year in 2005 and received 2.5% of the vote.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Omar Vizquel, Cleveland Indians (1996)

Vizquel has been on the ballot for two years and finished as high as 42.8% in 2019.  Ranked #51 Notinhalloffame.com.

Eric Davis, Baltimore Orioles (1997)

Davis was on the ballot for one year in 2007 and received 0.6% of the vote.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

David Cone, New York Yankees (1998)

Cone was on the ballot for one year in 2009 and received 3.9% of the vote.  Ranked #48 Notinhalloffame.com.

Sean Casey, Cincinnati Reds (1999)

Casey was on the ballot for one year in 2014 but did not receive any votes.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Jason Giambi, Oakland Athletics (2000)

Giambi is entering his first year of eligibility. Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Curt Schilling, Arizona Diamondbacks (2001)

Schilling has been on the ballot for seven years and has finished as high as 60.9% in 2019.  Ranked #5 Notinhalloffame.com.

Tim Salmon, Anaheim Angels (2002)

Salmon was on the ballot for one year in 2012 and received 0.9% of the vote.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Jamie Moyer, Seattle Mariners (2003)

Moyer was on the ballot for one year in 2018 and received 2.4% of the vote.  Ranked #105 Notinhalloffame.com.

Mark Loretta, Boston Red Sox (2006)

Although Loretta was eligible for the Hall of Fame in 2015, he wasn’t on the ballot.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Mike Sweeney, Kansas City Royals (2007)

Sweeney was on the ballot for one year in 2016 and received 0.7% of the vote.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Mark Teahen, Kansas City Royals (2009)

Teahen did not play the mandatory ten years to qualify for the Hall of Fame.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Raul Ibanez, Seattle Mariners (2013)

Ibanez is entering his first year of eligibility. Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Let’s update our tally, shall we?

Award in Question

Percentage of recipients who have entered the HOF

Percentage of recipients by year who have entered the HOF.

NBA MVP

100%

100%

NHL Norris

90.5%

96.4%

NBA All Star Game MVP

89.5%

91.7%

NHL Conn Smythe

74.2%

85.4%

NHL Lady Byng

63.8%

76.0%

NFL Super Bowl MVP

60.6%

64.9%

NBA Defensive Player of the Year

58.3%

56.5%

NBA Rookie of the Year

56.5%

56.5%

NFL Pro Bowl MVP

52.3%

54.8%

MLB Lou Gehrig Award

51.9%

51.9%

MLB Roberto Clemente Award

47.4%

47.4%

MLB/NL/AL Cy Young Award

44.4%

55.4%

MLB Babe Ruth Award

37.0%

39.3%

NHL Frank J. Selke Trophy

33.3%

36.7%

MLB Hutch Award

33.1%

33.1%

NFL Offensive Rookie of the Year

28.6%

28.6%

MLB Edgar Martinez Award

26.7%

17.2%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Designated Hitter)

25.0%

30.8%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Shortstop)

23.5%

52.6%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove

21.7%

36.8%

NFL Defensive Rookie of the Year

20.6%

20.6%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Catcher)

20.0%

22.5%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Second Base)

18.8%

39.8%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Shortstop)

18.2%

35.1%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Pitcher)

18.2%

20.1%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Second Base)

16.7%

32.7%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Outfield)

16.7%

30.1%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Outfield)

15.7%

25.2%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Third Base)

14.3%

14.3%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Third Base)

13.6%

14.3%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (First Base)

13.6%

13.3%

MLB (NL/AL) Rookie of the Year

13.3%

13.3%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Catcher)

10.3%

15.2%

NBA Most Improved Player of the Year

5.3%

3.2%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (First Base)

3.8%

3.2%

So, who is up next?

The following are the players who have won the Hutch Award in the Major League Baseball who have retired but have not met the mandatory years out of the game to qualify for the Baseball Hall of Fame:

Tim Hudson, Atlanta Braves(2010)

Hudson is eligible for the Hall of Fame in 2021.

Billy Butler, Kansas City Chiefs(2011)

Hudson is eligible for the Hall of Fame in 2022.

Barry Zito, San Francisco Giants(2012)

Zito is eligible for the Hall of Fame in 2021.

Dustin McGowan, Miami Marlins(2016)

McGowan is eligible for the Hall of Fame in 2023.

The following are the players who have won the Hutch Award who are still active.

Jon Lester, Boston Red Sox (2008)

35 Years Old, Playing for the Chicago Cubs.

Alex Gordon, Kansas City Royals (2014)

35 Years Old, Playing for the Kansas City Royals.

Adam Wainwright, St. Louis Cardinals (2015)

37 Years Old, Playing for the St. Louis Cardinals.

Jake Diekman, Texas Rangers (2017)

32 Years Old, Playing for the Oakland Athletics.

Stephen Piscotty, Oakland Athletics (2018)

32 Years Old, Playing for the Oakland Athletics.

The Hutch Award winners don’t focus on elite players like other tertiary, or any other baseball related award.  Since its namesake was not a Hall of Famer himself, this is not exactly a surprise.

We are finally finished with the tertiary Baseball Awards and we are going to go back to Football with a major award in the Offensive Player of the Year.

As always, we thank you for that support and look for that soon!

We here at Notinhalloffame.com thought it would be fun to take a look at the major awards in North American team sports and see how it translates into Hall of Fame potential.

Needless to say, different awards in different sports yield hall of fame potential.  In basketball, the team sport with the least number of players on a roster, the dividend for greatness much higher.  In baseball, it is not as much as a great individual season does not have the same impact.

For our next selection we look at the Lou Gehrig Memorial Award.  Created by the Phi Delta Theta Fraternity, it is designed to be given annually to the baseball player who is recognized for his work in his community and through his philanthropic work.  Think of this as the Baseball equivalent to the Walter Payton Man of the Year Award.

So, how many Lou Gehrig Memorial Award winners have been enshrined in the Baseball Hall of Fame?

Let’s find out!

*Please note that as statistics are not as relevant for this award so as opposed to how we normally list players, we will simply just list the winners as opposed to go into that year’s accomplishments.  This is the same position that we took with the Roberto Clemente Award.

The following are the past players who have won the Lou Gehrig Memorial Award in the MLB who are eligible for the Baseball Hall of Fame and have been enshrined.

Pee Wee Reese, Brooklyn Dodgers (1956)

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1984.

Stan Musial, St. Louis Cardinals (1957)

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1969.

Warren Spahn, Milwaukee Braves (1961)

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1973.

Robin Roberts, Baltimore Orioles (1962)

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1976.

Brooks Robinson, Baltimore Orioles (1966)

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1983.

Ernie Banks, Chicago Cubs (1967)

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1977.

Al Kaline, Detroit Tigers (1968)

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1980.

Hank Aaron, Atlanta Braves (1970)

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1982.

Harmon Killebrew, Minnesota Twins (1971)

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1984.

Ron Santo, Chicago Cubs (1973)

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2012.

Willie Stargell, Chicago Cubs (1974)

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1988.

Johnny Bench, Cincinnati Reds (1975)

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1989.

Don Sutton, Los Angeles Dodgers (1976)

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1998.

Lou Brock, St. Louis Cardinals (1977)

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1985.

Phil Niekro, Atlanta Braves (1979)

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1997.

Tony Perez, Boston Red Sox (1980)

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2000.

Mike Schmidt, Philadelphia Phillies (1983)

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1995.

George Brett, Kansas City Royals (1986)

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1999.

Ozzie Smith, St. Louis Cardinals (1989)

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2002.

Cal Ripken Jr., Baltimore Orioles (1992)

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2007.

Barry Larkin, Cincinnati Reds (1994)

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2012.

Paul Molitor, Minnesota Twins (1997)

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2004.

Tony Gwynn, San Diego Padres (1998)

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2012.

Jim Thome, Philadelphia Phillies (2004)

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2018.

John Smoltz, Atlanta Braves (2005)

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2015.

Trevor Hoffman, San Diego Padres (2006)

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2018.

The following are the players who have won the Lou Gehrig Memorial Award in MLB who are eligible for the Baseball Hall of Fame and have not been selected:

Al Dark, New York Giants (1955)

Dark was on the ballot for fifteen years and finished as high as 18.5% in 1979.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Gil McDougald, New York Yankees (1958)

McDougald was on the ballot for nine years and finished as high as 1.7% in 1966.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Gil Hodges, Los Angeles Dodgers (1959)

Hodges was on the ballot for fifteen years and finished as high as 63.4% in 1983.  Ranked #11 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Dick Groat, Pittsburgh Pirates (1960)

Groat was on the ballot for nine years and finished as high as 1.8% in 1973.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Bobby Richardson, New York Yankees (1963)

Richardson was on the ballot for three years and finished as high as 2.0% in 1972.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Ken Boyer, St. Louis Cardinals (1964)

Boyer was on the ballot for fifteen years and finished as high as 25.5% in 1983.  Ranked #49 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Vern Law, Pittsburgh Pirates (1965)

Law was on the ballot for seven years and finished as high as 2.4% in 1973.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Pete Rose, Cincinnati Reds (1969)

Rose has been banned from the Baseball for gambling and the Baseball Hall of Fame has not allowed him on the ballot.  Ranked #1A on Notinhalloffame.com

Wes Parker, Los Angeles Dodgers (1972)

Parker did not play the mandatory ten seasons to qualify for the Baseball Hall of Fame.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Don Kessinger, Chicago White Sox (1978)

Kessinger was on the ballot for one year and received 0.5% of the vote.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Tommy John, New York Yankees (1981)

John was on the ballot for fifteen years and finished as high as 31.7% in 2009.  Ranked #12 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Ron Cey, Los Angeles Dodgers (1982)

Cey was on the ballot for one years and finished with 1.9% in 1993.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Steve Garvey, San Diego Padres (1984)

Garvey was on the ballot for fifteen years and finished as high as 42.6% in 1995.  Ranked #12 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Dale Murphy, Atlanta Braves (1985)

Murphy was on the ballot for fifteen years and finished as high as 23.2% in 2000.  Ranked #12 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Rick Sutcliffe, Chicago Cubs (1987)

Sutcliffe was on the ballot for one year and finished with 1.8% in 2000.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Buddy Bell, Texas Rangers (1988)

Bell was on the ballot for one year and finished with 1.7% in 1995.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Glenn Davis, Houston Astros (1990)

While Davis played the minimum 10 years, he was not on the Baseball Hall of Fame ballot.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Kent Hrbek, Minnesota Twins (1990)

Hrbek was on the ballot for one year and finished with 1.0% in 2000.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Don Mattingly, New York Yankees (1993)

Murphy was on the ballot for fifteen years and finished as high as 28.2% in 2001.  Ranked #40 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Curt Schilling, Philadelphia Phillies (1995)

Schilling has been on the ballot for seven years and finished as high as 60.9% in 2019.  Ranked #5 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Brett Butler, Los Angeles Dodgers (1996)

Butler was on the ballot for one year and finished with 0.4% in 2003.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Mark McGwire, St. Louis Cardinals (1999)

McGwire has been on the ballot for ten years and finished as high as 23.7% in 2010.  Ranked #16 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Todd Stottlemyre, Arizona Diamondbacks (2000)

Stottlemyre was on the ballot for one year and finished with 0.2% in 2008.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

John Franco, New York Mets (2001)

Franco was on the ballot for one year and finished with 4.6% in 2011.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Danny Graves, Cincinnati Reds (2002)

Although Graves was eligible for the Hall of Fame in 2012, he was not on the ballot.

Jamie Moyer, Seattle Mariners (2003)

Moyer was on the ballot for one year and finished with 2.4% in 2018.  Ranked #105 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Mike Timlin, Boston Red Sox (2007)

Timlin was on the ballot for one year but did not receive any votes in 2007.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Josh Hamilton, Texas Rangers (2013)

Hamilton did not play the minimum ten years to qualify for the Baseball Hall of Fame.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

 

Let’s update our tally, shall we?

Award in Question

Percentage of recipients who have entered the HOF

Percentage of recipients by year who have entered the HOF.

NBA MVP

100%

100%

NHL Norris

90.5%

96.4%

NBA All Star Game MVP

89.5%

91.7%

NHL Conn Smythe

74.2%

85.4%

NHL Lady Byng

63.8%

76.0%

NFL Super Bowl MVP

60.6%

64.9%

NBA Defensive Player of the Year

58.3%

56.5%

NBA Rookie of the Year

56.5%

56.5%

NFL Pro Bowl MVP

52.3%

54.8%

MLB Lou Gehrig Award

51.9%

51.9%

MLB Roberto Clemente Award

47.4%

47.4%

MLB/NL/AL Cy Young Award

44.4%

55.4%

MLB Babe Ruth Award

37.0%

39.3%

NHL Frank J. Selke Trophy

33.3%

36.7%

NFL Offensive Rookie of the Year

28.6%

28.6%

MLB Edgar Martinez Award

26.7%

17.2%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Designated Hitter)

25.0%

30.8%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Shortstop)

23.5%

52.6%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove

21.7%

36.8%

NFL Defensive Rookie of the Year

20.6%

20.6%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Catcher)

20.0%

22.5%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Second Base)

18.8%

39.8%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Shortstop)

18.2%

35.1%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Pitcher)

18.2%

20.1%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Second Base)

16.7%

32.7%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Outfield)

16.7%

30.1%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Outfield)

15.7%

25.2%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Third Base)

14.3%

14.3%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Third Base)

13.6%

14.3%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (First Base)

13.6%

13.3%

MLB (NL/AL) Rookie of the Year

13.3%

13.3%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Catcher)

10.3%

15.2%

NBA Most Improved Player of the Year

5.3%

3.2%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (First Base)

3.8%

3.2%

So, who is up next?

The following are the players who have won the Lou Gehrig Memorial Award in the Major League Baseball who have retired but have not met the mandatory years out of the game to qualify for the Baseball Hall of Fame:

Shane Victorino, Philadelphia Phillies (2008)

Eligible for the Baseball Hall of Fame in 2021.

Derek Jeter, New York Yankees (2010)

Eligible for the Baseball Hall of Fame in 2020.

Barry Zito, San Francisco Giants (2012)

Eligible for the Baseball Hall of Fame in 2021.

Adrian Beltre, Texas Rangers (2014)

Eligible for the Baseball Hall of Fame in 2014.

The following are the players who have won the Lou Gehrig Memorial Award who are still active.

Albert Pujols, St. Louis Cardinals (2009)

39 Years Old, Playing for the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim.

Ryan Zimmerman, Washington Nationals (2011)

34 Years Old, Playing for the Washington Nationals.

Curtis Granderson, New York Mets (2015)

38 Years Old, Playing for the Miami Marlins.

Jose Altuve, Houston Astros (2016)

29 Years Old, Playing for the Houston Astros.

Joey Votto, Cincinnati Reds (2017)

35 Years Old, Playing for the Cincinnati Reds.

Corey Kluber, Cleveland Indians (2018)

33 Years Old, Playing for the Cleveland Indians.

The Lou Gehrig Memorial Award winners seems to lean toward elite players and we suspect that this will be a pattern to continue.

Up next, we are going to stay within the tertiary Baseball Awards and look at the Hutch Award Winner.

As always, we thank you for that support and look for that soon!

We here at Notinhalloffame.com thought it would be fun to take a look at the major awards in North American team sports and see how it translates into Hall of Fame potential.

Needless to say, different awards in different sports yield hall of fame potential.  In basketball, the team sport with the least number of players on a roster, the dividend for greatness much higher.  In baseball, it is not as much as a great individual season does not have the same impact.

For our next selection we look at the Roberto Clemente Award. Originally, this was called the Commissioners Award, the accolade is given annually to the player who best exemplifies the game of baseball, sportsmanship, community involvement and the individual’s contribution to the team.  It was renamed the Roberto Clemente Award following the death of Clemente who died in a plane crash while on the way to Nicaragua to deliver supplies to victims of the Nicaragua Earthquake.

So, how many Roberto Clemente Award winners have been enshrined in the Baseball Hall of Fame?

Let’s find out!

*Please note that as statistics are not as relevant for this award so as opposed to how we normally list players, we will simply just list the winners as opposed to go into that year’s accomplishments.

The following are the past players who have won the Roberto Clemente Award in the MLB who are eligible for the Baseball Hall of Fame and have been enshrined.

Willie Mays, San Francisco Giants (1971)

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1979.

Brooks Robinson, Baltimore Orioles (1972)

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1983.

Al Kaline, Detroit Tigers (1973)

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1980.

Willie Stargell, Pittsburgh Pirates (1974)

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1988.

Lou Brock, St. Louis Cardinals (1975)

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1985.

Rod Carew, Minnesota Twins (1977)

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1991.

Phil Niekro, Atlanta Braves (1980)

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1997.

Gary Carter, New York Mets (1989)

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2003.

Cal Ripken Jr., Baltimore Orioles (1992)

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2007.

Barry Larkin, Cincinnati Reds (1993)

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2012.

Dave Winfield, Minnesota Twins (1994)

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2001.

Ozzie Smith, St. Louis Cardinals (1995)

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2002.

Kirby Puckett, Minnesota Twins (1996)

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2001.

Tony Gwynn, San Diego Padres (1999)

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2007.

Jim Thome, Cleveland Indians (2002)

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2018.

Edgar Martinez, Seattle Mariners (2004)

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2019.

John Smoltz, Atlanta Braves (2005)

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2015.

Craig Biggio, Houston Astros (2007)

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2015.

The following are the players who have won the Roberto Clemente Award in MLB who are eligible for the Baseball Hall of Fame and have not been selected:

Pete Rose, Cincinnati Reds (1976)

Rose is banned from the Hall of Fame. Ranked #1A on Notinhalloffame.com.

Greg Luzinski, Philadelphia Phillies (1978)

Luzinski was on the ballot for one year in 1990 and received 0.2% of the vote.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Andre Thornton, Cleveland Indians (1979)

Thornton was on the ballot for one year in 1993 and received 0.5% of the vote.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Steve Garvey, Los Angeles Dodgers (1981)

Garvey was on the ballot for fifteen years in and finished as high as 42.6% in 1995.  Ranked #25 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Ken Singleton, Baltimore Orioles (1982)

Singleton was on the ballot for one year in 1990 but did not receive any votes.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Cecil Cooper, Milwaukee Brewers (1983)

Cooper was on the ballot for one year in 1993 and received 0.5% of the vote.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Ron Guidry, New York Yankees (1984)

Guidrey was on the ballot for nine years in and finished as high as 8.8% in 2000.  Ranked #54 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Don Baylor, New York Yankees (1985)

Baylor was on the ballot for two years in 1993 and received 2.6% of the vote in both years.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Garry Maddox, Philadelphia Phillies (1986)

Maddox was on the ballot for one year in 1990 but did not receive any votes.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Rick Sutcliffe, Chicago Cubs (1987)

Sutcliffe was on the ballot for one year in 2000 and received 1.7% of the vote.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Dale Murphy, Atlanta Braves (1988)

Murphy was on the ballot for fifteen years in and finished as high as 23.2% in 2000.  Ranked #30 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Dave Stewart, Oakland Athletics (1990)

Stewart was on the ballot for two years and finished as high as 7.4% in 2001.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Harold Reynolds, Seattle Mariners (1991)

Although Reynolds was eligible for the Hall of Fame in 2000 he was not on the ballot.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Eric Davis, Cincinnati Reds (1997)

Davis was on the ballot for one year in 2007 and received 0.6% of the ballot.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Sammy Sosa, Chicago Cubs (1998)

Sosa has been on the ballot for seven years and finished as high as 12.5% in 2013.  Ranked #29 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Al Leiter, New York Mets (2000)

Leiter was on the ballot for one year in 2011 and received 0.7% of the vote.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Curt Schilling, Arizona Diamondbacks (2001)

Schilling has been on the ballot for seven years and finished as high as 60.9% in 2019.  Ranked #5 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Jamie Moyer, Seattle Mariners (2003)

Moyer was on the ballot for one year and finished with 2.4% in 2018.  Ranked #105 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Carlos Delgado, New York Mets (2006)

Delgado was on the ballot for one year and finished with 3.8% in 2015.  Ranked #79 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Tim Wakefield, Boston Red Sox (2010)

Wakefield was on the ballot for one year in 2017 and received 0.2% of the vote.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

 

Let’s update our tally, shall we?

Award in Question

Percentage of recipients who have entered the HOF

Percentage of recipients by year who have entered the HOF.

NBA MVP

100%

100%

NHL Norris

90.5%

96.4%

NBA All Star Game MVP

89.5%

91.7%

NHL Conn Smythe

74.2%

85.4%

NHL Lady Byng

63.8%

76.0%

NFL Super Bowl MVP

60.6%

64.9%

NBA Defensive Player of the Year

58.3%

56.5%

NBA Rookie of the Year

56.5%

56.5%

NFL Pro Bowl MVP

52.3%

54.8%

MLB/NL/AL Cy Young Award

44.4%

55.4%

MLB Roberto Clemente Award

47.4%

47.4%

MLB Babe Ruth Award

37.0%

39.3%

NHL Frank J. Selke Trophy

33.3%

36.7%

NFL Offensive Rookie of the Year

28.6%

28.6%

MLB Edgar Martinez Award

26.7%

17.2%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Designated Hitter)

25.0%

30.8%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Shortstop)

23.5%

52.6%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove

21.7%

36.8%

NFL Defensive Rookie of the Year

20.6%

20.6%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Catcher)

20.0%

22.5%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Second Base)

18.8%

39.8%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Shortstop)

18.2%

35.1%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Pitcher)

18.2%

20.1%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Second Base)

16.7%

32.7%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Outfield)

16.7%

30.1%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Outfield)

15.7%

25.2%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Third Base)

14.3%

14.3%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Third Base)

13.6%

14.3%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (First Base)

13.6%

13.3%

MLB (NL/AL) Rookie of the Year

13.3%

13.3%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Catcher)

10.3%

15.2%

NBA Most Improved Player of the Year

5.3%

3.2%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (First Base)

3.8%

3.2%

So, who is up next?

The following are the players who have won the Roberto Clemente Award in the Major League Baseball who have retired but have not met the mandatory years out of the game to qualify for the Baseball Hall of Fame:

Derek Jeter, New York Yankees (2009)

Eligible for the Baseball Hall of Fame in 2020.

David Ortiz, Boston Red Sox (2011)

Eligible for the Baseball Hall of Fame in 2022.

Carlos Beltran, New York Mets (2013)

Eligible for the Baseball Hall of Fame in 2023.

Jimmy Howard, Philadelphia Phillies (2014) (Co-Winner)

Eligible for the Baseball Hall of Fame in 2022.

Paul Konerko, Chicago White Sox (2014) (Co-Winner)

Eligible for the Baseball Hall of Fame in 2020.

 

The following are the players who have won the Roberto Clemente Award who are still active.

Albert Pujols, St. Louis Cardinals (2008)

39 Years Old, Playing for the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim.

Clayton Kershaw, Los Angeles Dodgers (2012)

31 Years Old, Playing for the Los Angeles Dodgers.

Andrew McCutchen, Pittsburgh Pirates (2015)

32 Years Old, Playing for the Philadelphia Phillies.

Curtis Granderson, New York Mets (2016)

38 Years Old, Playing for the Miami Marlins.

Anthony Rizzo, Chicago Cubs (2017)

29 Years Old, Playing for the Chicago Cubs.

Yadier Molina, St. Louis Cardinals (2018)

36 Years Old, Playing for the Philadelphia Phillies.

The Roberto Clemente Award winners seems to lean toward elite players and we suspect that this will be a pattern to continue.

Up next, we are going to stay within the tertiary Baseball Awards and look at the Lou Gehrig Memorial Award.

As always, we thank you for that support and look for that soon!

With heightened competition triggered by an influx of casinos in the United States, there is speculation that NetEntertainment gaming sites will add sports betting into their business to help them remain popular and profitable. With the casino business seemingly dipping in Las Vegas over the last few months of 2019, and Chinese enclave Macau experiencing declining numbers, NetEnt powered casinos believe that sports betting is the silver lining to help them prosper.

For years, sports betting in the US has been an afterthought for most casino operators because of the legal system's tough stance on it. Casinos purely considered sportsbooks as an extra amenity for players as sports betting gave the house a minimal edge all the same - an advantage of less than 10%. Casino operators, therefore, didn't gawk at sports betting too fondly.

Following the US Supreme Court's rulingon legalization of sports betting back in 2018, several casino operators have added sportsbooks into their works. Most casinos in the Las Vegas area, are quickly strategizing on how to tap into the proliferating market and are looking up to providers like NetEnt to make their dreams come true. Casino software developers and igaming providers like IGT gaming, Playtech, Yggdrasil, Betsoft, Nextgen Gaming, Microgaming, RTG, and Rival are already providing comprehensive coverage of sports betting to casinos and bookmakers.

So, will the US NetEnt casinos follow suit and add sports betting options anytime soon?

Before delving into NetEnt's decision to dive into the world of sports betting, it is crucial to take a look at just how big the online casino software provider is in the country and why it is a big deal for it to provide sports betting. So, how big is NetEnt in the United States?

NetEnt in the United States

The entry of the company from Sweden into the gambling industry of the United States back in 2013 was part of the company's expansion plan to tap into the North American Market. NetEnt acquired its license in New Jersey and officially started operations in the country in 2015.

Although the legal structure governing gambling was still shaky in the country, New Jersey had already defined gambling legislation, and NetEnt used the state as the entry point into the vast US casino market. NetEnt acquired its first license and a transactional waiver in New Jersey and immediately started partnering with local casinos providing them with online casino software solutions. Today, NetEnt has a permanent Casino Service Industry License which allows it to operate full-time in the market.

NetEnt first partnered with Tropicana Casinos and instantly made a name for itself. Although the company had already earned a reputation from its excellent service delivery in the European gambling industry, NetEnt brought a new dimension into the US online casino industry. It attracted several casinos and casino operators who were looking to adopt its services. The NetEnt brand and portfolio proliferated. 

It has been a little over five years since NetEnt launched its services in the United States. And today, NetEnt powers some of the best online casinos in the country. Casinos like Pokerstars, Virgin Casino, Mohegan Sun Casino, Caesars Casino, Party Casino, 888 Casino, BGO Casino, Casumo Casino, Dream Vegas, Leovegas Casino, Vegas Luck Casino, Mr Green Casino, Videoslots Casino, Fun Casino, and Golden Nugget Casinos are all powered by NetEnt. The number of US casinos employing NetEnt's services is growing by the day as the existing customers are reaping big from NetEnt's platform.

How did this meteoritic rise come to be? Why did NetEnt grow tremendously in the United States? What are some of the features of NetEnt that saw it partner with so many American customers? Here are the top reasons why NetEnt found a lot of joy in the American market.

Why NetEnt Grew so Rapidly in the United States

  • Popular NetEnt Games

NetEnt introduced a host of exclusive new games into the online gaming industry which players found to be fun and exciting. They also promised more winnings. NetEnt slots, in particular, brought a new lease of life to the casino industry which was stale with traditional table games. Customers were tired of the leading games casinos offered and were looking for something fun that would enhance their gaming experience.

Some of the top NetEnt games released and which players enjoy to date include top slot video games such as Starburst, variants of baccarat, blackjack, Guns n Roses slots, video poker, progressive jackpots, Gonzo's Quest, Mega Fortune, roulette, and other top casino games. And this is not the full range of NetEnt casino games offers listed by the best casinos.

  • Promotions and Offers

NetEnt casinos understand the value of rewarding customers and came up with some of the best promotions and huge offers to lure players to different websites that use NetEnt’s software. From giving customers free bets, free spins upon sign up like the popular 100 welcome bonus, free spins on Starburst, awarding 20 free spins for roulette, offering 100, 200, 500 free spins for registering to specific casino games, casino 10 free spins on several slot games, matching deposits made through Skrill, PayPal, and Neteller. The unique NetEnt bonuses and promotions awarded on a variety of games earned casinos new customers and helped retain existing customers.

  • Great Apps and Websites

NetEnt is not only about developing excellent casino games; their websites and mobile applications are worth attention too. Casino sites are no longer bland; the platforms have fantastic graphics with an intricate placement of a variety of features to enhance the gaming experience of players. Wagering in online casinos is not limited to casino websites on desktops; customers can play casino games through Android and iOS apps on their mobile devices.

Registration at new casinos, safe depositing of money, playing live casino games, reading terms and conditions, and instant withdrawal of funds are now effortless. Any player could do this with relative ease. The apps and casino websites have extra features like blogs for reading the latest casino news, articles with fresh casino content every month, contacts for customer support, and other options meant to optimize the user experience.

With the help of website cookies, NetEnt casinos personalize the browsing and playing experience for the players giving them classic entertainment while they play for real money. NetEnt casinos take advantage of their blogs to educate players on privacy policy, and advise players to gamble responsibly with the help of specific gambling organizations such as BeGambleAware.

Now that we have seen why NetEnt casinos are so popular, what are the chances of these online casinos venturing into sports betting? What will be the impact of NetEnt casinos subscribing to sports betting? Is the US market ready for sports betting?

Reasons Why NetEnt Casinos Will Eventually Venture Into Sports Betting in the US

The Success of Sports Betting in Markets Outside the US

If the evolution of sports betting in the US is anything to go by, then it won't be long before we start hearing of NetEnt casinos venturing into the sports betting industry. In fact, sports betting is not all too new for NetEnt. Back in 2018, NetEnt launched an innovative widgetenabling casino players to bet on sports and play other quality live casino games simultaneously.

NetEnt launched the widget in a bid to capitalize on the 2018 FIFA World Cup, but it also served as a test of how sports betting could benefit NetEnt casinos. Casinos outside the US that adopted the trial widget reported increased revenues during the showpiece tournament. The profits from sports betting during the period supplemented the income from other regular casino games. Some operators recorded their highest earnings during the same period.

Even before the introduction of the widget, most NetEnt casinos outside the US were already incorporating sportsbooks into their business models. The profit margins from these casinos suggest that sports betting is a ripe growth frontier and a safe haven which will add value to stakeholders. NetEnt casinos, especially in Europe, are raking in billions by providing sports betting markets to UK players who love sports betting more than their American counterparts. The thing is that such casinos are not powered by NetEnt purely; they incorporate software solutions from different providers.

Regulatory Changes

Following the legalization of online betting in the United States by the Supreme Court on May 14, 2018, many casinos will start to venture into the untapped industry. Different states can now regulate sports betting, and already more than seven states have opened up their borders for bookmakers and casinos to offer betting options.

Negative legislation was one of the hindrances cited by many casino operators who dreaded investing in sports betting. Now that the legal environment is better, casinos have already started giving sports betting a go in the United States.

With other casinos expanding into sports betting, NetEnt casinos in the US will be forced to also dive into the deep end to be able to compete with rival casinos and bookmakers.

Sports Betting is Huge in the US

Gone are the days when boxing, basketball, and football were the only sports Americans could gamble on for cash. The sports industry, as a whole, has grown tremendously over the last two decades and the interest in these games has also hit record numbers. With the increased interest in modern-day sports, comes a rise in the number of people willing to wager on the games and try their luck.

Soccer, in particular, has attracted lots of attention in the last decade as the United States grapple with matching the standards of soccer in other established countries like the UK, Malta, Spain, etc. Soccer betting within the nation is snowballing, and casinos are looking to tap into that market.

The sports gaming industry is already huge in the country. For example, players wagered close to $5 billion in Las Vegas' sportsbooks back in 2017. Gambling compliance office estimates that the US sports betting industry will be worth $3 bn by December 2023, which is telling in itself. The size of the criminal underworld of illegal betting is even bigger and accounts for more than $70 billion wagering on sports events offered by international casinos and bookies.

Any wise casino operator will put measures into place to ensure that sports betting is part and parcel of their business. NetEnt casinos are not an exception and will want a piece of the global sports betting pie.

Legalization of Sports Betting Will Affect the Stock Market Positively

The other reason why NetEnt casinos will hop onto the sports betting wagon is the fact that the legalization of sports betting in the country is expected to impact gambling stocks positively. Since NetEnt is listed on the stock market, they'll want their company to benefit from sports betting by offering sports betting in the US.

Other gambling stocks in the same category including IGT, MGM and Playtech have already started reaping the benefits of the legalization of sports betting, and it won't be long before NetEnt starts looking fondly at the possibility of offering the same services and goes on an adventure.

These are all speculations though, and the official word from NetEnt is yet to trickle down to the press. It is crucial to note that adopting sports betting is a sensitive subject which requires careful planning and a large amount of money. So, there’s still much room for consideration. From meeting the minimum requirements to get licenses to certifying of the licenses by the relevant bodies and laws like DMCA, it will take a lot of time before NetEnt actualizes the dream of sports bettors.

With the revenue of traditional online casinos tumbling by the day, NetEnt will eventually have to venture into sports betting to supplement their income. It will only be a matter of time, but American customers are eager for the service to be released soon.

Now that the NBA Finals are over and the 2018/19 Season has officially been brought to a close, we can turn our attention to what we always do here at Notinhalloffame.com, look at the next Basketball Hall of Fame Class!

People who thought the 2018 Hall of Fame class was stacked, with Jason Kidd, Steve Nash, Grant Hill, and Ray Allen, will gawk at the 2020 eligibles say Paruk from SBD. The top-three players in this class -- Tim Duncan, Kobe Bryant, and Kevin Garnett -- are arguably the three most-accomplished players ever to become eligible at the same time. The trio has 11 NBA titles and 48 All-Star Game nods between them, and they are all 100%, iron-clad locks to be inducted in their first year of eligibility.

Every single one of them is bona fide headliners but if you are looking for a quadruple threat like 2018 remember that the forced end of Chris Bosh’s career in 2016 makes him also Hall of Fame eligible for 2020 and he too has a first ballot resume.

Even with the retirements this year of Dwyane Wade, Dirk Nowitzki and Tony Parker (all of whom will be eligible for the Class of 2023) we may never see a more loaded group in any Basketball Hall of Fame Class.

We will go one step further and state that this is the most star-studded group of any North American Athletic Hall of Fame Class in the 21stCentury.

One thing is for sure is that this will be the hottest Hall of Fame ticket of any kind in the year of 2020!

There are a but a few sporting events that have such a massive following in the western world as the Baseball World Series. Just like the NBA is to basketball and the NFL to football, Major League Baseball has tremendous appeal not only in The United States of America but also in countries such as Canada and Japan.

We here at Notinhalloffame.com thought it would be fun to take a look at the major awards in North American team sports and see how it translates into Hall of Fame potential.

Needless to say, different awards in different sports yield hall of fame potential.  In basketball, the team sport with the least number of players on a roster, the dividend for greatness much higher.  In baseball, it is not as much as a great individual season does not have the same impact.

For our next selection we look at the Babe Ruth Award, which until 2007 only constituted the MVP of the World Series, which may seem like overkill considering it is secondary to the World Series MVP, which is awarded right after the World Series.  The Babe Ruth Award is given a few weeks after.  Incidentally, the Babe Ruth Award is older than the World Series MVP, but as it is not sanctioned by Major League Baseball it is not considered nearly as prestigious, but we aren’t letting that stop us here at Notinhalloffame.com!

So, how many Babe Ruth Award winners have been enshrined in the Baseball Hall of Fame?

Let’s find out!

The following are the past players who have won the Babe Ruth Award in the MLB who are eligible for the Baseball Hall of Fame and have been enshrined.

Phil Rizzuto, New York Yankees (1951)

The first Hall of Famer who was also a Babe Ruth Award winner is fittingly a New York Yankee.  Phil Rizzuto played his entire career with the Yankees and he would win the World Series seven times, this being his fifth.  In the Fall Classic, “Scooter” would bat .320 with 8 Hits and a Home Run in New York’s six game win over their crosstown rival, the New York Giants.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1994.

Johnny Mize, New York Yankees (1952)

The Yankees would generate their fourth (in four) straight Babe Ruth winner and this one is especially sweet.  Mize was very late in his career and was a bench player at this stage but he was still clutch and in the 1952 World Series five game win over the Brooklyn Dodgers, he batted .400 with 3 Home Runs and 6 Runs Batted In. He would only play one more year in the Majors.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1981.

Bill Mazeroski, Pittsburgh Pirates (1960)

Bill Mazeroski batted .320 in the World Series with a pair of Home Runs, one of which being the most famous in World Series history as he blasted a walk-off dinger in Game 7, to date the only one of its kind.  Despite the heroics and overall good series (he also had 5 Runs Batted In and a .960 OPS) Bobby Richardson of the New York Yankees (.367 and 12 RBIs) won the World Series MVP despite being on the losing team. As for Mazeroski, he was a seven-time All-Star, eight-time Gold Glove recipient but only had a career On Base Percentage of .299.  The chances are that had Mazeroski not had that World Series winning Home Run we have to wonder if he would have gotten into the Hall of Fame without it.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2001.

Whitey Ford, New York Yankees (1961)

This was the best season of Whitey Ford’s career, though this was 1961 where most people remember the Roger Maris home run chase.  Ford went 25 and 4 won the Cy Young Award and in the 1961 World Series he went 2 and 0 with 14 Innings of scoreless baseball with a 0.500 WHIP.  Ford would also win the World Series MVP this year.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1974.

Sandy Koufax, Los Angeles Dodgers (1963)

This was about as good as a season as you can get as Sandy Koufax won the National League’s Triple Crown with 25 Wins, a 1.88 ERA, 306 Strikeouts and he also had a 0.875 WHIP.  Not only did Koufax win the Cy Young, he was also the MVP.  He kept his dominance in the post-season going 2 and 0 with a 1.50 ERA in their win over the Minnesota Twins.  Koufax also won the World Series MVP.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1972.

Bob Gibson, St. Louis Cardinals(1964)

Gibson had a good 1964 but this year’s World Series was arguably the coming out party of the dominance that was to come as he would go on to win the Cy Young Award twice and the MVP once.  Gibson would go 2 and 1 completing all three games with a 3.00 ERA.  He would also win the World Series MVP.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1981.

Sandy Koufax, Los Angeles Dodgers (2) (1965)

This was almost a carbon copy season of 1963 where Koufax again won the Pitcher’s Triple Crown (26 Wins, 2.04 ERA and 382 Strikeouts) and he would again win the Cy Young and have a WHIP under 0.900.  The only thing he didn’t so was win the MVP (he was second) but in the 1965 World Series he went 2 and 1 over 24 Innings and an ERA of 0.38. Koufax played one more year in baseball before retiring at the peak of his career.  Historically speaking this is the first time that there was a repeat winner for the Babe Ruth Award.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1972.

Frank Robinson, Baltimore Orioles(1966)

Robinson made a lot of history in 1966 as in his first season in Baltimore he won the MVP, making him the first player in baseball history to win the MVP in both leagues (he won the NL version in Cincinnati in 1961).  He would also lead his Orioles to their first World Series win since they moved east from St. Louis.  In the World Series, Robinson batted .286 with a pair of Home Runs in their sweep over the Los Angeles Dodgers.   Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1982.

Lou Brock, St. Louis Cardinals(1967)

Lou Brock is without question one of the greatest tablesetters in baseball history and he did exactly what you would expect him to do in the World Series where he batted .414, had 7 Stolen Bases and 8 Runs. This year was his first of six All-Star trips and he retired with the all-time record in Stolen Bases.  With all due respect to Brock, the World Series MVP was awarded to Bob Gibson who won three Games with a 1.00 ERA and a 0.704 WHIP.  That was the better choice.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1985.

Brooks Robinson, Baltimore Orioles(1970)

Brooks Robinson is one of the best defensive players the game of baseball has ever seen and his bat wasn’t too shabby either.  In the 1970 World Series, Robinson batted .429 with a pair of Home Runs and six RBIs.  He would simultaneously win the World Series MVP.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1983.

Roberto Clemente, Pittsburgh Pirates(1971)

Roberto Clemente is one of the few players who when you say the word, “legend”, there is no inaccuracy in the statement.  Clemente was a 12-time All-Star who had an even 3,000 Hits and probably would have had more had he not perished in a plane crash in 1972.  In 1971, Clemente would lead Pittsburgh to the World Series (his second) and he would bat .414 with two Home Runs in Pittsburgh’s win over Baltimore.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1973.

Johnny Bench, Cincinnati Reds(1976)

The Catcher of “The Big Red Machine” was in the middle of a career that had already seen him win two National League MVP Awards and a World Series the year before.  Bench would bat .533 with a pair of Home Runs in this version of the Fall Classic.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1989.

Reggie Jackson, Oakland Athletics(1977)

Reggie Jackson had already won the World Series MVP (but not the Babe Ruth Award) in 1973 as an Oakland Athletic, but it was his 1977 performance as a New York Yankee that made him forever a legend.  Jackson blasted five Home Runs in the World Series, including three in Game 6, making him the first to do that since Babe Ruth did it in 1928.  Jackson also batted .450 with a 54 On Base Percentage.  This is where he got the nickname of “Mr. October”.  Jackson of course would also win the World Series MVP. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1993.

Willie Stargell, Pittsburgh Pirates(1979)

Willie Stargell was deep into back nine of his career but he shot an eagle in 1979 winning the National League MVP and in the World Series he batted .400 with three Home Runs in their seven game win over the Baltimore Orioles. He would notably also win the NLCS MV batting .455 with two Home Runs against Cincinnati.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1988.

Bruce Sutter, St. Louis Cardinals(1982)

Bruce Sutter was one of the most dominating closers of his day and he was named the Cy Young Award winner in 1979.  In 1982 he would lead the National League in Saves for the fourth straight year and in the World Series he had two more, but had an ERA of 4.70. Sutter would not win the World Series MVP as Darrell Porter would earn that accolade along with the NLCS MVP.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2006.

Jack Morris, Detroit Tigers(1984)

The Detroit Tigers were the dominating team of 1984 and Jack Morris was their ace.  In the 1984 World Series he would win both his starts with 13 Strikeouts, a 2.00 ERA and a WHIP of 0.889.  He would not win the World Series MVP as that went to the Tigers’ Shortstop, Alan Trammell. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2018.

Jack Morris, Minnesota Twins (2)(1991)

In the thrilling seven game series against the Atlanta Braves, Jack Morris would win his second Babe Ruth Award when he went 2 and 0 over 23 Innings and a 1.17 ERA.  His heroic 10 Inning shutout win in Game 7 will never (and should never) be forgotten. This time, Morris would be named the World Series MVP.  It should be mentioned that whether or not the Baseball Hall of Fame Veteran’s Committee were on the fence about his overall stats, his post-season exploits had to put him over the top.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2018.

Dave Winfield, Toronto Blue Jays(1992)

For the first time ever the World Series Championship left the United States as the Toronto Blue Jays would win it all in 1992.  Winfield batted .227 with 5 RBs, including the series winning double in Game 6.  Winfield did not win the World Series MVP as that went to Jays Catcher, Pat Borders who batted .450.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2001.

Paul Molitor, Toronto Blue Jays(1993)

For the second year in a row the Babe Ruth Award winner was a Toronto Blue Designated Hitter.  Paul Molitor would bat .500 with half of his hits being of the extra-base variety.  He would also accumulate eight RBIs and he was also named the World Series MVP.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2004.

Tom Glavine, Atlanta Braves(1995)

The Atlanta Braves finally won a World Series, though I think we can agree that they should have won a lot more in the 1990s.  Glavine won the Cy Young Award in 1991 and would again in 1998 but in 1995 the Babe Ruth Award and World Series MVP where he went 2 and 0 with a 1.29 ERA, 0.714 WHIP and 11 Strikeouts.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2014.

Mariano Rivera, New York Yankees(1999)

This would be the third of Mariano Rivera’s five World Series Championships and in this World Series he appeared in three games, winning one Game, saving two and allowing zero runs.  Rivera is not just the greatest Relief Pitcher of all-time, he is also the greatest post-season closer.  His overall playoff numbers (all for the Yankees) is 8 and 1 with 42 Saves, 78 Games Finished an ERA of 0.70 and WHIP of 0.759.  Is there any wonder that he would become the first person to enter the Baseball Hall of Fame on a perfect ballot.  He would also win the World Series MVP.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2019.

Randy Johnson, Arizona Diamondbacks(2001)

In 2001, both the Babe Ruth Award and World Series MVP were co-awarded to Randy Johnson and Curt Schilling.  Johnson’s 2001 World Series would see him win all three of his starts with a 1.04 ERA, 0.692 WHIP and strikeout 19 batters.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2015.

The following are the players who have won the Babe Ruth Award in MLB who are eligible for the Baseball Hall of Fame and have not been selected:

Joe Page, New York Yankees (1949)

Joe Page was one of the game’s first relief pitchers of note and in 1949 he had already been to three All-Star Games.  1949 was the third and final straight year that he would finish first in Games Finished and he would record 27 Saves with a 13 and 8 record while also finishing third in MVP voting.  In the World Series five game win over the Brooklyn Dodgers, Page pitched in three games winning one, and saving another with a 2.00 ERA and 1.000 WHIP.  Page did not play enough seasons to qualify for the Baseball Hall of Fame. Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Jerry Coleman, New York Yankees (1950)

For the second year of the award’s inception, a New York Yankee would win the award and like the first winner he did not play enough seasons to be on the Baseball Hall of Fame ballot.  This was the second year for Jerry Coleman in the Majors and it was last (and arguably only) good season.  Coleman was an All-Star for what would be the only time in his career and is 150 Hits and .287 Batting Average were career highs.  The Yankees would win the World Series sweeping the Philadelphia Phillies and he would bat .286 with 4 RBIs.  That was not spectacular, but it was enough.  Notably, this was the second of four World Series that he would win, which was all with the Yankees.  Coleman did not play enough seasons to qualify for the Baseball Hall of Fame.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Billy Martin, New York Yankees (1953)

Five Babe Ruth Awards and five New York Yankees.  This one was one by Billy Martin, who would become more associated with the team later as a Manager.  In 1953, the Second Baseman hit 2 Home Runs with 8 RBIs and a .500 Batting Average in their six-game win over Brooklyn.  Martin was on the ballot for one year in 1967 and received 0.3% of the vote.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Dusty Rhodes, New York Giants (1954)

For the first time ever the Babe Ruth Award did not go to a New York Yankee and of course it couldn’t as the Yanks did not make the post-season for the first time in the awards existence.  Rhodes was a clutch Pinch Hitter throughout the series and while he only batted seven times he had a .667 Batting Average with 2 Home Runs and 7 Runs Batted In.  Rhodes did not play enough seasons to qualify for the Hall of Fame.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Johnny Podres, Brooklyn Dodgers (1955)

This is an important year in regards to the Babe Ruth Award as this is the first year that the World Series MVP was also issued.  This year’s winner (and also of the inaugural World Series MVP) was Johnny Podres who would later be a three time All-Star and would help the Dodgers win two more World Series titles after they relocated to Los Angeles.  In this World Series, Podres threw for 18 Innings with a 2 and 0 record and a 1.00 ERA. This was the only title that the Dodgers would win when the team was located on the East Coast.  Podres was on the ballot for three years and finished as high as 0.8% in both 1975 & 1977.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Don Larsen, New York Yankees (1956)

The Babe Ruth Award returned to the New York Yankees and it went to Don Larsen who made history by throwing what has been to date the only perfect game in World Series history.  The Yankees would beat the Brooklyn Dodgers in seven games and Larsen would go on to have a journeyman’s career going 81 and 91 over 14 seasons and nine teams.   Of course, Larsen would also win the World Series MVP.  Larsen was on the ballot for fifteen years and finished as high as 12.3% in 1979.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Lew Burdette, Milwaukee Braves (1957)

1957 was the first and only time that the Braves would win the World Series while playing in Milwaukee thus making Lew Burdette the only Babe Ruth Award winner (and World Series MVP) who was a Milwaukee Brave.  Burdette had a really good season as he was an All-Star this year and would go 3 and 0 with a 0.67 ERA in the World Series. Milwaukee’s opponents, the New York Yankees, could only muster two runs over 27 Innings.  Burdette was on the ballot for fifteen years and finished as high as 23.2% in 1987.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Elston Howard, New York Yankees (1958)

The choice of Elston Howard for the Babe Ruth Award was a little curious as he only batted .222 in the World Series and none of his four Hits were for extra bases.  He did hit the series winning RBI, which may have been why he won the award.  The World Series MVP was given to Bob Turley, who went 2-1 with a Save and he was also named the Cy Young Award winner that year. This marked the first time that the Babe Ruth Award winner and the World Series MVP went to two different people. He would later be named the American League MVP in 1963.  Howard was on the ballot for fifteen years and finished as high as 20.7% in 1981.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Larry Sherry, Los Angeles Dodgers (1959)

This was the official rookie season for Larry Sherry (he played five games the year before) and he would go on to have a good career as a Relief Pitcher securing 82 Saves.  Sherry assisted the Dodgers in winning the 1959 World Series where he pitched in four games, winning two and saving another two.  Over 12.2 Innings he had an ERA of 0.71 and a WHIP of 0.789.  Sherry was also named the World Series MVP.  Although Sherry was eligible for the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1974, he was not on the ballot.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Ralph Terry, New York Yankees (1962)

This was the best year by far for Ralph Terry who in the regular season won a league leading 23 Games and was an All-Star for the only time in his career.  Terry went 2 and 1 with a 1.80 ERA in their World Series win over the San Francisco Giants. He was also named the World Series MVP. Although Terry was eligible for the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1973, he was not on the ballot.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Mickey Lolich, Detroit Tigers (1968)

The 1968 World Series was expected to be the battle between Bob Gibson of the St. Louis Cardinals and Denny McClain of the Detroit Tigers but the best hurler of the World Series was Mickey Lolich who went 3 and 0 with a 1.67 ERA. Lolich would go on to participate in three All-Star Games and win 217 Games in baseball.  He was also the World Series MVP.  Lolich was on the ballot for fifteen years and finished as high as 25.5% in 1988.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Al Weis, New York Mets (1969)

This is one of the most unlikely winners of the Babe Ruth Award, which was fitting considering that the New York Mets were the most unlikely World Series Champions.  Weis, who never had more than 81 Hits in a season and a career Batting Average of .219. In the 1969 World Series, Weis batted .455 with a Home Run and had an OBP of .529.  Donn Clendenon would be named the World Series MVP as he hit three Home Runs with a Batting Average of .357.  With these two heroes, the name “Miracle Mets” really makes a lot of sense. Although Weis was eligible for the ballot in 1977 he was not on the ballot.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Gene Tenace, Oakland Athletics (1972)

Gene Tenace had only 51 Hits in the regular season but by the playoffs he was the team’s Catcher and in the World Series he would bat .348 with four Home Runs and nine Runs Batted In.  Tenace would later be an All-Star in 1985.  Tenace was on the ballot for one year in 1989 and received 0.2% of the ballot.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Bert Campaneris, Oakland Athletics (1973)

Bert Campaneris was a very good player who had 2,249 Hits, which chances are most of you may not have been aware that he is a member of the 2,000 Hit Club.  In the 1973 World Series he batted .290 with three RBIs.  He did not win the World Series MVP as it was given to Reggie Jackson with a .310 Batting Average with six RBIs.  Campaneris was on the ballot for one year in 1989 and received 3.1% of the ballot.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Dick Green, Oakland Athletics (1974)

While Dick Green had a good defensive series engineering six double plays, he didn’t have a hit in the World Series and only had one walk in fifteen Plate Appearances with one Run and one RBI.  Green retired after the World Series but was not the World Series MVP. That honor was given to Rollie Fingers who pitched in four of the five games with a Win and two Saves.  Although Green was eligible for the Hall of Fame in 1980, he was not on the ballot. Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Luis Tiant, Boston Red Sox (1975)

A lot of history with this award took place in 1975 as for the third year in a row the Babe Ruth winner did not match the World Series MVP. Also for the first and only time this award was given to the losing team of the World Series.  The winner, Luis Tiant went 2 and 0 in three games, pitching 25 Innings with a 3.60 ERA.  Pete Rose was named the World Series MVP.  Tiant was on the ballot for 15 years finishing as high as 30.9% in 1988.  Ranked #34 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Bucky Dent, New York Yankees (1978)

Bucky Dent was not known for being a great hitter but in 1978 he was clutch.  Prior to the World Series, Dent hit a three run Home Run to win a one game playoff against the Boston Red Sox to get them into the playoffs.  In the World Series, Dent batted .417 with seven Runs Batted In and he would also be named the World Series MVP.  Dent was on the ballot for one year in 1990 and received 0.7% of the vote.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Tug McGraw, Philadelphia Phillies (1980)

Tug McGraw went 1 and 1 with a 1.17 ERA where he pitched in four of the games in the Phillies’ first World Series win.  This was McGraw’s second World Series championship as he would win his first with the New York Mets in 1969.  McGraw would not win the World Series MVP as that went to Mike Schmidt who batted .381 with two Home Runs and seven RBIs.  McGraw was on the ballot for one year in 1990 and received 1.4% of the vote.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Ron Cey, Los Angeles Dodgers (1981)

Arguably, the best seasons of Ron Cey were behind him as his six All-Star Games were behind him but the Third Baseman was still good and in the 1980 World Series, he would bat .350 with a Home Run and six Runs Batted In. Cey would also be named the World Series MVP.  Cey was on the ballot for one year in 1993 and received 1.9% of the vote.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Rick Dempsey, Baltimore Orioles (1983)

Light hitting but defensively brilliant, Rick Dempsey was an unlikely post-season hero but in the 1983 World Series the Catcher would bat .385 with all five of his hits being extra bases (four doubles and a home run). Dempsey would also be named the World Series MVP.  Cey was on the ballot for one year in 1998 and received 0.2% of the vote.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Bret Saberhagen, Kansas City Royals (1985)

Saberhagen would win the first of two Cy Youngs in 1985 and he took the Royals to win their first World Series.  He would win both of his starts in the World Series with a 0.50 ERA and a WHIP of 0.667.  Saberhagen was on the ballot for one year in 2007 and received 1.3% of the vote.  Ranked #67 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Ray Knight, New York Mets (1986)

Ray Knight would bat .391 in the World Series and he would hit the series winning Home Run in the 7thInning of Game 7.  Knight, who would have five Runs Batted In would also win the World Series MVP.  Knight was on the ballot for one year in 1994 and received 0.2% of the vote.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Frank Viola, Minnesota Twins (1987)

Viola finished 6thin Cy Young voting this year and would hurl the Twins to their first World Series win since they relocated to Minnesota from Washington.  Viola went 2 and 1 with 16 Strikeouts and would also be the World Series MVP. Viola would win the American League Cy Young the year after.  Viola was on the ballot for one year in 2002 and received 0.4% of the vote.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Orel Hershiser, Los Angeles Dodgers (1988)

1988 was a dream season for Orel Hershiser as he would win the National League Cy Young Award and would follow that up with the NLCS and World Series MVP.  In the World Series, Hershiser won both of his starts with a 1.00 ERA, 17 Strikeouts and a 0.722 WHIP.  Hershiser was on the ballot for two years and finished as high as 11.2%.  Ranked #70 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Dave Stewart, Oakland Athletics (1989)

1989 was the third of four straight 20 Win seasons for Dave Stewart who was the ace of a potent offensive Oakland Athletics team.  In the 1989 World Series, he would win both his starts with a 1.69 ERA, 0.750 WHIP and 14 Ks.  He would also win the World Series MVP and would also be named the ALCS MVP the following year.  Stewart was on the ballot for two years and finished as high as 7.4% in 2001.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Billy Hatcher, Cincinnati Reds (1990)

How fitting that the 1990 Babe Ruth Award went to a surprise player considering that the Reds were a surprise themselves sweeping the heavily favored Oakland Athletics.  In the 1990 World Series, Hatcher batted .750 with four Doubles but was not the World Series MVP.  That would go to Jose Rijo who went 2 and 0 with a sparkling Earned Run Average of 0.59. Although Hatcher was eligible for the Hall of Fame in 2001 he was not on the ballot.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Cecil Fielder, New York Yankees (1996)

Cecil Fielder was traded from the Detroit Tigers midway through the season and though his best years were behind him, his greatest team accomplishments were still to come.  Fielder would bat .391 with 2 Runs Batted In in the World Series.  He was not named the World Series MVP as that would go to John Wetteland who saved all four of New York’s wins.  Fielder was on the ballot for one year in 2004 and received 0.2% of the vote.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Moises Alou, Florida Marlins (1997)

Moises Alou was a Florida Marlin for only one season and it was a World Series winning one, the first in franchise history.  Alou would bat .321 with three Home Runs and nine RBIs in the World Series.  Livan Hernandez would win the World Series MVP however as the rookie won both of his starts, though had an ERA of 5.27.  Alou was on the ballot for one year in 2014 and received 1.1% of the vote.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Scott Brosius, New York Yankees (1998)

The New York Yankees would sweep the San Diego Padres, and in the Fall Classic Scott Brosius would bat .471 with a pair of Home Runs. Brosius would help New York win two more World Series Titles.  Brosius was on the ballot for one year in 2007 but did not receive any votes.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Curt Schilling, Arizona Diamondbacks (2001)

Like with the 2001 World Series MVP, Curt Schilling would share the Babe Ruth MVP with Randy Johnson.  Schilling went 1 and 0 with a 1.69 ERA, a 0.656 WHIP with 26 Strikeouts. Schilling has been on the ballot for seven years and has finished as high as 60.9% in 2019.  Ranked #5 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Troy Glaus, Anaheim Angels (2002)

A four-time All-Star, Glaus was enjoying his third straight 100 RBI season.  Glaus would bat .385 with 3 Home Runs and 8 Runs Batted In in the 2002 World Series, which brought the Angels their first title.  Glaus would also be named the World Series MVP.  Glaus was on the ballot for one year in 2016 but did not receive any votes.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Keith Foulke, Boston Red Sox (2004)

The curse ended with the Red Sox sweep of the St. Louis Cardinals and he would finish all four of Boston’s games with one Save and a 1.80 ERA. Foulke would not be named the World Series MVP as that would go to Manny Ramirez.  Although Foulke was eligible for the Hall of Fame in 2014 he was not on the ballot. Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Jermaine Dye, Chicago White Sox (2005)

Also winning the World Series MVP, Jermaine Dye had a really good career where he would have 1,779 Hits and 325 Home Runs.  In the 2005 World Series, he would bat .438 with the series winning RBI.  Dye was on the ballot for one year in 2015 but he did not receive any votes.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

David Eckstein, St. Louis Cardinals (2006)

Eckstein was a two-time All-Star and 2006 was the second of them. The infielder was already a World Series Champion (Anaheim in 2002) and in this World Series he would bat .364 with 4 Runs Batted In.  He would also win the World Series MVP.  Dye was on the ballot for one year in 2015 but he did not receive any votes.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Let’s update our tally, shall we?

Award in Question

Percentage of recipients who have entered the HOF

Percentage of recipients by year who have entered the HOF.

NBA MVP

100%

100%

NHL Norris

90.5%

96.4%

NBA All Star Game MVP

89.5%

91.7%

NHL Conn Smythe

74.2%

85.4%

NHL Lady Byng

63.8%

76.0%

NFL Super Bowl MVP

60.6%

64.9%

NBA Defensive Player of the Year

58.3%

56.5%

NBA Rookie of the Year

56.5%

56.5%

NFL Pro Bowl MVP

52.3%

54.8%

MLB/NL/AL Cy Young Award

44.4%

55.4%

MLB Babe Ruth Award

37.0%

39.3%

NHL Frank J. Selke Trophy

33.3%

36.7%

NFL Offensive Rookie of the Year

28.6%

28.6%

MLB Edgar Martinez Award

26.7%

17.2%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Designated Hitter)

25.0%

30.8%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Shortstop)

23.5%

52.6%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove

21.7%

36.8%

NFL Defensive Rookie of the Year

20.6%

20.6%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Catcher)

20.0%

22.5%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Second Base)

18.8%

39.8%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Shortstop)

18.2%

35.1%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Pitcher)

18.2%

20.1%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Second Base)

16.7%

32.7%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Outfield)

16.7%

30.1%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Outfield)

15.7%

25.2%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Third Base)

14.3%

14.3%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Third Base)

13.6%

14.3%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (First Base)

13.6%

13.3%

MLB (NL/AL) Rookie of the Year

13.3%

13.3%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Catcher)

10.3%

15.2%

NBA Most Improved Player of the Year

5.3%

3.2%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (First Base)

3.8%

3.2%

So, who is up next?

The following are the players who have won the Babe Ruth Award in the Major League Baseball who have retired but have not met the mandatory years out of the game to qualify for the Baseball Hall of Fame:

Derek Jeter, New York Yankees (2000)

This was the Yankees fourth World Series win in five years and this one was the battle of New York.  The Yankees defeated the Mets in five games and he batted .409 with two Home Runs.  Jeter would also win the World Series MVP.  Eligible for the Baseball Hall of Fame in 2020.

Josh Beckett, Florida Marlins (2003)

In the second World Series Championship for the Marlins, Josh Beckett went 1 and 1 with a 1.10 ERA, 19 Strikeouts and a WHIP of 0.714. Beckett would go on to win the ALCS MVP for Boston and help the team win the 2007 World Series.  He would win 138 Games over his career.  Eligible for the Baseball Hall of Fame in 2020.

Jonathan Papelbon, Boston Red Sox (2007)

This was the start of a new era for the Babe Ruth Award now covered the entire post-season as opposed to just the World Series.  Papelbon was in his second season as Boston’s closer and in the post-season he would win one game, record four Saves and would not allow a run in 10.2 Innings of work.  Mike Lowell would be named the World Series MVP.  Eligible for the Baseball Hall of Fame in 2022.

Alex Rodriguez, New York Yankees (2009)

Alex Rodriguez was often criticized for his lack of playoff success but in 2009 he was a huge part of the Yankees’ success in the 2009 World Series. A-Rod’s playoffs would see him bat .365 with 6 Home Runs and 18 Runs Batted In, but he would not win the World Series MVP as that would go to Mariano Rivera.  Eligible for the Baseball Hall of Fame in 2021.

Tim Lincecum, San Francisco Giants (2010)

Tim Lincecum finished 10thin Cy Young voting this year and he won the award the two years previously.  Lincecum would have an excellent playoff with a 4 and 1 record and 2.43 ERA with 43 Strikeouts.  Lincecum would be a member of San Francisco’s 2012 and 2014 World Series wins but he was not nearly as productive as he was here.  Eligible for the Baseball Hall of Fame in 2022.

David Ortiz, Boston Red Sox (2013)

“Big Papi” would win his third World Series ring and he saved the best for last.  Ortiz would hammer five playoff Home Runs with a .353 Batting Average.  He would also win the Worod Series MVP Award.  Eligible for the Baseball Hall of Fame in 2022.

The following are the players who have won the Babe Ruth Award who are still active.

Cole Hamels, Philadelphia Phillies (2008)

In Cole Hamels’ five post-season starts he would go 4 and 0 with a 1.80 ERA. He would also win the World Series MVP and the National League NLCS MVP.  35 Years Old, Playing for the Chicago Cubs.

David Freese, St. Louis Cardinals (2011)

Who else could win this in 2011 other than David Freese?  Freese, who would also win the NLCS and World Series MVP would set playoff records with 50 Extra Base Hits and 21 RBIs and he would bat .397 with five Home Runs.  36 Years Old, Playing for the Los Angeles Dodgers.

Pablo Sandoval, San Francisco Giants (2012)

“Panda” captured the imagination of the Baseball world in 2012 where the popular figure had six post-season Home Runs with 13 RBIs and a .364 Batting Average.  The Third Baseman would also win the World Series MVP and was a member of both the 2010 and 2014 World Series Title with the Giants.  32 Years Old, Playing for the San Francisco Giants.

Madison Bumgarner, San Francisco Giants (2014)

Bumgarner was in the second year of a four-year All-Star stretch and like many of his teammates, he was a part of San Francisco’s 2010 and 2012 World Series wins.  Bumgarner, who also won the World Series and NLCS MVP went 4 and 1 with a 1.03 ERA over 52.2 Innings Pitched.  He would also record the Save in Game 7 of the World Series,.  29 Years Old, Playing for the San Francisco Giants.

Wade Davis, Kansas City Royals (2015)

Davis pitched in eight games, recording a Win, four saves and striking out 18 batters over 10.2 scoreless Innings.  Salvador Perez would be named the World Series MVP.  33 Years Old, Playing for the Colorado Rockies.

Jon Lester, Chicago Cubs (2016)

Lester was named to his third All-Star game and he was already a two-time World Series Champion with the Boston Red Sox.  Lester was a vital part of the Cubs first win in over a century and he was the NLCS MVP while going 3 and 1 with a 2.02 ERA with 30 Strikeouts. The World Series MVP would not go to Lester but to Ben Zobrist.  35 Years Old, Playing for the Chicago Cubs.

Jose Altuve, Houston Astros (2017)

The Babe Ruth Award had a co-winner for the first time since 2001 and in the first World Series win for the Houston Astros, Jose Altuve would go yard seven times in the playoffs with 14 RBIs and a .310 Batting Average.  Neither Altive or his co-winner, Justin Verlander would win the World Series MVP, as that would go to George Springer.  29 Years Old, Playing for the Houston Astros.

Justin Verlander, Houston Astros (2017)

Verlander accomplished what he could not do in Detroit by winning a World Series with the Houston Astros and the move was a rejuvenation of sorts as he returned to elite form.  Verlander went 4 and 1 over 36.2 Innings with 38 Strikeouts.  He did not win the World Series MVP as that would go to George Springer, but he was the ALCS MVP.  35 Years Old, Playing for the Houston Astros.

David Price, Boston Red Sox (2018)

David Price had a bad appearance in the ALDS against the New York Yankees, but he rebounded with three wins in the rest of the playoffs including wins in Game 2 and 5 in the World Series.  Price would not be named the World Series MVP, as that would go to Steve Pearce.  32 Years Old, Playing for the Boston Red Sox.

The Babe Ruth Award winners are all over the map in terms of legends, one-offs and everything in between.

Up next, we are going to stay within the tertiary Baseball Awards and look at the Roberto Clemente Award.

As always, we thank you for that support and look for that soon!

We here at Notinhalloffame.com thought it would be fun to take a look at the major awards in North American team sports and see how it translates into Hall of Fame potential.

Needless to say, different awards in different sports yield hall of fame potential.  In basketball, the team sport with the least amount of players on a roster, the dividend for greatness much higher.  In baseball, it is not as much as a great individual season does not have the same impact.

For our next selection we look at the Pro Bowl MVP, which admittedly does not mean so much as the game is not exactly hotly contested but you have to be a really good player to get there.  How many of these past winners have made the Pro Football Hall of Fame?

Let’s find out!

But before we do that…

Usually when we isolate the winner, we mention the accomplishments of the year.  We will do that in addition to what transpired in the Pro Bowl Game itself…if there is any reason to in this annual dud of a game.

The following are the past players who have been named the Pro Bowl MVP in the NFL who are eligible for the Pro Football Hall of Fame and have been enshrined.

Otto Graham, Cleveland Browns (1950)

The Pro Bowl was resurrected after last being played in the form of an All Star Game in 1942.  Graham had just taken the Cleveland Browns to the NFL Championship and was a First Team All Pro the three years before.  The Browns were previously in the AAFC and had won the title the last four years.  This was the icing on the cake that showed that the Cleveland Browns belonged in the NFL and Graham was one of the game’s biggest stars.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1965.

Chuck Bednarik, Philadelphia Eagles (1953)

This was Chuck Bednarik fourth of eight Pro Bowls and he had already helped the Philadelphia Eagles win the NFL Championship as a rookie in 1949. He was a two way player (one of the last who did so regularly and “Concrete Charlie” was also a First Team All Pro six times.  He helped the Eagles win the title again in 1960.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1967.

Ollie Matson, Chicago Cardinals (1955)

In his first five seasons in the NFL, Matson was a Pro Bowler and a First Team All Prom this being the third year of that run.  Matson was also an Olympian, winning a bronze medal in the 400m sprint and a silver in 4 x 400 relay at the 1952 Helsinki Games.  He would later play for the Los Angeles Rams, Detroit Lions and Philadelphia Eagles.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1972.

Ernie Stautner, Pittsburgh Steelers (1956)

Stautner was named the Co-MVP as the game’s outstanding lineman. This was his fourth Pro Bowl and he would go to five more.  He was a First Team All Pro in 1958 and he played all 173 of his Games as a Pittsburgh Steeler.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1969.

Hugh McElhenny, San Francisco 49ers (1957)

This was the fourth Pro Bowl for McElhenny who would go to two more after this one.  He rushed for 478 Yards and caught 37 passes for 458 Yards in 1957.  He would have over 10,000 Yards from Scrimmage, which was a really good number for that era.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1970.

Frank Gifford, New York Giants (1958)

This would be Gifford’s seventh of eight straight Pro Bowls and he was a First Team All Pro for the fifth time and he would add a sixth the following season.  Gifford was a Champion in 1956, which was the year he also won the MVP.  He would become better known as a commentator for Monday Night Football for 27 years.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1970.

Doug Atkins, New York Giants (1958)

The Co MVP of the 1958 Pro Bowl, Doug Atkins would be named the most Outstanding Lineman of the game.  Atkins went to the Pro Bowl for the second of seven straight (he went to eight overall) and this was also his first of four First Team All-Pro Selections. Atkins was a champion in 1954 with the Cleveland Browns and would later help the Chicago Bears win it all in 1963. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1970.

Johnny Unitas, Baltimore Colts (1959)

1959 was the year of Johnny Unitas.  In 1958 he took the Baltimore Colts to the NFL Championship and he would do it again in 1959 where he was also named the MVP of the NFL.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1970.

Johnny Unitas, Baltimore Colts (2) (1960)

Johnny Unitas would become the first player to win the Pro Bowl MVP twice though it was a questionable decision as Norm Van Brocklin threw for a then record 288 Yards and three Touchdowns and this was his last game ever.  Jim Taylor also had three TDs, yet somehow the accolade went to the very popular Johnny Unitas.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1970.

Sam Huff, Baltimore Colts (1960)

Sam Huff was the fifth and final player to be named the (co)-MVP of the Pro Bowl when they were giving that out to the best Lineman of the game. Huff would help the New York Giants win the 1956 Championship as a rookie and this would be his third of five Pro Bowls.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1982.

Jim Brown, Cleveland Browns (1961)

We will (again) go on record and state that Jim Brown is the greatest Running Back who ever played.  Brown played nine seasons in the NFL and he was named to the Pro Bowl in every single one of them.  This was his fifth year in the league and he won the Rushing Title in every single one of them as well as being named a First Team All-Pro.  Brown had was named the MVP in 1957 and 1958.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1971.

Jim Brown, Cleveland Browns (2) (1962)

Brown won his second Pro Bowl MVP and this was the only season that he was not named a First Team All-Pro or win the Rushing Title, though he would in his next three seasons in the NFL.  He would win his third MVP in 1965, his last in the NFL and he would also help the Cleveland Browns in 1964.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1971.

Johnny Unitas, Baltimore Colts (3) (1963)

Johnny Unitas made history again by winning his third Pro Bowl MVP, becoming the first person to do so.  Unitas was named “Back of the Game” while fellow Baltimore Colt, Gino Marchetti was named the “Lineman” of the Game.  Over his career, Unitas would go to 10 Pro Bowls and was a five time First Team All-Pro.  He would also be a three-time NFL Champion and three-time MVP.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1970.

Gino Marchetti, Baltimore Colts (1963)

Named the Lineman of the Game (thus Co-MVP) Gino Marchetti won this along with another Colt, Johnny Unitas.  Marchetti was chosen for 11 Pro Bowls, all consecutive and this was his tenth. Marhcetti was a two-time NFL Champion and a seven-time First Team All-Pro.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1972.

Fran Tarkenton, Minnesota Vikings (1964)

Tarkenton threw for 172 Yards earning him “Back of the Game”. The “Scrambler’s” career was just getting going as this was his first of nine Pro Bowls.  Tarkenton would take the Vikings to three Super Bowl appearances and he was the MVP in 1975.  He retired with 47,003 Passing Yards and rushed for another 3,674.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1970.

Jim Brown, Cleveland Browns (3) (1965)

This was the last game that Jim Brown would ever play and he went out like the Football God he was.  He rushed for 65 Yards and was the Back of the Game, A.K.A., the Co-MVP.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1971.

Gale Sayers, Chicago Bears (1966)

This was Gale Sayers’ second Pro Bowl selection and arguably it was the finest season of his career.  The Chicago Bear would lead the NFL in Rushing Yards (1,231), Yards from Scrimmage (1,678) and All-Purpose Yards (2,440) and he was named to his second First Team All-Pro in as many years.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1977.

Gale Sayers, Chicago Bears (2) (1967)

Sayers was the Back of the Game for the second year in a row and again he was named a First Team All-Pro.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1977.

Dave Robinson, Green Bay Packers (1967)

Dave Robinson went to three Pro Bowls this being his second one. Robinson would be named a First Team All-Pro this season and he was a three-time NFL Champion with the Green Bay Packers.  His Hall of Fame induction would take place via the Senior Committee.   Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2013.

Merlin Olsen, Los Angeles Rams (1968)

Merlin Olsen was named the Lineman of the Game and it was an all-Ram affair as his Quarterback, Roman Gabriel was named the “Back of the Game”. The Defensive Tackle went to 14 straight Pro Bowls (1962-75) and he was in the middle of five straight First Team All-Pro Selections.  He entered the Pro Football Hall of Fame on his first year of eligibility.   Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1982.

Gale Sayers, Chicago Bears (3) (1969)

Gale Sayers became the third player to be named a Pro Bowl MVP three times.  This was the end of an era for Sayers as this was his fifth and final Pro Bowl and he would also win his second Rushing Title.  Sayers would suffer a severe injury and was limited in what he could do. He retired after the 1971 season and he would be inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame in his first year of eligibility.  He was the youngest person ever to enter the Pro Football Hall of Fame.   Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1977.

Mel Renfro, Dallas Cowboys (1970)

In 1970, the Pro Bowl began instituting a new Co-MVP system where there was one winner on offense and one on defense.  Renfro was the 1970’s offensive winner and this was his seventh Pro Bowl of what would be ten straight.  The Defensive Back played his entire career with the Dallas Cowboys and he would help bring the team two Super Bowls (VI & XII).  It should be noted that this is no misprint in terms of offense as he also was a Punt Returner taking two back for a Touchdown in the game.   Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1996.

Jan Stenerud, Kansas City Chiefs (1971)

Jan Stenerud went to six Pro Bowls, four of which being consecutive and this was the last of that stretch.  Stenerud would four times lead the NFL in Field Goal Percentage.  In this Pro Bowl he had three field goals and two extra points.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1991.

Willie Lanier, Kansas City Chiefs (1971)

It was a sweep for the Kansas City Chiefs as his Willie Lanier’s teammate, Jan Stenerud won the Offensive Player MVP to match Lanier’s Defensive Player MVP.  The Linebacker went to eight straight Pro Bowls and this was his fourth.  He had previously aided the Chiefs win Super Bowl IV and he was chosen for three First Team All-Pros, this year being one of them. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1986.

O.J. Simpson, Buffalo Bills (1972)

From 1972 to 1976, O.J. Simpson was the top Running Back in the National Football League and this was the beginning of that stretch.  The Juice won the Rushing Title this year and in the Pro Bowl he rushed for 116 Yards and a Touchdown and caught three passes for 56 Yards.  He was a First Team All-Pro this year and the four years after and he rushed for 11,236 Yards over his career.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1985.

Mel Blount, Pittsburgh Steelers (1976)

The Pittsburgh Steelers were the dynasty of the 1970’s and they generated many Hall of Fame inductees, one of which being Cornerback, Mel Blount. In this season, he was chosen for his second of five Pro Bowls and he helped them win four Super Bowls, two prior and two after this year.  In this Pro Bowl he would record two Interceptions.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1989.

Walter Payton, Chicago Bears (1977)

Walter Payton was one of the greatest Running Backs ever and this was his second of what worked out to be nine Pro Bowls.  “Sweetness” played his entire career with the Chicago Bears and 1977 would see him set his career high of 1,852 Rushing Yards and 2,121 Yards from Scrimmage, both were league leading.  This was also his second of five First Team All-Pro Selections.  In this particular Pro Bowl he rushed for 77 Yards and a Touchdown.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1993.

Kellen Winslow, San Diego Chargers (1981)

Kellen Winslow spent his entire career with the San Diego Chargers where he was a five time Pro Bowl, this being his second trip to the dance. Winslow was a three time a First Team All-Pro with this being the second of the two years where he led the NFL in Receptions.  In this Pro Bowl there was two game MVPs and he was the offensive winner.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1995.

Lee Roy Salmon, Tampa Bay Buccaneers (1981)

Lee Roy Salmon was the co-winner of the Pro Bowl MVP and was the first Tampa Bay Buccaneer to win the Pro Bowl MVP.  Salmon went to six Pro Bowls, and this was his third.  He was also named the 1979 AP Defensive Player of the Year.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1995.

Dan Fouts, San Diego Chargers (1982)

Dan Fouts is one of the best Quarterbacks of his day and this was the fourth of his sixth Pro Bowls.  The Quarterback spent his entire NFL career with the San Diego Chargers and he was a First Team All Pro this year.  In this Pro Bowl he would throw for 274 Yards and a Touchdown and was the Co-MVP.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1993.

Reggie White, Philadelphia Eagles (1986)

This was the first Pro Bowl for Reggie White and it would mark the beginning of a streak that went on until 1998.  White had 18 Quarterback Sacks in 1986 and he would lead the NFL in that category the next two years where “The Minister of Defense” would also be named the Defensive Player of the Year.  Named an eight-time First Team All Pro, White would later in the Super Bowl with the Green Bay Packers.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2006.

Bruce Smith, Buffalo Bills (1987)

Bruce Smith was chosen to play in 11 Pro Bowls and this would be the first one for him.  The Buffalo Bill was named the AFC Defensive Player of the Year and would twice become the NFL Defensive Player of the Year.  He holds the record for Quarterback Sacks with 200 and in the Pro Bowl he would have two.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2009.

Jim Kelly, Buffalo Bills (1990)

Jim Kelly would take the Bills to four straight Super Bowls but the infamously lost them all but this year would be the first of them.  The Bills Quarterback would find some solace winning the Pro Bowl MVP in a game where he threw for 210 Yards and a Touchdown. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2002.

Michael Irvin, Dallas Cowboys (1991)

Playing his entire career with the Dallas Cowboys, Michael Irvin was chosen for five straight Pro Bowls and this was his first one, which would also be the year that he was named a First Team All-Pro and would lead the NFL in Receiving Yards.  He would be a huge part of the Cowboys winning three of the next four years. Irvin caught eight passes for 125 Yards and a Touchdown.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2002.

Marshall Faulk, Indianapolis Colts (1994)

Named to the Pro Bowl as a rookie, Marshall Faulk would go to the Pro Bowl six more times, two with Indianapolis and four with St. Louis. Faulk rushed for 12,279 Yards and was a true dual threat as he also caught 767 receptions for 6,875 Yards. Winning a Super Bowl later in his career with the Rams, in this Pro Bowl he rushed for 180 Yards and a Touchdown while also catching two passes for 27 more Yards.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2011.

Jerry Rice, San Francisco 49ers (1995)

What didn’t Jerry Rice do?  By this time, Rice had been named to his tenth of eleven straight Pro Bowls and he would go two more after.  He had already won the Super Bowl three times with the San Francisco 49ers and was the MVP in one of them.  This year would be the sixth (and final) time that he led the NFL in Receiving Yards and he was on his eighth of nine First Team All-Pro Selections.  Rice is the all-time leader in Receiving Yards with 22,895 and it will be a long time before anyone touches that.  In the Pro Bowl he caught six passes for 82 Yards and a Touchdown.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2010.

Warren Moon, Seattle Seahawks (1997)

Warren Moon had a very long career in football where he was a five time Grey Cup Champion with the Edmonton Eskimos prior to getting his chance at the NFL.  He would go to eight straight Pro Bowls (1988-1995) and in 1997 he went to his last one.  He would throw for 49,325 Yards in the NFL, an incredible amount considering how late he joined.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2006.

Ty Law, New England Patriots (1998)

Ty Law was the Co-MVP of this Pro Bowl, which he shared with Keyshawn Johnson.  This was Law’s first of five Pro Bowls and he was the league leader in Interceptions this year.  Law would later help the New England Patriots win three Super Bowls and in this Pro Bowl he returned an Interception for a Touchdown.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2019.

Randy Moss, Minnesota Vikings (1999)

Randy Moss is one of the game’s most exciting players ever in 1999 he was in his second year in football.  He went to six Pro Bowls, this being his second and he had 15,292 Receiving Yards with 156 Touchdowns over one hell of a career.  In the game, Moss caught 9 passes for 212 Yards with a Touchdown. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2018.

Derrick Brooks, Tampa Bay Buccaneers (2005)

One of the greatest (if not the greatest) defensive players in Buccaneer history, Derrick Brooks won this accolade in what was his tenth of eleven straight Pro Bowls.  Brooks (who would also go to another one before his career ended) led the Buccaneers to their first Super Bowl and in this season, he was chosen for his fifth and final First Team All-Pro.  In this Pro Bowl, the Linebacker had a pick six.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2014.

The following are the players who have won the Pro Bowl MVP in the NFL who are eligible for the Pro Football Hall of Fame and have not been selected:

Dan Towler, Los Angeles Rams (1951)

Towler would also be chosen for the next three Pro Bowls with the season after seeing him being named a First Team All Pro and win the Rushing Title.  The Fullback did not have a long career only playing six years all with Los Angeles.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Don Doll, Detroit Lions (1952)

Doll was in his third season of his four year Pro Bowl streak and he would become the first defensive player to be named the Pro Bowl MVP. Doll was a member of the Detroit Lions 1952 NFL Championship Team though he would be a Washington Redskin the following year.  He only played six years in the NFL.   Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Billy Wilson, San Francisco 49ers (1954)

Billy Wilson was chosen for his first of what would be six consecutive Pro Bowls and he would lead the NFL in Receptions this year.  He would do the same again in 1956 and 1957, the latter being a good enough year to warrant a First Team All Pro nod.  Wilson retired after 1960 playing his entire career with San Francisco.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Bert Rechichar, Baltimore Colts (1956)

Rechichar was the Co-MVP of the Pro Bowl and he was a Defensive Back/Kicker for the Colts.  Rechichar would go to three Pro Bowls, this being his second and at the time of his appearance he held the since broken record of the longest Field Goal of 56 Yards. He had four Interceptions that year. Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Gene Brito, Washington Redskins (1957)

Brito was the Co-MVP as he was named the most Outstanding Lineman. Brito was chosen for five Pro Bowls, this being the fourth and his third and final First Team All-Pro Selection. He was named the NFL Player of the Year in 1955.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Gene Lipscomb, Baltimore Colts (1959)

This was the fourth time that the Pro Bowl would have a Co-MVP that would be given to the best Lineman of the game.  Fittingly, it went to another Baltimore Colt as Johnny Unitas was the other Pro Bowl MVP.  The Colts would win the NFL Championship that year and he was also a First Team All Pro. This was Lipscomb’s second of three Pro Bowls.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Gene Lipscomb, Pittsburgh Steelers (2) (1962)

Lipscomb was a Pittsburgh Steeler making him the first person to win a Pro Bowl MVP with two different teams.  The NFL brought back giving a Co-MVP to the Lineman of the Game, which Lipscomb certainly deserved as he blocked two Field Goals.  This was the last game that “Big Daddy” would play as he dies of a cocaine overdose in May of 1963.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Terry Barr, Detroit Lions (1964)

Barr would go to two Pro Bowls, this being the second where he won the Lineman of the Game Award.  He would play all nine of his seasons with the Detroit Lions and as a rookie he helped the Lions win the NFL Championship.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Dale Meinart, St. Louis Cardinals (1965)

Named the Lineman of the Game, Meinart played nine seasons all with the Cardinals and this was his first of what would be three Pro Bowls.  The Linebacker had previously won two Grey Cups with the Edmonton Eskimos.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Floyd Peters, Philadelphia Eagles (1966)

Named the Lineman of the Game, Peters was chosen for the second of his three Pro Bowls.  He would later be a successful Defensive Coordinator for twenty years in the NFL. Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Roman Gabirel, St. Louis Rams (1968)

This Pro Bowl was all about the St. Louis Rams as Roman Gabriel and Merlin Olsen were named the Back of the Game and Lineman of the Game respectively.  Gabriel would go to four Pro Bowls, this being the second and he would later be would be the MVP the year after.  He threw for 29,444 Yards over his career.  Ranked #37 on Notinhalloffame.com.

George Andrie, Dallas Cowboys (1969)

George Andrie was the first Dallas Cowboy to be named a Pro Bowl MVP when he was named the Lineman of the Game for the 1969 version.  Andrie was a five time Pro Bowl, this being his fifth trip.  He would later help Dallas win Super Bowl VI.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Fred Carr, Green Bay Packers (1970)

Fred Carr would go to three Pro Bowls with this being his first. Carr was chosen as the Defensive MVP and this was the first year where they have an offensive and defensive MVP of the Pro Bowl.  He played all ten of his seasons in the NFL with the Green Bay Packers.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Garo Yepremian, Miami Dolphins (1973)

Yepremian set a still standing record of booting five Field Goals in a Pro Bowl.  The Place Kicker went to three Pro Bowls, this being his second and the first and only year that he would be chosen a First Team All-Pro.  The native of Cyprus would help the Dolphins win two Super Bowls. Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

James Harris, Los Angeles Rams (1974)

This was the only Pro Bowl that James Harris was selected for and he threw for two Touchdowns and 119 Yards.  Harris threw for 1,544 Yards and 11 Touchdowns in 1974 with a 7 and 2 record. He would later play for the San Diego Chargers and prior to his stint with L.A. was a backup for the Buffalo Bills. Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Billy Johnson, Houston Oilers (1975)

Billy “White Shoes” Johnson was one of the greatest return specialists of his day and easily the most exciting.  This was Johnson’s first of what would be three Pro Bowls, the second also coming as an Oiler the last one as an Atlanta.  In the game, Johnson would return a Punt for a 90 Yard Touchdown Return and he also had another return of 55 Yards.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Ahmad Rashad, Minnesota Vikings (1978)

Ahmad Rashad went to four straight Pro Bowls and this was the first of them.  In his 10 year career he caught 495 passes for 6,831 Yards for 44 Touchdowns and in this Pro Bowl he caught five passes for 85 Yards.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Chuck Muncie, New Orleans Saints (1979)

For it was worth, this would be the first of 30 straight Pro Bowls to take place in Honolulu and for the first time a New Orleans Saint would be named the Pro Bowl MVP.  This was the first of three Pro Bowl selections for the Running Back with the other two coming as a San Diego Charger.  Muncie rushed for 1,198 Yards this season and in the Pro Bowl he had rushed for two touchdowns, threw for one and had 79 Yards from Scrimmage.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Eddie Murray, Detroit Lions (1980)

Murray was a rookie this year and he won this award by making four Field Goals in the game.  Murray would later go to two more Pro Bowls and would later win a Super Bowl with the Dallas Cowboys in Super Bowl XXVIII.  He is the first Canadian to win this award.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

John Jefferson, Green Bay Packers (1982)

This was John Jefferson’s fourth and final Pro Bowl appearance and he was the leader in Receiving Yards in 1980.  Jefferson was named the Co-MVP along with his former Quarterback, Dan Fouts, who he played with in San Diego.  In this game he caught four passes for 66 Yards and a Touchdown.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Joe Theismann, Washington Redskins (1983)

This was Joe Theismann’s second and last Pro Bowl but it was capping off the best season he ever had.  The Quarterback was named the NFL Offensive Player of the Year, the MVP and took the Redskins to the a win at Super Bowl XVII.  In Hawaii, he went 21 for 27 for 242 Yards and three Touchdowns. Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Mark Gastineau, New York Jets (1984)

At this point Mark Gastineau was one of the most popular defensive players in the NFL and one of the best.  In 1984 he went to the fourth of five straight Pro Bowls and this was his third and final First Team All Pro Selection.  Gastineau played his entire career with the Jets and in 1984 he led the NFL with 22 Quarterback Sacks.  In the Pro Bowl, Gastineau recorded seven Tackles, and four Sacks.  Ranked #46 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Phil Simms, New York Giants (1985)

Simms only went to two Pro Bowls but he was always considered one of the better Quarterbacks of his day.  Simms would throw for 212 Yards and three TDs in the Pro Bowl.  He would later take the Giants to two Super Bowl wins.  Ranked #57 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Randall Cunningham, Philadelphia Eagles (1988)

One of the most exciting players of his time, Randall Cunningham went to four Pro Bowls with this being his first.  Cunningham would win the Bert Bell Award this year and would win it again two more times.  He would throw for 83 Yards and rush for 49 in this game.  Ranked #33 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Jerry Gray, Los Angeles Rams (1989)

Gray would go to four Pro Bowls, and this was his fourth.  Gray had six picks in the season returning one for a pick six.  The Defensive Back would have six tackles and an interception in the game.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Steve Tasker, Buffalo Bills (1992)

A seven-time Pro Bowl selection, Steve Tasker is considered one of the greatest Special Teams player ever.  Tasker helped the Bills reach four straight (losing) Super Bowls and in this Pro Bowl he recorded four tackles, forced a fumble and blocked a Field Goal. Ranked #88 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Andre Rison, Atlanta Falcons (1993)

Rison was a five time Pro Bowler and this was his fourth of what would be four straight.  The Wide Receiver had a career high of 1,242 Yards and topped the 10,000 mark in total. Rison had six catches for 86 Yards in the game.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Mark Brunell, Jacksonville Jaguars (1996)

Mark Brunell would become the first Jacksonville Jaguar to win the Pro Bowl MVP on what would be his first of three selections.  1996 was an interesting year for Brunell’s as he threw for a league leading 4,367 Yards but also had a TD-INT ratio of 19-20.  In the Pro Bowl he would throw for 236 Yards and a Touchdown.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Keyshawn Johnson, New York Jets (1998)

Keyshawn Johnson went to three Pro Bowls and this was his first as well it being the first season, he had over 1,000 Receiving Yards (1,131). He would accumulate 10,571 Receiving Yards with 64 Touchdowns over his career and he was a key member of Tampa Bay’s first Super Bowl win.  In the Pro Bowl, Johnson had seven Receptions for 87 Yards.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Rich Gannon, Oakland Raiders (2000)

Rich Gannon would go to four straight Pro Bowls (this being his second) but he did so in a somewhat unique fashion as he was in his early 30’s when it started.  Quarterbacking for the Oakland Raiders, in 2000 he would go also be chosen for a First Team All-Pro.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Rich Gannon, Oakland Raiders (2) (2001)

A back-to-back winner, Gannon would have the best season the year after as he was again a First Team All-Pro and he would lead the National Football League in Completions (418) and Passing Yards (4,689) and led the Raiders to the Super Bowl…where they were thrashed by the Tampa Bay Buccaneers. Gannon would suffer injuries in the next two seasons and his career was essentially over after it.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Ricky Williams, Miami Dolphins (2002)

Ricky Williams was known for an awful lot in his career, which included the idiotic trade the New Orleans Saints made to draft him, his pot use and his eccentricities but this was also a Running Back who is a member of the 10,000 Yard club and in 2002 he was a Pro Bowl and First Team All-Pro Selection and his 1,853 Yards won him the Rushing Title.  He would score two Touchdowns in the Pro Bowl.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Marc Bulger, St. Louis Rams (2003)

Marc Bulger went to two Pro Bowls, this being his first where he did not have the best TD-INT line of 22-22 but threw for 3,845 Yards and won 12 Games and took the Rams to the playoffs.  In the game Bulger three for three Touchdowns.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Let’s update our tally, shall we?

Award in Question

Percentage of recipients who have entered the HOF

Percentage of recipients by year who have entered the HOF.

NBA MVP

100%

100%

NHL Norris

90.5%

96.4%

NBA All Star Game MVP

89.5%

91.7%

NHL Conn Smythe

74.2%

85.4%

NHL Lady Byng

63.8%

76.0%

NFL Super Bowl MVP

60.6%

64.9%

NBA Defensive Player of the Year

58.3%

56.5%

NBA Rookie of the Year

56.5%

56.5%

NFL Pro Bowl MVP

52.3%

54.8%

MLB/NL/AL Cy Young Award

44.4%

55.4%

NHL Frank J. Selke Trophy

33.3%

36.7%

NFL Offensive Rookie of the Year

28.6%

28.6%

MLB Edgar Martinez Award

26.7%

17.2%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Designated Hitter)

25.0%

30.8%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Shortstop)

23.5%

52.6%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove

21.7%

36.8%

NFL Defensive Rookie of the Year

20.6%

20.6%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Catcher)

20.0%

22.5%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Second Base)

18.8%

39.8%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Shortstop)

18.2%

35.1%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Pitcher)

18.2%

20.1%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Second Base)

16.7%

32.7%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Outfield)

16.7%

30.1%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Outfield)

15.7%

25.2%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Third Base)

14.3%

14.3%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Third Base)

13.6%

14.3%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (First Base)

13.6%

13.3%

MLB (NL/AL) Rookie of the Year

13.3%

13.3%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Catcher)

10.3%

15.2%

NBA Most Improved Player of the Year

5.3%

3.2%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (First Base)

3.8%

3.2%

So, who is up next?

The following are the players who have won the Pro Bowl MVP in the NFL who have retired but have not met the mandatory years out of the game to qualify for the Pro Football Hall of Fame:

Peyton Manning, Indianapolis Colts (2004)

One of the most prolific Quarterbacks of all-time, Peyton Manning went to 13 Pro Bowls with this being his fourth.  This was also his second of seven First Team All-Pro Selections and he would lead the NFL in Touchdown Passes with 49.  Over his career he would throw for 71,940 Yards and 539 Touchdowns while also taking the Indianapolis Colts and Denver Broncos to Super Bowl wins. He would score three Touchdowns in the game.  Eligible for the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 2021.

Carson Palmer, Cincinnati Bengals (2006)

Carson Palmer went to three Pro Bowls, this being his second also being the second with the Bengals with the third coming as an Arizona Cardinal. Palmer threw for 28 Touchdowns and 4,035 Yards this year and would accumulate 46,247 Yards in total.  Eligible for the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 2023.

DeAngelo Hall, Washington Redskins (2010)

This was the third and final Pro Bowl that DeAngelo Hall would be chosen for and Hall had six Interceptions that season.  In the game Hall returned a fumble for a Touchdown.  Eligible for the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 2023.

Derrick Johnson, Kansas City Chiefs (2013)

In 2013, the Pro Bowl began issuing offensive and defensive Pro Bowl MVPs like they had in the past and Derrick Johnson was the first defensive winner of this new run.  Johnson would go to four Pro Bowls and this was his third.  Eligible for the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 2024.

The following are the players who have won the NFL Pro Bowl MVP who are still active.

Adrian Peterson, Minnesota Vikings (2007)

Adrian Peterson went to the Pro Bowl as a rookie and has gone to six more.  This was his rookie season and he rushed for 1,341 Yards and 12 Touchdowns.  To date he has over 13,000 Rushing Yards and has well over 100 Touchdowns.  He ran for two Touchdowns in the game.  33 Years Old, Playing for the Washington Redskins.

Larry Fitzgerald, Arizona Cardinals (2008)

Larry Fitzgerald was chosen for one First Team All-Pro roster and this was the year.  The Wide Receiver however has been a Pro Bowl fixture as he was named to 11 Pro Bowls, with this being the third.  In this game, Fitzgerald caught five passes for 81 Yards and a pair of TDs.  35 Years Old, Playing for the Arizona Cardinals.

Matt Schaub, Houston Texans (2009)

Matt Schaub went to two Pro Bowls with 2009 being the first.  The Houston Texan led the NFL in Completions (396) and Passing Yards (4,770) and in the Pro Bowl he threw for two Touchdowns. 37 Years Old, Playing for the Atlanta Falcons.

Brandon Marshall, Houston Texans (2011)

Brandon Marshall went to six Pro Bowls and this was his third trip and the only one he would go to as a Miami Dolphin.  The Wide Receiver had a 1,214 Yard Season and to date has over 12,000 Yards.  In this Pro Bowl he would catch a record four Touchdown Passes.  35 Years Old, Free Agent.

Kyle Rudolph, Minnesota Vikings (2012)

This was the first Pro Bowl of Kyle Rudolph’s career and in the game he caught five passes for 129 Yards and a TD.  29 Years Old, Playing for the Minnesota Vikings.

Nick Foles, Philadelphia Eagles (2013)

To date, this is the only Pro Bowl that Nick Foles has gone to. Foles left Philadelphia for two years and came back where he led them to a surprise Super Bowl win when he was their back-up.  29 Years Old, Playing for the Jacksonville Jaguars.

J.J. Watt, Houston Texans (2014)

Watt was the Defensive MVP of the Pro Bowl and this was his third of five Pro Bowls, all of which would see him be named a First Team All-Pro.  29 Years Old, Playing for the Houston Texans.

Matthew Stafford, Detroit Lions (2014)

Matthew Stafford has been one of the better Quarterbacks since he arrived in Detroit but to date 2014 has been his only Pro Bowl arrival.  He had seven straight seasons where he threw for over 4,200 Yards.  31 Years Old, Playing for the Detroit Lions.

Michael Bennett, Seattle Seahawks (2015)

This was Michael Bennett’s first of three straight Pro Bowls and earlier in his career he assisted the Seahawks win the Super Bowl.  33 Years Old, Playing for the Philadelphia Eagles.

Russell Wilson, Seattle Seahawks (2015)

Wilson joined his teammate, Michael Bennett in being the Co-MVP of the Pro Bowl.  The Quarterback led the Seahawks two years before to a Super Bowl win and this was to date the third of five Pro Bowls.  30 Years Old, Playing for the Seattle Seahawks.

Lorenzo Alexander, Buffalo Bills (2016)

Lorenzo Alexander went to his second Pro Bowl and at the age of 33 this was probably the best year of his career.  Alexander was named the Co-MVP as the defensive player of the game.  35 Years Old, Playing for the Buffalo Bills.

Travis Kelce, Kansas City Chiefs (2016)

The Tight End was in his second of four straight Pro Bowls and this year he was named a First Team All-Pro after having his first 1,000 Yard Season.   29 Years Old, Playing for the Kansas City Chiefs.

Von Miller, Denver Broncos (2017)

Miller was named the Defensive MVP this year of the Pro Bowl.  Miller had already won a Super Bowl for the Broncos and this was his sixth of what has been seven Pro Bowls thus far.  30 Years Old, Playing for the Denver Broncos.

Delanie Walker, Tennessee Titans (2017)

This is what was Delanie Walker’s third straight and likely last Pro Bowl appearance.  The Tight End had four consecutive seasons (this being the fourth) of 800 Yards or more.  34 Years Old, Playing for the Tennessee Titans.

Jamal Adams, New York Jets (2018)

This was in Adams’ second year in the NFL and it was his first Pro Bowl appearance, which netted him the Defensive Co-MVP.  He had 115 Combined Tackles this season.  23 Years Old, Playing for the New York Jets.

Patrick Mahomes, Kansas City Chiefs (2018)

This was his second season in the NFL and first as a starter and you could state that it is one of the best years ever by a Quarterback. Mahomes threw for 50 Touchdowns and 5,097 Yards and was named the AP MVP. 23 Years Old, Playing for the Kansas City Chiefs.

From what we can see in terms of the Pro Bowl MVP winners you have someone who at one time was considered an elite player.  While we can all agree that the game itself is meaningless getting there means something but essentially, we are looking at a high-end crapshoot here.

Up next we are going to back to the MLB and the Babe Ruth Award.

As always, we thank you for that support and look for that soon!

We here at Notinhalloffame.com thought it would be fun to take a look at the major awards in North American team sports and see how it translates into Hall of Fame potential.

Needless to say, different awards in different sports yield hall of fame potential.  In basketball, the team sport with the least amount of players on a roster, the dividend for greatness much higher.  In baseball, it is not as much as a great individual season does not have the same impact.

For our next selection we go back to the National Hockey League with the Calder Trophy, which is awarded annually to the league’s top rookie. Does being a top rookie put you in line for the Hockey Hall of Fame?

Let’s find out!

The following are the past players who have won the Calder Trophy in the NHL who are eligible for the Hockey Hall of Fame and have been enshrined.

Syl Apps, Toronto Maple Leafs (1937)

16 Goals, 29 Assists, 45 Points, 6.1 Point Shares.  This is off to an excellent start at Syl Apps would lead the National Hockey League in Assists as a Rookie and he built on that to be named a post season All Star five times.  More importantly for Apps and the Maple Leafs he would help them win three Stanley Cups and he would retire as a Point per Game player.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1961.

Frank Brimsek, Boston Bruins (1939)

33 Wins, 9 Losses 1 Tie, 1.56 GAA, 11.3 Goalie Point Shares.  Very few players had a start to their career like Frank Brimsek as not only was the Calder Trophy winner, he also was the Vezina Trophy winner, a First Team All Star and he took the Boston Bruins to the Stanley Cup.  The native of Eveleth, Minnesota would lead the Bruins to another Cup win in 1941 and he was also a Vezina Trophy winner in 1942.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1966.

Edgar Laprade, New York Rangers (1946)

15 Goals, 19 Assists 34 Points, 2.9 Point Shares.  Edgar Laprade played his entire career with the New York Rangers and he would finish third in Lady Byng balloting that year.  He would win the Lady Byng in the 1949/50 season. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1993.

Terry Sawchuk, Detroit Red Wings (1951)

44 Wins, 13 Losses 13 Ties, 1.56 GAA, 17.0 Goalie Point Shares. In what would be a huge opening year, Terry Sawchuk would lead the National Hockey League in Goalie Point Shares and was also a First Team All Star.  Sawchuk was the leader in Wins his year and would be the next four seasons. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1971.

Bernie Geoffrion, Montreal Canadiens (1952)

30 Goals, 24 Assists 54 Points, 7.0 Point Shares.  The future Hockey Hall of Famer would lead the NHL in Power-Play Goals.  The future Hart Trophy winner would win six Stanley Cups with a Hart and Art Ross Trophy win in 1961.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1972.

Gump Worsley, New York Rangers (1953)

13 Wins, 29 Losses 8 Ties, 3.02 GAA, 4.4 Goalie Point Shares. The “Gump” would lose way more games than he won in this season (16) and this would be a theme for Worsley but he gave it everything he always had, which was why he would enter the Hockey Hall of Fame and would win two Vezina Trophies.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1971.

Glenn Hall, Detroit Red Wings (1956)

30 Wins, 24 Losses 16 Ties, 2.10 GAA, 14.5 Goalie Point Shares. As a rookie, Glenn Hall was not only the Calder Trophy winner but was a Second Team All Star and the leader in Shutouts and Minutes Played and a second place finish in Point Shares.  Hall would later be a multi time post season All Star and was a first ballot Hall of Famer.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1975.

Frank Mahovolich, Toronto Maple Leafs (1958)

20 Goals, 16 Assists 37 Points, 3.3 Point Shares.  The “Big M” had a. good rookie season but he would later become a six time Stanley Cup winner and also a nine time post season All Star.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1972.

Dave Keon, Toronto Maple Leafs (1961)

20 Goals, 25 Assists 45 Points, 4.2 Point Shares.  With the Toronto Maple Leafs for most of his career, Dave Keon would later be a two time Lady Byng Trophy winner and was the Conn Smythe Trophy winner for the last Toronto Maple Leaf Stanley Cup Championship team.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1986.

Jacques Laperriere, Montreal Canadiens(1964)

2 Goals, 28 Assists, 30 Points, 6.7 Point Shares.  Laperriere was another great Quebecer to play for his home province team where he was immediately one of the better Defenseman in the NHL.  Playing for the Montreal Canadiens his entire career be was a Second Team All Star as a rookie and would be a First Team All Star the next two seasons after, which included a Norris Trophy win in 1966.  Laperriere would help the Habs win five Stanley Cups.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1987.

Bobby Orr, Boston Bruins(1967)

13 Goals, 28 Assists, 41 Points, 6.0 Point Shares.  Any chance we have here to talk about Bobby Orr is always a blessing to us!  Orr is without question the greatest Defenseman that ever lived and some will go as far to say is the best hockey player period.  As a rookie, the Boston Bruin was a member of the Second Team All Star roster.  Orr finished third in Norris Trophy voting but would go on to win the next eight. He was such a great player that he was inducted into the Hockey Hall of Fame without the mandatory three year wait. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1979.

Tony Esposito, Chicago Blackhawks(1970)

38 Wins, 17 Losses 8 Ties, 2.17 GAA, 14.7 Goalie Point Shares. This would be an incredible career for Tony Esposito who as a rookie would not only win the Calder but the Vezina Trophy First Team NHL and was the league leader in Wins and Save Percentage. He would win the Vezina two more times. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1988.

Gilbert Perreault, Buffalo Sabres(1971)

38 Goals, 34 Assists, 72 Points, 6.5 Point Shares.  One of the greatest Buffalo Sabres of all time, Gilbert Perreault played his entire career in Western New York.  The Quebecer would later be named a Second Team All Star on two occasions and a later Lady Byng Trophy winner.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1990.

Ken Dryden, Montreal Canadiens(1972)

38 Wins, 8 Losses 15 Ties, 2.24 GAA, 15.0 Goalie Point Shares. In terms of a brief career, there is nobody in any team sport that equals that if Ken Dryden.  Prior to winning the Calder, Ken Dryden would win the Stanley Cup and Conn Smythe, which made him more successful than any other Calder Trophy winner. Dryden would later win four Vezina Trophy wins and would hoist the Stanley Cup five more times.  Long story short, Ken Dryden was the best NHL Goalie of the 1970’s. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1983.

Denis Potvin, New York Islanders(1974)

17 Goals, 37 Assists, 54 Points, 6.5 Point Shares.  Denis Potvin was the first piece in what would eventually become the New York Islanders dynasty that would win four Stanley Cups in the 1980’s.  Potvin anchored the Islanders blueline where he would win three Norris Trophies and was a five time First Team All Star.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1991.

Bryan Trottier, New York Islanders(1976)

32 Goals, 63 Assists, 95 Points, 8.6 Point Shares.  See above!  With the Denis Potvin entry we talked about him being the building block for the Islanders dynasty.  Here was the next massive piece of the puzzle was Bryan Trottier who was eighth in the NHL in Assists as a Rookie and had an excellent finish of 95 Points.  Trottier would later win the Hart Trophy (1979), was a four time post season All Star and in addition to the four Stanley Cups he won with the Islanders, he would help the Pittsburgh Penguins two Cups in the early 1990’s.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1997.

Mike Bossy, New York Islanders(1978)

53 Goals, 38 Assists, 91 Points, 10.3 Point Shares.  See above!  Again!  Potvin. Trottier.  Mike Bossy.  Three Calder trophy winners in five years and all three Hall of Famers resulting in four Stanley Cups.  As a rookie, Mike Bossy scored 53 Goals and was second in that metric.  With the exception of his final season he never had a year where he dipped below 50.  A Second Team All Star as a Rookie, Bossy would later be a First Team All Star five times.  His excellent career ended early at the age of 30 due to back issues.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1991.

Ray Bourque, Boston Bruins(1980)

17 Goals, 48 Assists, 65 Points, 10.3 Point Shares.  When you had Bobby Orr, how lucky are you as an organization to land Ray Bourque?  The Boston Bruins Defenseman was a First Team All Star as a rookie and he would be named to either a First or Second Team All Star every year after until the 1996/97 season. Bourque would later win the Norris Trophy five times.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2004.

Peter Stastny, Quebec Nordiques(1981)

39 Goals, 70 Assists, 109 Points, 8.6 Point Shares.  While some might point to Stastny’s age (24) and that he had already been playing in his native Czechoslovakia for a while to paint this Calder win as tainted, this was a huge deal as Stastny had already established himself as the best player on the Czechoslovakian team and his defection (along with his brother Anton) ushered in others from the Iron Curtain to do the same.  As an NHL rookie, he scored 109 Points and would have five more 100 Point seasons.   Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1998.

Dale Hawerchuk, Winnipeg Jets(1982)

45 Goals, 58 Assists, 103 Points, 7.9 Point Shares.  Scoring 103 Points as a rookie, Hawerchuk would later be a Second Team All Star and runner-up for the Hart Trophy in the 1984/85 season.  He would score 1,409 Points over his National Hockey League career.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2001.

Mario Lemieux, Pittsburgh Penguins(1985)

43 Goals, 57 Assists, 100 Points, 7.9 Point Shares.  With a 100 Point season as a rookie, Mario Lemieux was just getting started.  He would win the Hart Trophy three times, the Art Ross six times, was a post season NHL All Star nine times and took the Pittsburgh Penguins to a Stanley Cup win in 1991 and 1992.  He would become the player to rival Wayne Gretzky.  Lemieux retired in 1997 but returned in 2000 as a player owner and retired again in 2006.  Lemieux would later win three more Stanley Cups as an owner and is the only man in history to have his name etched on the Cup as a player and as an owner.  Had the Penguins never drafted him there is a very good chance that Pittsburgh would not have an NHL team today.  He was inducted immediately after his first retirement and he would become the first player to win the Calder, was inducted into the Hockey Hall of Fame and return to action.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1997.

Luc Robitaille, Los Angeles Kings(1987)

45 Goals, 39 Assists, 84 Points, 6.8 Point Shares.  In addition to winning the Calder, Luc Robitaille would be named a Second Team All Star.  This was just the beginning for a great career that was spent predominantly with Los Angeles and he would be named a First Team All Star five times and a Second Team All Star three times.  He retired with 1,394 Points and he entered the Hockey Hall of Fame in his first year of eligibility.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2006.

Joe Nieuwendyk, Calgary Flames(1988)

51 Goals, 41 Assists, 92 Points, 8.7 Point Shares.  Nieuwendyk would lead the NHL in Power Play Goals as a rookie and later in his career would win the Stanley Cup with three different teams; 1989 with Calgary, 1999 with Dallas (where he won the Conn Smythe) and 2003 with New Jersey.  He finished his career with 1,126 Points.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2011.

Brian Leetch, New York Rangers(1989)

23 Goals, 48 Assists, 71 Points, 9.0 Point Shares.  Brian Leetch had an exceptional career in the NHL and securing the Calder Trophy was just the beginning.  Leetch played for the Rangers most of his career where he would win the Norris Trophy twice and lead his team to win the Stanley Cup in 1994 where he was named the Conn Smythe Trophy winner.  He scored 1,028 Points and entered the Hall of Fame in his first year of eligibility.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2011.

Sergei Makarov, Calgary Flames(1990)

24 Goals, 62 Assists, 86 Points, 6.8 Point Shares.  This is the most controversial Calder Trophy winner as Makarov was over 30, but this was in fact his professional season as he played for the Soviet Union and was a star for the Red Army throughout the 1980’s and through Canada Cups and other small tournaments he had played against the NHL’s best many times.  Still, by the definition of what a rookie is, he qualified though he entered the Hockey Hall of Fame more on what he did Internationally.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2016.

Ed Belfour, Chicago Blackhawks(1991)

43 Wins, 19 Losses 7 Ties, 2.47 GAA, 14.0 Goalie Point Shares. Ed Belfour had many excellent seasons in the National Hockey League and the argument can certainly be made that this was his best one.  Belfour won the Vezina and William M. Jennings trophy and was the leader in Goals Against Average, Save Percentage and Minutes Played.  Belfour would later earn his second Vezina as a Blackhawk two years later, and he was also a William M. Jennings Trophy winner three more times.  More importantly, “Eddie the Eagle” would backstop the Dallas Stars to a Stanley Cup win in 1999. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2011.

Pavel Bure, Vancouver Canucks(1992)

34 Goals, 26 Assists, 60 Points, 6.8 Point Shares.  This was a good season for “The Russian Rocket” but he would later have five 50 Goal Seasons, two of which would see him net 60. Bure a First Team All Star with the Canucks and later for the Florida Panthers would have back-to-back Second Team All Star Selections and Maurice Richard Trophy wins as the NHL’s leading Goal Scorer.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2016. 

Teemu Selanne, Winnipeg Jets(1993)

76 Goals, 56 Assists, 132 Points, 13.4 Point Shares.  Wow!!!  First off Selanne was the first player from Finland to win the Calder but there is so much more here.  Selanne scored 76 Goals and 132 Points, both of which are by the far most of any rookie and Calder winner.  Considering the current landscape, this could be untouchable.  Selanne would score the most goals this year but this would be his best season by far of his career though “The Finnish Flash” was no flash in the pan (sorry, couldn’t resist).  Selanne would have three more 100 Point seasons and would play into his early 40’s and scored 1,457 Points over his career.  He would win a Stanley Cup with the Ducks and was a first ballot Hall of Famer.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2017.

Martin Brodeur, New Jersey Devils(1994)

27 Wins, 11 Losses, 8 Ties, 8.9 Point Shares.  Martin Brodeur is one of the most successful Goalies of all-time and save for seven games with the St. Louis Blues it was done with the Devils.  Brodeur had a good rookie year but unlike other Calder winners who were Goalies, Brodeur’s Calder year was not even in his top ten.  Brodeur would later win four Vezina Trophies, five William M. Jennings Trophies and four Stanley Cups.  He is the all time leader in Wins, Saves, Games Played (by a Goalie) and Minutes Played and that may not change in 50 years.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2018.

Peter Forsberg, Quebec Nordiques(1995)

15 Goals, 35 Assists, 50 Points, 8.2 Point Shares.  When the Philadelphia Flyers traded for Eric Lindros there was piece of the puzzle that was an unknown factor.  That was the rights to Peter Forsberg, who would turn out (we think) to best player in the deal.  The Swedish star would later help the Colorado Avalanche win two Stanley Cups and for his own trophy case the Hart Trophy and Art Ross in 2002/03.  He would also be a three First Team All Star.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2014.

 

The following are the players who have won the Calder Trophy in the NHL who are eligible for the Hockey Hall of Fame and have not been selected:

Cully Dahlstrom, Chicago Blackhawks (1938)

10 Goals, 9 Assists, 19 Points, 1.3 Point Shares.  Dahlstrom would have better seasons in the National Hockey League but he would never have a season that could be considered great. He would however win the Stanley Cup as a rookie with the Blackhawks and his 206 Points in 345 Games were perfectly decent.   Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Kilby MacDonald, New York Rangers (1940)

15 Goals, 13 Assists, 28 Points, 3.8 Point Shares.  This would be the best season of Kilby MacDonals’s brief career as he would bounce back and forth between the Rangers and the minors after. MacDonald who also won a Stanley Cup with the Rangers this year also served in the Army in between stints in professional hockey.   Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

John Quilty, Montreal Canadiens (1941)

18 Goals, 16 Assists, 34 Points, 3.8 Point Shares.  This was by far and away the best season of John Quilty’s career and after another season for the Montreal Canadiens he would join the Canadian military.  Quilty would later return but did not do much and retired with only 81 Points in 125 NHL Games.   Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Grant Warwick, New York Rangers (1942)

16 Goals, 17 Assists, 33 Points, 3.0 Point Shares.  Warwick would play for nine seasons in the NHL and peaked with 42 Points in the 1944/45 Season.  He would play most of his career with the New York Rangers with two seasons with Boston and a year with Montreal following.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Gaye Stewart, Toronto Maple Leafs (1943)

24 Goals, 23 Assists, 47 Points, 4.0 Point Shares.  The Calder Trophy win for Gaye Stewart had so much historical meaning.  The first is that he would become the first player to win the Calder after he won the Stanley Cup as he played for the Maple Leafs in three games in the 1942 Playoffs.  Like so many, Stewart’s career took on a sabbatical as he joined the Royal Canadian Navy during World War II but he returned in the 1945/46 Season to lead the National Hockey League in Goals and he was the runner-up for the Hart Trophy and the year after he helped Toronto win the 1947 Stanley Cup.  He was traded the following season to Chicago and was a Second Team All Star that season.  He finished his career with 344 Points in 502 Games.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Gus Bodnar, Toronto Maple Leafs (1944)

22 Goals, 40 Assists, 62 Points, 4.5 Point Shares.  Bodnar’s 62 Points was the best of his career and that was likely because it occurred in the depleted talent pool that was the World War II NHL.  Bodnar’s career was not Hall of Fame worthy but it was a good one that spanned 12 years long and he would win two Stanley Cups with Toronto in 1945 and 1947.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Frank McCool, Toronto Maple Leafs (1945)

24 Wins, 22 Losses 4 Ties, 3.22 GAA, 10.1 Goalie Point Shares. Frank McCool had a very interesting and brief career.  The Goalie played hockey at Gonzaga and would join the Canadian Military to serve in World War II.  He would return to hockey and this time it was at the professional level where he would serve between the pipes for the Toronto Maple Leafs and take them to the Finals and win the Cup.  In the process he recorded four Shutouts in the post season and three straight, which still is tied for the record today.  So what did Frank McCool do for an encore?  Nothing really.  He would play 22 more games for the Leafs and retire shortly after due to ulcers.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Howie Meeker, Toronto Maple Leafs (1947)

27 Goals, 18 Assists, 45 Points, 4.5 Point Shares.  The first season of Howie Meeker’s career was arguably his finest as he had career highs with 27 Goals and 45 Points as a rookie and would help the Toronto Maple Leafs win the Stanley Cup.  Meeker would win two more Stanley Cups with Toronto and retired with 185 Points in 346 Games.  Meeker would later become more famous as a broadcaster.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Jim McFadden, Detroit Red Wings (1948)

24 Goals, 24 Assists, 48 Points, 5.7 Point Shares.  In terms of traditional statistics, Jim McFadden’s best season was his rookie year where he had career highs in Goals, Assists and Points. McFadden’s career was not a long one as it lasted seven seasons, four with Detroit and three with Chicago.  His last season in Motown would see him win the Stanley Cup.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Pentti Lund, New York Rangers (1949)

14 Goals, 16 Assists, 30 Points, 2.6 Point Shares.  This was the best season of Lund’s career where he had career highs in Points and would become the first European born to win the Calder.  Lund was born in Finland, although arrived in Canada at the age of six.  The Forward would last five years in the NHL. Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Jack Gelineau, Boston Bruins (1950)

22 Wins, 30 Losses, 15 Ties, 3.28 GAA, 7.3 Point Shares.  Jack Gelineau may have had a losing record but he was a machine in terms of work load.  The Boston Bruin was fifth in Goalie Point Shares this season and he was third in the season after but his overall career ended shortly after.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Camille Henry, New York Rangers (1954)

24 Goals, 15 Assists, 39 Points, 5.4 Point Shares.  Camille Henry’s rookie season would see him lead the National Hockey League in Power Play Goals (20).  Henry would regress and would bounce around in the AHL but would return wo have a Second Team All Star and Lady Byng winning season in 1957/58. Henry would finish in the top five in Lady Byng voting five more times and would also finish first in Power Play Goals two more times and he would retire with 528 Points in 727 Games.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Ed Litzenberger, Montreal Canadiens/Chicago Blackhawks (1955)

23 Goals, 28 Assists, 51 Points, 5.8 Point Shares.  According to the story, the Montreal Canadiens “gifted” Litzenberger in a trade to the Chicago Blackhawks in an attempt to keep the team viable in the NHL; basically so that they would not go under!  He would score 51 Points as a rookie and would later be a Second Team All Star in 1957 where he was sixth in Hart Trophy voting. He retired with 416 Points in 619 Games. Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Larry Regan, Boston Bruins (1957)

14 Goals, 19 Assists, 33 Points, 2.8 Point Shares.  With all due respect to Larry Regan, he had a pedestrian career in professional hockey and he did nothing more than what you saw in this season.  The forward would only score 136 Points over his career in the NHL  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Ralph Backstrom, Montreal Canadiens (1959)

18 Goals, 22 Assists, 40 Points, 3.8 Point Shares.  Ralph Backstrom would win six Stanley Cup Rings with the Montreal Canadiens and was also a six time All Star.  Ranked #34 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Bill Hay, Chicago Blackhawks (1960)

18 Goals, 37 Assists, 50 Points, 4.9 Point Shares.  Bill Hay played all of his eight seasons in the NHL with the Chicago Blackhawks where he would win a Stanley Cup and a Calder, but this would be the only awards he would win.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Bobby Rousseau, Montreal Canadiens (1962)

21 Goals, 24 Assists, 45 Points, 4.3 Point Shares.  Rousseau would lead the NHL in Short-Handed Goals and he would later help the Montreal Canadiens win four Stanley Cups in the 1960’s. In the 1965/66 season he would lead the NHL in Assists and was named a Second Team All Star.  He would score 703 Points over his career.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Kent Douglas, Toronto Maple Leafs (1963)

7 Goals, 15 Assists, 22 Points, 6.6 Point Shares.  While Kent Douglas would have better individual stats in later years, his first season in the NHL was a special one as he not only won the Calder but was a member of the Toronto Maple Leafs’ 1963 Stanley Cup win. Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Roger Crozier, Detroit Red Wings (1965)

40 Wins, 22 Losses, 7 Ties, 2.42 GAA, 14.4 Point Shares.  The rookie season of Roger Crozier was also the best of his career as he was the league leader in Wins, Saves, Shutouts and Minutes Played while also being named a First Team All Star.  Crozier was named the Conn Smythe winner the next year but he never had a season like this again though is still a 200 Game winner. Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Brit Selby, Toronto Maple Leafs (1966)

14 Goals, 13 Assists, 27 Points, 2.0 Point Shares.  Considering that he was a Calder Trophy winner, Brit Selby did not have a great career as he would be sent down to the minors the year after and never had a season higher than 30 Points.  He isn’t the worst player to win the Calder but is in the top ten. Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Derek Sanderson, Boston Bruins (1968) 

24 Goals, 25 Assists, 49 Points, 4.8 Point Shares.  Many books can be written on the career of Derek Sanderson but for this purpose we have an exciting Calder Trophy winner who had the tiger by the tail. Sanderson would later win the Stanley Cup twice with the Boston Bruins but would never win another individual accolade again.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Danny Grant, Minnesota North Stars (1969)

34 Goals, 31 Assists, 65 Points, 6.8 Point Shares.  Danny Grant had an understated career which was spent predominantly with the Minnesota North Stars and Detroit Red Wings.  Grant would have four 60 Point Seasons, this being the first of them, but overall it was not one that warranted serious Hall of Fame consideration.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Steve Vickers, New York Rangers (1973)

30 Goals, 23 Assists, 53 Points, 5.9 Point Shares.  Steve Vickers made history as the first rookie to score consecutive hat tricks and he would overall put the puck in the net 30 times in his Calder Trophy winning season. Vickers would later be named a Second Team All Star two season later with a 41 Goal year but by age 30 he was out of the NHL after his play dropped off considerably.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Eric Vail, Atlanta Flames (1975)

39 Goals, 21 Assists, 60 Points, 6.1 Point Shares.  Eric Vail’s best goal scoring season was as a rookie (39) and he would become the first player in Flames franchise history to win the Calder.  Vail would have two more 30 Goal seasons and when the team moved to Calgary he was the leading goal scorer in franchise history.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Willi Plett, Atlanta Flames (1977)

33 Goals, 23 Assists, 56 Points, 6.1 Point Shares.  This was the second Calder trophy in three years for the Atlanta Flames but unlike the Islanders who had the same earlier with Potvin and Trottier, Eric Vail and Willi Plett were not in that league. Still, Plett had 33 Goals as a rookie and would have another 30 goal season when he scored 38 the year the Flames moved to Calgary.  This would be the only individual award that Plett would win the NHL.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Bobby Smith, Minnesota North Stars (1979)

30 Goals, 44 Assists, 74 Points, 6.1 Point Shares.  Bobby Smith had a really good career where he would score 1,036 Points and would be a four time All Star.  His best individual seasons were with the Minnesota North Stars but he would later win the Stanley Cup with the Montreal Canadiens in 1986. Ranked #22 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Steve Larmer, Chicago Blackhawks (1983)

43 Goals, 47 Assists, 90 Points, 8.4 Point Shares.  Steve Larmer was a Point per Game player in the National Hockey League, which was very good for the 1980’s but not what it means today. Larmer would go to two All Star Games and late in his career he would assist the New York Rangers would win the Stanley Cup.  Ranked #32 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Tom Barrasso, Buffalo Sabres (1984)

26 Wins, 12 Losses, 3 Ties, 2.85 GAA, 7.5 Point Shares.  Tom Barrasso would have a very long career in the National Hockey League (19 years) but like other Calder winning Goalies his best season professionally was as a rookie.  He would not only win the Calder but was a First Team All Star and would win the Vezina.  Barrasso would later win the William M. Jennings Trophy and two Second Team All Star nods and overall won 369 Games in the NHL.  Ranked #12 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Gary Suter, Calgary Flames (1986)

18 Goals, 50 Assists, 68 Points, 8.0 Point Shares.  Gary Suter would score well for a Defenseman and in his third season he scored 91 Points en route to a third place finish in Norris Trophy voting and a Second Team All Star Selection.  Suter would help the Flames win the Stanley Cup the year after and overall would score 844 Points in his NHL career.  Ranked #27 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Daniel Alfredsson, Ottawa Senators (1996)

26 Goals, 35 Assists, 61 Points, 5.3 Point Shares.  Daniel Alfredsson was the second straight Swedish player to win the Calder (following Peter Forsberg) and the Ottawa Senator would go on to lead the team to what is their greatest success to date.  The greatest player in franchise history would score 1,157 Points and was named a Second Team All Star in 2005/06.  Ranked #4 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Bryan Berard, New York Islanders (1997)

8 Goals, 40 Assists, 48 Points, 7.6 Point Shares.  The native of Rhode Island would never have a season where he had more Points or Point Shares but he still had a good career, especially considering it was almost over after getting slashed in the eye by a stick in 2000 that almost caused him to lose it.  The fact that he came back at all to be effective was a testament to who Berard was and he would win the Bill Masterton Memorial Trophy in the 2003/04 Season.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com

Sergei Samsonov, Boston Bruins (1998)

22 Goals, 25 Assists, 47 Points, 5.5 Point Shares.  Sergei Samsonov would have a pretty good career in the NHL with 571 Points in 888 Games but when you a teen sensation from Russia winning the Calder you expected something more and likely the Bruins faithful hoped for the same.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com

Chris Drury, Colorado Avalanche (1999)

20 Goals, 24 Assists, 44 Points, 5.0 Point Shares.  Drury would go on to have a solid career where he helped the Avalanche win the Stanley Cup in 2001.  He would later blossom into a strong defensive forward and for five years in a row (2005-06 to 2009-10) he would receive votes for the Frank J. Selke. Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Scott Gomez, New Jersey Devils (2000)

19 Goals, 51 Assists, 70 Points, 7.3 Point Shares.  From the great state of Alaska, Scott Gomez scored 70 Points as a rookie and would hit that mark three more times.  Gomez helped the Devils win the Stanley Cup as a rookie and again in 2003 and he would be a two time All Star.  He scored 756 Points over his career.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Evgeni Nabokov, San Jose Sharks (2001)

32 Wins, 21 Losses, 7 Ties, 11.7 Point Shares.  Evgeni Nabokov finished fourth in Vezina Trophy as a rookie, and would finish in the top six five more times.  He would also be a First Team All Star in 2007/08 when he led the Goalies in Wins.  He would have a career record of 353-227-86.  Ranked #124 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Dany Heatley, Atlanta Thrashers (2002)

26 Goals, 41 Assists, 67 Points, 6.8 Point Shares.  Heatley had a great start to his career but a car crash that killed a teammate necessitated a change of scenery and he would be traded to the Ottawa Senators who would later have a pair of 100 Point Seasons where he was named a First Team and Second Team All Star.  He would score 791 Points in 869 Games.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Barret Jackman, St. Louis Blues (2003)

3 Goals, 16 Assists, 19 Points, 5.4 Point Shares.  Barret Jackman would have a good career as a stay-at-home Defenseman and his was spent with the St. Louis Blues for all but one season. Jackman never would come close to winning an individual award but the fact that the Blues held on to him for 13 seasons show what kind of asset he was.   Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Andrew Raycroft, Boston Bruins (2004)

29 Wins, 18 Losses, 9 Ties, 12.6 Point Shares.  Other than his Calder trophy win, Raycroft only had one good season of note which was with the Toronto Maple Leafs three years after his Calder win.  Those two years comprised well over half of Goalie Point Shares over his 11 seasons in the National Hockey League.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Let’s update our tally shall we?

Award in Question

Percentage of recipients who have entered the HOF

Percentage of recipients by year who have entered the HOF.

NBA MVP

100%

100%

NHL Norris

90.5%

96.4%

NBA All Star Game MVP

89.5%

91.7%

NHL Conn Smythe

74.2%

85.4%

NHL Lady Byng

63.8%

76.0%

NFL Super Bowl MVP

60.6%

64.9%

NBA Defensive Player of the Year

58.3%

56.5%

NBA Rookie of the Year

56.5%

56.5%

MLB/NL/AL Cy Young Award

44.4%

55.4%

NHL Calder

44.1%

44.1%

NHL Frank J. Selke Trophy

33.3%

36.7%

NFL Offensive Rookie of the Year

28.6%

28.6%

MLB Edgar Martinez Award

26.7%

17.2%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Designated Hitter)

25.0%

30.8%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Shortstop)

23.5%

52.6%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove

21.7%

36.8%

NFL Defensive Rookie of the Year

20.6%

20.6%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Catcher)

20.0%

22.5%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Second Base)

18.8%

39.8%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Shortstop)

18.2%

35.1%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Pitcher)

18.2%

20.1%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Second Base)

16.7%

32.7%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Outfield)

16.7%

30.1%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Outfield)

15.7%

25.2%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Third Base)

14.3%

14.3%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Third Base)

13.6%

14.3%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (First Base)

13.6%

13.3%

MLB (NL/AL) Rookie of the Year

13.3%

13.3%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Catcher)

10.3%

15.2%

NBA Most Improved Player of the Year

5.3%

3.2%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (First Base)

3.8%

3.2%

So who is up next?

The following are the players who have won the Calder Trophy in the NHL who have retired but have not met the mandatory years out of the game to qualify for the Hockey Hall of Fame:

Steve Mason, Columbus Blue Jackets (2009)

33 Wins, 20 Losses, 7 Ties, 11.2 Point Shares.  Mason’s Calder Trophy winning season was his best year and he was also the runner-up for the Vezina and fourth place finish in Hart Trophy voting. Mason would have a 205-183-64 record. Eligible for the Hockey Hall of Fame in 2021.

The following are the players who have won the NHL Calder Trophy who are still active.

Alex Ovechkin, Washington Capitals (2006)

52 Goals, 54 Assists, 106 Points, 12.7 Point Shares.  Ovechkin was the first Washington Capital to win the Calder and he did so with a 50 Goal and 100 Point Season which is no small feat in the dead puck era.  Since that win Ovechkin took the Capitals to their first Stanley Cup win in 2018 and along the way he has won seven Maurice Richard Awards, three Hart Trophies and one Art Ross.  33 Years Old, Playing for the Washington Capitals.

Evgeni Malkin, Pittsburgh Penguins (2007)

33 Goals, 52 Assists, 85 Points, 9.4 Point Shares.  Evgeni Malkin would be the second straight Russian to win the Calder and to date he has had a spectacular career where he has been a four time All Star, a Hart Trophy winner and two time Art Ross winner.  Malkin would also take the Penguins to three Stanley Cups continuing the winning tradition of the Western Pennsylvania team.  32 Years Old, Playing for the Washington Capitals.

Patrick Kane, Chicago Blackhawks (2008)

21 Goals, 51 Assists, 72 Points, 7.2 Point Shares.  Patrick Kane has to date an incredible career where he has won three Stanley Cups with the Blackhawks and was also a three time First Team All Star.  He would win the Hart Trophy in 2015/16.  30 Years Old, Playing for the Chicago Blackhawks.

Tyler Myers, Buffalo Sabres (2010)

11 Goals, 37 Assists, 48 Points, 9.8 Point Shares.  As of this writing, Tyler Myers’ rookie season was his best by far as his Goals, Assists, Points and Point Shares were all career highs. It has been a good career but not what you would hope for considering his start.  28 Years Old, Playing for the Buffalo Sabres.

Jeff Skinner, Carolina Hurricanes (2011)

31 Goals, 32 Assists, 63 Points, 8.1 Point Shares.  To date Skinner has been named an All Star twice and has equaled his rookie point total in 2016/17 but has not eclipsed it.  26 Years Old, Playing for the Buffalo Sabres.

Gabriel Landeskog, Colorado Avalanche (2012)

22 Goals, 30 Assists, 52 Points, 6.8 Point Shares.  From Sweden, Gabirel Landeskog has performed well and went to his first All Star Game in 2019.  He does have a way to go to get onto a Hockey Hall of Fame trajectory.  26 Years Old, Playing for the Colorado Avalanche.

Jonathan Huberdeau, Florida Panthers (2013)

14 Goals, 17 Assists, 31 Points, 3.3 Point Shares.  Huberdeau has thus far had a good career though it has been spent exclusively in Florida and he has not been showcased much on a national level.  25 Years Old, Playing for the Florida Panthers.

Nathan McKinnon, Colorado Avalanche (2014)

24 Goals, 39 Assists, 63 Points, 3.3 Point Shares.  Since his Calder Trophy win McKinnon has had two 90 Point Seasons and in 2017/18 was a Second Team All Star and the runner-up for the Hart Trophy.  23 Years Old, Playing for the Colorado Avalanche.

Aaron Ekblad, Florida Panthers (2015)

12 Goals, 27 Assists, 39 Points, 8.5 Point Shares.  A better than you think blueliner, Ekblad finished 22ndin Norris Trophy voting as a rookie and was 16thas a sophomore.  22 Years Old, Playing for the Florida Panthers.

Artemi Panarin, Chicago Blackhawks (2016)

30 Goals, 47 Assists, 77 Points, 9.8 Point Shares.  Panarin played in the KHL a little longer and did not arrive in the NHL until he was 23 making him a little older than most rookies so perhaps he had a bit of an advantage, but he was great as a rookie and he would be named a Second Team All Star in his second season.  27 Years Old, Playing for the Columbus Blue Jackets.

Auston Matthews, Toronto Maple Leafs (2017)

40 Goals, 29 Assists, 69 Points, 9.7 Point Shares.  Maple Leafs fans were thrilled when Matthews scored five goals in his first game and overall in his rookie year he had a 40 Goal season that was good enough for second overall.  The American was also named an All Star and he led the NHL in Even Strength Goals.  22 Years Old, Playing for the Toronto Maple Leafs.

Mathew Barzal, New York Islanders (2018)

22 Goals, 63 Assists, 85 Points, 8.2 Point Shares.  Barzal finished fifth in the NHL in Assists as a rookie.  21 Years Old, Playing for the New York Islanders.

From what we can see in terms of the Calder Trophy winners there are some solid Hall of Fame potential but like so many sports injuries can derail such great starts.  This looks to be our favorite to monitor as we go forward.

Up next we are going to back to the NFL to the Pro Bowl MVP.

As always, we thank you for that support and look for that soon!

The outcome of Sunday’s match between the Saints and the Rams has shown that the 53rd Super Bowl is still very much up in the air. The Rams won by a mere three points, which was about as expected, but this kind of margin certainly suggests that both teams are playing at roughly the same level, with no real indication of which of these NFL heavyweights will take the gold this year as last night’s winners will go head to head with the Patriots in football’s biggest night.

No Sure Thing

Punters are, as always, trying to look for something of a sure thing to place the big bucks on for the coming Super Bowl but, because the L.A Rams have brought  their a-games so far this season, the competition is simply far too close to call. Nonetheless, the Patriots’ are still the bookies’ favourites to win again this year. But other teams will make it really difficult this time. The outcome will be highly unpredictable this year so punters would be wise to make use of the free Super Bowl Bets on offer.

The Patriots currently stand at 11-6 for taking the Bowl but they hardly demolished the Chiefs in their match against them and with Sunday’s solid but unspectacular win, the Rams aren’t exactly scoring much lower. The money may be on the Patriots but it’s really all up in the air right now. What this means, though, is that exciting, unpredictable games makes for exciting betting that can result in fairly big wins, even with fairly modest bets placed. It’s this sort of game, in fact, that is ideal for free bets from online bookies the results are so unpredictable and the payout will more than do justice to the modest amount that is placed with a free bet. In short, what we’re looking at here is low to no risk resulting in solid payouts if the Patriots do, indeed, demolish the competition and even bigger payouts if you bet on them not to and they don’t.  It’s exciting stuff regardless.

rams

The Revenge of the Rams?

It will be interesting to see how the Rams will look to disrupt the Patriot and Brady’s passing. The Patriot’s offense will have their work cut out as the Rams’ defensive partnership has been in excellent form off late. Torry Holt, in particular, has proven himself time and time again to be one of the NFL’s unsung secret weapons and if anyone is going to challenge the Patriot’s current hot streak it will no doubt be any team that has Holt as a member.

Still, the bookie’s favourite remains the Patriots even in the face of stiff competition from the Rams. They have had an incredible past season and should, if nothing else, provide an exciting game against the newly intimidating Rams.