Awards - HOF? Part Sixty-One: The MLB All-Star Game MVP

Awards - HOF?  Part Sixty-One:  The MLB All-Star Game MVP
25 Nov
2021
Not in Hall of Fame

We here at Notinhalloffame.com thought it would be fun to take a look at the major awards in North American team sports and see how it translates into Hall of Fame potential.

Needless to say, different awards in different sports yield hall of fame potential.  In basketball, the team sport with the least number of players on a roster, the dividend for greatness much higher.  In baseball, it is not as much as a great individual season does not have the same impact.

Last time, we looked at the Hank Aaron Award.  We now have one of our last Baseball awards, the MLB All-Star Game MVP.

The trophy first came into existence in 1962, thirty years after Major League Baseball first gave us the mid-season classic.   It goes without saying that to win this award, you first have to be good enough that year to have made it to the game.

Let’s find out!

The following are the past players who have won the All-Star Game MVP who are eligible for the Baseball Hall of Fame and have been enshrined.

1963 Willie Mays, San Francisco Giants, Outfield, 1 for 3, 2 R, 2 RBI, 1 BB, 2 SB.

Mays was in the prime of his career, and he finished the year with 38 Home Runs, 103 RBIs and a Slash Line of .314/.380/.582.  He finished fifth in MVP voting.

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1979.

1965 Juan Marichal, San Francisco Giants, Pitcher, 1 for 1, 1 R, 3 IP, 1 H, 0 ER, 0 SO, 0 BB.

Marichal became the first Pitcher to win the All-Star Game MVP, and would finish the year with 22-13, with a 2.13 ERA, and a league-leading 159 in ERA+.  He finished ninth in MVP voting this year, and appeared in ten All-Star Games.

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1983.

1966 Brooks Robinson, Baltimore Orioles, Third Base, 3 for 4, 1 R, 1 2B.

Robinson went to eighteen All-Star Games over his career, and he finished the season with 23 Home Runs, 100 RBIs, and a Gold Glove, which would be one of his sixteen.  He would lead Baltimore to a World Series win this year.

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1983.

1967 Tony Perez, Cincinnati Reds, Third Base, 1 for 2, 1 R, 1 HR, 1 RBI.

This was Perez’ first of seven All-Star Games, and he amassed 26 Home Runs, 102 RBIs and batted .290.  Perez finished ninth in MVP voting, and would later win two World Series Rings with the Reds.

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2000.

1968 Willie Mays, San Francisco Giants, Outfield, 1 for 4. (2)

It is not surprising that a legend like Willie Mays became the first man to win the All-Star Game MVP twice, although maybe it should be as Mays did nothing remarkable to win this award.  Nevertheless, he finished the year with 23 HR, a .289 Batting Average and was 13th in MVP voting.  Mays would overall participate in 24 All-Star Games.

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1979.

1969 Willie McCovey, San Francisco Giants, First Base, 2 for 4, 2 R, 3 RBI, 2 HR.

McCovey was an All-Star for the fourth of six times this season, and he would lead the National League in Home Runs (45), RBIs (126), On Base Percentage (.453), Slugging (.656) and OPS (1.108), all of which were career highs.  He would win the MVP this year.

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1986.

1970 Carl Yastrzemski, Boston Red Sox, Outfield, 4 for 6, 1 R, 1 RBI, 1 2B.

Yastrzemski played his entire career with the BoSox and in 1970, he led the American League in Runs (125), On Base Percentage (.452), Slugging (.592), OPS (1.044) and OPS+ (177).  He finished fourth in MVP voting.

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1989.

1971 Frank Robinson, Baltimore Orioles, Outfield, 1 for 2, 1 R, 1 RBI, 1 HR.

Robinson went to 14 All-Star Games, with this being his 13th.  This year, he would smack 28 Home Runs with a .510 Slugging Percentage and was third in MVP voting.

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1989.

1972 Joe Morgan, Cincinnati Reds, Second Base, 1 for 4, 1 RBI, 1 BB, 1 SB.

This was Morgan’s first year in Cincinnati, and third All-Star Game, with this year beginning an eight-year streak.  He finished this season leading the NL in Runs (122), Walks (115), On Base Percentage (.417), and was fourth in MVP voting.  Morgan later won two MVPs and two World Series rings with the Reds.

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1990.

1977 Don Sutton, Los Angeles Dodgers, Pitcher. Win, 3 IP, 4 SO, 1 BB, 1 H.

This was Suttons last of four All-Star Games, but he played another 11 years.  This season, Sutton finished the year with a 14-8 record with a 3.18 ERA and 154 Strikeouts.

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1998.

1981 Gary Carter, Montreal Expos, Catcher.  2 for 3, 1 R, 2 HR, 2 RBI.

Carter was an All-Star for the fourth time this year, and the third season of what would be a ten-year run.  He finished the strike-impaired season with 16 HR, 68 RBI and was sixth in MVP voting.

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2003.

1984 Gary Carter, Montreal Expos, Catcher.  1 for 2, 1 R, 1 HR, 1 RBI. (2)

Carter repeated as All-Star Game MVP, and was the NL leader in RBIs this season (106).  He was 14th in MVP voting this year, and captured his third of five Silver Sluggers.

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2003.

1987 Tim Raines, Montreal Expos, Outfield.  3 for 3, 1 3B, 1 SB, 2 RBI.

Raines was an All-Star for the seventh and final time, which were all consecutive.  He concluded the year as the NL leader in Runs (123), with a .330 Batting Average and 50 Stolen Bases.  He was seventh in MVP voting, and though this year ended his era as an elite player, Raines played until 2002.

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2017.

1991 Cal Ripken Jr., Baltimore Orioles, Shortstop.  2 for 3, 1 R, 1 HR, 3 RBI.

Ripken was a perennial All-Star from 1983 to 2001, one of the longest runs of the sport.  This season, Ripken won his second MVP in a year where he had career-highs in Home Runs (34), RBIs (114), and batted .323.  Ripken also secured his sixth of eight Silver Sluggers.

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2007.

1992 Ken Griffey Jr., Seattle Mariners, Outfield.  2 for 3, 2 R, 1 2B, 1 HR, 2 RBI.

With this win, the Griffeys became the first father and son combination to become All-Star Game MVPs.  Griffey Jr. was an All-Star for the third of eleven straight years, and he finished the year with 27 HR, 103 RBIs and a 17th place finish in MVP voting.

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2016.

1993 Kirby Puckett, Minnesota Twins, Outfield.  2 for 3, 1 R, 1 2B, 1 HR, 2 RBI.

Puckett went to All-Star Game number eight of ten this year, and the former MVP and World Series Champion had a 22 HR season with a ,296 Batting Average.

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2001.

1996 Mike Piazza, Los Angeles Dodgers, Catcher.  2 for 3, 1 R, 1 2B, 1 HR, 2 RBI.

A 12-time All-Star, Piazza went to his fourth one this year, and would smack 36 Home Runs, 105 RBIs and batted .336.  Piazza won the Silver Slugger this year, and was second in MVP voting.

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2016.

1998 Roberto Alomar, Baltimore Orioles, Second Base.  3 for 4, 2 R, 1 HR, 1 SB, 1 RBI.

A two-time World Series winner with Toronto, Alomar went to 12 consecutive All-Star Games, with this year being number nine.  Alomar also won the Gold Glove and batted .282 with 166 Hits this season.

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2011.

1999 Pedro Martinez, Boston Red Sox, Pitcher.  Win, 2 IP, 0 H, 0 BB, 5 SO.

Martinez won the Cy Young this year, the second of three times he would do so.  He led the AL in ERA (2.07, Strikeouts (313), ERA+ (243), FIP (1.39), WHIP (0.923), SO/9 (13.2) and was second in MVP voting.  Martinez was also an All-Star eight times.

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2015.

2000 Derek Jeter, New York Yankees, Shortstop.  3 for 3, 1 R, 1 2B, 2 RBI.

Jeter had already won four World Series Rings by this point, and he was in his third All-Star Game, with 11 more coming in his career.  This year, Jeter was tenth in MVP voting with a .339 Batting Average, 15 Home Runs and 201 Hits.

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2020.

2001 Cal Ripken Jr., Baltimore Orioles, Shortstop.  1 for 2, 1 R, 1 HR, 1 RBI. (2)

This was Ripken’s farewell year, and realistically, he was not an All-Star worthy player at this point, only collecting 114 Hits with a .239 Batting Average in his swansong.  Nevertheless, the All-Star Game MVP was earned with a Home Run in the game.

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2007.

2013 Mariano Rivera, New York Yankees, Pitcher.  1 IP, 0 H, 0 BB, 0 SO.

Rivera was given the MVP nod over other worthy ASG competitors, but whatever, as this was his swansong.  He finished his last season in the Majors with 44 Saves and a 2.11 ERA.

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2019.

The following are the players who have won the All-Star Game MVP who are eligible for the Baseball Hall of Fame and have not been selected:

1962-1 Maury Wills, Los Angeles Dodgers, Outfield, 1 for 1, 2 R, 1 SB.            

This was the second year that Wills would be an All-Star, and he would be in three more seasons.  Wills would be the NL MVP this year, and led the NL in Stolen Bases (104), Triples (10), and batted .299.

Eligible Since 1978.  Wills was on the ballot for 15 years, and finished as high as 40.6% in 1981.  Ranked #73 on Notinhalloffame.com.  

1962-2 Leon Wagner, Los Angeles Angels, Outfield, 3 for 4, 1 R, 1 HR, 2 RBI.            

1962 would be Wagner’s first of two All-Star years, and it was also his best season in Baseball, finishing fourth in MVP voting with career-highs in Hits (164), Home Runs (37) and RBIs (107).

Eligible Since 1975.  Although Wagner was Hall of Fame eligible in 1975, he was not on the ballot.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com 

1964 Johnny Callison, Philadelphia Phillies, Outfield, 1 for 3, 1 R, 1 HR, 3 RBI.            

This was Callison’s third of four All-Star Game appearances, and he went on to have the best year of his career, with 31 Home Runs, 104 RBIs and a second place finish for the MVP.

Eligible Since 1979.  Callison was on the ballot for one year and received 0.2% of the vote.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com. 

1973 Bobby Bonds, San Francisco Giants, Outfield, 2 for 2, 1 R, 1 2B, 1 HR, 2 RBI.            

Bonds went to his second All-Star Game (of what would be three), and he finished this season leading the NL in Runs (131) with career-highs in Home Runs (39) and Slugging (.530).  Bonds was third in MVP voting this year.

Eligible Since 1979.  Bonds was on the ballot for eleven years and finished as high as 10.6% of the vote.  Ranked #67 on Notinhalloffame.com

1974 Steve Garvey, Los Angeles Dodgers, First Base, 2 for 4, 1 R, 1 2B, 1 RBI.            

This was Garvey’s breakout year, and he won the MVP with a 21 HR, 111 RB and .312 BA year.  This was the first of his ten All-Star years.

Eligible Since 1993.  Garvey was on the ballot for fifteen years and finished as high as 41.6% in 1993.  Ranked #23 on Notinhalloffame.com

1975 Jon Matlack, New York Mets, Pitcher, Win, 3 OP, 0 ER, 4 SO. Co-Winner

This was the second of Matlack’s three All-Star years, and he finished the year with a 16-12 Record with a 3.38 ERA and 154 SO.

Eligible Since 1989.  Matlack was on the ballot for one year but did not receive any votes.  Ranked #274 on Notinhalloffame.com

1975 Bill Madlock, Chicago Cubs, Third Base, 1 for 2, 2 RBI. Co-Winner.

Madlock was an All-Star three times, this year being the first.  He would win the first of four Batting Titles this year and was 12th in MVP voting.

Eligible Since 1993.  Madlock was on the ballot for one year and received 4.5% of the vote.  Ranked #208 on Notinhalloffame.com

1976 George Foster, Cincinnati Reds, Outfield, 1 for 3, 1 R, 1 HR, 3 RBI. 

This was the first of five All-Star Games for Foster, and the first of his three straight league-leading RBI years.  He was second for the MVP this year, won the World Series this season (his second), but win the MVP the following year.  

Eligible Since 1992.  Foster was on the ballot for four years and received as much as 6.9% in 1993.  Ranked #126 on Notinhalloffame.com

1978 Steve Garvey, Los Angeles Dodgers, First Base, 2 for 3, 1 R, 1 3B, 1 BB, 2 RBI. (2)           

This was Garvey’s fifth All-Star Game and his second as the game’s MVP.  He finished the year leading the NL in Hits (202) with a .316 Batting Average.  This year, he was the runner-up for the MVP.

Eligible Since 1993.  Garvey was on the ballot for fifteen years and finished as high as 41.6% in 1993.  Ranked #23 on Notinhalloffame.com

1979 Dave Parker, Pittsburgh Pirates, Outfield, 1 for 3, 1 BB, 1 SF, 1 RBI.            

An MVP the year before, Parker was an All-Star for the second of seven times, and he was tenth in MVP voting this year.  He completed the year with 25 Home Runs, 94 RBIs and a Slash Line of .310/.380/.526.

Eligible Since 1997.  Parker was on the ballot for fifteen years and finished as high as 24.5% in 1998.  Ranked #19 on Notinhalloffame.com

1980 Ken Griffey, Cincinnati Reds, Outfield, 2 for 3, 1 HR, 1 RBI.            

This was Griffey’s third and final All-Star Game and he was a previous two-time World Series winner with the Reds.  Griffey batted .294 this year with 13 Home Runs, and was 22nd in MVP voting.

Eligible Since 1997.  Griffey was on the ballot for one year and finished with 4.7% in 1998.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

1982 Dave Concepcion, Cincinnati Reds, Shortstop, 1 for 2, 1 R, 1 HR, 2 RBI.            

This was Concepcion’s ninth and final All-Star Game appearance, and the two-time World Series winner completed the year with a Silver Slugger and a .287 Batting Average.

Eligible Since 1994.  Concepcion was on the ballot for fifteen years and finished as high as 16.9% in 1998.  Ranked #54 on Notinhalloffame.com.

1983 Fred Lynn, California Angels, Outfield. 1 for 3, 1 R, 1 BB, 1 HR, 4 RBI.            

This was the last of Lynn nine consecutive All-Star Games, and the former MVP concluded his season with 22 HR, 79 RBI with a .272 Batting Average.

Eligible Since 1996.  Lynn was on the ballot for two years and finished as high as 5.5% in 1996.  Ranked #110 on Notinhalloffame.com.

1985 LaMarr Hoyt, San Diego Padres, Pitcher. Win, 2 H, 0 ER, 0 SO.            

Hoyt was only a one-time All-Star, but was a previous Cy Young winner.  He finished this season with a 16-8 record, a 3.47 ERA, and the league lead in BB/9 (0.9).

*Eligible Since 1992.  Hoyt did not play the ten years needed to make the ballot.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.

1985 Roger Clemens, Boston Red Sox, Pitcher. Win, 0 H, 0 ER, 0 BB, 2 SO.            

This was the first of Clemens’ 11 All-Star Games, and he would win both the American League MVP and Cy Young off of a 24-8 year, where he led the league in Wins, ERA (2.48), ERA+ (169), FIP (2.81), WHIP (0.969) and H/9 (6.3).  He was also second in Strikeouts (238). 

Eligible Since 2013.  Clemens had been on the ballot for nine years and has finished as high as 61.6% in 2021.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.

1988 Terry Steinbach, Oakland Athletics, Catcher.  1 for 2, 1 R, 1 HR 1 SF, 2 RBI.            

Steinbach was an All-Star three times, with this being the first of them.  He would be injured for a chunk of this year and he only appeared in 104 Games with 93 Hits and a .265 Batting Average.

Eligible Since 2005.  Steinbach was on the ballot for one year and received 0.2% of the vote.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.

1989 Bo Jackson, Kansas City Royals, Outfield.  2 for 4, 1 R, 1 HR 1 SB, 2 RBI.            

This was Jackson’s lone All-Star year, and the two-sport star belted 32 Home Runs, 105 RBIs and batted .256.  Jackson was tenth in MVP voting for the year.

*Eligible Since 2000.  Jackson did not play the minimum ten years to qualify for the Hall.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.

1990 Julio Franco, Texas Rangers, Second Base.  1 for 3, 1 2B, 2 RBI.            

Franco was a three-time All-Star, this being the second, and he would win the third of what were five Silver Sluggers.  He finished the season with 172 Hits, batted .26 and had 31 Stolen Bases.  Franco amazingly played in 23 MLB seasons, and more outside of the United States.

Eligible Since 2013.  Franco was on the ballot for one year and had 1.1% of the vote.  Ranked #95 on Notinhalloffame.

1994 Fred McGriff, Atlanta Braves, First Base.  1 for 1, 1 R, 1 HR, 2 RBI.            

“The Crime Dog” participated in five All-Star Games, this being his second.  He concluded the season with 34 Home Runs, 94 RBIs, batted .318, and was eighth in MVP voting.

Eligible Since 2013.  McGriff was on the ballot for ten years and finished as high as 39.8% in 2019.  Ranked #29 on Notinhalloffame.

1995 Jeff Conine, Florida Marlins, First Base.  1 for 1, 1 R, 1 HR, 1 RBI.            

Conine was an All-Star twice in his career, with 1995 being his second time.  A future two-time World Series winner with the Marlins, Conine had 146 Hits this year with 25 Home Runs, 105 RBIs and a .302 Batting Average.  He was 22nd in MVP voting this year.

Eligible Since 2013.  Conine did not receive any votes in his lone year on the ballot.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

1997 Sandy Alomar, Cleveland Indians, Catcher.  1 for 2, 1 R, 1 HR, 2 RBI.            

This was Alomar’s fifth of six All-Star Games, and he completed the season with career-highs in Hits (146), Home Runs (21), RBIs (83) and Batting Average (.324).  This was also the only season in which Alomar received MVP votes, and he was fourteenth in balloting.

Eligible Since 2013.  Alomar was on the ballot for one year and received 2.8% of the vote.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

2003 Garrett Anderson, Anaheim Angels, Outfield.  3 for 4, 1 R, 1 2B, 1 HR, 2 RBI.            

Anderson led the Angels to their first World Series win last year, and this season was All-Star number two of three for the Outfielder.  He finished 2003 as the American League leader in Doubles (49), hit 29 Home Runs, with 116 RBIs and a .315 Batting Average.  Anderson also won his second and final Silver Slugger and was 14th in MVP voting.

Eligible Since 2016.  Anderson was on the ballot for one year and received 0.2% of the vote.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

2004 Alfonso Soriano, Texas Rangers, Second Base.  2 for 3, 1 R, 1 HR, 3 RBI.            

Soriano went to seven consecutive All-Star Games, and this was the third in the streak.  He added his second Silver Slugger and would belt 28 Home Runs, 91 RBIs with a .280 Batting Average.

Eligible Since 2020.  Soriano was on the ballot for one year and received 1.5% of the vote.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

2005 Miguel Tejada, Baltimore Orioles, Shortstop.  1 for 3, 1 R, 1 HR, 2 RBI.            

Tejada was an All-Star for the third of six times in 2005, and he won his second and final Silver Slugger this season.  He concluded the season with 26 Home Runs, a league-leading 50 Doubles and a .304 Batting Average.  Tejada was 15th in MVP voting this year.

Eligible Since 2019.  Tejada was on the ballot for one year and received 1.2% of the vote.  Ranked #103 on Notinhalloffame.com.

2006 Michael Young, Texas Rangers, Second Base.  1 for 2, 1 3B, 2 RBI.            

Young was an All-Star for the third time this year with four more coming in his career.  This season, Young had 217 Hits with a .314 Batting Average, and was 30th in MVP voting.

Eligible Since 2019.  Young was on the ballot for one year and received 2.1% of the vote.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

2008 J.D. Drew, Boston Red Sox, Outfield.  2 for 4, 1 R, 1 HR, 1 SB, 1 BB, 2 RBI.            

A year after winning the World Series with the Red Sox, Drew was one of Boston’s All-Star representatives, the first and only time he made one.  He finished the season with 19 Home Runs, 64 RBIs, and batted .260.

Eligible Since 2017.  Drew was on the ballot for one year but did not receive any votes.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

2009 Carl Crawford, Tampa Bay Rays, Outfield.  1 for 3.

This was Crawford’s third of four All-Star Games, all of which occurring with Tampa.  He batted .305 with 15 Home Runs and 185 Hits.

Eligible Since 2022.  Crawford is in his first year of eligibility.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

2011 Prince Fielder, Milwaukee Brewers, First Base.  1 for 2, 1 R, 1 HR, 3 RBI.

Fielder was an All-Star for the third of six times, with the First Baseman hitting 38 Home Runs with 120 RBIs over the year.  He would also win his second of three Silver Sluggers, and was third in MVP voting.

Eligible Since 2022.  Fielder is in his first year of eligibility.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

*This would be the year of eligibility should he be given an exemption.

Let’s update our tally, shall we?       

Award in Question

Percentage of recipients who have entered the HOF

Percentage of recipients by year who have entered the HOF.

NBA MVP

100%

100%

NHL Art Ross

100%

100%

NHL Hart Trophy

93.6%

96.3%

NBA Finals MVP

91.3%

94.9%

NHL Norris

90.5%

96.4%

NHL Ted Lindsay Award

90.0%

 

NBA All-Star Game MVP

89.5%

91.7%

NHL Conn Smythe

74.2%

85.4%

NFL Bert Bell Award

73.7%

71.4%

NFL AP Offensive Player of the Year

73.1%

79.4%

NFL AP MVP

68.3%

74.0%

NFL Walter Payton Man of the Year

66.7%

66.7%

NHL Lady Byng

63.8%

76.0%

NFL Defensive Player of the Year

60.8%

71.1%

NFL Super Bowl MVP

60.6%

64.9%

NHL Mark Messier Leadership Award

60.0%

60.0%

NBA Defensive Player of the Year

58.3%

56.5%

NHL Vezina

57.1%

66.3%

NBA Rookie of the Year

56.5%

56.5%

MLB MVP

55.0%

60.2%

NFL Pro Bowl MVP

52.3%

54.8%

MLB Lou Gehrig Award

51.9%

51.9%

MLB Roberto Clemente Award

47.4%

47.4%

NHL Calder Trophy

46.5%

46.5%

NBA J. Walter Kennedy Citizenship Award

46.0%

46.0%

MLB/NL/AL Cy Young Award

44.4%

55.4%

MLB All-Star Game MVP

41.3%

44.0%

MLB Babe Ruth Award

37.0%

39.3%

NHL King Clancy Award

36.8%

36.8%

NHL Frank J. Selke Trophy

33.3%

36.7%

MLB World Series MVP

33.3%

36.8%

MLB Hutch Award

33.1%

33.1%

NFL Offensive Rookie of the Year

28.6%

28.6%

NHL Bill Masterton Memorial Trophy

27.9%

27.9%

MLB Edgar Martinez Award

26.7%

17.2%

MLB Delivery Man of the Year

25.0%

50.0%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Designated Hitter)

25.0%

30.8%

MLB Comeback Player of the Year

25.0%

25.0%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Shortstop)

23.5%

52.6%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove

21.7%

36.8%

NHL William M. Jennings Trophy

20.7%

40.4%

NFL Defensive Rookie of the Year

20.6%

20.6%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Catcher)

20.0%

22.5%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Second Base)

18.8%

39.8%

MLB Rolaids Reliever of the Year

18.6%

33.3%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Shortstop)

18.2%

35.1%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Pitcher)

18.2%

20.1%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Second Base)

16.7%

32.7%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Outfield)

16.7%

30.1%

MLB NLCS/ALCS MVP

16.1%

15.3%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Outfield)

15.7%

25.2%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Third Base)

14.3%

14.3%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Third Base)

13.6%

14.3%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (First Base)

13.6%

13.3%

MLB (NL/AL) Rookie of the Year

13.3%

13.3%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Catcher)

10.3%

15.2%

MLB Hank Aaron Award

9.1%

14.3%

NBA Most Improved Player of the Year

5.3%

3.2%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (First Base)

3.8%

3.2%

NFL AP Comeback Player of the Year

0.0%

0.0%

So, who is up next?

The following are the players who have won the All-Star Game in MLB who have retired but have not met the mandatory years out of the game to qualify for the Baseball Hall of Fame: 

2010 Brian McCann, Atlanta Braves, Catcher, 1 for 3, 1 2B, 3 RBI.   

McCann was a seven-time All-Star, with this season being the fifth of them.  This was his only Silver Slugger year, and the only one where he added an MVP vote; 21st.   McCann had 21 Home Runs this year. 

Eligible In 2025. 

2012 Melky Cabrera, San Francisco Giants, Outfield, 2 for 3, 1 R, 1 HR, 3 RBI.   

This was the only year that Cabrera was a Giant, and coincidentally the only season he was an All-Star.  Cabrera batted .346 with 159 Hits, but his campaign was struck short when he was suspended 50 Games due to PED use.  The Giants went on to win the World Series that year, without him in the lineup. 

Eligible In 2025. 

2012 Melky Cabrera, San Francisco Giants, Outfield, 2 for 3, 1 R, 1 HR, 3 RBI.   

This was the only year that Cabrera was a Giant, and coincidentally the only season he was an All-Star.  Cabrera batted .346 with 159 Hits, but his campaign was struck short when he was suspended 50 Games due to PED use.  The Giants went on to win the World Series that year, without him in the lineup. 

Eligible In 2025. 

2017 Robinson Cano, Seattle Mariners, Second Base, 2 for 3, 1 R, 1 HR, 3 RBI.   

Cano went to his eighth and final All-Star Game this year, and he would smack 23 Home Runs with 97 RBIs this year.  He would also bat .280. 

Eligible In 2026. 

The following are the past players who have won the MLB All-Star Game MVP who are eligible for the Baseball Hall of Fame and are still active.

2014 Mike Trout, Los Angeles Angels, Outfield, 2 for 3, 1 R, 1 2B, 1 3B, 2 RBI.   

An All-Star for the third time, Trout won his first MVP, two years after he was the Rookie of the Year.  Trout led the AL in Runs (115) and RBIs (111) and would also belt 36 Home Runs with an OPS of .939.  Trout also win his third Silver Slugger.

30 Years Old, Playing for the Los Angeles Angels.

2015 Mike Trout, Los Angeles Angels, Outfield, 1 for 2, 1 R, 1 HR, 1 BB, 1 RBI. (2)  

Trout became the first player to become back-to-back All-Star Game MVPs and he was second for the MVP.  He also was a Silver Slugger, and the Slugging Champion (.590) with 41 Home Runs and a .299 Batting Average.

30 Years Old, Playing for the Los Angeles Angels.

2016 Eric Hosmer, Kansas City Royals, First Base, 2 for 3, 1 R, 1 HR, 2 RBI.   

To date, this was Hosmer’s only All-Star Game, and he would belt 25 Home Runs with 104 RBIs this year.  He also batted .263.

31 Years Old, Playing for the San Diego Padres.

2018 Alex Bregman, Houston Astros, Third Base, 1 for 3, 1 R, 1 HR, 1 RBI.   

This was Bregman’s first All-Star Game, and he would lead the American League in Doubles (51), and had 31 Home Runs, 103 RBIs and a .926 OPS.  He finished fifth in MVP voting.

28 Years Old, Playing for the Houston Astros.

2019 Shane Bieber, Cleveland Indians, Pitcher, 1 IP, 0 H, 0 BB, 0 ER, 3 S0.

Bieber was an All-Star for the first time, and he led the AL in BB/9 (1.7), with a 15-6 Record with 259 Strikeouts and a 3.28 ERA.  He was fourth in Cy Young voting.

27 Years Old, Playing for the Cleveland Indians.

2021 Vladimir Guerrero Jr., Toronto Blue Jays, First Base, 1 for 2, 1 R, 1 HR, 1 RBI.

Guerrero Jr. led the AL in Runs Scored (122), Home Runs (58), On Base Percentage (.401), Slugging Percentage (.601) and OPS (1.002), while having 121 RBIs and batting .311.  He won the Silver Slugger and was the runner up to Shohei Ohtani for the MVP.

23 Years Old, Playing for the Toronto Blue Jays.

So, what is up next?

We go back to Basketball, with the Sixth Man of the Year.

As always, we thank you for your support, and look for that soon.

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Committee Chairman

Kirk Buchner, "The Committee Chairman", is the owner and operator of the site.  Kirk can be contacted at [email protected] . Email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

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