Now that the NBA Finals are over and the 2018/19 Season has officially been brought to a close, we can turn our attention to what we always do here at Notinhalloffame.com, look at the next Basketball Hall of Fame Class!

People who thought the 2018 Hall of Fame class was stacked, with Jason Kidd, Steve Nash, Grant Hill, and Ray Allen, will gawk at the 2020 eligibles say Paruk from SBD. The top-three players in this class -- Tim Duncan, Kobe Bryant, and Kevin Garnett -- are arguably the three most-accomplished players ever to become eligible at the same time. The trio has 11 NBA titles and 48 All-Star Game nods between them, and they are all 100%, iron-clad locks to be inducted in their first year of eligibility.

Every single one of them is bona fide headliners but if you are looking for a quadruple threat like 2018 remember that the forced end of Chris Bosh’s career in 2016 makes him also Hall of Fame eligible for 2020 and he too has a first ballot resume.

Even with the retirements this year of Dwyane Wade, Dirk Nowitzki and Tony Parker (all of whom will be eligible for the Class of 2023) we may never see a more loaded group in any Basketball Hall of Fame Class.

We will go one step further and state that this is the most star-studded group of any North American Athletic Hall of Fame Class in the 21stCentury.

One thing is for sure is that this will be the hottest Hall of Fame ticket of any kind in the year of 2020!

There are a but a few sporting events that have such a massive following in the western world as the Baseball World Series. Just like the NBA is to basketball and the NFL to football, Major League Baseball has tremendous appeal not only in The United States of America but also in countries such as Canada and Japan.

We here at Notinhalloffame.com thought it would be fun to take a look at the major awards in North American team sports and see how it translates into Hall of Fame potential.

Needless to say, different awards in different sports yield hall of fame potential.  In basketball, the team sport with the least number of players on a roster, the dividend for greatness much higher.  In baseball, it is not as much as a great individual season does not have the same impact.

For our next selection we look at the Babe Ruth Award, which until 2007 only constituted the MVP of the World Series, which may seem like overkill considering it is secondary to the World Series MVP, which is awarded right after the World Series.  The Babe Ruth Award is given a few weeks after.  Incidentally, the Babe Ruth Award is older than the World Series MVP, but as it is not sanctioned by Major League Baseball it is not considered nearly as prestigious, but we aren’t letting that stop us here at Notinhalloffame.com!

So, how many Babe Ruth Award winners have been enshrined in the Baseball Hall of Fame?

Let’s find out!

The following are the past players who have won the Babe Ruth Award in the MLB who are eligible for the Baseball Hall of Fame and have been enshrined.

Phil Rizzuto, New York Yankees (1951)

The first Hall of Famer who was also a Babe Ruth Award winner is fittingly a New York Yankee.  Phil Rizzuto played his entire career with the Yankees and he would win the World Series seven times, this being his fifth.  In the Fall Classic, “Scooter” would bat .320 with 8 Hits and a Home Run in New York’s six game win over their crosstown rival, the New York Giants.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1994.

Johnny Mize, New York Yankees (1952)

The Yankees would generate their fourth (in four) straight Babe Ruth winner and this one is especially sweet.  Mize was very late in his career and was a bench player at this stage but he was still clutch and in the 1952 World Series five game win over the Brooklyn Dodgers, he batted .400 with 3 Home Runs and 6 Runs Batted In. He would only play one more year in the Majors.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1981.

Bill Mazeroski, Pittsburgh Pirates (1960)

Bill Mazeroski batted .320 in the World Series with a pair of Home Runs, one of which being the most famous in World Series history as he blasted a walk-off dinger in Game 7, to date the only one of its kind.  Despite the heroics and overall good series (he also had 5 Runs Batted In and a .960 OPS) Bobby Richardson of the New York Yankees (.367 and 12 RBIs) won the World Series MVP despite being on the losing team. As for Mazeroski, he was a seven-time All-Star, eight-time Gold Glove recipient but only had a career On Base Percentage of .299.  The chances are that had Mazeroski not had that World Series winning Home Run we have to wonder if he would have gotten into the Hall of Fame without it.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2001.

Whitey Ford, New York Yankees (1961)

This was the best season of Whitey Ford’s career, though this was 1961 where most people remember the Roger Maris home run chase.  Ford went 25 and 4 won the Cy Young Award and in the 1961 World Series he went 2 and 0 with 14 Innings of scoreless baseball with a 0.500 WHIP.  Ford would also win the World Series MVP this year.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1974.

Sandy Koufax, Los Angeles Dodgers (1963)

This was about as good as a season as you can get as Sandy Koufax won the National League’s Triple Crown with 25 Wins, a 1.88 ERA, 306 Strikeouts and he also had a 0.875 WHIP.  Not only did Koufax win the Cy Young, he was also the MVP.  He kept his dominance in the post-season going 2 and 0 with a 1.50 ERA in their win over the Minnesota Twins.  Koufax also won the World Series MVP.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1972.

Bob Gibson, St. Louis Cardinals(1964)

Gibson had a good 1964 but this year’s World Series was arguably the coming out party of the dominance that was to come as he would go on to win the Cy Young Award twice and the MVP once.  Gibson would go 2 and 1 completing all three games with a 3.00 ERA.  He would also win the World Series MVP.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1981.

Sandy Koufax, Los Angeles Dodgers (2) (1965)

This was almost a carbon copy season of 1963 where Koufax again won the Pitcher’s Triple Crown (26 Wins, 2.04 ERA and 382 Strikeouts) and he would again win the Cy Young and have a WHIP under 0.900.  The only thing he didn’t so was win the MVP (he was second) but in the 1965 World Series he went 2 and 1 over 24 Innings and an ERA of 0.38. Koufax played one more year in baseball before retiring at the peak of his career.  Historically speaking this is the first time that there was a repeat winner for the Babe Ruth Award.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1972.

Frank Robinson, Baltimore Orioles(1966)

Robinson made a lot of history in 1966 as in his first season in Baltimore he won the MVP, making him the first player in baseball history to win the MVP in both leagues (he won the NL version in Cincinnati in 1961).  He would also lead his Orioles to their first World Series win since they moved east from St. Louis.  In the World Series, Robinson batted .286 with a pair of Home Runs in their sweep over the Los Angeles Dodgers.   Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1982.

Lou Brock, St. Louis Cardinals(1967)

Lou Brock is without question one of the greatest tablesetters in baseball history and he did exactly what you would expect him to do in the World Series where he batted .414, had 7 Stolen Bases and 8 Runs. This year was his first of six All-Star trips and he retired with the all-time record in Stolen Bases.  With all due respect to Brock, the World Series MVP was awarded to Bob Gibson who won three Games with a 1.00 ERA and a 0.704 WHIP.  That was the better choice.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1985.

Brooks Robinson, Baltimore Orioles(1970)

Brooks Robinson is one of the best defensive players the game of baseball has ever seen and his bat wasn’t too shabby either.  In the 1970 World Series, Robinson batted .429 with a pair of Home Runs and six RBIs.  He would simultaneously win the World Series MVP.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1983.

Roberto Clemente, Pittsburgh Pirates(1971)

Roberto Clemente is one of the few players who when you say the word, “legend”, there is no inaccuracy in the statement.  Clemente was a 12-time All-Star who had an even 3,000 Hits and probably would have had more had he not perished in a plane crash in 1972.  In 1971, Clemente would lead Pittsburgh to the World Series (his second) and he would bat .414 with two Home Runs in Pittsburgh’s win over Baltimore.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1973.

Johnny Bench, Cincinnati Reds(1976)

The Catcher of “The Big Red Machine” was in the middle of a career that had already seen him win two National League MVP Awards and a World Series the year before.  Bench would bat .533 with a pair of Home Runs in this version of the Fall Classic.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1989.

Reggie Jackson, Oakland Athletics(1977)

Reggie Jackson had already won the World Series MVP (but not the Babe Ruth Award) in 1973 as an Oakland Athletic, but it was his 1977 performance as a New York Yankee that made him forever a legend.  Jackson blasted five Home Runs in the World Series, including three in Game 6, making him the first to do that since Babe Ruth did it in 1928.  Jackson also batted .450 with a 54 On Base Percentage.  This is where he got the nickname of “Mr. October”.  Jackson of course would also win the World Series MVP. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1993.

Willie Stargell, Pittsburgh Pirates(1979)

Willie Stargell was deep into back nine of his career but he shot an eagle in 1979 winning the National League MVP and in the World Series he batted .400 with three Home Runs in their seven game win over the Baltimore Orioles. He would notably also win the NLCS MV batting .455 with two Home Runs against Cincinnati.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1988.

Bruce Sutter, St. Louis Cardinals(1982)

Bruce Sutter was one of the most dominating closers of his day and he was named the Cy Young Award winner in 1979.  In 1982 he would lead the National League in Saves for the fourth straight year and in the World Series he had two more, but had an ERA of 4.70. Sutter would not win the World Series MVP as Darrell Porter would earn that accolade along with the NLCS MVP.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2006.

Jack Morris, Detroit Tigers(1984)

The Detroit Tigers were the dominating team of 1984 and Jack Morris was their ace.  In the 1984 World Series he would win both his starts with 13 Strikeouts, a 2.00 ERA and a WHIP of 0.889.  He would not win the World Series MVP as that went to the Tigers’ Shortstop, Alan Trammell. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2018.

Jack Morris, Minnesota Twins (2)(1991)

In the thrilling seven game series against the Atlanta Braves, Jack Morris would win his second Babe Ruth Award when he went 2 and 0 over 23 Innings and a 1.17 ERA.  His heroic 10 Inning shutout win in Game 7 will never (and should never) be forgotten. This time, Morris would be named the World Series MVP.  It should be mentioned that whether or not the Baseball Hall of Fame Veteran’s Committee were on the fence about his overall stats, his post-season exploits had to put him over the top.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2018.

Dave Winfield, Toronto Blue Jays(1992)

For the first time ever the World Series Championship left the United States as the Toronto Blue Jays would win it all in 1992.  Winfield batted .227 with 5 RBs, including the series winning double in Game 6.  Winfield did not win the World Series MVP as that went to Jays Catcher, Pat Borders who batted .450.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2001.

Paul Molitor, Toronto Blue Jays(1993)

For the second year in a row the Babe Ruth Award winner was a Toronto Blue Designated Hitter.  Paul Molitor would bat .500 with half of his hits being of the extra-base variety.  He would also accumulate eight RBIs and he was also named the World Series MVP.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2004.

Tom Glavine, Atlanta Braves(1995)

The Atlanta Braves finally won a World Series, though I think we can agree that they should have won a lot more in the 1990s.  Glavine won the Cy Young Award in 1991 and would again in 1998 but in 1995 the Babe Ruth Award and World Series MVP where he went 2 and 0 with a 1.29 ERA, 0.714 WHIP and 11 Strikeouts.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2014.

Mariano Rivera, New York Yankees(1999)

This would be the third of Mariano Rivera’s five World Series Championships and in this World Series he appeared in three games, winning one Game, saving two and allowing zero runs.  Rivera is not just the greatest Relief Pitcher of all-time, he is also the greatest post-season closer.  His overall playoff numbers (all for the Yankees) is 8 and 1 with 42 Saves, 78 Games Finished an ERA of 0.70 and WHIP of 0.759.  Is there any wonder that he would become the first person to enter the Baseball Hall of Fame on a perfect ballot.  He would also win the World Series MVP.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2019.

Randy Johnson, Arizona Diamondbacks(2001)

In 2001, both the Babe Ruth Award and World Series MVP were co-awarded to Randy Johnson and Curt Schilling.  Johnson’s 2001 World Series would see him win all three of his starts with a 1.04 ERA, 0.692 WHIP and strikeout 19 batters.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2015.

The following are the players who have won the Babe Ruth Award in MLB who are eligible for the Baseball Hall of Fame and have not been selected:

Joe Page, New York Yankees (1949)

Joe Page was one of the game’s first relief pitchers of note and in 1949 he had already been to three All-Star Games.  1949 was the third and final straight year that he would finish first in Games Finished and he would record 27 Saves with a 13 and 8 record while also finishing third in MVP voting.  In the World Series five game win over the Brooklyn Dodgers, Page pitched in three games winning one, and saving another with a 2.00 ERA and 1.000 WHIP.  Page did not play enough seasons to qualify for the Baseball Hall of Fame. Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Jerry Coleman, New York Yankees (1950)

For the second year of the award’s inception, a New York Yankee would win the award and like the first winner he did not play enough seasons to be on the Baseball Hall of Fame ballot.  This was the second year for Jerry Coleman in the Majors and it was last (and arguably only) good season.  Coleman was an All-Star for what would be the only time in his career and is 150 Hits and .287 Batting Average were career highs.  The Yankees would win the World Series sweeping the Philadelphia Phillies and he would bat .286 with 4 RBIs.  That was not spectacular, but it was enough.  Notably, this was the second of four World Series that he would win, which was all with the Yankees.  Coleman did not play enough seasons to qualify for the Baseball Hall of Fame.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Billy Martin, New York Yankees (1953)

Five Babe Ruth Awards and five New York Yankees.  This one was one by Billy Martin, who would become more associated with the team later as a Manager.  In 1953, the Second Baseman hit 2 Home Runs with 8 RBIs and a .500 Batting Average in their six-game win over Brooklyn.  Martin was on the ballot for one year in 1967 and received 0.3% of the vote.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Dusty Rhodes, New York Giants (1954)

For the first time ever the Babe Ruth Award did not go to a New York Yankee and of course it couldn’t as the Yanks did not make the post-season for the first time in the awards existence.  Rhodes was a clutch Pinch Hitter throughout the series and while he only batted seven times he had a .667 Batting Average with 2 Home Runs and 7 Runs Batted In.  Rhodes did not play enough seasons to qualify for the Hall of Fame.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Johnny Podres, Brooklyn Dodgers (1955)

This is an important year in regards to the Babe Ruth Award as this is the first year that the World Series MVP was also issued.  This year’s winner (and also of the inaugural World Series MVP) was Johnny Podres who would later be a three time All-Star and would help the Dodgers win two more World Series titles after they relocated to Los Angeles.  In this World Series, Podres threw for 18 Innings with a 2 and 0 record and a 1.00 ERA. This was the only title that the Dodgers would win when the team was located on the East Coast.  Podres was on the ballot for three years and finished as high as 0.8% in both 1975 & 1977.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Don Larsen, New York Yankees (1956)

The Babe Ruth Award returned to the New York Yankees and it went to Don Larsen who made history by throwing what has been to date the only perfect game in World Series history.  The Yankees would beat the Brooklyn Dodgers in seven games and Larsen would go on to have a journeyman’s career going 81 and 91 over 14 seasons and nine teams.   Of course, Larsen would also win the World Series MVP.  Larsen was on the ballot for fifteen years and finished as high as 12.3% in 1979.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Lew Burdette, Milwaukee Braves (1957)

1957 was the first and only time that the Braves would win the World Series while playing in Milwaukee thus making Lew Burdette the only Babe Ruth Award winner (and World Series MVP) who was a Milwaukee Brave.  Burdette had a really good season as he was an All-Star this year and would go 3 and 0 with a 0.67 ERA in the World Series. Milwaukee’s opponents, the New York Yankees, could only muster two runs over 27 Innings.  Burdette was on the ballot for fifteen years and finished as high as 23.2% in 1987.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Elston Howard, New York Yankees (1958)

The choice of Elston Howard for the Babe Ruth Award was a little curious as he only batted .222 in the World Series and none of his four Hits were for extra bases.  He did hit the series winning RBI, which may have been why he won the award.  The World Series MVP was given to Bob Turley, who went 2-1 with a Save and he was also named the Cy Young Award winner that year. This marked the first time that the Babe Ruth Award winner and the World Series MVP went to two different people. He would later be named the American League MVP in 1963.  Howard was on the ballot for fifteen years and finished as high as 20.7% in 1981.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Larry Sherry, Los Angeles Dodgers (1959)

This was the official rookie season for Larry Sherry (he played five games the year before) and he would go on to have a good career as a Relief Pitcher securing 82 Saves.  Sherry assisted the Dodgers in winning the 1959 World Series where he pitched in four games, winning two and saving another two.  Over 12.2 Innings he had an ERA of 0.71 and a WHIP of 0.789.  Sherry was also named the World Series MVP.  Although Sherry was eligible for the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1974, he was not on the ballot.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Ralph Terry, New York Yankees (1962)

This was the best year by far for Ralph Terry who in the regular season won a league leading 23 Games and was an All-Star for the only time in his career.  Terry went 2 and 1 with a 1.80 ERA in their World Series win over the San Francisco Giants. He was also named the World Series MVP. Although Terry was eligible for the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1973, he was not on the ballot.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Mickey Lolich, Detroit Tigers (1968)

The 1968 World Series was expected to be the battle between Bob Gibson of the St. Louis Cardinals and Denny McClain of the Detroit Tigers but the best hurler of the World Series was Mickey Lolich who went 3 and 0 with a 1.67 ERA. Lolich would go on to participate in three All-Star Games and win 217 Games in baseball.  He was also the World Series MVP.  Lolich was on the ballot for fifteen years and finished as high as 25.5% in 1988.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Al Weis, New York Mets (1969)

This is one of the most unlikely winners of the Babe Ruth Award, which was fitting considering that the New York Mets were the most unlikely World Series Champions.  Weis, who never had more than 81 Hits in a season and a career Batting Average of .219. In the 1969 World Series, Weis batted .455 with a Home Run and had an OBP of .529.  Donn Clendenon would be named the World Series MVP as he hit three Home Runs with a Batting Average of .357.  With these two heroes, the name “Miracle Mets” really makes a lot of sense. Although Weis was eligible for the ballot in 1977 he was not on the ballot.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Gene Tenace, Oakland Athletics (1972)

Gene Tenace had only 51 Hits in the regular season but by the playoffs he was the team’s Catcher and in the World Series he would bat .348 with four Home Runs and nine Runs Batted In.  Tenace would later be an All-Star in 1985.  Tenace was on the ballot for one year in 1989 and received 0.2% of the ballot.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Bert Campaneris, Oakland Athletics (1973)

Bert Campaneris was a very good player who had 2,249 Hits, which chances are most of you may not have been aware that he is a member of the 2,000 Hit Club.  In the 1973 World Series he batted .290 with three RBIs.  He did not win the World Series MVP as it was given to Reggie Jackson with a .310 Batting Average with six RBIs.  Campaneris was on the ballot for one year in 1989 and received 3.1% of the ballot.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Dick Green, Oakland Athletics (1974)

While Dick Green had a good defensive series engineering six double plays, he didn’t have a hit in the World Series and only had one walk in fifteen Plate Appearances with one Run and one RBI.  Green retired after the World Series but was not the World Series MVP. That honor was given to Rollie Fingers who pitched in four of the five games with a Win and two Saves.  Although Green was eligible for the Hall of Fame in 1980, he was not on the ballot. Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Luis Tiant, Boston Red Sox (1975)

A lot of history with this award took place in 1975 as for the third year in a row the Babe Ruth winner did not match the World Series MVP. Also for the first and only time this award was given to the losing team of the World Series.  The winner, Luis Tiant went 2 and 0 in three games, pitching 25 Innings with a 3.60 ERA.  Pete Rose was named the World Series MVP.  Tiant was on the ballot for 15 years finishing as high as 30.9% in 1988.  Ranked #34 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Bucky Dent, New York Yankees (1978)

Bucky Dent was not known for being a great hitter but in 1978 he was clutch.  Prior to the World Series, Dent hit a three run Home Run to win a one game playoff against the Boston Red Sox to get them into the playoffs.  In the World Series, Dent batted .417 with seven Runs Batted In and he would also be named the World Series MVP.  Dent was on the ballot for one year in 1990 and received 0.7% of the vote.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Tug McGraw, Philadelphia Phillies (1980)

Tug McGraw went 1 and 1 with a 1.17 ERA where he pitched in four of the games in the Phillies’ first World Series win.  This was McGraw’s second World Series championship as he would win his first with the New York Mets in 1969.  McGraw would not win the World Series MVP as that went to Mike Schmidt who batted .381 with two Home Runs and seven RBIs.  McGraw was on the ballot for one year in 1990 and received 1.4% of the vote.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Ron Cey, Los Angeles Dodgers (1981)

Arguably, the best seasons of Ron Cey were behind him as his six All-Star Games were behind him but the Third Baseman was still good and in the 1980 World Series, he would bat .350 with a Home Run and six Runs Batted In. Cey would also be named the World Series MVP.  Cey was on the ballot for one year in 1993 and received 1.9% of the vote.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Rick Dempsey, Baltimore Orioles (1983)

Light hitting but defensively brilliant, Rick Dempsey was an unlikely post-season hero but in the 1983 World Series the Catcher would bat .385 with all five of his hits being extra bases (four doubles and a home run). Dempsey would also be named the World Series MVP.  Cey was on the ballot for one year in 1998 and received 0.2% of the vote.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Bret Saberhagen, Kansas City Royals (1985)

Saberhagen would win the first of two Cy Youngs in 1985 and he took the Royals to win their first World Series.  He would win both of his starts in the World Series with a 0.50 ERA and a WHIP of 0.667.  Saberhagen was on the ballot for one year in 2007 and received 1.3% of the vote.  Ranked #67 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Ray Knight, New York Mets (1986)

Ray Knight would bat .391 in the World Series and he would hit the series winning Home Run in the 7thInning of Game 7.  Knight, who would have five Runs Batted In would also win the World Series MVP.  Knight was on the ballot for one year in 1994 and received 0.2% of the vote.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Frank Viola, Minnesota Twins (1987)

Viola finished 6thin Cy Young voting this year and would hurl the Twins to their first World Series win since they relocated to Minnesota from Washington.  Viola went 2 and 1 with 16 Strikeouts and would also be the World Series MVP. Viola would win the American League Cy Young the year after.  Viola was on the ballot for one year in 2002 and received 0.4% of the vote.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Orel Hershiser, Los Angeles Dodgers (1988)

1988 was a dream season for Orel Hershiser as he would win the National League Cy Young Award and would follow that up with the NLCS and World Series MVP.  In the World Series, Hershiser won both of his starts with a 1.00 ERA, 17 Strikeouts and a 0.722 WHIP.  Hershiser was on the ballot for two years and finished as high as 11.2%.  Ranked #70 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Dave Stewart, Oakland Athletics (1989)

1989 was the third of four straight 20 Win seasons for Dave Stewart who was the ace of a potent offensive Oakland Athletics team.  In the 1989 World Series, he would win both his starts with a 1.69 ERA, 0.750 WHIP and 14 Ks.  He would also win the World Series MVP and would also be named the ALCS MVP the following year.  Stewart was on the ballot for two years and finished as high as 7.4% in 2001.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Billy Hatcher, Cincinnati Reds (1990)

How fitting that the 1990 Babe Ruth Award went to a surprise player considering that the Reds were a surprise themselves sweeping the heavily favored Oakland Athletics.  In the 1990 World Series, Hatcher batted .750 with four Doubles but was not the World Series MVP.  That would go to Jose Rijo who went 2 and 0 with a sparkling Earned Run Average of 0.59. Although Hatcher was eligible for the Hall of Fame in 2001 he was not on the ballot.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Cecil Fielder, New York Yankees (1996)

Cecil Fielder was traded from the Detroit Tigers midway through the season and though his best years were behind him, his greatest team accomplishments were still to come.  Fielder would bat .391 with 2 Runs Batted In in the World Series.  He was not named the World Series MVP as that would go to John Wetteland who saved all four of New York’s wins.  Fielder was on the ballot for one year in 2004 and received 0.2% of the vote.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Moises Alou, Florida Marlins (1997)

Moises Alou was a Florida Marlin for only one season and it was a World Series winning one, the first in franchise history.  Alou would bat .321 with three Home Runs and nine RBIs in the World Series.  Livan Hernandez would win the World Series MVP however as the rookie won both of his starts, though had an ERA of 5.27.  Alou was on the ballot for one year in 2014 and received 1.1% of the vote.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Scott Brosius, New York Yankees (1998)

The New York Yankees would sweep the San Diego Padres, and in the Fall Classic Scott Brosius would bat .471 with a pair of Home Runs. Brosius would help New York win two more World Series Titles.  Brosius was on the ballot for one year in 2007 but did not receive any votes.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Curt Schilling, Arizona Diamondbacks (2001)

Like with the 2001 World Series MVP, Curt Schilling would share the Babe Ruth MVP with Randy Johnson.  Schilling went 1 and 0 with a 1.69 ERA, a 0.656 WHIP with 26 Strikeouts. Schilling has been on the ballot for seven years and has finished as high as 60.9% in 2019.  Ranked #5 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Troy Glaus, Anaheim Angels (2002)

A four-time All-Star, Glaus was enjoying his third straight 100 RBI season.  Glaus would bat .385 with 3 Home Runs and 8 Runs Batted In in the 2002 World Series, which brought the Angels their first title.  Glaus would also be named the World Series MVP.  Glaus was on the ballot for one year in 2016 but did not receive any votes.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Keith Foulke, Boston Red Sox (2004)

The curse ended with the Red Sox sweep of the St. Louis Cardinals and he would finish all four of Boston’s games with one Save and a 1.80 ERA. Foulke would not be named the World Series MVP as that would go to Manny Ramirez.  Although Foulke was eligible for the Hall of Fame in 2014 he was not on the ballot. Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Jermaine Dye, Chicago White Sox (2005)

Also winning the World Series MVP, Jermaine Dye had a really good career where he would have 1,779 Hits and 325 Home Runs.  In the 2005 World Series, he would bat .438 with the series winning RBI.  Dye was on the ballot for one year in 2015 but he did not receive any votes.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

David Eckstein, St. Louis Cardinals (2006)

Eckstein was a two-time All-Star and 2006 was the second of them. The infielder was already a World Series Champion (Anaheim in 2002) and in this World Series he would bat .364 with 4 Runs Batted In.  He would also win the World Series MVP.  Dye was on the ballot for one year in 2015 but he did not receive any votes.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Let’s update our tally, shall we?

Award in Question

Percentage of recipients who have entered the HOF

Percentage of recipients by year who have entered the HOF.

NBA MVP

100%

100%

NHL Norris

90.5%

96.4%

NBA All Star Game MVP

89.5%

91.7%

NHL Conn Smythe

74.2%

85.4%

NHL Lady Byng

63.8%

76.0%

NFL Super Bowl MVP

60.6%

64.9%

NBA Defensive Player of the Year

58.3%

56.5%

NBA Rookie of the Year

56.5%

56.5%

NFL Pro Bowl MVP

52.3%

54.8%

MLB/NL/AL Cy Young Award

44.4%

55.4%

MLB Babe Ruth Award

37.0%

39.3%

NHL Frank J. Selke Trophy

33.3%

36.7%

NFL Offensive Rookie of the Year

28.6%

28.6%

MLB Edgar Martinez Award

26.7%

17.2%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Designated Hitter)

25.0%

30.8%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Shortstop)

23.5%

52.6%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove

21.7%

36.8%

NFL Defensive Rookie of the Year

20.6%

20.6%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Catcher)

20.0%

22.5%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Second Base)

18.8%

39.8%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Shortstop)

18.2%

35.1%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Pitcher)

18.2%

20.1%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Second Base)

16.7%

32.7%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Outfield)

16.7%

30.1%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Outfield)

15.7%

25.2%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Third Base)

14.3%

14.3%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Third Base)

13.6%

14.3%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (First Base)

13.6%

13.3%

MLB (NL/AL) Rookie of the Year

13.3%

13.3%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Catcher)

10.3%

15.2%

NBA Most Improved Player of the Year

5.3%

3.2%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (First Base)

3.8%

3.2%

So, who is up next?

The following are the players who have won the Babe Ruth Award in the Major League Baseball who have retired but have not met the mandatory years out of the game to qualify for the Baseball Hall of Fame:

Derek Jeter, New York Yankees (2000)

This was the Yankees fourth World Series win in five years and this one was the battle of New York.  The Yankees defeated the Mets in five games and he batted .409 with two Home Runs.  Jeter would also win the World Series MVP.  Eligible for the Baseball Hall of Fame in 2020.

Josh Beckett, Florida Marlins (2003)

In the second World Series Championship for the Marlins, Josh Beckett went 1 and 1 with a 1.10 ERA, 19 Strikeouts and a WHIP of 0.714. Beckett would go on to win the ALCS MVP for Boston and help the team win the 2007 World Series.  He would win 138 Games over his career.  Eligible for the Baseball Hall of Fame in 2020.

Jonathan Papelbon, Boston Red Sox (2007)

This was the start of a new era for the Babe Ruth Award now covered the entire post-season as opposed to just the World Series.  Papelbon was in his second season as Boston’s closer and in the post-season he would win one game, record four Saves and would not allow a run in 10.2 Innings of work.  Mike Lowell would be named the World Series MVP.  Eligible for the Baseball Hall of Fame in 2022.

Alex Rodriguez, New York Yankees (2009)

Alex Rodriguez was often criticized for his lack of playoff success but in 2009 he was a huge part of the Yankees’ success in the 2009 World Series. A-Rod’s playoffs would see him bat .365 with 6 Home Runs and 18 Runs Batted In, but he would not win the World Series MVP as that would go to Mariano Rivera.  Eligible for the Baseball Hall of Fame in 2021.

Tim Lincecum, San Francisco Giants (2010)

Tim Lincecum finished 10thin Cy Young voting this year and he won the award the two years previously.  Lincecum would have an excellent playoff with a 4 and 1 record and 2.43 ERA with 43 Strikeouts.  Lincecum would be a member of San Francisco’s 2012 and 2014 World Series wins but he was not nearly as productive as he was here.  Eligible for the Baseball Hall of Fame in 2022.

David Ortiz, Boston Red Sox (2013)

“Big Papi” would win his third World Series ring and he saved the best for last.  Ortiz would hammer five playoff Home Runs with a .353 Batting Average.  He would also win the Worod Series MVP Award.  Eligible for the Baseball Hall of Fame in 2022.

The following are the players who have won the Babe Ruth Award who are still active.

Cole Hamels, Philadelphia Phillies (2008)

In Cole Hamels’ five post-season starts he would go 4 and 0 with a 1.80 ERA. He would also win the World Series MVP and the National League NLCS MVP.  35 Years Old, Playing for the Chicago Cubs.

David Freese, St. Louis Cardinals (2011)

Who else could win this in 2011 other than David Freese?  Freese, who would also win the NLCS and World Series MVP would set playoff records with 50 Extra Base Hits and 21 RBIs and he would bat .397 with five Home Runs.  36 Years Old, Playing for the Los Angeles Dodgers.

Pablo Sandoval, San Francisco Giants (2012)

“Panda” captured the imagination of the Baseball world in 2012 where the popular figure had six post-season Home Runs with 13 RBIs and a .364 Batting Average.  The Third Baseman would also win the World Series MVP and was a member of both the 2010 and 2014 World Series Title with the Giants.  32 Years Old, Playing for the San Francisco Giants.

Madison Bumgarner, San Francisco Giants (2014)

Bumgarner was in the second year of a four-year All-Star stretch and like many of his teammates, he was a part of San Francisco’s 2010 and 2012 World Series wins.  Bumgarner, who also won the World Series and NLCS MVP went 4 and 1 with a 1.03 ERA over 52.2 Innings Pitched.  He would also record the Save in Game 7 of the World Series,.  29 Years Old, Playing for the San Francisco Giants.

Wade Davis, Kansas City Royals (2015)

Davis pitched in eight games, recording a Win, four saves and striking out 18 batters over 10.2 scoreless Innings.  Salvador Perez would be named the World Series MVP.  33 Years Old, Playing for the Colorado Rockies.

Jon Lester, Chicago Cubs (2016)

Lester was named to his third All-Star game and he was already a two-time World Series Champion with the Boston Red Sox.  Lester was a vital part of the Cubs first win in over a century and he was the NLCS MVP while going 3 and 1 with a 2.02 ERA with 30 Strikeouts. The World Series MVP would not go to Lester but to Ben Zobrist.  35 Years Old, Playing for the Chicago Cubs.

Jose Altuve, Houston Astros (2017)

The Babe Ruth Award had a co-winner for the first time since 2001 and in the first World Series win for the Houston Astros, Jose Altuve would go yard seven times in the playoffs with 14 RBIs and a .310 Batting Average.  Neither Altive or his co-winner, Justin Verlander would win the World Series MVP, as that would go to George Springer.  29 Years Old, Playing for the Houston Astros.

Justin Verlander, Houston Astros (2017)

Verlander accomplished what he could not do in Detroit by winning a World Series with the Houston Astros and the move was a rejuvenation of sorts as he returned to elite form.  Verlander went 4 and 1 over 36.2 Innings with 38 Strikeouts.  He did not win the World Series MVP as that would go to George Springer, but he was the ALCS MVP.  35 Years Old, Playing for the Houston Astros.

David Price, Boston Red Sox (2018)

David Price had a bad appearance in the ALDS against the New York Yankees, but he rebounded with three wins in the rest of the playoffs including wins in Game 2 and 5 in the World Series.  Price would not be named the World Series MVP, as that would go to Steve Pearce.  32 Years Old, Playing for the Boston Red Sox.

The Babe Ruth Award winners are all over the map in terms of legends, one-offs and everything in between.

Up next, we are going to stay within the tertiary Baseball Awards and look at the Roberto Clemente Award.

As always, we thank you for that support and look for that soon!

We here at Notinhalloffame.com thought it would be fun to take a look at the major awards in North American team sports and see how it translates into Hall of Fame potential.

Needless to say, different awards in different sports yield hall of fame potential.  In basketball, the team sport with the least amount of players on a roster, the dividend for greatness much higher.  In baseball, it is not as much as a great individual season does not have the same impact.

For our next selection we look at the Pro Bowl MVP, which admittedly does not mean so much as the game is not exactly hotly contested but you have to be a really good player to get there.  How many of these past winners have made the Pro Football Hall of Fame?

Let’s find out!

But before we do that…

Usually when we isolate the winner, we mention the accomplishments of the year.  We will do that in addition to what transpired in the Pro Bowl Game itself…if there is any reason to in this annual dud of a game.

The following are the past players who have been named the Pro Bowl MVP in the NFL who are eligible for the Pro Football Hall of Fame and have been enshrined.

Otto Graham, Cleveland Browns (1950)

The Pro Bowl was resurrected after last being played in the form of an All Star Game in 1942.  Graham had just taken the Cleveland Browns to the NFL Championship and was a First Team All Pro the three years before.  The Browns were previously in the AAFC and had won the title the last four years.  This was the icing on the cake that showed that the Cleveland Browns belonged in the NFL and Graham was one of the game’s biggest stars.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1965.

Chuck Bednarik, Philadelphia Eagles (1953)

This was Chuck Bednarik fourth of eight Pro Bowls and he had already helped the Philadelphia Eagles win the NFL Championship as a rookie in 1949. He was a two way player (one of the last who did so regularly and “Concrete Charlie” was also a First Team All Pro six times.  He helped the Eagles win the title again in 1960.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1967.

Ollie Matson, Chicago Cardinals (1955)

In his first five seasons in the NFL, Matson was a Pro Bowler and a First Team All Prom this being the third year of that run.  Matson was also an Olympian, winning a bronze medal in the 400m sprint and a silver in 4 x 400 relay at the 1952 Helsinki Games.  He would later play for the Los Angeles Rams, Detroit Lions and Philadelphia Eagles.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1972.

Ernie Stautner, Pittsburgh Steelers (1956)

Stautner was named the Co-MVP as the game’s outstanding lineman. This was his fourth Pro Bowl and he would go to five more.  He was a First Team All Pro in 1958 and he played all 173 of his Games as a Pittsburgh Steeler.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1969.

Hugh McElhenny, San Francisco 49ers (1957)

This was the fourth Pro Bowl for McElhenny who would go to two more after this one.  He rushed for 478 Yards and caught 37 passes for 458 Yards in 1957.  He would have over 10,000 Yards from Scrimmage, which was a really good number for that era.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1970.

Frank Gifford, New York Giants (1958)

This would be Gifford’s seventh of eight straight Pro Bowls and he was a First Team All Pro for the fifth time and he would add a sixth the following season.  Gifford was a Champion in 1956, which was the year he also won the MVP.  He would become better known as a commentator for Monday Night Football for 27 years.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1970.

Doug Atkins, New York Giants (1958)

The Co MVP of the 1958 Pro Bowl, Doug Atkins would be named the most Outstanding Lineman of the game.  Atkins went to the Pro Bowl for the second of seven straight (he went to eight overall) and this was also his first of four First Team All-Pro Selections. Atkins was a champion in 1954 with the Cleveland Browns and would later help the Chicago Bears win it all in 1963. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1970.

Johnny Unitas, Baltimore Colts (1959)

1959 was the year of Johnny Unitas.  In 1958 he took the Baltimore Colts to the NFL Championship and he would do it again in 1959 where he was also named the MVP of the NFL.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1970.

Johnny Unitas, Baltimore Colts (2) (1960)

Johnny Unitas would become the first player to win the Pro Bowl MVP twice though it was a questionable decision as Norm Van Brocklin threw for a then record 288 Yards and three Touchdowns and this was his last game ever.  Jim Taylor also had three TDs, yet somehow the accolade went to the very popular Johnny Unitas.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1970.

Sam Huff, Baltimore Colts (1960)

Sam Huff was the fifth and final player to be named the (co)-MVP of the Pro Bowl when they were giving that out to the best Lineman of the game. Huff would help the New York Giants win the 1956 Championship as a rookie and this would be his third of five Pro Bowls.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1982.

Jim Brown, Cleveland Browns (1961)

We will (again) go on record and state that Jim Brown is the greatest Running Back who ever played.  Brown played nine seasons in the NFL and he was named to the Pro Bowl in every single one of them.  This was his fifth year in the league and he won the Rushing Title in every single one of them as well as being named a First Team All-Pro.  Brown had was named the MVP in 1957 and 1958.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1971.

Jim Brown, Cleveland Browns (2) (1962)

Brown won his second Pro Bowl MVP and this was the only season that he was not named a First Team All-Pro or win the Rushing Title, though he would in his next three seasons in the NFL.  He would win his third MVP in 1965, his last in the NFL and he would also help the Cleveland Browns in 1964.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1971.

Johnny Unitas, Baltimore Colts (3) (1963)

Johnny Unitas made history again by winning his third Pro Bowl MVP, becoming the first person to do so.  Unitas was named “Back of the Game” while fellow Baltimore Colt, Gino Marchetti was named the “Lineman” of the Game.  Over his career, Unitas would go to 10 Pro Bowls and was a five time First Team All-Pro.  He would also be a three-time NFL Champion and three-time MVP.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1970.

Gino Marchetti, Baltimore Colts (1963)

Named the Lineman of the Game (thus Co-MVP) Gino Marchetti won this along with another Colt, Johnny Unitas.  Marchetti was chosen for 11 Pro Bowls, all consecutive and this was his tenth. Marhcetti was a two-time NFL Champion and a seven-time First Team All-Pro.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1972.

Fran Tarkenton, Minnesota Vikings (1964)

Tarkenton threw for 172 Yards earning him “Back of the Game”. The “Scrambler’s” career was just getting going as this was his first of nine Pro Bowls.  Tarkenton would take the Vikings to three Super Bowl appearances and he was the MVP in 1975.  He retired with 47,003 Passing Yards and rushed for another 3,674.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1970.

Jim Brown, Cleveland Browns (3) (1965)

This was the last game that Jim Brown would ever play and he went out like the Football God he was.  He rushed for 65 Yards and was the Back of the Game, A.K.A., the Co-MVP.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1971.

Gale Sayers, Chicago Bears (1966)

This was Gale Sayers’ second Pro Bowl selection and arguably it was the finest season of his career.  The Chicago Bear would lead the NFL in Rushing Yards (1,231), Yards from Scrimmage (1,678) and All-Purpose Yards (2,440) and he was named to his second First Team All-Pro in as many years.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1977.

Gale Sayers, Chicago Bears (2) (1967)

Sayers was the Back of the Game for the second year in a row and again he was named a First Team All-Pro.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1977.

Dave Robinson, Green Bay Packers (1967)

Dave Robinson went to three Pro Bowls this being his second one. Robinson would be named a First Team All-Pro this season and he was a three-time NFL Champion with the Green Bay Packers.  His Hall of Fame induction would take place via the Senior Committee.   Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2013.

Merlin Olsen, Los Angeles Rams (1968)

Merlin Olsen was named the Lineman of the Game and it was an all-Ram affair as his Quarterback, Roman Gabriel was named the “Back of the Game”. The Defensive Tackle went to 14 straight Pro Bowls (1962-75) and he was in the middle of five straight First Team All-Pro Selections.  He entered the Pro Football Hall of Fame on his first year of eligibility.   Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1982.

Gale Sayers, Chicago Bears (3) (1969)

Gale Sayers became the third player to be named a Pro Bowl MVP three times.  This was the end of an era for Sayers as this was his fifth and final Pro Bowl and he would also win his second Rushing Title.  Sayers would suffer a severe injury and was limited in what he could do. He retired after the 1971 season and he would be inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame in his first year of eligibility.  He was the youngest person ever to enter the Pro Football Hall of Fame.   Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1977.

Mel Renfro, Dallas Cowboys (1970)

In 1970, the Pro Bowl began instituting a new Co-MVP system where there was one winner on offense and one on defense.  Renfro was the 1970’s offensive winner and this was his seventh Pro Bowl of what would be ten straight.  The Defensive Back played his entire career with the Dallas Cowboys and he would help bring the team two Super Bowls (VI & XII).  It should be noted that this is no misprint in terms of offense as he also was a Punt Returner taking two back for a Touchdown in the game.   Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1996.

Jan Stenerud, Kansas City Chiefs (1971)

Jan Stenerud went to six Pro Bowls, four of which being consecutive and this was the last of that stretch.  Stenerud would four times lead the NFL in Field Goal Percentage.  In this Pro Bowl he had three field goals and two extra points.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1991.

Willie Lanier, Kansas City Chiefs (1971)

It was a sweep for the Kansas City Chiefs as his Willie Lanier’s teammate, Jan Stenerud won the Offensive Player MVP to match Lanier’s Defensive Player MVP.  The Linebacker went to eight straight Pro Bowls and this was his fourth.  He had previously aided the Chiefs win Super Bowl IV and he was chosen for three First Team All-Pros, this year being one of them. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1986.

O.J. Simpson, Buffalo Bills (1972)

From 1972 to 1976, O.J. Simpson was the top Running Back in the National Football League and this was the beginning of that stretch.  The Juice won the Rushing Title this year and in the Pro Bowl he rushed for 116 Yards and a Touchdown and caught three passes for 56 Yards.  He was a First Team All-Pro this year and the four years after and he rushed for 11,236 Yards over his career.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1985.

Mel Blount, Pittsburgh Steelers (1976)

The Pittsburgh Steelers were the dynasty of the 1970’s and they generated many Hall of Fame inductees, one of which being Cornerback, Mel Blount. In this season, he was chosen for his second of five Pro Bowls and he helped them win four Super Bowls, two prior and two after this year.  In this Pro Bowl he would record two Interceptions.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1989.

Walter Payton, Chicago Bears (1977)

Walter Payton was one of the greatest Running Backs ever and this was his second of what worked out to be nine Pro Bowls.  “Sweetness” played his entire career with the Chicago Bears and 1977 would see him set his career high of 1,852 Rushing Yards and 2,121 Yards from Scrimmage, both were league leading.  This was also his second of five First Team All-Pro Selections.  In this particular Pro Bowl he rushed for 77 Yards and a Touchdown.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1993.

Kellen Winslow, San Diego Chargers (1981)

Kellen Winslow spent his entire career with the San Diego Chargers where he was a five time Pro Bowl, this being his second trip to the dance. Winslow was a three time a First Team All-Pro with this being the second of the two years where he led the NFL in Receptions.  In this Pro Bowl there was two game MVPs and he was the offensive winner.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1995.

Lee Roy Salmon, Tampa Bay Buccaneers (1981)

Lee Roy Salmon was the co-winner of the Pro Bowl MVP and was the first Tampa Bay Buccaneer to win the Pro Bowl MVP.  Salmon went to six Pro Bowls, and this was his third.  He was also named the 1979 AP Defensive Player of the Year.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1995.

Dan Fouts, San Diego Chargers (1982)

Dan Fouts is one of the best Quarterbacks of his day and this was the fourth of his sixth Pro Bowls.  The Quarterback spent his entire NFL career with the San Diego Chargers and he was a First Team All Pro this year.  In this Pro Bowl he would throw for 274 Yards and a Touchdown and was the Co-MVP.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1993.

Reggie White, Philadelphia Eagles (1986)

This was the first Pro Bowl for Reggie White and it would mark the beginning of a streak that went on until 1998.  White had 18 Quarterback Sacks in 1986 and he would lead the NFL in that category the next two years where “The Minister of Defense” would also be named the Defensive Player of the Year.  Named an eight-time First Team All Pro, White would later in the Super Bowl with the Green Bay Packers.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2006.

Bruce Smith, Buffalo Bills (1987)

Bruce Smith was chosen to play in 11 Pro Bowls and this would be the first one for him.  The Buffalo Bill was named the AFC Defensive Player of the Year and would twice become the NFL Defensive Player of the Year.  He holds the record for Quarterback Sacks with 200 and in the Pro Bowl he would have two.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2009.

Jim Kelly, Buffalo Bills (1990)

Jim Kelly would take the Bills to four straight Super Bowls but the infamously lost them all but this year would be the first of them.  The Bills Quarterback would find some solace winning the Pro Bowl MVP in a game where he threw for 210 Yards and a Touchdown. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2002.

Michael Irvin, Dallas Cowboys (1991)

Playing his entire career with the Dallas Cowboys, Michael Irvin was chosen for five straight Pro Bowls and this was his first one, which would also be the year that he was named a First Team All-Pro and would lead the NFL in Receiving Yards.  He would be a huge part of the Cowboys winning three of the next four years. Irvin caught eight passes for 125 Yards and a Touchdown.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2002.

Marshall Faulk, Indianapolis Colts (1994)

Named to the Pro Bowl as a rookie, Marshall Faulk would go to the Pro Bowl six more times, two with Indianapolis and four with St. Louis. Faulk rushed for 12,279 Yards and was a true dual threat as he also caught 767 receptions for 6,875 Yards. Winning a Super Bowl later in his career with the Rams, in this Pro Bowl he rushed for 180 Yards and a Touchdown while also catching two passes for 27 more Yards.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2011.

Jerry Rice, San Francisco 49ers (1995)

What didn’t Jerry Rice do?  By this time, Rice had been named to his tenth of eleven straight Pro Bowls and he would go two more after.  He had already won the Super Bowl three times with the San Francisco 49ers and was the MVP in one of them.  This year would be the sixth (and final) time that he led the NFL in Receiving Yards and he was on his eighth of nine First Team All-Pro Selections.  Rice is the all-time leader in Receiving Yards with 22,895 and it will be a long time before anyone touches that.  In the Pro Bowl he caught six passes for 82 Yards and a Touchdown.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2010.

Warren Moon, Seattle Seahawks (1997)

Warren Moon had a very long career in football where he was a five time Grey Cup Champion with the Edmonton Eskimos prior to getting his chance at the NFL.  He would go to eight straight Pro Bowls (1988-1995) and in 1997 he went to his last one.  He would throw for 49,325 Yards in the NFL, an incredible amount considering how late he joined.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2006.

Ty Law, New England Patriots (1998)

Ty Law was the Co-MVP of this Pro Bowl, which he shared with Keyshawn Johnson.  This was Law’s first of five Pro Bowls and he was the league leader in Interceptions this year.  Law would later help the New England Patriots win three Super Bowls and in this Pro Bowl he returned an Interception for a Touchdown.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2019.

Randy Moss, Minnesota Vikings (1999)

Randy Moss is one of the game’s most exciting players ever in 1999 he was in his second year in football.  He went to six Pro Bowls, this being his second and he had 15,292 Receiving Yards with 156 Touchdowns over one hell of a career.  In the game, Moss caught 9 passes for 212 Yards with a Touchdown. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2018.

Derrick Brooks, Tampa Bay Buccaneers (2005)

One of the greatest (if not the greatest) defensive players in Buccaneer history, Derrick Brooks won this accolade in what was his tenth of eleven straight Pro Bowls.  Brooks (who would also go to another one before his career ended) led the Buccaneers to their first Super Bowl and in this season, he was chosen for his fifth and final First Team All-Pro.  In this Pro Bowl, the Linebacker had a pick six.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2014.

The following are the players who have won the Pro Bowl MVP in the NFL who are eligible for the Pro Football Hall of Fame and have not been selected:

Dan Towler, Los Angeles Rams (1951)

Towler would also be chosen for the next three Pro Bowls with the season after seeing him being named a First Team All Pro and win the Rushing Title.  The Fullback did not have a long career only playing six years all with Los Angeles.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Don Doll, Detroit Lions (1952)

Doll was in his third season of his four year Pro Bowl streak and he would become the first defensive player to be named the Pro Bowl MVP. Doll was a member of the Detroit Lions 1952 NFL Championship Team though he would be a Washington Redskin the following year.  He only played six years in the NFL.   Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Billy Wilson, San Francisco 49ers (1954)

Billy Wilson was chosen for his first of what would be six consecutive Pro Bowls and he would lead the NFL in Receptions this year.  He would do the same again in 1956 and 1957, the latter being a good enough year to warrant a First Team All Pro nod.  Wilson retired after 1960 playing his entire career with San Francisco.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Bert Rechichar, Baltimore Colts (1956)

Rechichar was the Co-MVP of the Pro Bowl and he was a Defensive Back/Kicker for the Colts.  Rechichar would go to three Pro Bowls, this being his second and at the time of his appearance he held the since broken record of the longest Field Goal of 56 Yards. He had four Interceptions that year. Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Gene Brito, Washington Redskins (1957)

Brito was the Co-MVP as he was named the most Outstanding Lineman. Brito was chosen for five Pro Bowls, this being the fourth and his third and final First Team All-Pro Selection. He was named the NFL Player of the Year in 1955.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Gene Lipscomb, Baltimore Colts (1959)

This was the fourth time that the Pro Bowl would have a Co-MVP that would be given to the best Lineman of the game.  Fittingly, it went to another Baltimore Colt as Johnny Unitas was the other Pro Bowl MVP.  The Colts would win the NFL Championship that year and he was also a First Team All Pro. This was Lipscomb’s second of three Pro Bowls.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Gene Lipscomb, Pittsburgh Steelers (2) (1962)

Lipscomb was a Pittsburgh Steeler making him the first person to win a Pro Bowl MVP with two different teams.  The NFL brought back giving a Co-MVP to the Lineman of the Game, which Lipscomb certainly deserved as he blocked two Field Goals.  This was the last game that “Big Daddy” would play as he dies of a cocaine overdose in May of 1963.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Terry Barr, Detroit Lions (1964)

Barr would go to two Pro Bowls, this being the second where he won the Lineman of the Game Award.  He would play all nine of his seasons with the Detroit Lions and as a rookie he helped the Lions win the NFL Championship.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Dale Meinart, St. Louis Cardinals (1965)

Named the Lineman of the Game, Meinart played nine seasons all with the Cardinals and this was his first of what would be three Pro Bowls.  The Linebacker had previously won two Grey Cups with the Edmonton Eskimos.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Floyd Peters, Philadelphia Eagles (1966)

Named the Lineman of the Game, Peters was chosen for the second of his three Pro Bowls.  He would later be a successful Defensive Coordinator for twenty years in the NFL. Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Roman Gabirel, St. Louis Rams (1968)

This Pro Bowl was all about the St. Louis Rams as Roman Gabriel and Merlin Olsen were named the Back of the Game and Lineman of the Game respectively.  Gabriel would go to four Pro Bowls, this being the second and he would later be would be the MVP the year after.  He threw for 29,444 Yards over his career.  Ranked #37 on Notinhalloffame.com.

George Andrie, Dallas Cowboys (1969)

George Andrie was the first Dallas Cowboy to be named a Pro Bowl MVP when he was named the Lineman of the Game for the 1969 version.  Andrie was a five time Pro Bowl, this being his fifth trip.  He would later help Dallas win Super Bowl VI.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Fred Carr, Green Bay Packers (1970)

Fred Carr would go to three Pro Bowls with this being his first. Carr was chosen as the Defensive MVP and this was the first year where they have an offensive and defensive MVP of the Pro Bowl.  He played all ten of his seasons in the NFL with the Green Bay Packers.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Garo Yepremian, Miami Dolphins (1973)

Yepremian set a still standing record of booting five Field Goals in a Pro Bowl.  The Place Kicker went to three Pro Bowls, this being his second and the first and only year that he would be chosen a First Team All-Pro.  The native of Cyprus would help the Dolphins win two Super Bowls. Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

James Harris, Los Angeles Rams (1974)

This was the only Pro Bowl that James Harris was selected for and he threw for two Touchdowns and 119 Yards.  Harris threw for 1,544 Yards and 11 Touchdowns in 1974 with a 7 and 2 record. He would later play for the San Diego Chargers and prior to his stint with L.A. was a backup for the Buffalo Bills. Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Billy Johnson, Houston Oilers (1975)

Billy “White Shoes” Johnson was one of the greatest return specialists of his day and easily the most exciting.  This was Johnson’s first of what would be three Pro Bowls, the second also coming as an Oiler the last one as an Atlanta.  In the game, Johnson would return a Punt for a 90 Yard Touchdown Return and he also had another return of 55 Yards.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Ahmad Rashad, Minnesota Vikings (1978)

Ahmad Rashad went to four straight Pro Bowls and this was the first of them.  In his 10 year career he caught 495 passes for 6,831 Yards for 44 Touchdowns and in this Pro Bowl he caught five passes for 85 Yards.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Chuck Muncie, New Orleans Saints (1979)

For it was worth, this would be the first of 30 straight Pro Bowls to take place in Honolulu and for the first time a New Orleans Saint would be named the Pro Bowl MVP.  This was the first of three Pro Bowl selections for the Running Back with the other two coming as a San Diego Charger.  Muncie rushed for 1,198 Yards this season and in the Pro Bowl he had rushed for two touchdowns, threw for one and had 79 Yards from Scrimmage.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Eddie Murray, Detroit Lions (1980)

Murray was a rookie this year and he won this award by making four Field Goals in the game.  Murray would later go to two more Pro Bowls and would later win a Super Bowl with the Dallas Cowboys in Super Bowl XXVIII.  He is the first Canadian to win this award.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

John Jefferson, Green Bay Packers (1982)

This was John Jefferson’s fourth and final Pro Bowl appearance and he was the leader in Receiving Yards in 1980.  Jefferson was named the Co-MVP along with his former Quarterback, Dan Fouts, who he played with in San Diego.  In this game he caught four passes for 66 Yards and a Touchdown.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Joe Theismann, Washington Redskins (1983)

This was Joe Theismann’s second and last Pro Bowl but it was capping off the best season he ever had.  The Quarterback was named the NFL Offensive Player of the Year, the MVP and took the Redskins to the a win at Super Bowl XVII.  In Hawaii, he went 21 for 27 for 242 Yards and three Touchdowns. Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Mark Gastineau, New York Jets (1984)

At this point Mark Gastineau was one of the most popular defensive players in the NFL and one of the best.  In 1984 he went to the fourth of five straight Pro Bowls and this was his third and final First Team All Pro Selection.  Gastineau played his entire career with the Jets and in 1984 he led the NFL with 22 Quarterback Sacks.  In the Pro Bowl, Gastineau recorded seven Tackles, and four Sacks.  Ranked #46 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Phil Simms, New York Giants (1985)

Simms only went to two Pro Bowls but he was always considered one of the better Quarterbacks of his day.  Simms would throw for 212 Yards and three TDs in the Pro Bowl.  He would later take the Giants to two Super Bowl wins.  Ranked #57 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Randall Cunningham, Philadelphia Eagles (1988)

One of the most exciting players of his time, Randall Cunningham went to four Pro Bowls with this being his first.  Cunningham would win the Bert Bell Award this year and would win it again two more times.  He would throw for 83 Yards and rush for 49 in this game.  Ranked #33 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Jerry Gray, Los Angeles Rams (1989)

Gray would go to four Pro Bowls, and this was his fourth.  Gray had six picks in the season returning one for a pick six.  The Defensive Back would have six tackles and an interception in the game.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Steve Tasker, Buffalo Bills (1992)

A seven-time Pro Bowl selection, Steve Tasker is considered one of the greatest Special Teams player ever.  Tasker helped the Bills reach four straight (losing) Super Bowls and in this Pro Bowl he recorded four tackles, forced a fumble and blocked a Field Goal. Ranked #88 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Andre Rison, Atlanta Falcons (1993)

Rison was a five time Pro Bowler and this was his fourth of what would be four straight.  The Wide Receiver had a career high of 1,242 Yards and topped the 10,000 mark in total. Rison had six catches for 86 Yards in the game.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Mark Brunell, Jacksonville Jaguars (1996)

Mark Brunell would become the first Jacksonville Jaguar to win the Pro Bowl MVP on what would be his first of three selections.  1996 was an interesting year for Brunell’s as he threw for a league leading 4,367 Yards but also had a TD-INT ratio of 19-20.  In the Pro Bowl he would throw for 236 Yards and a Touchdown.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Keyshawn Johnson, New York Jets (1998)

Keyshawn Johnson went to three Pro Bowls and this was his first as well it being the first season, he had over 1,000 Receiving Yards (1,131). He would accumulate 10,571 Receiving Yards with 64 Touchdowns over his career and he was a key member of Tampa Bay’s first Super Bowl win.  In the Pro Bowl, Johnson had seven Receptions for 87 Yards.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Rich Gannon, Oakland Raiders (2000)

Rich Gannon would go to four straight Pro Bowls (this being his second) but he did so in a somewhat unique fashion as he was in his early 30’s when it started.  Quarterbacking for the Oakland Raiders, in 2000 he would go also be chosen for a First Team All-Pro.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Rich Gannon, Oakland Raiders (2) (2001)

A back-to-back winner, Gannon would have the best season the year after as he was again a First Team All-Pro and he would lead the National Football League in Completions (418) and Passing Yards (4,689) and led the Raiders to the Super Bowl…where they were thrashed by the Tampa Bay Buccaneers. Gannon would suffer injuries in the next two seasons and his career was essentially over after it.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Ricky Williams, Miami Dolphins (2002)

Ricky Williams was known for an awful lot in his career, which included the idiotic trade the New Orleans Saints made to draft him, his pot use and his eccentricities but this was also a Running Back who is a member of the 10,000 Yard club and in 2002 he was a Pro Bowl and First Team All-Pro Selection and his 1,853 Yards won him the Rushing Title.  He would score two Touchdowns in the Pro Bowl.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Marc Bulger, St. Louis Rams (2003)

Marc Bulger went to two Pro Bowls, this being his first where he did not have the best TD-INT line of 22-22 but threw for 3,845 Yards and won 12 Games and took the Rams to the playoffs.  In the game Bulger three for three Touchdowns.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Let’s update our tally, shall we?

Award in Question

Percentage of recipients who have entered the HOF

Percentage of recipients by year who have entered the HOF.

NBA MVP

100%

100%

NHL Norris

90.5%

96.4%

NBA All Star Game MVP

89.5%

91.7%

NHL Conn Smythe

74.2%

85.4%

NHL Lady Byng

63.8%

76.0%

NFL Super Bowl MVP

60.6%

64.9%

NBA Defensive Player of the Year

58.3%

56.5%

NBA Rookie of the Year

56.5%

56.5%

NFL Pro Bowl MVP

52.3%

54.8%

MLB/NL/AL Cy Young Award

44.4%

55.4%

NHL Frank J. Selke Trophy

33.3%

36.7%

NFL Offensive Rookie of the Year

28.6%

28.6%

MLB Edgar Martinez Award

26.7%

17.2%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Designated Hitter)

25.0%

30.8%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Shortstop)

23.5%

52.6%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove

21.7%

36.8%

NFL Defensive Rookie of the Year

20.6%

20.6%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Catcher)

20.0%

22.5%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Second Base)

18.8%

39.8%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Shortstop)

18.2%

35.1%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Pitcher)

18.2%

20.1%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Second Base)

16.7%

32.7%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Outfield)

16.7%

30.1%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Outfield)

15.7%

25.2%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Third Base)

14.3%

14.3%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Third Base)

13.6%

14.3%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (First Base)

13.6%

13.3%

MLB (NL/AL) Rookie of the Year

13.3%

13.3%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Catcher)

10.3%

15.2%

NBA Most Improved Player of the Year

5.3%

3.2%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (First Base)

3.8%

3.2%

So, who is up next?

The following are the players who have won the Pro Bowl MVP in the NFL who have retired but have not met the mandatory years out of the game to qualify for the Pro Football Hall of Fame:

Peyton Manning, Indianapolis Colts (2004)

One of the most prolific Quarterbacks of all-time, Peyton Manning went to 13 Pro Bowls with this being his fourth.  This was also his second of seven First Team All-Pro Selections and he would lead the NFL in Touchdown Passes with 49.  Over his career he would throw for 71,940 Yards and 539 Touchdowns while also taking the Indianapolis Colts and Denver Broncos to Super Bowl wins. He would score three Touchdowns in the game.  Eligible for the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 2021.

Carson Palmer, Cincinnati Bengals (2006)

Carson Palmer went to three Pro Bowls, this being his second also being the second with the Bengals with the third coming as an Arizona Cardinal. Palmer threw for 28 Touchdowns and 4,035 Yards this year and would accumulate 46,247 Yards in total.  Eligible for the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 2023.

DeAngelo Hall, Washington Redskins (2010)

This was the third and final Pro Bowl that DeAngelo Hall would be chosen for and Hall had six Interceptions that season.  In the game Hall returned a fumble for a Touchdown.  Eligible for the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 2023.

Derrick Johnson, Kansas City Chiefs (2013)

In 2013, the Pro Bowl began issuing offensive and defensive Pro Bowl MVPs like they had in the past and Derrick Johnson was the first defensive winner of this new run.  Johnson would go to four Pro Bowls and this was his third.  Eligible for the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 2024.

The following are the players who have won the NFL Pro Bowl MVP who are still active.

Adrian Peterson, Minnesota Vikings (2007)

Adrian Peterson went to the Pro Bowl as a rookie and has gone to six more.  This was his rookie season and he rushed for 1,341 Yards and 12 Touchdowns.  To date he has over 13,000 Rushing Yards and has well over 100 Touchdowns.  He ran for two Touchdowns in the game.  33 Years Old, Playing for the Washington Redskins.

Larry Fitzgerald, Arizona Cardinals (2008)

Larry Fitzgerald was chosen for one First Team All-Pro roster and this was the year.  The Wide Receiver however has been a Pro Bowl fixture as he was named to 11 Pro Bowls, with this being the third.  In this game, Fitzgerald caught five passes for 81 Yards and a pair of TDs.  35 Years Old, Playing for the Arizona Cardinals.

Matt Schaub, Houston Texans (2009)

Matt Schaub went to two Pro Bowls with 2009 being the first.  The Houston Texan led the NFL in Completions (396) and Passing Yards (4,770) and in the Pro Bowl he threw for two Touchdowns. 37 Years Old, Playing for the Atlanta Falcons.

Brandon Marshall, Houston Texans (2011)

Brandon Marshall went to six Pro Bowls and this was his third trip and the only one he would go to as a Miami Dolphin.  The Wide Receiver had a 1,214 Yard Season and to date has over 12,000 Yards.  In this Pro Bowl he would catch a record four Touchdown Passes.  35 Years Old, Free Agent.

Kyle Rudolph, Minnesota Vikings (2012)

This was the first Pro Bowl of Kyle Rudolph’s career and in the game he caught five passes for 129 Yards and a TD.  29 Years Old, Playing for the Minnesota Vikings.

Nick Foles, Philadelphia Eagles (2013)

To date, this is the only Pro Bowl that Nick Foles has gone to. Foles left Philadelphia for two years and came back where he led them to a surprise Super Bowl win when he was their back-up.  29 Years Old, Playing for the Jacksonville Jaguars.

J.J. Watt, Houston Texans (2014)

Watt was the Defensive MVP of the Pro Bowl and this was his third of five Pro Bowls, all of which would see him be named a First Team All-Pro.  29 Years Old, Playing for the Houston Texans.

Matthew Stafford, Detroit Lions (2014)

Matthew Stafford has been one of the better Quarterbacks since he arrived in Detroit but to date 2014 has been his only Pro Bowl arrival.  He had seven straight seasons where he threw for over 4,200 Yards.  31 Years Old, Playing for the Detroit Lions.

Michael Bennett, Seattle Seahawks (2015)

This was Michael Bennett’s first of three straight Pro Bowls and earlier in his career he assisted the Seahawks win the Super Bowl.  33 Years Old, Playing for the Philadelphia Eagles.

Russell Wilson, Seattle Seahawks (2015)

Wilson joined his teammate, Michael Bennett in being the Co-MVP of the Pro Bowl.  The Quarterback led the Seahawks two years before to a Super Bowl win and this was to date the third of five Pro Bowls.  30 Years Old, Playing for the Seattle Seahawks.

Lorenzo Alexander, Buffalo Bills (2016)

Lorenzo Alexander went to his second Pro Bowl and at the age of 33 this was probably the best year of his career.  Alexander was named the Co-MVP as the defensive player of the game.  35 Years Old, Playing for the Buffalo Bills.

Travis Kelce, Kansas City Chiefs (2016)

The Tight End was in his second of four straight Pro Bowls and this year he was named a First Team All-Pro after having his first 1,000 Yard Season.   29 Years Old, Playing for the Kansas City Chiefs.

Von Miller, Denver Broncos (2017)

Miller was named the Defensive MVP this year of the Pro Bowl.  Miller had already won a Super Bowl for the Broncos and this was his sixth of what has been seven Pro Bowls thus far.  30 Years Old, Playing for the Denver Broncos.

Delanie Walker, Tennessee Titans (2017)

This is what was Delanie Walker’s third straight and likely last Pro Bowl appearance.  The Tight End had four consecutive seasons (this being the fourth) of 800 Yards or more.  34 Years Old, Playing for the Tennessee Titans.

Jamal Adams, New York Jets (2018)

This was in Adams’ second year in the NFL and it was his first Pro Bowl appearance, which netted him the Defensive Co-MVP.  He had 115 Combined Tackles this season.  23 Years Old, Playing for the New York Jets.

Patrick Mahomes, Kansas City Chiefs (2018)

This was his second season in the NFL and first as a starter and you could state that it is one of the best years ever by a Quarterback. Mahomes threw for 50 Touchdowns and 5,097 Yards and was named the AP MVP. 23 Years Old, Playing for the Kansas City Chiefs.

From what we can see in terms of the Pro Bowl MVP winners you have someone who at one time was considered an elite player.  While we can all agree that the game itself is meaningless getting there means something but essentially, we are looking at a high-end crapshoot here.

Up next we are going to back to the MLB and the Babe Ruth Award.

As always, we thank you for that support and look for that soon!

We here at Notinhalloffame.com thought it would be fun to take a look at the major awards in North American team sports and see how it translates into Hall of Fame potential.

Needless to say, different awards in different sports yield hall of fame potential.  In basketball, the team sport with the least amount of players on a roster, the dividend for greatness much higher.  In baseball, it is not as much as a great individual season does not have the same impact.

For our next selection we go back to the National Hockey League with the Calder Trophy, which is awarded annually to the league’s top rookie. Does being a top rookie put you in line for the Hockey Hall of Fame?

Let’s find out!

The following are the past players who have won the Calder Trophy in the NHL who are eligible for the Hockey Hall of Fame and have been enshrined.

Syl Apps, Toronto Maple Leafs (1937)

16 Goals, 29 Assists, 45 Points, 6.1 Point Shares.  This is off to an excellent start at Syl Apps would lead the National Hockey League in Assists as a Rookie and he built on that to be named a post season All Star five times.  More importantly for Apps and the Maple Leafs he would help them win three Stanley Cups and he would retire as a Point per Game player.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1961.

Frank Brimsek, Boston Bruins (1939)

33 Wins, 9 Losses 1 Tie, 1.56 GAA, 11.3 Goalie Point Shares.  Very few players had a start to their career like Frank Brimsek as not only was the Calder Trophy winner, he also was the Vezina Trophy winner, a First Team All Star and he took the Boston Bruins to the Stanley Cup.  The native of Eveleth, Minnesota would lead the Bruins to another Cup win in 1941 and he was also a Vezina Trophy winner in 1942.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1966.

Edgar Laprade, New York Rangers (1946)

15 Goals, 19 Assists 34 Points, 2.9 Point Shares.  Edgar Laprade played his entire career with the New York Rangers and he would finish third in Lady Byng balloting that year.  He would win the Lady Byng in the 1949/50 season. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1993.

Terry Sawchuk, Detroit Red Wings (1951)

44 Wins, 13 Losses 13 Ties, 1.56 GAA, 17.0 Goalie Point Shares. In what would be a huge opening year, Terry Sawchuk would lead the National Hockey League in Goalie Point Shares and was also a First Team All Star.  Sawchuk was the leader in Wins his year and would be the next four seasons. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1971.

Bernie Geoffrion, Montreal Canadiens (1952)

30 Goals, 24 Assists 54 Points, 7.0 Point Shares.  The future Hockey Hall of Famer would lead the NHL in Power-Play Goals.  The future Hart Trophy winner would win six Stanley Cups with a Hart and Art Ross Trophy win in 1961.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1972.

Gump Worsley, New York Rangers (1953)

13 Wins, 29 Losses 8 Ties, 3.02 GAA, 4.4 Goalie Point Shares. The “Gump” would lose way more games than he won in this season (16) and this would be a theme for Worsley but he gave it everything he always had, which was why he would enter the Hockey Hall of Fame and would win two Vezina Trophies.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1971.

Glenn Hall, Detroit Red Wings (1956)

30 Wins, 24 Losses 16 Ties, 2.10 GAA, 14.5 Goalie Point Shares. As a rookie, Glenn Hall was not only the Calder Trophy winner but was a Second Team All Star and the leader in Shutouts and Minutes Played and a second place finish in Point Shares.  Hall would later be a multi time post season All Star and was a first ballot Hall of Famer.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1975.

Frank Mahovolich, Toronto Maple Leafs (1958)

20 Goals, 16 Assists 37 Points, 3.3 Point Shares.  The “Big M” had a. good rookie season but he would later become a six time Stanley Cup winner and also a nine time post season All Star.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1972.

Dave Keon, Toronto Maple Leafs (1961)

20 Goals, 25 Assists 45 Points, 4.2 Point Shares.  With the Toronto Maple Leafs for most of his career, Dave Keon would later be a two time Lady Byng Trophy winner and was the Conn Smythe Trophy winner for the last Toronto Maple Leaf Stanley Cup Championship team.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1986.

Jacques Laperriere, Montreal Canadiens(1964)

2 Goals, 28 Assists, 30 Points, 6.7 Point Shares.  Laperriere was another great Quebecer to play for his home province team where he was immediately one of the better Defenseman in the NHL.  Playing for the Montreal Canadiens his entire career be was a Second Team All Star as a rookie and would be a First Team All Star the next two seasons after, which included a Norris Trophy win in 1966.  Laperriere would help the Habs win five Stanley Cups.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1987.

Bobby Orr, Boston Bruins(1967)

13 Goals, 28 Assists, 41 Points, 6.0 Point Shares.  Any chance we have here to talk about Bobby Orr is always a blessing to us!  Orr is without question the greatest Defenseman that ever lived and some will go as far to say is the best hockey player period.  As a rookie, the Boston Bruin was a member of the Second Team All Star roster.  Orr finished third in Norris Trophy voting but would go on to win the next eight. He was such a great player that he was inducted into the Hockey Hall of Fame without the mandatory three year wait. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1979.

Tony Esposito, Chicago Blackhawks(1970)

38 Wins, 17 Losses 8 Ties, 2.17 GAA, 14.7 Goalie Point Shares. This would be an incredible career for Tony Esposito who as a rookie would not only win the Calder but the Vezina Trophy First Team NHL and was the league leader in Wins and Save Percentage. He would win the Vezina two more times. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1988.

Gilbert Perreault, Buffalo Sabres(1971)

38 Goals, 34 Assists, 72 Points, 6.5 Point Shares.  One of the greatest Buffalo Sabres of all time, Gilbert Perreault played his entire career in Western New York.  The Quebecer would later be named a Second Team All Star on two occasions and a later Lady Byng Trophy winner.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1990.

Ken Dryden, Montreal Canadiens(1972)

38 Wins, 8 Losses 15 Ties, 2.24 GAA, 15.0 Goalie Point Shares. In terms of a brief career, there is nobody in any team sport that equals that if Ken Dryden.  Prior to winning the Calder, Ken Dryden would win the Stanley Cup and Conn Smythe, which made him more successful than any other Calder Trophy winner. Dryden would later win four Vezina Trophy wins and would hoist the Stanley Cup five more times.  Long story short, Ken Dryden was the best NHL Goalie of the 1970’s. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1983.

Denis Potvin, New York Islanders(1974)

17 Goals, 37 Assists, 54 Points, 6.5 Point Shares.  Denis Potvin was the first piece in what would eventually become the New York Islanders dynasty that would win four Stanley Cups in the 1980’s.  Potvin anchored the Islanders blueline where he would win three Norris Trophies and was a five time First Team All Star.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1991.

Bryan Trottier, New York Islanders(1976)

32 Goals, 63 Assists, 95 Points, 8.6 Point Shares.  See above!  With the Denis Potvin entry we talked about him being the building block for the Islanders dynasty.  Here was the next massive piece of the puzzle was Bryan Trottier who was eighth in the NHL in Assists as a Rookie and had an excellent finish of 95 Points.  Trottier would later win the Hart Trophy (1979), was a four time post season All Star and in addition to the four Stanley Cups he won with the Islanders, he would help the Pittsburgh Penguins two Cups in the early 1990’s.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1997.

Mike Bossy, New York Islanders(1978)

53 Goals, 38 Assists, 91 Points, 10.3 Point Shares.  See above!  Again!  Potvin. Trottier.  Mike Bossy.  Three Calder trophy winners in five years and all three Hall of Famers resulting in four Stanley Cups.  As a rookie, Mike Bossy scored 53 Goals and was second in that metric.  With the exception of his final season he never had a year where he dipped below 50.  A Second Team All Star as a Rookie, Bossy would later be a First Team All Star five times.  His excellent career ended early at the age of 30 due to back issues.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1991.

Ray Bourque, Boston Bruins(1980)

17 Goals, 48 Assists, 65 Points, 10.3 Point Shares.  When you had Bobby Orr, how lucky are you as an organization to land Ray Bourque?  The Boston Bruins Defenseman was a First Team All Star as a rookie and he would be named to either a First or Second Team All Star every year after until the 1996/97 season. Bourque would later win the Norris Trophy five times.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2004.

Peter Stastny, Quebec Nordiques(1981)

39 Goals, 70 Assists, 109 Points, 8.6 Point Shares.  While some might point to Stastny’s age (24) and that he had already been playing in his native Czechoslovakia for a while to paint this Calder win as tainted, this was a huge deal as Stastny had already established himself as the best player on the Czechoslovakian team and his defection (along with his brother Anton) ushered in others from the Iron Curtain to do the same.  As an NHL rookie, he scored 109 Points and would have five more 100 Point seasons.   Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1998.

Dale Hawerchuk, Winnipeg Jets(1982)

45 Goals, 58 Assists, 103 Points, 7.9 Point Shares.  Scoring 103 Points as a rookie, Hawerchuk would later be a Second Team All Star and runner-up for the Hart Trophy in the 1984/85 season.  He would score 1,409 Points over his National Hockey League career.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2001.

Mario Lemieux, Pittsburgh Penguins(1985)

43 Goals, 57 Assists, 100 Points, 7.9 Point Shares.  With a 100 Point season as a rookie, Mario Lemieux was just getting started.  He would win the Hart Trophy three times, the Art Ross six times, was a post season NHL All Star nine times and took the Pittsburgh Penguins to a Stanley Cup win in 1991 and 1992.  He would become the player to rival Wayne Gretzky.  Lemieux retired in 1997 but returned in 2000 as a player owner and retired again in 2006.  Lemieux would later win three more Stanley Cups as an owner and is the only man in history to have his name etched on the Cup as a player and as an owner.  Had the Penguins never drafted him there is a very good chance that Pittsburgh would not have an NHL team today.  He was inducted immediately after his first retirement and he would become the first player to win the Calder, was inducted into the Hockey Hall of Fame and return to action.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1997.

Luc Robitaille, Los Angeles Kings(1987)

45 Goals, 39 Assists, 84 Points, 6.8 Point Shares.  In addition to winning the Calder, Luc Robitaille would be named a Second Team All Star.  This was just the beginning for a great career that was spent predominantly with Los Angeles and he would be named a First Team All Star five times and a Second Team All Star three times.  He retired with 1,394 Points and he entered the Hockey Hall of Fame in his first year of eligibility.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2006.

Joe Nieuwendyk, Calgary Flames(1988)

51 Goals, 41 Assists, 92 Points, 8.7 Point Shares.  Nieuwendyk would lead the NHL in Power Play Goals as a rookie and later in his career would win the Stanley Cup with three different teams; 1989 with Calgary, 1999 with Dallas (where he won the Conn Smythe) and 2003 with New Jersey.  He finished his career with 1,126 Points.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2011.

Brian Leetch, New York Rangers(1989)

23 Goals, 48 Assists, 71 Points, 9.0 Point Shares.  Brian Leetch had an exceptional career in the NHL and securing the Calder Trophy was just the beginning.  Leetch played for the Rangers most of his career where he would win the Norris Trophy twice and lead his team to win the Stanley Cup in 1994 where he was named the Conn Smythe Trophy winner.  He scored 1,028 Points and entered the Hall of Fame in his first year of eligibility.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2011.

Sergei Makarov, Calgary Flames(1990)

24 Goals, 62 Assists, 86 Points, 6.8 Point Shares.  This is the most controversial Calder Trophy winner as Makarov was over 30, but this was in fact his professional season as he played for the Soviet Union and was a star for the Red Army throughout the 1980’s and through Canada Cups and other small tournaments he had played against the NHL’s best many times.  Still, by the definition of what a rookie is, he qualified though he entered the Hockey Hall of Fame more on what he did Internationally.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2016.

Ed Belfour, Chicago Blackhawks(1991)

43 Wins, 19 Losses 7 Ties, 2.47 GAA, 14.0 Goalie Point Shares. Ed Belfour had many excellent seasons in the National Hockey League and the argument can certainly be made that this was his best one.  Belfour won the Vezina and William M. Jennings trophy and was the leader in Goals Against Average, Save Percentage and Minutes Played.  Belfour would later earn his second Vezina as a Blackhawk two years later, and he was also a William M. Jennings Trophy winner three more times.  More importantly, “Eddie the Eagle” would backstop the Dallas Stars to a Stanley Cup win in 1999. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2011.

Pavel Bure, Vancouver Canucks(1992)

34 Goals, 26 Assists, 60 Points, 6.8 Point Shares.  This was a good season for “The Russian Rocket” but he would later have five 50 Goal Seasons, two of which would see him net 60. Bure a First Team All Star with the Canucks and later for the Florida Panthers would have back-to-back Second Team All Star Selections and Maurice Richard Trophy wins as the NHL’s leading Goal Scorer.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2016. 

Teemu Selanne, Winnipeg Jets(1993)

76 Goals, 56 Assists, 132 Points, 13.4 Point Shares.  Wow!!!  First off Selanne was the first player from Finland to win the Calder but there is so much more here.  Selanne scored 76 Goals and 132 Points, both of which are by the far most of any rookie and Calder winner.  Considering the current landscape, this could be untouchable.  Selanne would score the most goals this year but this would be his best season by far of his career though “The Finnish Flash” was no flash in the pan (sorry, couldn’t resist).  Selanne would have three more 100 Point seasons and would play into his early 40’s and scored 1,457 Points over his career.  He would win a Stanley Cup with the Ducks and was a first ballot Hall of Famer.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2017.

Martin Brodeur, New Jersey Devils(1994)

27 Wins, 11 Losses, 8 Ties, 8.9 Point Shares.  Martin Brodeur is one of the most successful Goalies of all-time and save for seven games with the St. Louis Blues it was done with the Devils.  Brodeur had a good rookie year but unlike other Calder winners who were Goalies, Brodeur’s Calder year was not even in his top ten.  Brodeur would later win four Vezina Trophies, five William M. Jennings Trophies and four Stanley Cups.  He is the all time leader in Wins, Saves, Games Played (by a Goalie) and Minutes Played and that may not change in 50 years.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2018.

Peter Forsberg, Quebec Nordiques(1995)

15 Goals, 35 Assists, 50 Points, 8.2 Point Shares.  When the Philadelphia Flyers traded for Eric Lindros there was piece of the puzzle that was an unknown factor.  That was the rights to Peter Forsberg, who would turn out (we think) to best player in the deal.  The Swedish star would later help the Colorado Avalanche win two Stanley Cups and for his own trophy case the Hart Trophy and Art Ross in 2002/03.  He would also be a three First Team All Star.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2014.

 

The following are the players who have won the Calder Trophy in the NHL who are eligible for the Hockey Hall of Fame and have not been selected:

Cully Dahlstrom, Chicago Blackhawks (1938)

10 Goals, 9 Assists, 19 Points, 1.3 Point Shares.  Dahlstrom would have better seasons in the National Hockey League but he would never have a season that could be considered great. He would however win the Stanley Cup as a rookie with the Blackhawks and his 206 Points in 345 Games were perfectly decent.   Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Kilby MacDonald, New York Rangers (1940)

15 Goals, 13 Assists, 28 Points, 3.8 Point Shares.  This would be the best season of Kilby MacDonals’s brief career as he would bounce back and forth between the Rangers and the minors after. MacDonald who also won a Stanley Cup with the Rangers this year also served in the Army in between stints in professional hockey.   Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

John Quilty, Montreal Canadiens (1941)

18 Goals, 16 Assists, 34 Points, 3.8 Point Shares.  This was by far and away the best season of John Quilty’s career and after another season for the Montreal Canadiens he would join the Canadian military.  Quilty would later return but did not do much and retired with only 81 Points in 125 NHL Games.   Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Grant Warwick, New York Rangers (1942)

16 Goals, 17 Assists, 33 Points, 3.0 Point Shares.  Warwick would play for nine seasons in the NHL and peaked with 42 Points in the 1944/45 Season.  He would play most of his career with the New York Rangers with two seasons with Boston and a year with Montreal following.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Gaye Stewart, Toronto Maple Leafs (1943)

24 Goals, 23 Assists, 47 Points, 4.0 Point Shares.  The Calder Trophy win for Gaye Stewart had so much historical meaning.  The first is that he would become the first player to win the Calder after he won the Stanley Cup as he played for the Maple Leafs in three games in the 1942 Playoffs.  Like so many, Stewart’s career took on a sabbatical as he joined the Royal Canadian Navy during World War II but he returned in the 1945/46 Season to lead the National Hockey League in Goals and he was the runner-up for the Hart Trophy and the year after he helped Toronto win the 1947 Stanley Cup.  He was traded the following season to Chicago and was a Second Team All Star that season.  He finished his career with 344 Points in 502 Games.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Gus Bodnar, Toronto Maple Leafs (1944)

22 Goals, 40 Assists, 62 Points, 4.5 Point Shares.  Bodnar’s 62 Points was the best of his career and that was likely because it occurred in the depleted talent pool that was the World War II NHL.  Bodnar’s career was not Hall of Fame worthy but it was a good one that spanned 12 years long and he would win two Stanley Cups with Toronto in 1945 and 1947.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Frank McCool, Toronto Maple Leafs (1945)

24 Wins, 22 Losses 4 Ties, 3.22 GAA, 10.1 Goalie Point Shares. Frank McCool had a very interesting and brief career.  The Goalie played hockey at Gonzaga and would join the Canadian Military to serve in World War II.  He would return to hockey and this time it was at the professional level where he would serve between the pipes for the Toronto Maple Leafs and take them to the Finals and win the Cup.  In the process he recorded four Shutouts in the post season and three straight, which still is tied for the record today.  So what did Frank McCool do for an encore?  Nothing really.  He would play 22 more games for the Leafs and retire shortly after due to ulcers.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Howie Meeker, Toronto Maple Leafs (1947)

27 Goals, 18 Assists, 45 Points, 4.5 Point Shares.  The first season of Howie Meeker’s career was arguably his finest as he had career highs with 27 Goals and 45 Points as a rookie and would help the Toronto Maple Leafs win the Stanley Cup.  Meeker would win two more Stanley Cups with Toronto and retired with 185 Points in 346 Games.  Meeker would later become more famous as a broadcaster.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Jim McFadden, Detroit Red Wings (1948)

24 Goals, 24 Assists, 48 Points, 5.7 Point Shares.  In terms of traditional statistics, Jim McFadden’s best season was his rookie year where he had career highs in Goals, Assists and Points. McFadden’s career was not a long one as it lasted seven seasons, four with Detroit and three with Chicago.  His last season in Motown would see him win the Stanley Cup.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Pentti Lund, New York Rangers (1949)

14 Goals, 16 Assists, 30 Points, 2.6 Point Shares.  This was the best season of Lund’s career where he had career highs in Points and would become the first European born to win the Calder.  Lund was born in Finland, although arrived in Canada at the age of six.  The Forward would last five years in the NHL. Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Jack Gelineau, Boston Bruins (1950)

22 Wins, 30 Losses, 15 Ties, 3.28 GAA, 7.3 Point Shares.  Jack Gelineau may have had a losing record but he was a machine in terms of work load.  The Boston Bruin was fifth in Goalie Point Shares this season and he was third in the season after but his overall career ended shortly after.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Camille Henry, New York Rangers (1954)

24 Goals, 15 Assists, 39 Points, 5.4 Point Shares.  Camille Henry’s rookie season would see him lead the National Hockey League in Power Play Goals (20).  Henry would regress and would bounce around in the AHL but would return wo have a Second Team All Star and Lady Byng winning season in 1957/58. Henry would finish in the top five in Lady Byng voting five more times and would also finish first in Power Play Goals two more times and he would retire with 528 Points in 727 Games.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Ed Litzenberger, Montreal Canadiens/Chicago Blackhawks (1955)

23 Goals, 28 Assists, 51 Points, 5.8 Point Shares.  According to the story, the Montreal Canadiens “gifted” Litzenberger in a trade to the Chicago Blackhawks in an attempt to keep the team viable in the NHL; basically so that they would not go under!  He would score 51 Points as a rookie and would later be a Second Team All Star in 1957 where he was sixth in Hart Trophy voting. He retired with 416 Points in 619 Games. Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Larry Regan, Boston Bruins (1957)

14 Goals, 19 Assists, 33 Points, 2.8 Point Shares.  With all due respect to Larry Regan, he had a pedestrian career in professional hockey and he did nothing more than what you saw in this season.  The forward would only score 136 Points over his career in the NHL  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Ralph Backstrom, Montreal Canadiens (1959)

18 Goals, 22 Assists, 40 Points, 3.8 Point Shares.  Ralph Backstrom would win six Stanley Cup Rings with the Montreal Canadiens and was also a six time All Star.  Ranked #34 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Bill Hay, Chicago Blackhawks (1960)

18 Goals, 37 Assists, 50 Points, 4.9 Point Shares.  Bill Hay played all of his eight seasons in the NHL with the Chicago Blackhawks where he would win a Stanley Cup and a Calder, but this would be the only awards he would win.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Bobby Rousseau, Montreal Canadiens (1962)

21 Goals, 24 Assists, 45 Points, 4.3 Point Shares.  Rousseau would lead the NHL in Short-Handed Goals and he would later help the Montreal Canadiens win four Stanley Cups in the 1960’s. In the 1965/66 season he would lead the NHL in Assists and was named a Second Team All Star.  He would score 703 Points over his career.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Kent Douglas, Toronto Maple Leafs (1963)

7 Goals, 15 Assists, 22 Points, 6.6 Point Shares.  While Kent Douglas would have better individual stats in later years, his first season in the NHL was a special one as he not only won the Calder but was a member of the Toronto Maple Leafs’ 1963 Stanley Cup win. Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Roger Crozier, Detroit Red Wings (1965)

40 Wins, 22 Losses, 7 Ties, 2.42 GAA, 14.4 Point Shares.  The rookie season of Roger Crozier was also the best of his career as he was the league leader in Wins, Saves, Shutouts and Minutes Played while also being named a First Team All Star.  Crozier was named the Conn Smythe winner the next year but he never had a season like this again though is still a 200 Game winner. Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Brit Selby, Toronto Maple Leafs (1966)

14 Goals, 13 Assists, 27 Points, 2.0 Point Shares.  Considering that he was a Calder Trophy winner, Brit Selby did not have a great career as he would be sent down to the minors the year after and never had a season higher than 30 Points.  He isn’t the worst player to win the Calder but is in the top ten. Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Derek Sanderson, Boston Bruins (1968) 

24 Goals, 25 Assists, 49 Points, 4.8 Point Shares.  Many books can be written on the career of Derek Sanderson but for this purpose we have an exciting Calder Trophy winner who had the tiger by the tail. Sanderson would later win the Stanley Cup twice with the Boston Bruins but would never win another individual accolade again.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Danny Grant, Minnesota North Stars (1969)

34 Goals, 31 Assists, 65 Points, 6.8 Point Shares.  Danny Grant had an understated career which was spent predominantly with the Minnesota North Stars and Detroit Red Wings.  Grant would have four 60 Point Seasons, this being the first of them, but overall it was not one that warranted serious Hall of Fame consideration.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Steve Vickers, New York Rangers (1973)

30 Goals, 23 Assists, 53 Points, 5.9 Point Shares.  Steve Vickers made history as the first rookie to score consecutive hat tricks and he would overall put the puck in the net 30 times in his Calder Trophy winning season. Vickers would later be named a Second Team All Star two season later with a 41 Goal year but by age 30 he was out of the NHL after his play dropped off considerably.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Eric Vail, Atlanta Flames (1975)

39 Goals, 21 Assists, 60 Points, 6.1 Point Shares.  Eric Vail’s best goal scoring season was as a rookie (39) and he would become the first player in Flames franchise history to win the Calder.  Vail would have two more 30 Goal seasons and when the team moved to Calgary he was the leading goal scorer in franchise history.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Willi Plett, Atlanta Flames (1977)

33 Goals, 23 Assists, 56 Points, 6.1 Point Shares.  This was the second Calder trophy in three years for the Atlanta Flames but unlike the Islanders who had the same earlier with Potvin and Trottier, Eric Vail and Willi Plett were not in that league. Still, Plett had 33 Goals as a rookie and would have another 30 goal season when he scored 38 the year the Flames moved to Calgary.  This would be the only individual award that Plett would win the NHL.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Bobby Smith, Minnesota North Stars (1979)

30 Goals, 44 Assists, 74 Points, 6.1 Point Shares.  Bobby Smith had a really good career where he would score 1,036 Points and would be a four time All Star.  His best individual seasons were with the Minnesota North Stars but he would later win the Stanley Cup with the Montreal Canadiens in 1986. Ranked #22 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Steve Larmer, Chicago Blackhawks (1983)

43 Goals, 47 Assists, 90 Points, 8.4 Point Shares.  Steve Larmer was a Point per Game player in the National Hockey League, which was very good for the 1980’s but not what it means today. Larmer would go to two All Star Games and late in his career he would assist the New York Rangers would win the Stanley Cup.  Ranked #32 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Tom Barrasso, Buffalo Sabres (1984)

26 Wins, 12 Losses, 3 Ties, 2.85 GAA, 7.5 Point Shares.  Tom Barrasso would have a very long career in the National Hockey League (19 years) but like other Calder winning Goalies his best season professionally was as a rookie.  He would not only win the Calder but was a First Team All Star and would win the Vezina.  Barrasso would later win the William M. Jennings Trophy and two Second Team All Star nods and overall won 369 Games in the NHL.  Ranked #12 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Gary Suter, Calgary Flames (1986)

18 Goals, 50 Assists, 68 Points, 8.0 Point Shares.  Gary Suter would score well for a Defenseman and in his third season he scored 91 Points en route to a third place finish in Norris Trophy voting and a Second Team All Star Selection.  Suter would help the Flames win the Stanley Cup the year after and overall would score 844 Points in his NHL career.  Ranked #27 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Daniel Alfredsson, Ottawa Senators (1996)

26 Goals, 35 Assists, 61 Points, 5.3 Point Shares.  Daniel Alfredsson was the second straight Swedish player to win the Calder (following Peter Forsberg) and the Ottawa Senator would go on to lead the team to what is their greatest success to date.  The greatest player in franchise history would score 1,157 Points and was named a Second Team All Star in 2005/06.  Ranked #4 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Bryan Berard, New York Islanders (1997)

8 Goals, 40 Assists, 48 Points, 7.6 Point Shares.  The native of Rhode Island would never have a season where he had more Points or Point Shares but he still had a good career, especially considering it was almost over after getting slashed in the eye by a stick in 2000 that almost caused him to lose it.  The fact that he came back at all to be effective was a testament to who Berard was and he would win the Bill Masterton Memorial Trophy in the 2003/04 Season.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com

Sergei Samsonov, Boston Bruins (1998)

22 Goals, 25 Assists, 47 Points, 5.5 Point Shares.  Sergei Samsonov would have a pretty good career in the NHL with 571 Points in 888 Games but when you a teen sensation from Russia winning the Calder you expected something more and likely the Bruins faithful hoped for the same.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com

Chris Drury, Colorado Avalanche (1999)

20 Goals, 24 Assists, 44 Points, 5.0 Point Shares.  Drury would go on to have a solid career where he helped the Avalanche win the Stanley Cup in 2001.  He would later blossom into a strong defensive forward and for five years in a row (2005-06 to 2009-10) he would receive votes for the Frank J. Selke. Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Scott Gomez, New Jersey Devils (2000)

19 Goals, 51 Assists, 70 Points, 7.3 Point Shares.  From the great state of Alaska, Scott Gomez scored 70 Points as a rookie and would hit that mark three more times.  Gomez helped the Devils win the Stanley Cup as a rookie and again in 2003 and he would be a two time All Star.  He scored 756 Points over his career.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Evgeni Nabokov, San Jose Sharks (2001)

32 Wins, 21 Losses, 7 Ties, 11.7 Point Shares.  Evgeni Nabokov finished fourth in Vezina Trophy as a rookie, and would finish in the top six five more times.  He would also be a First Team All Star in 2007/08 when he led the Goalies in Wins.  He would have a career record of 353-227-86.  Ranked #124 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Dany Heatley, Atlanta Thrashers (2002)

26 Goals, 41 Assists, 67 Points, 6.8 Point Shares.  Heatley had a great start to his career but a car crash that killed a teammate necessitated a change of scenery and he would be traded to the Ottawa Senators who would later have a pair of 100 Point Seasons where he was named a First Team and Second Team All Star.  He would score 791 Points in 869 Games.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Barret Jackman, St. Louis Blues (2003)

3 Goals, 16 Assists, 19 Points, 5.4 Point Shares.  Barret Jackman would have a good career as a stay-at-home Defenseman and his was spent with the St. Louis Blues for all but one season. Jackman never would come close to winning an individual award but the fact that the Blues held on to him for 13 seasons show what kind of asset he was.   Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Andrew Raycroft, Boston Bruins (2004)

29 Wins, 18 Losses, 9 Ties, 12.6 Point Shares.  Other than his Calder trophy win, Raycroft only had one good season of note which was with the Toronto Maple Leafs three years after his Calder win.  Those two years comprised well over half of Goalie Point Shares over his 11 seasons in the National Hockey League.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Let’s update our tally shall we?

Award in Question

Percentage of recipients who have entered the HOF

Percentage of recipients by year who have entered the HOF.

NBA MVP

100%

100%

NHL Norris

90.5%

96.4%

NBA All Star Game MVP

89.5%

91.7%

NHL Conn Smythe

74.2%

85.4%

NHL Lady Byng

63.8%

76.0%

NFL Super Bowl MVP

60.6%

64.9%

NBA Defensive Player of the Year

58.3%

56.5%

NBA Rookie of the Year

56.5%

56.5%

MLB/NL/AL Cy Young Award

44.4%

55.4%

NHL Calder

44.1%

44.1%

NHL Frank J. Selke Trophy

33.3%

36.7%

NFL Offensive Rookie of the Year

28.6%

28.6%

MLB Edgar Martinez Award

26.7%

17.2%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Designated Hitter)

25.0%

30.8%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Shortstop)

23.5%

52.6%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove

21.7%

36.8%

NFL Defensive Rookie of the Year

20.6%

20.6%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Catcher)

20.0%

22.5%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Second Base)

18.8%

39.8%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Shortstop)

18.2%

35.1%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Pitcher)

18.2%

20.1%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Second Base)

16.7%

32.7%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Outfield)

16.7%

30.1%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Outfield)

15.7%

25.2%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Third Base)

14.3%

14.3%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Third Base)

13.6%

14.3%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (First Base)

13.6%

13.3%

MLB (NL/AL) Rookie of the Year

13.3%

13.3%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Catcher)

10.3%

15.2%

NBA Most Improved Player of the Year

5.3%

3.2%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (First Base)

3.8%

3.2%

So who is up next?

The following are the players who have won the Calder Trophy in the NHL who have retired but have not met the mandatory years out of the game to qualify for the Hockey Hall of Fame:

Steve Mason, Columbus Blue Jackets (2009)

33 Wins, 20 Losses, 7 Ties, 11.2 Point Shares.  Mason’s Calder Trophy winning season was his best year and he was also the runner-up for the Vezina and fourth place finish in Hart Trophy voting. Mason would have a 205-183-64 record. Eligible for the Hockey Hall of Fame in 2021.

The following are the players who have won the NHL Calder Trophy who are still active.

Alex Ovechkin, Washington Capitals (2006)

52 Goals, 54 Assists, 106 Points, 12.7 Point Shares.  Ovechkin was the first Washington Capital to win the Calder and he did so with a 50 Goal and 100 Point Season which is no small feat in the dead puck era.  Since that win Ovechkin took the Capitals to their first Stanley Cup win in 2018 and along the way he has won seven Maurice Richard Awards, three Hart Trophies and one Art Ross.  33 Years Old, Playing for the Washington Capitals.

Evgeni Malkin, Pittsburgh Penguins (2007)

33 Goals, 52 Assists, 85 Points, 9.4 Point Shares.  Evgeni Malkin would be the second straight Russian to win the Calder and to date he has had a spectacular career where he has been a four time All Star, a Hart Trophy winner and two time Art Ross winner.  Malkin would also take the Penguins to three Stanley Cups continuing the winning tradition of the Western Pennsylvania team.  32 Years Old, Playing for the Washington Capitals.

Patrick Kane, Chicago Blackhawks (2008)

21 Goals, 51 Assists, 72 Points, 7.2 Point Shares.  Patrick Kane has to date an incredible career where he has won three Stanley Cups with the Blackhawks and was also a three time First Team All Star.  He would win the Hart Trophy in 2015/16.  30 Years Old, Playing for the Chicago Blackhawks.

Tyler Myers, Buffalo Sabres (2010)

11 Goals, 37 Assists, 48 Points, 9.8 Point Shares.  As of this writing, Tyler Myers’ rookie season was his best by far as his Goals, Assists, Points and Point Shares were all career highs. It has been a good career but not what you would hope for considering his start.  28 Years Old, Playing for the Buffalo Sabres.

Jeff Skinner, Carolina Hurricanes (2011)

31 Goals, 32 Assists, 63 Points, 8.1 Point Shares.  To date Skinner has been named an All Star twice and has equaled his rookie point total in 2016/17 but has not eclipsed it.  26 Years Old, Playing for the Buffalo Sabres.

Gabriel Landeskog, Colorado Avalanche (2012)

22 Goals, 30 Assists, 52 Points, 6.8 Point Shares.  From Sweden, Gabirel Landeskog has performed well and went to his first All Star Game in 2019.  He does have a way to go to get onto a Hockey Hall of Fame trajectory.  26 Years Old, Playing for the Colorado Avalanche.

Jonathan Huberdeau, Florida Panthers (2013)

14 Goals, 17 Assists, 31 Points, 3.3 Point Shares.  Huberdeau has thus far had a good career though it has been spent exclusively in Florida and he has not been showcased much on a national level.  25 Years Old, Playing for the Florida Panthers.

Nathan McKinnon, Colorado Avalanche (2014)

24 Goals, 39 Assists, 63 Points, 3.3 Point Shares.  Since his Calder Trophy win McKinnon has had two 90 Point Seasons and in 2017/18 was a Second Team All Star and the runner-up for the Hart Trophy.  23 Years Old, Playing for the Colorado Avalanche.

Aaron Ekblad, Florida Panthers (2015)

12 Goals, 27 Assists, 39 Points, 8.5 Point Shares.  A better than you think blueliner, Ekblad finished 22ndin Norris Trophy voting as a rookie and was 16thas a sophomore.  22 Years Old, Playing for the Florida Panthers.

Artemi Panarin, Chicago Blackhawks (2016)

30 Goals, 47 Assists, 77 Points, 9.8 Point Shares.  Panarin played in the KHL a little longer and did not arrive in the NHL until he was 23 making him a little older than most rookies so perhaps he had a bit of an advantage, but he was great as a rookie and he would be named a Second Team All Star in his second season.  27 Years Old, Playing for the Columbus Blue Jackets.

Auston Matthews, Toronto Maple Leafs (2017)

40 Goals, 29 Assists, 69 Points, 9.7 Point Shares.  Maple Leafs fans were thrilled when Matthews scored five goals in his first game and overall in his rookie year he had a 40 Goal season that was good enough for second overall.  The American was also named an All Star and he led the NHL in Even Strength Goals.  22 Years Old, Playing for the Toronto Maple Leafs.

Mathew Barzal, New York Islanders (2018)

22 Goals, 63 Assists, 85 Points, 8.2 Point Shares.  Barzal finished fifth in the NHL in Assists as a rookie.  21 Years Old, Playing for the New York Islanders.

From what we can see in terms of the Calder Trophy winners there are some solid Hall of Fame potential but like so many sports injuries can derail such great starts.  This looks to be our favorite to monitor as we go forward.

Up next we are going to back to the NFL to the Pro Bowl MVP.

As always, we thank you for that support and look for that soon!

The outcome of Sunday’s match between the Saints and the Rams has shown that the 53rd Super Bowl is still very much up in the air. The Rams won by a mere three points, which was about as expected, but this kind of margin certainly suggests that both teams are playing at roughly the same level, with no real indication of which of these NFL heavyweights will take the gold this year as last night’s winners will go head to head with the Patriots in football’s biggest night.

No Sure Thing

Punters are, as always, trying to look for something of a sure thing to place the big bucks on for the coming Super Bowl but, because the L.A Rams have brought  their a-games so far this season, the competition is simply far too close to call. Nonetheless, the Patriots’ are still the bookies’ favourites to win again this year. But other teams will make it really difficult this time. The outcome will be highly unpredictable this year so punters would be wise to make use of the free Super Bowl Bets on offer.

The Patriots currently stand at 11-6 for taking the Bowl but they hardly demolished the Chiefs in their match against them and with Sunday’s solid but unspectacular win, the Rams aren’t exactly scoring much lower. The money may be on the Patriots but it’s really all up in the air right now. What this means, though, is that exciting, unpredictable games makes for exciting betting that can result in fairly big wins, even with fairly modest bets placed. It’s this sort of game, in fact, that is ideal for free bets from online bookies the results are so unpredictable and the payout will more than do justice to the modest amount that is placed with a free bet. In short, what we’re looking at here is low to no risk resulting in solid payouts if the Patriots do, indeed, demolish the competition and even bigger payouts if you bet on them not to and they don’t.  It’s exciting stuff regardless.

rams

The Revenge of the Rams?

It will be interesting to see how the Rams will look to disrupt the Patriot and Brady’s passing. The Patriot’s offense will have their work cut out as the Rams’ defensive partnership has been in excellent form off late. Torry Holt, in particular, has proven himself time and time again to be one of the NFL’s unsung secret weapons and if anyone is going to challenge the Patriot’s current hot streak it will no doubt be any team that has Holt as a member.

Still, the bookie’s favourite remains the Patriots even in the face of stiff competition from the Rams. They have had an incredible past season and should, if nothing else, provide an exciting game against the newly intimidating Rams.

Sports and gambling have long had a favourable relationship. Irrespective of the fact that a person is a fan or not, there is a sense of excitement, associated with sports, that is infectious. People around the world partake in games of different kinds with players ending up as Gods of their respective arenas.

The arrival of mobile gaming and online casinos has brought about a new trend that is spreading wide in the gambling community. Among all the games that are available to play online, slots have captured the fancy of novices as well as professionals. Consisting of different themes based on films, music, sports, adventure, or anything that your mind can imagine, slots are indeed a bag full of money-making entertainment.

One key feature in selected slots is progressive jackpots. Some of the main progressive-jackpot slots now famous include Mega Moolah, Mega Fortune, and Hall of Gods. A progressive slot accumulates a certain percentage of every spin to a giant pool with life-changing amounts. The winner of this jackpot can bet as little as 0.25p and become a multimillionaire in less than 10 seconds.

To get the most out of these games, it is crucial to hit only the best and most trustworthy online casinos. The best of these normally update their software and layout fairly often. Take , for example, Dunder Casino, which recently offered a fresh take on Dunder that offers more games than ever, a wider variety of the kinds of games on offer and some mouth-watering bonus and introductory offers. They have a particularly excellent selection of progressive slot machines and offer some of the lowest wager requirements around.

Now, take out your sports shoes and get the ball spinning for some mega wins.  

ronnie

Ronnie O’Sullivan Sporting Legends

If snooker is your game of choice, then you will know the greatness of Ronnie O’Sullivan. Considered as one of the greatest players ever, he is an English professional who even has a bunch of video games to his name. He is the current World Grand Prix, Players Championship, and UK Championship winner. The progressive slot has 5 reels, 3 rows, and 25 paylines with the jackpot at over £500,000 and rising. There are scatter symbols and bonuses aplenty in the game which features snooker balls, word symbols, and Ronnie in various snooker poses.    

Top Trump Football Stars

Football, or soccer if you may, is the world’s most watched and loved sport. So, it comes as no surprise that this progressive slot that features greats like Messi and Ronaldo as symbols is popular with fans of the game. The most exciting aspect of the game is that it has not one or two, but three jackpots. The main progressive-jackpot slots are an excellent opportunity to make some big moolah especially with the highest prize presently at a whopping £245,000. So, take out your kicks, dribble through your daily routine, warm up your fingers, and get ready for a game of slots that you are never going to forget.

Basketball Star

Technically this is not a progressive slot, but the pay-out is still huge at $240,000 using bonus games, multipliers, free spins and the likes, making this a must play on our list. Basketball, once again, is a much-loved game that is full of tact and skill. The slot has the court in the background and fans cheering with every spin. There are 5 reels and 243 ways to win, which places the odds in favour of the player. For anyone remotely interested in basketball, this is definitely the one to look out for. 

We here at Notinhalloffame.com thought it would be fun to take a look at the major awards in North American team sports and see how it translates into Hall of Fame potential.

Needless to say, different awards in different sports yield hall of fame potential.  In basketball, the team sport with the least amount of players on a roster, the dividend for greatness much higher.  In baseball, it is not as much as a great individual season does not have the same impact.

After completing the Gold Gloves (thank God!) we wanted to do something away from Baseball and we picked a relatively new award, The NBA Most Improved Player of the Year.

On the surface, it would seem like anyone who improved enough to get this award likely had less than auspicious beginnings, which may mean that not very many of these players are Hall of Famers, but this is why we do this process!

Let’s find out!

The following are the past players who have won the Most Improved Player in the NBA who are eligible for the Naismith Basketball Hall of Fame and have been enshrined.

Tracy McGrady, Orlando Magic (2001)

26.8 PPG, 7.5 RPG, 4.6 APG, 1.5 SPG, 1.5 BPG.  It took the award seventeen years of existence before we found our first Hall of Fame inductee (unless previous inductee Kevin Johnson gets in) but regardless if what happens with KJ, this is the first real NBA superstar we are talking about here.  McGrady was with the Toronto Raptors the season before where he started nearly half of his games but this year he was Orlando’s starting Shooting Guard and his Minutes per Game increased from 31.2 to 40.1 with a PPG rise from 15.4 to 26.8 and a PER increase from 20.0 to 24.9.  He would be named a Second Team All NBA member and would later win two scoring titles in his career.    Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2017.

The following are the players who have won the NBA Most Improved Player of the Year Award who are eligible for the Naismith Basketball Hall of Fame and have not been selected:

Alvin Robertson, San Antonio Spurs (1986)

17.0 PPG, 6.3 RPG, 5.5 APG, 3.7 SPG, 0.5 BPG.  This was the sophomore season for Alvin Robertson whose minutes shot up from 21.3 to 35.1 per Game.  Increased time certainly led to the increased production as he increased his PPG from 9.2 to 17.0 and more notably would win the Steals Title with a career high of 3.7 per Game.  For his efforts this year, the San Antonio Spur would be chosen for his first All Star Game, would also win the Defensive Player of the Year and was a Second Team All NBA Selection.  This would be his best season as he had a career high 19.5 PER, 6.2 VORP and 8.6 Win Shares.  Robertson would go to three more All Star Games and make more All-Defensive Selections, but he never had a better regular season than this in the NBA.  Ranked #47 on Notinhalloffame.com.  

Dale Ellis, Seattle Supersonics (1987)

24.9 PPG, 5.5 RPG, 2.9 APG, 1.3 SPG, 0.4 BPG.  Dale Ellis played for the Dallas Mavericks for the first three seasons of his career where he came off of the bench but in his first season with the Supersonics he was a starter and he more than tripled his Points per Game from 7.1 to 24.9 and in the next three seasons he would equal his 20 PP and 19.0 plus PER.  However, he was only an All Star once.  Ranked #97 on Notinhalloffame.com.  

Kevin Duckworth, Portland Trail Blazers (1988)

15.8 PPG, 7.4 RPG, 0.8 APG, 0.4 SPG, 0.4 BPG.  Kevin Duckworth would be later go to two All Star Games and in this season, which was his third in the NBA he was a starter for the first time doubling his minutes from 14.8 and 28.6.  Playing for Portland, the Center would increase his PPG from 6.0 to 15.8 and doubled his Rebounds per Game from 4.8 to 7.4 but his Blocks per Game remained at 4.0.  His PER was also only 14.9 but this was actually his career high and he had a VORP of -0.5.  Duckworth actually NEVER had a VORP that had a positive integer.  I guess we are saying that he really didn’t improve by much! Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Kevin Johnson, Phoenix Suns (1989)

20.4 PPG, 4.2 RPG, 12.2 APG, 1.7 SPG, 0.3 BPG.  Kevin Johnson was in his sophomore season and as a rookie he was traded from the Cleveland Cavaliers to the Phoenix Suns where he would become the starting Point Guard.  K.J. now played nearly 40 Minutes per Game (up from 24.0) and this would be his first of four straight 10 Assist seasons, and the 12.2 he had this year would be his highest.  Johnson would be named a Second Team All NBA Selection this year, and he would earn that honor again three more times.  While the Naismith Basketball Hall of Fame does not yet inducted him, he is a strong contender to enter in the future.  Ranked #9 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Rony Seikaly, Miami Heat (1990)

16.6 PPG, 10.4 RPG, 1.1 APG, 1.1 SPG, 1.7 BPG.  Rony Seikaly was in his second season and he had a modest increase in Minutes per Game from 25.2 to 32.6 and he increased his PPG from 10.9 to 16.6 and his boards per Game went from 7.0 to 10.4.  In the next four seasons he would average a double-double per season.  This would be the only individual accolade (other than two Player of the Weeks) that Seikaly would win.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Scott Skiles, Orlando Magic (1991)

17.2 PPG, 3.4 RPG, 8.4 APG, 1.1 SPG, 0.1 BPG.  This would be the only individual accolade for Scott Skiles who had his best season in almost every metric.  This was a significant jump from the previous season in regards to his stats but in what was his fifth season in the NBA was also his halfway point of his professional career.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Pervis Ellison, Washington Bullets (1992)

20.0 PPG, 11.2 RPG, 2.9 APG, 0.9 SPG, 2.7 BPG.  There is no argument that in what was the third NBA season of Pervis Ellison’s career that it was not just a warranted Most Improved Player of the Year Award year but it was by far and away the best campaign of his career.  This was the only double-double season of the Center’s career but also the only 20 PPG season for Ellison who nearly doubled his Points from the year before.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Mahmoud Abdul-Rauf, Denver Nuggets (1993)

19.2 PPG, 2.8 RPG, 4.2 APG, 1.0 SPG, 0.1 BPG.  Mahmoud Abdul-Rauf had his first of three 18.0 Points per Game Seasons, this one being a 19.2 PPG, which was a career high. This was his third season in the NBA and he had a significant increase in all stats, but as this was his highlight and it was not an All Star worthy one, we don’t have much of a Hall of Fame threat here.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Don MacLean, Washington Bullets (1994)

18.2 PPG, 6.2 RPG, 2.1 APG, 0.6 SPG, 0.3 BPG.  Hmmm.  This was the best season by far of Don MacLean’s career but if this was the best are we even close to a Hall of Fame career?  We are not!  After this season (he won his award in his second year) he never had a statistical campaign like this again and he would never come close to any award.   Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Dana Barros, Philadelphia 76ers (1995)

20.6 PPG, 3.3 RPG, 7.5 APG, 1.8 SPG, 0.0 BPG.  This was the sixth season of Dana Barros’ career and by leaps and bounds the best.  The above stats destroyed anything else he did before or after and this was also his only All Star campaign.  Barros would never come close to another individual award again.   Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Gheorghe Muresan, Washington Bullets (1996)

14.5 PPG, 9.6 RPG, 0.7 APG, 0.7 SPG, 2.3 BPG.  The star of Billy Crystal’s “My Giant” would win what would be his only individual award here and this was also his best season in the NBA. All of the above stat line would be career highs and he would finish first in Field Goal Percentage and was eighth in Blocks per Game.  He would only be in the NBA for four years after this, one of which he had to sit out due to injury.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Isaac Austin, Miami Heat (1997)

9.7 PPG, 5.8 RPG, 1.2 APG, 0.5 SPG, 0.5 BPG.  This was the sixth professional season of Isaac Austin’s career however it needs to be noted that the previous two seasons Austin played overseas and was in the Turkish League the year before.  Was anyone really aware of how he improved from the season before?  For what it is worth, he improved the next two years as an NBA player.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Alan Henderson, Atlanta Hawks (1998)

14.3 PPG, 6.4 RPG, 1.1 APG, 0.6 SPG, 0.5 BPG.  Henderson would start 33 Games this year as opposed to the zero from the year before and the Power Forward would see his minutes increase from 16.7 to 29.0 per Game.  His 14.3 PPG would be a career high and he would be a starter the next three years. This would be the only award he would win in the NBA.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Darrell Armstrong, Orlando Magic (1999)

13.8 PPG, 3.6 RPG, 6.7 APG, 2.2 SPG, 0.1 BPG.  In this season, Darrell Armstrong would also be named the NBA Sixth Man of the Year.  Armstrong only went from 25.8 to 30.0 Minutes per Game but it was a disproportional increase in terms of his Points per Game (13.8 from 9.2) Assists (6.7 from 4.9) and Steals (2.2 from 1.2).  His PER shot up from 15.7 to what would be a career high of 22.2.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Jalen Rose, Indiana Pacers (2000)

18.2 PPG, 4.8 RPG, 4.0 APG, 1.1 SPG, 0.6 BPG.  This was the sixth season for Jalen Rose and his fourth in Indiana.  In his first two seasons, he was a starter in Denver, but wet to Indiana on a bench role. This season, Rose returned as a starter and he put up the best numbers (up until that point) this year.  The former member of Michigan’s “Fab Five” raised his PPG over 7 Points and doubled his Assists.  His PER went up from 14.4 to 16.7.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Jermaine O’Neal, Indiana Pacers (2002)

19.0 PPG, 10.5 RPG, 1.6 APG, 0.6 SPG, 2.3 BPG.  For the second time in three years, our NBA Most Improved Player of the Year is an Indiana Pacer with Jermaine O’Neal winning this award. The Center/Power Forward only played five more Minutes per Game (32.6 to 37.6) but he increased his PPG from 12.9 to 19.0 and with a now 10.5 RPG, he was a double-double player.  He was named to the Al Star Team and would be the next five years after.  Ranked #69 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Gilbert Arenas, Golden State Warriors (2003)

18.3 PPG, 4.7 RPG, 6.3 APG, 1.5 SPG, 0.2 BPG.  “Agent Zero” was in his second season in the NBA where he improved his numbers from 24.6 Minutes per Game to 35.0, which resulted in an increase of Points per Game from 10.9 to 18.3.  Arenas would later go to three All Star Games after signing with the Washington Wizards.  Ranked #69 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Bobby Simmons, Los Angeles Clippers (2005)

16.4 PPG, 5.9 RPG, 2.7 APG, 1.4 SPG, 0.2 BPG.  For the first time Simmons was a regular starter and he went from 24.6 to 37.3 Minutes per Game.  This resulted in a 7.8 to 16.4 increase in Points per Game and he would have a career high 16.1 PER.  He would sign with the Milwaukee Bucks the year after and he would never win another individual award again.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

 

Let’s update our tally shall we?

Award in Question

Percentage of recipients who have entered the HOF

Percentage of recipients by year who have entered the HOF.

NBA MVP

100%

100%

NHL Norris

90.5%

96.4%

NBA All Star Game MVP

89.5%

91.7%

NHL Conn Smythe

74.2%

85.4%

NHL Lady Byng

63.8%

76.0%

NFL Super Bowl MVP

60.6%

64.9%

NBA Defensive Player of the Year

58.3%

56.5%

NBA Rookie of the Year

56.5%

56.5%

MLB/NL/AL Cy Young Award

44.4%

55.4%

NHL Frank J. Selke Trophy

33.3%

36.7%

NFL Offensive Rookie of the Year

28.6%

28.6%

MLB Edgar Martinez Award

26.7%

17.2%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Designated Hitter)

25.0%

30.8%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Shortstop)

23.5%

52.6%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove

21.7%

36.8%

NFL Defensive Rookie of the Year

20.6%

20.6%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Catcher)

20.0%

22.5%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Second Base)

18.8%

39.8%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Shortstop)

18.2%

35.1%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Pitcher)

18.2%

20.1%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Second Base)

16.7%

32.7%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Outfield)

16.7%

30.1%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Outfield)

15.7%

25.2%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Third Base)

14.3%

14.3%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Third Base)

13.6%

14.3%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (First Base)

13.6%

13.3%

MLB (NL/AL) Rookie of the Year

13.3%

13.3%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Catcher)

10.3%

15.2%

NBA Most Improved Player of the Year

5.3%

3.2%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (First Base)

3.8%

3.2%

So who is up next?

The following are the players who have won the Most Improved Player in the NBA who have retired but have not met the mandatory years out of the game to qualify for the Basketball Hall of Fame:

Boris Diaw, Phoenix Suns (2006)

13.3 PPG, 6.9 RPG, 6.2 APG, 0.7 SPG, 1.0 BPG.  In his third year in the NBA, Boris Diaw would nearly double his minutes but he would see his Points per Game almost triple from 4.8 to 12.3 and it was the same for Rebounds (2.6 to 6.9), Assists (2.3 to 6.2) and Blocks (0.3 to 1.0).  His PER shot up from 10.0 to 17.3 with a VORP of -0.5 to 3.7.   Diaw will be eligible for the Hall of Fame in 2021.

Monte Ellis, Golden State Warriors (2007)

16.5 PPG, 3.2 RPG, 4.1 APG, 1.7 SPG, 0.3 BPG.  This was Ellis’ second season in the NBA and his Minutes per Game nearly doubled from 18.1 to 34.3.  He responded well with his shooting with the increased minutes going from 6.8 to 16.5 in Points per Game and his PER increased from 11.1 to 15.0. Ellis will be eligible for the Hall of Fame in 2021.

Hedo Turkoglu, Orlando Magic (2008)

19.5 PPG, 5.7 RPG, 5.0 APG, 0.9 SPG, 0.3 BPG.  At age 28, Hedo Turkoglu only increased his Minutes per Game from 31.1 to 36.9 but his Points per Game shot up to 19.5 from 13.3.  This would be the native of Turkey’s best season in the NBA as this season would be career highs in PPG and PER (17.8).  Turkoglu will be eligible for the Hall of Fame in 2019.

Danny Granger, Indiana Pacers (2009)

25.8 PPG, 5.1 RPG, 2.7 APG, 1.0 SPG, 1.4 BPG.  While Granger only played .2 minutes from the season before he increased an already good 19.6 Points per Game to an excellent 25.8. That PPG would be a career high as would his PER of 21.8 and this would see Granger go to his first and only All Star Game.  He would have two more 20 PPG seasons after.  Granger will be eligible for the Hall of Fame in 2019.

Aaron Brooks, Houston Rockets (2010)

19.6 PPG, 2.6 RPG, 5.3 APG, 0.8 SPG, 0.2 BPG.  This was the third season of Aaron Brooks’ career and it would be by far his best.  With an increase of 10.6 Minutes per Game, Brooks went from 11.2 Points per Game to 19.6 and had a PER of 16.0, which again was a career high.  Brooks will be eligible for the Hall of Fame in 2022.

 

 

The following are the players who have won the NBA Most Improved Player who are still active.

Zach Randolph, Portland Trail Blazers (2004)

20.1 PPG, 10.5 RPG, 2.0 APG, 0.8 SPG, 0.5 BPG.  Zach Randolph had a monstrous statistical increase from the season before.  Randolph became a starter and more than doubled his minutes from 16.9 to 37.9 and he was now a double-double player with 20.1 Points and 10.5 Rebounds per Game. His PER actually was a little lower from the season before going from 19.9 to 19.6 essentially indicating he could have produced this in 2003.   37 Years Old, Playing for the Sacramento Kings.

Kevin Love, Minnesota Timberwolves (2011)

20.2 PPG, 15.2 RPG, 2.5 APG, 0.6 SPG, 0.4 BPG.  Love shot up in both Points and Rebounds in what was his third season improving 6.2 and 4.2 respectively in those categories per Game, with a 7.2 Minutes per Game increase.  Love would be chosen for his first of five All Star Games and his 15.2 Rebounds per Game would be a career high and would give him the Rebounding title. The Power Forward also saw a decent rise in his PER from 20.7 to 24.3 and more than doubled his Win Shares going from 4.9 to 11.4.  30 Years Old, Playing for the Cleveland Cavaliers.

Ryan Anderson, Orlando Magic (2012)

16.1 PPG, 7.7 RPG, 0.9 APG, 0.8 SPG, 0.4 BPG.  Ryan Anderson was in his fourth season in the NBA and what would be his last in Orlando as he would be traded to New Orleans the year after. With a 10 Minutes per Game gain, he went from 10.6 to 16.1 in Points per Game and had a career high 7.7 Rebounds per Game.  He would have a career high PER of 21.2 this season.  30 Years Old, Playing for the Phoenix Suns.

Paul George, Indiana Pacers (2013)

17.4 PPG, 7.6 RPG, 4.1 APG, 1.8 SPG, 0.6 BPG.  George’s Minutes per Game went up from 29.7 to 37.6 and he responded with increase of 2.0 Rebounds, 1.7 Assists and 5.3 Points per Game. He arguably had a bigger improvement the next season when he went up to a PPG and PER over 20.  This would be the first of many All Star Game seasons for George. 28 Years Old, Playing for the Oklahoma City Thunder.

Goran Dragic, Phoenix Suns (2014)

20.3 PPG, 3.2 RPG, 5.9 APG, 1.4 SPG, 0.3 BPG.  In his seventh season in the National Basketball Association, Goran Dragic did not play much more than the season before (only 1.6 Minutes per Game) but his Points per Game went up from 14.7 to 20.3 and he had sizable increase Field Goal Percentage going from .443 to .505.  The Slovenian would also raise his PER from 17.5 to 21.4.  32 Years Old, Playing for the Miami Heat.

Jimmy Butler, Chicago Bulls (2015)

20.0 PPG, 5.8 RPG, 3.3 APG, 1.8 SPG, 0.6 BPG.  Jimmy Butler played 38.7 Minutes per Game this year, the exact amount he played the season before but he increased his effectiveness as a shooter going to .462 from .397, which resulted into a rise from 13.1 to 20.0 Points per Game.  29 Years Old, Playing for the Philadelphia 76ers.

C.J. McCollum, Portland Trail Blazers (2016)

20.8 PPG, 3.2 RPG, 4.3 APG, 1.2 SPG, 0.3 BPG.  Statistically speaking, this might be the most deserving winner of this award.  McCollum more than doubled his minutes (15.7 to 34.8) and more than triples his Points per Game going from 6.8 to 20.8.  His PER also went from 13.1 to 17.7.  27 Years Old, Playing for the Portland Trail Blazers.

Giannis Antetokounmpko, Milwaukee Bucks (2017)

22.9 PPG, 8.8 RPG, 5.4 APG, 1.6 SPG, 1.9 BPG.  With only a .3 Minute per Game increase look what the “Greek Freak” did per Game.  He raised his Points by 6.0, his Rebounds by 1.1, his Assists by 0.9, his Steals by 0.4 and his blocks by 0.5.  Even more his PER went from 18.8 to 26.1!  This would be the first of many All Star Games for Antetokounmpko.  24 Years Old, Playing for the Milwaukee Bucks.

Victor Oladipo, Indiana Pacers (2018)

23.1 PPG, 5.2 RPG, 4.3 APG, 2.4 SPG, 0.8 BPG.  How frustrated must Orlando Magic fans have been when they saw Oladipo break out like this?  This was the season they always thought he was capable of and it happened in his first season in Indiana.  With only a Minutes per Game increase from 33.2 to 34.0 he shot up from 15.9 Points to 23.1 Points per Game and doubled his Steals from 1.2 to 2.4 per Game, which was enough to earn him the Steals Title.  Oladipo was a Third Team All-NBA Selection and he went to his first All Star Game.  His PER also had a massive increase from 13.6 to 23.1.  26 Years Old, Playing for the Indiana Pacers.

As you can see the current result with only one player (Tracy McGrady) who has made the Hall of Fame but with the recent winners who are still active we could easily see this percentage rise.  We initially thought that we would see a higher number as if you are the winner of this award you must be pretty good but there were a few winners here that we openly question and with the recent winners there seems to be an overall improvement, which we think will result in a higher percentage of Hall of Famers.

Up next we are going to back to the National Hockey League and the Calder Trophy, which is presented annually to the league’s top rookie.

As always, we thank you for that support and look for that soon!

Football is about to enter the ‘business end’ of the season, with several sides already punching their tickets to the playoffs and some even knowing that they will go straight to the divisional round It hasn’t been an up and down season by any means, with the majority of predicted contenders in September essentially being the same clutch of teams that are ‘real’ contenders as we push towards Christmas.

There has, of course, been some evolution throughout the season. The Ravens, for example, have been taken more seriously as we moved from fall to winter. The Chargers, too, seem to have a lot more respect now. However, by and large, pundits and sportsbooks have stuck with a clutch of teams as the main Super Bowl LIII contenders throughout the season: the Patriots, Rams, Chiefs and Saints.

Of that quartet, the candidacy of the favorite has changed between them at different junctures. The Patriots were the preseason favorites, but were soon usurped by the Rams and, for a while, the Chiefs.  However, as divisions have started to be clinched, it’s now clear that the sportsbooks have settled on a favorite that they are likely to stick with – New Orleans Saints.

This is being written just before Week 16, so you can follow the link for the latest updated NFL odds, but at the moment the Saints are coming in at around +275 with William Hill and others. At almost half the odds of the chasing pack, that’s the first time there has been clear daylight between a team at the top and the other contenders. Both the Rams and Chiefs can be found at odds of about +600, with the erratic Patriots further back at +800. The Chargers have also been recently put in around +800 with some bookmakers, with the Bears (+1200) the only other side less than +1600.

The pertinent question, however, is have the sportsbooks called it correctly? On one hand, it’s hard to argue with the idea that the Saints should be favorites to win their first Super Bowl since 2010. The haven’t missed a beat all season, matching scintillating offense with decent(ish) defense. Drew Brees looks once again like the sprightly 31-year-old who took the MVP trophy at Super Bowl XLIV. Crucially for a championship chasing team, the Saints look just as comfortable on the road as they do at home. Things just seem right with Brees, Sean Payton and co.

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However, if this was a horse race, we would very much hold the rest of the field in respect. A run to the Super Bowl will likely entail a showdown with the Rams in the NFC Championship game. Home advantage is still up for grabs at the time of writing, but even if it was played at the Superdome, where they defeated the Rams earlier in the season, a win is by no means guaranteed. When you consider a date with the Chiefs, Patriots are some AFC team with a lot of momentum, +275 looks a little short at this point of the season.

We here at Notinhalloffame.com thought it would be fun to take a look at the major awards in North American team sports and see how it translates into Hall of Fame potential.

Needless to say, different awards in different sports yield hall of fame potential. In basketball, the team sport with the least amount of players on a roster, the dividend for greatness much higher. In baseball, it is not as much as a great individual season does not have the same impact.

We are now taking a look at the Gold Glove Award, given annually to the best defensive player in MLB in each respective position.

We have finished our run around the bases and checked out the Outfield, which leaves the least interesting position left in regards to the Gold Glove, the Pitcher.

With this position there are less tangible statistics to look at and more what they do in terms of what they do to backup their teammates or holding runners.

Apologies ahead of time if there are limited commentary! Actually it will be quite limited!

The following are the past players who have won the Gold Glove at Pitcher who are eligible for the Baseball Hall of Fame and have been enshrined.

Bob Gibson, NL St. Louis Cardinals (1965)

0.0 dWAR Bob Gibson was coming off his first World Series win and in 1965 he went to his second All Star Game. Gibson was third in Putouts with a .952 Fielding Percentage with only a 20% Caught Stealing Percentage. This wasn’t terrible but fine for a Gold Glove, especially when he was as dominating as Gibson was with his arm. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1981.

Bob Gibson, NL St. Louis Cardinals (2) (1966)

0.0 dWAR Now a three time All Star, Gibson’s percentages increased to a 50% Caught Stealing and a .964 Fielding Percentage. This would be the first and only time where he would finish first in Putouts among National League Pitchers. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1981.

Bob Gibson, NL St. Louis Cardinals (3) (1967)

0.0 dWAR This season, Bob Gibson would again go to the All Star Game while finishing fourth in Putouts with a perfect Fielding Percentage and a 67% Caught Stealing Percentage. This seems like a Gold Glove win to us! Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1981.

Bob Gibson, NL St. Louis Cardinals (4) (1968)

0.1 dWAR Bob Gibson would win the National League MVP and Cy Young and netted his first and surprisingly only Pickoff of his career. He would have a more than respectable .980 Fielding Percentage and 45% Caught Stealing Percentage. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1981.

Bob Gibson, NL St. Louis Cardinals (5) (1969)

0.0 dWAR Gibson was third in Putouts with a somewhat average .946 Fielding Percentage and 33% Caught Stealing Percentage. This is not exactly screaming Gold Glove. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1981.

Bob Gibson, NL St. Louis Cardinals (6) (1970)

0.0 dWAR From the limited metrics we have, Bob Gibson was not exactly Gold Glove worthy as he had only a .931 Fielding Percentage and 23% Caught Stealing Percentage but he would win his second Cy Young this year, and honestly this didn’t hurt. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1981.

Bob Gibson, NL St. Louis Cardinals (7) (1971)

0.0 dWAR Again from what limited data we have Bob Gibson’s eighth Gold Glove win only saw him accrue a .942 Fielding Percentage and 23% Caught Stealing Percentage. We aren’t seeing defensive greatness here. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1981.

Bob Gibson, NL St. Louis Cardinals (8) (1972)

0.0 dWAR This would be the final All Star Game appearance for Bob Gibson and in terms of Fielding Percentage he had a decent .983. Still, with the data we have this is not spectacular. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1981.

Bob Gibson, NL St. Louis Cardinals (9) (1973)

0.0 dWAR 1973 would be the ninth and final Gold Glove win for Bob Gibson and again we don’t see anything notable with his .946 Fielding Percentage and 40% Caught Stealing Percentage. Again, he was not in the top five in Putouts and he was never in the top five in Range Factor per Game. What we can say is that overall he had a 31% Caught Stealing Percentage, which was lower than the league average of 37%. Is nine Gold Gloves correct here? Probably not. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1981.

Jim Palmer, AL Baltimore Orioles (1976)

0.0 dWAR 1976 would see Jim Palmer win his third and final Cy Young and he was already at this point was already a two time World Series Champion. Palmer was fourth in Range Factor per Game in the AL and for the third and final time he would finish first in Putouts. He would have a solid .987 Fielding Percentage and had three Pickoffs. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1990.

Jim Palmer, AL Baltimore Orioles (2) (1977)

0.0 dWAR Palmer was the American League Cy Young runner-up in 1977 and in regards to his defensive prowess he had a decent .971 Fielding Percentage and a 67% Caught Stealing Percentage. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1990.

Jim Palmer, AL Baltimore Orioles (3) (1978)

0.0 dWAR Jim Palmer would finish third in Putouts and fifth in Range Factor per Game and he would also finish third in Cy Young Voting. He had a solid .972 Fielding Percentage with a 49% Caught Stealing Percentage. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1990.

Phil Niekro, NL Atlanta Braves (1978)

0.0 dWAR Phil Niekro by this time had already led the National League Pitchers in Fielding Percentage three times yet in this year he was fourth in Range Factor per Game and second in Assists. 1978 would see him with a .978 Fielding Percentage but only had a 26% stat in Caught Stealing Percentage. He would also have four Pickoffs. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1997.

Jim Palmer, AL Baltimore Orioles (4) (1979)

0.0 dWAR This would be the fourth and final Gold Glove for Jim Palmer who would eventually enter the Baseball Hall of Fame on his first try. It should be mentioned that he would have a perfect 1.000% Fielding Percentage here, but his overall body of work does not showcase a four time Gold Glove recipient. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1990.

Phil Niekro, NL Atlanta Braves (2) (1979)

0.0 dWAR Niekro turned 40 this year but was still a very good Pitcher who for the second year in a row would finish sixth in Cy Young voting. Defensively he would have a .989 Fielding Percentage with a very low 22% Caught Stealing Percentage, although he was second in Range Factor per Game among all of the National League Pitchers, which would be the last time that Niekro would be in the top five. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1997.

Phil Niekro, NL Atlanta Braves (3) (1980)

0.0 dWAR Niekro had a .983 Fielding Percentage, which was good enough for fourth overall. He also had a Caught Stealing Percentage of 43 with two Pickoffs. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1997.

Steve Carlton, NL Philadelphia Phillies (1981)

0.0 dWAR Steve Carlton won his only Gold Glove in a season that was sandwiched between his third and fourth Cy Young Award, but a deeper look shows that Carlton possibly should have won more than just one. Carlton had five Pickoffs that year and he would have 146 in total, by far and wide the most of all-time. Carlton had five full seasons where he had a perfect Fielding Percentage and 1981 was one of those seasons. He had a 60% Caught Stealing Percentage and had a career 42% against the league average of 34%. Carlton should have won many more. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1994.

Phil Niekro, NL Atlanta Braves (4) (1982)

0.0 dWAR Phil Niekro would finish fifth in Cy Young voting, an amazing feat for a 43 year old. Defensively he had three Pickoffs with a 48% Caught Stealing Percentage and a .982 Fielding Percentage. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1997.

Phil Niekro, NL Atlanta Braves (5) (1983)

0.0 dWAR This would be the final Gold Glove for Niekro and it would see him with a .955 Fielding Percentage but only 29 in Caught Stealing Percentage. Amazingly, this would not be the last individual accolade for Phil Niekro as he was a New York Yankee the following season and was named to the American League All Star Team. Overall, Niekro had 51 Pickoffs in his career. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1997.

Greg Maddux, NL Chicago Cubs (1990)

0.0 dWAR Greg Maddux was a first ballot Hall of Fame inductee and is regarded as the finest defensive Pitcher of all time as evident by his record 18 Gold Gloves. Again, let’s say that again...18! However, this is the Gold Glove after all and we know that there are many suspect wins, however with Maddux this looks pretty solid. In what was his first win, he finished first in Putouts, Assists, Range Factor per Game and Fielding Percentage. Other than a 24% in Caught Stealing Percentage, this was a near perfect start to a defensive dynasty! Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2014.

Greg Maddux, NL Chicago Cubs (2) (1991)

0.0 dWAR 1991 would see the then Chicago Cub finish first in Putouts and Range Factor while landing second in Assists. Maddux had a decent Fielding Percentage of .978 with a low 22 in Caught Stealing Percentage but did have 5 Pickoffs. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2014.

Greg Maddux, NL Chicago Cubs (3) (1992)

0.0 dWAR The dominance on the mound for Greg Maddux begun here as he would win his first of four straight Cy Young Awards. Maddux was first in Assists, Putouts and Range Factor per Game with a .969 Fielding Percentage and 33 in Caught Stealing Percentage. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2014.

Greg Maddux, NL Atlanta Braves (4) (1993)

0.0 dWAR Now an Atlanta Brave after signing a Free Agent deal, Maddux would have a low .933 Fielding Percentage with 18% on Caught Stealing but he was again first in Assists, Putouts and Range Factor per Game. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2014.

Greg Maddux, NL Atlanta Braves (5) (1994)

0.0 dWAR This season, Greg Maddux was fifth in Putouts, second in Assists and again was the National League leader in Range Factor per Game. Maddux would have a .935 Fielding Percentage and 21 in Caught Stealing Percentage. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2014.

Greg Maddux, NL Atlanta Braves (6) (1995)

0.0 dWAR Greg Maddux would win his fourth straight and final Cy Young in 1995 and more importantly would win the World Series. Defensively, he had a low 19 in terms of Caught Stealing Percentage but he had a perfect Fielding Percentage and was also first in Assists and Range Factor per Game while finishing third in Putouts. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2014.

Greg Maddux, NL Atlanta Braves (7) (1996)

0.0 dWAR With his seventh straight Gold Glove win, Greg Maddux again finished first in Range Factor per Game for the eighth consecutive season and he was again first in Assists and Putouts. He had a strong .991 Fielding Percentage with a weak Caught Stealing Percentage of 19%. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2014.

Greg Maddux, NL Atlanta Braves (8) (1997)

0.0 dWAR For the first time there are some serious holes in a Gold Glove win for Greg Maddux. The Cy Young Award runner-up had a .956 Fielding Percentage but his streak of Range Factor per Game wins ended with a fifth place finish. He was also not in the top five in Assists and Putouts, the first time since 1987. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2014.

Greg Maddux, NL Atlanta Braves (9) (1998)

0.0 dWAR Maddux returned to his defensive dominance with a first place finish in Putouts, Assists and Range Factor per Game and he had a .959 Fielding Percentage. He still had a bad Caught Stealing metric with only 28%. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2014.

Greg Maddux, NL Atlanta Braves (10) (1999)

0.0 dWAR Greg Maddux did it again as he finished atop the leaderboard in Range Factor per Game and was second in Assists and Putouts. He would have a Fielding Percentage of .956 and had a Caught Stealing Percentage of 32%. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2014.

Greg Maddux, NL Atlanta Braves (11) (2000)

0.0 dWAR Maddux finished third in Cy Young voting, which would be the last time that he would receive votes for this accolade. He would have a .979 Fielding Percentage with 18% in Caught Stealing and was first in Assists, Range Factor per Game and was fourth in Putouts. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2014.

Greg Maddux, NL Atlanta Braves (12) (2001)

0.0 dWAR Once again, Greg Maddux would finish first in Range Factor per Game and Assists and was third in Putouts. His Fielding and Caught Stealing Percentage was .986 and 37 respectively. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2014.

Greg Maddux, NL Atlanta Braves (13) (2002)

0.0 dWAR Maddux did not finish first in Range Factor per Game this season but he was still very good with a third place finish and a fourth place rank in Assists. He would have a .986 Fielding Percentage and again a below league average of 14% in Caught Stealing. Notably, this was his last season with the Atlanta Braves. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2014.

Greg Maddux, NL Chicago Cubs (14) (2004)

0.0 dWAR Maddux would finish second in Range Factor per Game and Assists and for the last time in his career was first in Putouts. The legend would have a .987 Fielding Percentage with a Caught Stealing Percentage of 32. He may have missed out on the 2003 Gold Glove after winning 13 straight, but here he is starting a new one. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2014.

Greg Maddux, NL Chicago Cubs (15) (2005)

0.0 dWAR In what would be his final full season with the Chicago Cubs he was second in Assists and third in Range Factor per Game. His Fielding and Caught Stealing Percentage was .958 and 20 respectively. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2014.

Greg Maddux, NL Chicago Cubs/Los Angeles Dodgers (16) (2006)

0.0 dWAR Maddux turned 40 this year and he split his season between the Cubs and Dodgers. Despite his older age, he was still a good defensive contributor and for the third time he would have a perfect Fielding Percentage (although it was again a low Caught Stealing Percentage with only 19). He was third in Range Factor per Game and was the leader in Putouts. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2014.

Greg Maddux, NL San Diego Padres (17) (2007)

0.0 dWAR First the bad. We have been ragging on Maddux’s inability to assist his Catchers in stopping baserunners and this was his worst season yet with a paltry 5% in that statistic. Still, we don’t have any problem with this, as his fielding was again great as he finished first in Range Factor per Game and Assists. He had a Fielding Percentage of .986.   Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2014.

Greg Maddux, NL San Diego Padres/Los Angeles Dodgers (18) (2008)

0.0 dWAR As we have done this process, we have encountered many Hall of Fame players who won Gold Gloves late in their career who had no business winning that final award, or in some cases final ones. For Greg Maddux, who again we need to say “18 time Gold Glove winner Greg Maddux” was one of the most deserving multi-time winners ever. In his last win, Maddux had a .961 Fielding Percentage with a first place finish in both Range Factor per Game and Putouts. A nice finish for a defensive superstar. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2014.

The following are the players who have won the Gold Glove at Pitcher who are eligible for the Baseball Hall of Fame and have not been selected:

Bobby Schantz, ML New York Yankees (1957)

0.0 dWAR. In 1952, Bobby Schantz had the season of his life winning 24 Games and leading the American League in WHIP and SO/BB and the then Philadelphia Athletic would win the American League MVP Award. He would never have a season like that again, but he had a long career and the converted Third Baseman was known throughout baseball for his defensive skill, so naturally he won the first Gold Glove awarded to a Pitcher. Schantz was second in Range Factor per Game and he would go to his third and final All Star Game this year. He also would have three Pickoffs this year, a career high.  Schantz was on the ballot for five years and finished as high as 2.3% in both 1970 and 1972.

Bobby Schantz, AL New York Yankees (2) (1958)

0.0 dWAR. Schantz again made history as the first player to win the Gold Glove at Pitcher in the American League, however he only played 126 Innings this year. This trend will continue as Schantz would continue to collect Gold Gloves.   Schantz was on the ballot for five years and finished as high as 2.3% in both 1970 and 1972.

Harvey Haddix, NL Cincinnati Reds (1958)

0.0 dWAR. Harvey Haddix in terms of the defensive stats showed him to be average but he was already at this point in his career a three time All Star. Haddix was on the ballot for ten years and finished as high as 3.8% in both 1985.

Bobby Schantz, AL New York Yankees (3) (1959)

0.0 dWAR. By this stage of his career, Schantz was now coming out of the bullpen and he threw for 94.2 Innings.   Schantz was on the ballot for five years and finished as high as 2.3% in both 1970 and 1972.

Harvey Haddix, NL Pittsburgh Pirates (2) (1959)

0.0 dWAR. Haddix had a perfect Fielding Percentage, but 1959 for Harvey Haddix was all about the 12 perfect innings he threw in a game, and lost in the 13th. Nobody will ever do that again. Haddix was on the ballot for ten years and finished as high as 3.8% in both 1985.

Bobby Schantz, AL New York Yankees (4) (1960)

0.0 dWAR. Schantz would not start a game this year and he was now reduced to 67.2 Innings. While he may have been still solid with the glove, when you are playing a third of what other Pitchers are could there be a hole in this voting? There will be more of this to come. Schantz was on the ballot for five years and finished as high as 2.3% in both 1970 and 1972.

Harvey Haddix, NL Pittsburgh Pirates (3) (1960)

0.0 dWAR. This was the third and final Gold Glove win of Harvey Haddix’ career where he would finish fifth among National League Pitchers in Range Factor per Game. Haddix was on the ballot for ten years and finished as high as 3.8% in both 1985.

Frank Lary, AL Detroit Tigers (1961)

0.0 dWAR. This was unquestionably the greatest season of Frank Lary’s career where he was an All Star and a third place finisher in Cy Young voting. Defensively he was first in Putouts and Range Factor per Game by a Pitcher and he had 2 Pickoffs with a 64% Caught Stealing Percentage. Although Lary was Hall of Fame eligible in 1971 he was not on the ballot.

Bobby Schantz, NL Pittsburgh Pirates (5) (1961)

0.0 dWAR. This would be the first Gold Glove win for Schantz in the National League in what would be his only season in Western Pennsylvania. Schantz threw for 89.1 Innings this year. Schantz was on the ballot for five years and finished as high as 2.3% in both 1970 and 1972.

Jim Kaat, AL Minnesota Twins (1962)

-0.1 dWAR. Jim Kaat is regarded as one of the greatest defensive Pitchers ever and he certainly has a mantle of Gold Glove trophies to back it up. Kaat would have a good 75% Caught Stealing Percentage and had 1 Pickoff. He finished first among American League Pitchers in Assists and Range Factor Per Game. Kaat was on the ballot for 15 years finishing as high as 29.6% in 1993. He is ranked #29 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Bobby Schantz, NL Houston Astros/St. Louis Cardinals (6) (1962)

0.0 dWAR. Splitting his season between Houston and St. Louis, Schantz won his sixth straight Gold Glove and again did so in under 100 Innings. Schantz was on the ballot for five years and finished as high as 2.3% in both 1970 and 1972.

Jim Kaat, AL Minnesota Twins (2) (1963)

0.0 dWAR. Kaat was second in the American League in Range Factor per Game and he recorded two Pickoffs. Nothing special on the surface here. Kaat was on the ballot for 15 years finishing as high as 29.6% in 1993. He is ranked #29 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Bobby Schantz, NL St. Louis Cardinals (7) (1963)

0.0 dWAR. Again from the pen, Schantz won his seventh straight Gold Glove while pitching 79.1 Innings. Schantz was on the ballot for five years and finished as high as 2.3% in both 1970 and 1972.

Jim Kaat, AL Minnesota Twins (3) (1964)

-0.1 dWAR. Kaat had one pickoff but only a .928 Fielding Percentage and a pedestrian 38% Caught Stealing Percentage. He was third in Assists and fourth in Range Factor per Game. Kaat was on the ballot for 15 years finishing as high as 29.6% in 1993. He is ranked #29 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Bobby Schantz, NL St. Louis Cardinals/Chicago Cubs (8) (1964)

0.0 dWAR. In what would be his final Gold Glove win, Bobby Schantz spread 60.2 Innings between the Cardinals and Chicago Cubs. Should Schantz have won eight Gold Gloves? Probably not, as we will employ a reliever bias (or rather Innings bias) but there was no mistake to be made that by all accounts of his peers that he was very good with his glove. Schantz was on the ballot for five years and finished as high as 2.3% in both 1970 and 1972.

Jim Kaat, AL Minnesota Twins (4) (1965)

0.0 dWAR. While we have stated that the defensive skills of a Pitcher are harder to substantiate, we have going forward some statistical issues that should question whether or not he should have won so many Gold Gloves. This season would be the last in which Kaat would finish in the top five in Assists (third) and Range Factor per Game (fourth). He also finished first in Errors, picked off nobody, had only 27% in Caught Stealing Percentage and had a .929 Fielding Percentage. There will be a lot of living off reputation (or just using the same ballot as the year before) with Kaat as we continue…which will be a lot. Kaat was on the ballot for 15 years finishing as high as 29.6% in 1993. He is ranked #29 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Jim Kaat, AL Minnesota Twins (5) (1966)

-0.1 dWAR. This was Kaat’s best year as a Pitcher winning 25 Games and going to his second All Star Game. Defensively, he had three Pickoffs with a .958 Fielding Percentage. Kaat was on the ballot for 15 years finishing as high as 29.6% in 1993. He is ranked #29 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Jim Kaat, AL Minnesota Twins (6) (1967)

-0.1 dWAR. Kaat had no Pickoffs, a 30% Caught Stealing Percentage and a .952 Fielding Percentage. This certainly wasn’t spectacular. Kaat was on the ballot for 15 years finishing as high as 29.6% in 1993. He is ranked #29 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Jim Kaat, AL Minnesota Twins (7) (1968)

0.0 dWAR. Kaat did have a better Fielding Percentage than the year before with a .976 and he did have a much better Caught Stealing Percentage of 67% but there was only six attempts. Again, there was nothing spectacular in term of his numbers. Kaat was on the ballot for 15 years finishing as high as 29.6% in 1993. He is ranked #29 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Jim Kaat, AL Minnesota Twins (8) (1969)

0.0 dWAR. Jim Kaat’s Fielding Percentage plummeted to .826 and he had an American League leading 8 Errors for a Pitcher. He also had a 15% Caught Stealing Percentage with zero Pickoffs. There just doesn’t seem to be any statistical justification for this Gold Glove win, so what are we missing here? Kaat was on the ballot for 15 years finishing as high as 29.6% in 1993. He is ranked #29 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Jim Kaat, AL Minnesota Twins (9) (1970)

0.0 dWAR. Kaat would again have a low Fielding Percentage (.935) and Caught Stealing Percentage (20) there is not a lot here. Kaat was on the ballot for 15 years finishing as high as 29.6% in 1993. He is ranked #29 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Jim Kaat, AL Minnesota Twins (10) (1971)

0.0 dWAR. Kaat recorded a pair of Pickoffs this season with an improved Fielding Percentage of .982 but he did have a Caught Stealing Percentage of 20%. Kaat was on the ballot for 15 years finishing as high as 29.6% in 1993. He is ranked #29 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Jim Kaat, AL Minnesota Twins (11) (1972)

0.0 dWAR. Again we don’t see anything special here. He did have a Fielding Percentage of .923 and tied his career high of three Pickoffs but again he had a below league average Caught Stealing Percentage of 33%. Keep in mind that we haven’t in a while talked about his position in awhile in terms of Range Factor per Game because he was not in the top five. He won’t be again when we are done talking about him either. Kaat was on the ballot for 15 years finishing as high as 29.6% in 1993. He is ranked #29 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Jim Kaat, AL Minnesota Twins/Chicago White Sox (12) (1973)

0.0 dWAR. Kaat was traded to the Chicago White Sox midway through the season and while he had a .973 Fielding Percentage with a 20% Caught Stealing Percentage with no Pickoffs. Kaat was on the ballot for 15 years finishing as high as 29.6% in 1993. He is ranked #29 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Jim Kaat, AL Chicago White Sox (13) (1974)

0.0 dWAR. While it seems like we have been picking on the Gold Glove wins, there are some positives in this win. He tied his season high in Pickoffs (3) with a 69% Caught Stealing Percentage. Kaat was on the ballot for 15 years finishing as high as 29.6% in 1993.

Andy Messersmith, NL Los Angeles Dodgers (1974)

0.0 dWAR. Messersmith would lead the National League in Wins (20) and he was second in Cy Young voting, although his defensive numbers seemed below average with a .873 Fielding Percentage and 46% in Caught Stealing Percentage. Messersmith was on the ballot for 2 years finishing as high as 0.8% in 1985

Jim Kaat, AL Chicago White Sox (14) (1975)

0.0 dWAR. Kaat had a great season where he went to his third All Star Game and finished fourth in Cy Young voting and defensively he had two Pickoffs with a 75% Caught Stealing Percentage and .982 Fielding Percentage. Kaat was on the ballot for 15 years finishing as high as 29.6% in 1993. He is ranked #29 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Andy Messersmith, NL Los Angeles Dodgers (2) (1975)

0.0 dWAR. This would be the third and final time that Andy Messersmith would finish in the top five in Cy Young voting (he was fifth this year) and he would finish fourth in Assists, which was the only time that he ever did that. Worth mentioning is that Messersmith was in the top five in Errors seven times. Perhaps we don’t have a two time Gold Glove winner here? Messersmith was on the ballot for 2 years finishing as high as 0.8% in 1985

Jim Kaat, NL Philadelphia Phillies (15) (1976)

0.0 dWAR. While Jim Kaat was now in the National League his streak of consecutive Gold Gloves continued, though again there was not a lot to point at statistically to justify this win. He had no Pickoffs with a 33% Caught Stealing Percentage and a .949 Fielding Percentage. Kaat was on the ballot for 15 years finishing as high as 29.6% in 1993. He is ranked #29 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Jim Kaat, NL Philadelphia Phillies (16) (1977)

0.0 dWAR. We end our look at Jim Kaat who would win his sixteenth straight and final Gold Glove. We have certainly questioned many of those wins and this one is no different as his Fielding Percentage dipped back below .900 with .897%. A quick look overall sees that Kaat’s overall Range Factor per Game is not in the top 100 overall and over his career he had a below league average Caught Stealing Percentage of 34% compared to the rest of the league of 37%. He also had a career Defensive bWAR of -0.4. Honestly, does this seem like a 16 time Gold Glove winner to you? Kaat was on the ballot for 15 years finishing as high as 29.6% in 1993. He is ranked #29 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Mike Norris, AL Oakland Athletics (1980)

0.0 dWAR. Mike Norris was the runner-up for the Cy Young this season having by far his best season in the Majors with 22 Wins, leading the AL in H/9 and he was second in ERA. Defensively, he was good too as he led all of the American League Pitchers in Range Factor per Game and he was second in Assists and third in Putouts. Although Norris was Hall of Fame eligible in 1996 he was not on the ballot.

Mike Norris, AL Oakland Athletics (2) (1981)

0.0 dWAR. Mike Norris parlayed the success from the previous year to an All Star appearance, though his second Gold Glove was hard to find merit in. He was not in the top five in Range Factor per Game, Assists or Putouts and his decent .976 Fielding Percentage was offset by his 27 in Caught Stealing Percentage. They probably should have done better this year. Although Norris was Hall of Fame eligible in 1996 he was not on the ballot.

Ron Guidry, AL New York Yankees (1982)

0.0 dWAR. Oh Boy. This will be a bit of a mess in our eyes as Ron Guidry would go on a streak here that may be a little hard to justify, although we do our best. In 1982, Ron Guidry was already a Cy Young winner (1978) and in 1982 he would have his second perfect Fielding Percentage. He also had a 40% metric in Caught Stealing Percentage. Guidry was on the ballot for nine years and finished as high as 8.8% in 2000. Guidry is ranked #60 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Ron Guidry, AL New York Yankees (2) (1983)

0.0 dWAR. Finishing fifth in Cy Young voting this year, Guidry would have his third straight season where he had a perfect Fielding Percentage, although notably he was never in the top five in Range Factor per Game in ANY of his five Gold Glove wins. In this season, he would have a 34 in Caught Stealing Percentage. Guidry was on the ballot for nine years and finished as high as 8.8% in 2000. Guidry is ranked #60 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Ron Guidry, AL New York Yankees (3) (1984)

0.0 dWAR. This was the fourth straight and final time that “Louisiana Lightning” Ron Guidry would go perfect in Fielding Percentage. He would go 45% in Caught Stealing. Guidry was on the ballot for nine years and finished as high as 8.8% in 2000. Guidry is ranked #60 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Joaquin Andujar, NL St. Louis Cardinals (1984)

0.0 dWAR. This was arguably the best season of Joaquin Andujar’s career as he was a 20 Game Winner and he finished fourth in Cy Young Award voting. Andujar would finish first in Assists, third in Range Factor per Game and had 5 Pickoffs with a .954 Fielding Percentage. Although Andujar was eligible for the Hall of Fame in 1994 he was not on the ballot.

Ron Guidry, AL New York Yankees (4) (1985)

0.0 dWAR. The streak of perfect Fielding Percentage was over and Ron Guidry would finish with a .976. This season he was second in Cy Young voting and arguably this was his last really good season as a Pitcher. Again, he was not in the top five in Assists, Putouts and Range Factor per Game. Guidry was on the ballot for nine years and finished as high as 8.8% in 2000. Guidry is ranked #60 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Rick Reuschel, NL Pittsburgh Pirates (1985)

0.0 dWAR. Also the winner of the Hutch Award, Rick Reuschel was first in Range Factor per Game with a perfect Fielding Percentage. He was also second in Putouts and had a Caught Stealing Percentage of 47. Reuschel was on the ballot for one year in 1997 and received 0.4% of the vote. He is ranked #96 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Ron Guidry, AL New York Yankees (5) (1986)

0.0 dWAR. Like many of the Gold Glove wins by Ron Guidry, his fifth and final one probably should not have happened. Guidry (as you would expect from the previous wins) was not a top five finisher in Range Factor per Game, Assists and Putouts and his .968 and 28 in Fielding and Caught Stealing Percentage do not echo what a Gold Glove winner should have. Guidry was on the ballot for nine years and finished as high as 8.8% in 2000. Guidry is ranked #60 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Fernando Valenzuela, NL Los Angeles Dodgers (1986)

0.0 dWAR. Fernando Valenzuela was an above average defensive hurler and in 1986 he was the Cy Young runner-up while leading the NL in Wins. The popular Mexican led the league in Range Factor per Game, the third and final time that he did so and he was also the leader in Assists, which was the second time he did that. He was also second in Putouts and had a .987 Fielding Percentage with an above average 42 in Caught Stealing Percentage. Overall, it was good that Valenzuela won at least one Gold Glove and he probably should have won more. Valenzuela was on the ballot for two years and finished as high as 6.2% in 2004.

Mark Langston, AL Seattle Mariners (1987)

0.0 dWAR. Mark Langston was fifth in American League Cy Young voting but defensively he was not in the top five in Assists, Putouts or Range Factor per Game. His Fielding Percentage was a decent .961 and his Caught Stealing Percentage was 30, which was essentially the American League average. Langston was on the ballot for one year in 2005 but did not receive any votes.

Rick Reuschel, NL San Francisco Giants (2) (1987)

0.0 dWAR. Reuschel was named an All Star this year and he finished third in Cy Young Voting. Defensively, he was not in the top five in Range Factor per Game, but he was second in Putouts and had an excellent 67 in Caught Stealing Percentage. This would be the last Gold Glove for Reuschel who over his career was solid. Four times he would have a perfect Fielding Percentage and he would finish first in Range Factor per Game three times and was second twice. Reuschel was on the ballot for one year in 1997 and received 0.4% of the vote. He is ranked #96 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Orel Hershiser, NL Los Angeles Dodgers (1988)

0.0 dWAR. This was a dream season for Hershiser would win the Cy Young, the World Series and the World Series and NLCS MVP in 1988 and defensively he had a case here for what would be his only Gold Glove. While Hershiser led all National League Pitchers in Errors but he did finish first in Putouts, Assists and Range Factor per Game and had 5 Pickoffs. Hershiser was on the ballot for two year and finished as high as 11.2% in 2006. Hershiser is ranked #75 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Bret Saberhagen, AL Kansas City Royals (1989)

0.0 dWAR. Bret Saberhagen had an incredible pitching performance in 1989 where he would win his second Cy Young Award with an eighth place finish in American League MVP voting. That success apparently parlayed into a great defensive season but did he really have one? The Kansas City Royal would have 3 Pickoffs and a high 64% in regards to his Caught Stealing Percentage, however he was not in the top five in Assists, Putouts and Range Factor per Game. For that matter, he only ever had a top five finish once in Assists (3rd in 1994) and Range Factor per Game (4th in 1995). He did however have a career high 4 Errors and his Fielding Percentage of .934 was not special. This was clearly the wrong choice here. Saberhagen was on the ballot for one year and finished with 1.3% in 2001. Saberhagen is ranked #69 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Ron Darling, NL New York Mets (1989)

0.0 dWAR. This might be a little suspect as Darling was not in the top five in any significant defensive metrics and he had a pedestrian .929 and 30 Fielding Percentage and Caught Stealing Percentage respectively. Darling was on the ballot for one year and finished as high as 0.2% in 2001.

Mike Boddicker, AL Boston Red Sox (1990)

0.0 dWAR. Mike Boddicker has some seasons in the mid 1980’s where he should have won a Gold Glove or two but in 1990, while still decent was not at the level he had in previous season. In 1990 he would finish fifth in Range Factor per Game, third in Putouts and had a .966 Fielding Percentage with a Caught Stealing Percentage of 47%. At least he won one, albeit in the wrong year. Boddicker was on the ballot for one year in 1999 but did not receive any votes.

Mark Langston, AL California Angels (3) (1991)

0.0 dWAR. Mark Langston was an All Star for the second time in his career. Defensively he had a .942 Fielding Percentage but a solid 60% in Caught Stealing. The California Angel was fourth in Assists. Langston was on the ballot for one year in 2005 but did not receive any votes.

Mark Langston, AL California Angels (4) (1992)

0.0 dWAR. Langston regressed from the season before as he had a .941 Fielding Percentage and only a 32% in Caught Stealing. Langston was on the ballot for one year in 2005 but did not receive any votes.

Mark Langston, AL California Angels (5) (1993)

0.0 dWAR. For the third and final time Mark Langston would finish first in Assists among the American League Pitchers. He would have a .966 Fielding Percentage and a 55% in Caught Stealing. Langston was on the ballot for one year in 2005 but did not receive any votes.

Mark Langston, AL California Angels (6) (1994)

0.0 dWAR. Langston again was a strange winner for the American League Gold Glove for a Pitcher as not only he was not in the top five in any major defensive category for an AL Pitcher his .938 Fielding Percentage was nothing spectacular. Langston was on the ballot for one year in 2005 but did not receive any votes.

Mark Langston, AL California Angels (7) (1995)

0.0 dWAR. This was the final Gold Glove for Mark Langston and realistically we have to ask how he won one, let alone seven. He would have a solid 75% Caught Stealing Percentage this year. Langston was on the ballot for one year in 2005 but did not receive any votes.

Mike Mussina, AL Baltimore Orioles (1996)

0.0 dWAR. Mike Mussina would finish sixth in Cy Young voting in what would be his first Gold Glove win   Mussina would have a perfect Fielding Percentage this season, the third time he would do so. Buckle up, as we have a lot more to do with Mike Mussina to come. Mussina has been on the ballot for five years and finished as high as 63.5% in 2018.

Mike Mussina, AL Baltimore Orioles (2) (1997)

0.0 dWAR. This year Mike Mussina would finish sixth in Cy Young voting and for the fourth time he had a 1.000 Fielding Percentage.  Mussina also had a 40% in Caught Stealing. Mussina has been on the ballot for five years and finished as high as 63.5% in 2018.

Mike Mussina, AL Baltimore Orioles (3) (1998)

0.0 dWAR. For the third season in a row, Mussina would have a 1,000 Fielding Percentage while finishing fifth in Range Factor per Game. Mussina has been on the ballot for five years and finished as high as 63.5% in 2018.

Mike Mussina, AL Baltimore Orioles (4) (1999)

0.0 dWAR. An All Star for the fifth time of his career and the Cy Young Award runner-up, Mike Mussina had a good season in terms of his glove. Mussina was third in Range Factor per Game with a second place finish in Assists and he had a respectable 56% in Caught Stealing and a .984 Fielding Percentage. Mussina has been on the ballot for five years and finished as high as 63.5% in 2018.

Kenny Rogers, AL Texas Rangers (2000)

0.0 dWAR. “The Gambler” already had a case for Gold Gloves in the past and he was certainly worthy in 2000 when he won his first of five. Rogers would pick off nine runners, matching his career high and he had a decent .970 Fielding Percentage. For the second time (the first being 1998) he finished first in Assists and Range Factor per Game and he was also fifth in Putouts. Rogers was on the ballot for one year in 2014 and he finished with 0.2% of the ballot.

Mike Mussina, AL New York Yankees (5) (2001)

0.0 dWAR. This was the first Gold Glove for Mike Mussina as a New York Yankee and he was fifth place in Cy Young voting. Mussina was not in the top five in Range Factor per Game, Assists and Putouts and he had a strong Fielding and Caught Stealing Percentage of .977% and .59% respectively. Mussina has been on the ballot for five years and finished as high as 63.5% in 2018.

Kenny Rogers, AL Texas Rangers (2) (2002)

0.0 dWAR. Rogers again finished first in Range Factor per Game and he was second in Putouts and fifth in Assists. He had a .954 Fielding Percentage and NOBODY stole a base on him this year. Rogers was on the ballot for one year in 2014 and he finished with 0.2% of the ballot.

Mike Mussina, AL New York Yankees (6) (2003)

0.0 dWAR. Mike Mussina would return to the top of Fielding Percentage leaderboard as for the sixth time he was perfect. He had a respectable Caught Stealing Percentage of 53% but he was not in the top five in Assists, Putouts and Range Factor per Game. Mussina has been on the ballot for five years and finished as high as 63.5% in 2018.

Mike Hampton, NL Atlanta Braves (2003)

0.0 dWAR. Mike Hampton was the only National League Pitcher to win a Gold Glove in a nineteen year stretch who was not named Greg Maddux. Hampton, who was in his first season as an Atlanta Brave had a 67% Caught Stealing rate and a .985 Fielding Percentage and for the first and only time in his career was a first place finisher in Range Factor per Game. He was also second in Assists. Hampton was on the ballot for one year in 2000 but did not receive any votes.

Kenny Rogers, AL Texas Rangers (3) (2004)

0.0 dWAR. This was another good season with the glove for Kenny Rogers. He would finish fourth in both Range Factor per Game and Assists. This was a good match with his six Pickoffs, .985 Fielding Percentage and 71% Caught Stealing Percentage. Rogers was on the ballot for one year in 2014 and he finished with 0.2% of the ballot.

Kenny Rogers, AL Texas Rangers (4) (2005)

0.0 dWAR. For the first time, Rogers’ Catchers were unable to stop any runners from stealing bases (0 for 3) and also for the first time he recorded no Pickoffs in a Season. He did have a quality .985 Fielding Percentage and he was second in both Range Factor per Game and Assists. Rogers was on the ballot for one year in 2014 and he finished with 0.2% of the ballot.

Kenny Rogers, AL Detroit Tigers (5) (2006)

0.0 dWAR. Now a Detroit Tiger, Kenny Rogers had a fourth place finish in Range Factor per Game with a third place rank in Assists. “The Gambler” had a low .912 Fielding Percentage but he rebounded with a rate of 86% in Caught Stealing. It is also worth noting that Rogers was 41 and he had a fifth place finish in Cy Young voting, which was by far his best performance. This would be the final Gold Glove for Kenny Rogers and he finished his career with 79 Pickoffs and runners being Caught Stealing 59% of the time. This is definitely a worthy multi-time recipient of the Gold Glove. Rogers was on the ballot for one year in 2014 and he finished with 0.2% of the ballot.

Johan Santana, AL Minnesota Twins (2007)

0.0 dWAR. By this point, Johan Santana had already won his two Cy Young Awards however he never once finished in the top five in Assists, Putouts or Range Factor per Game. 2007 would be the first and only time he had a perfect Fielding Percentage, which coincidently was the only time he would win the Gold Glove. He had a 45% Caught Stealing Percentage this year. Santana was on the ballot for one year in 2018 and he finished with 2.4% of the ballot. Santana is ranked #64 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Mike Mussina, AL New York Yankees (7) (2008)

0.0 dWAR. This was Mike Mussina’s final season in the Majors and he ended on a great note with a sixth place Cy Young finish. He was decent this year defensively but he may not have been the best choice. Mussina again was not in the top five in Assists, Putouts and Range Factor per Game and he had a decent Fielding Percentage of .976. Overall, Mike Mussina was decent with his glove but we have to question whether he was worthy of seven Gold Gloves. Mussina has been on the ballot for five years and finished as high as 63.5% in 2018.

 

 

Let’s update our tally shall we?

Award in Question

Percentage of recipients who have entered the HOF

Percentage of recipients by year who have entered the HOF.

NBA MVP

100%

100%

NHL Norris

90.5%

96.4%

NBA All Star Game MVP

89.5%

91.7%

NHL Conn Smythe

74.2%

85.4%

NHL Lady Byng

63.8%

76.0%

NFL Super Bowl MVP

60.6%

64.9%

NBA Defensive Player of the Year

58.3%

56.5%

NBA Rookie of the Year

56.5%

56.5%

MLB/NL/AL Cy Young Award

44.4%

55.4%

NHL Frank J. Selke Trophy

33.3%

36.7%

NFL Offensive Rookie of the Year

28.6%

28.6%

MLB Edgar Martinez Award

26.7%

17.2%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Designated Hitter)

25.0%

30.8%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Shortstop)

23.5%

52.6%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove

21.7%

36.8%

NFL Defensive Rookie of the Year

20.6%

20.6%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Catcher)

20.0%

22.5%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Second Base)

18.8%

39.8%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Shortstop)

18.2%

35.1%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Pitcher)

18.2%

20.1%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Second Base)

16.7%

32.7%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Outfield)

16.7%

30.1%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Outfield)

15.7%

25.2%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Third Base)

14.3%

14.3%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Third Base)

13.6%

14.3%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (First Base)

13.6%

13.3%

MLB (NL/AL) Rookie of the Year

13.3%

13.3%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Catcher)

10.3%

15.2%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (First Base)

3.8%

3.2%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Catcher)

20.0%

22.5%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Second Base)

18.8%

39.8%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Shortstop)

18.2%

35.1%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Pitcher)

18.2%

20.1%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Second Base)

16.7%

32.7%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Outfield)

16.7%

30.1%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Outfield)

15.7%

25.2%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Third Base)

14.3%

14.3%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Third Base)

13.6%

14.3%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (First Base)

13.6%

13.3%

MLB (NL/AL) Rookie of the Year

13.3%

13.3%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Catcher)

10.3%

15.2%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (First Base)

3.8%

3.2%

So who is up next?

The following are the players who have won the Gold Glove at Pitcher who have retired but have not met the mandatory years out of the game to qualify for the Baseball Hall of Fame:

Mark Buehrle, AL Chicago White Sox (2009)

0.0 dWAR   Mark Buehrle went to his fourth All Star Game this year and the 2005 World Series winner would be first this season among the American League Pitchers in Range Factor per Game and Assists with a .982 Fielding Percentage. Buehrle will be eligible for the Hall of Fame in 2021.

Mark Buehrle, AL Chicago White Sox (2) (2010)

0.0 dWAR   In what would be his second Gold Glove win, Mark Buehrle would for the third time have a perfect Fielding Percentage and he was also third in Assists for an American League Pitcher. Buehrle will be eligible for the Hall of Fame in 2021.

Bronson Arroyo, NL Cincinnati Reds (2010)

0.0 dWAR   2010 was the best year of Bronson Arroyo’s career as he had a 12th place finish in Cy Young voting and had 17 Wins. He would have a perfect Fielding Percentage. Arroyo will be eligible for the Hall of Fame in 2023.

Mark Buehrle, AL Chicago White Sox (3) (2011)

0.0 dWAR   Mark Buehrle would for the second time in his career was the American League leader in Range Factor per Game and he was also second in Assists. Buehrle would have 6 Pickoffs with a 70% Caught Stealing Percentage with a .982 Fielding Percentage. Buehrle will be eligible for the Hall of Fame in 2021.

Jake Peavy, AL Chicago White Sox (2012)

0.0 dWAR   The National League Cy Young Award winner from 2007 would win his only Gold Glove as a member of the Chicago White Sox in the American League. Peavy would sport a .973 and 47 in Fielding and Caught Stealing Percentage but was not in the top five in Assists, Putouts or Range Factor per Game. Peavy will be eligible for the Hall of Fame in 2022.

Mark Buehrle, NL Miami Marlins (4) (2012)

0.0 dWAR   Buehrle was only in the National League for one season but he would go “one for one” in terms of Gold Gloves. He would finish this season with a perfect Fielding Percentage and he was the league leader in Assists. Beuhrle also second in Range Factor per Game with 4 Pickoffs and a Caught Stealing Percentage of 38%. Buehrle would record an even 100 Pickoffs of his career and his Caught Stealing Percentage of 58% percent was well above the league average of 29%. Buehrle will be eligible for the Hall of Fame in 2021.

R.A. Dickey, AL Toronto Blue Jays (2013)

0.0 dWAR   The knuckleballer was the surprise National League Cy Young Award winner the season before after seemingly coming out of nowhere. Dickey would win the Gold Glove in his first season as a Toronto Blue Jay and his resume showed him finish third in Range Factor per Game and was first in Assists. He had a .962 Fielding Percentage. Dickey will be eligible for the Hall of Fame in 2023.

 

 

The following are the players who have won the Gold Glove at Pitcher who are still active.

Adam Wainwright, NL St. Louis Cardinals (2009)

0.0 dWAR. Wainwright would finish among all of the National League Pitchers in Putouts and Field Percentage while ranking third in Range Factor per Game. 37 Years Old, Playing for the St. Louis Cardinals.

Clayton Kershaw, NL Los Angeles Dodgers (2011)

0.0 dWAR. To say that Clayton Kershaw would become one of the most dominant Pitchers form this point on and to the rest of the decade would be an understatement. Seriously, he was just that good! In regards to his season defensively in 2011, Kershaw would win his first Cy Young and he had a perfect Fielding Percentage with a fifth place finish in Assists. 31 Years Old, Playing for the Los Angeles Dodgers.

Jeremy Hellickson, AL Tampa Bay Rays (2012)

0.0 dWAR. The co-winner of the Gold Glove, Hellickson won this Gold Glove the year after being named the Rookie of the Year. The Tampa Bay Ray had a .950 Fielding Percentage, although he would bookend those seasons with a perfect 1,000. He was not in the top five in Assists, Putouts or Range Factor per Game. 31 Years Old, Playing for the Washington Nationals.

Adam Wainwright, NL St. Louis Cardinals (2) (2013)

0.0 dWAR. Wainwright was the second place finisher in the Cy Young voting while having a 50% Caught Stealing Percentage. Wainwright would have a perfect Fielding Percentage, while finishing second in Range Factor per Game and third in Putouts. 37 Years Old, Playing for the St. Louis Cardinals.

Dallas Kuechel, AL Houston Astros (2014)

0.0 dWAR. This would be the first individual award for Kuechel and he really earned this Gold Glove. The Houston Astro was first in Range Factor per Game and Assists with a fourth place rank in Putouts. He had a .985 Fielding Percentage with only one runner successfully stealing a base on him (75% Caught Stealing Percentage rate). 30 Years Old, Playing for the Houston Astros.

Zack Greinke, NL Los Angeles Dodgers (2014)

0.0 dWAR. Greinke won a Cy Young Award with the Kansas City Royals in 2009, but it would not be until 2013 where he would receive votes again for that prestigious accolade. In 2014, Greinke finished with a .983 Fielding Percentage and he finished first in both Putouts and Range Factor per Game. He was seventh in Cy Young voting this year. 35 Years Old, Playing for the Arizona Diamondbacks.

Dallas Kuechel, AL Houston Astros (2) (2015)

0.0 dWAR. Keuchel would win the Cy Young this year and he was the fifth place finisher in MVP voting. He would finish first in both Assists and Range Factor per Game with a fourth place finish in Putouts while having a .986 Fielding Percentage. He would however fail to have ant runner not steal a base. 30 Years Old, Playing for the Houston Astros.

Zack Greinke, NL Los Angeles Dodgers (2) (2015)

0.0 dWAR. Greinke was an All Star for the third time this year and he was the Cy Young Award runner-up. Greinke finished second in Range Factor per Game and was fourth in both Putouts and Assists. He would have a Fielding and Caught Stealing Percentage of .968 and 46 respectively. 35 Years Old, Playing for the Arizona Diamondbacks.

Dallas Kuechel, AL Houston Astros (3) (2016)

0.0 dWAR. For the second time, Dallas Kuechel had a perfect Fielding Percentage and he would have a 50% record in Caught Stealing. He did however fail to finish in the top five in Assists, Putouts and Range Factor per Game. 30 Years Old, Playing for the Houston Astros.

Zack Greinke, NL Arizona Diamondbacks (3) (2016)

0.0 dWAR. Greinke would not finish in the top five in Range Factor per Game but he was named a Wilson Defensive Player. He had a Fielding Percentage of .980 and a Caught Stealing record of 57%. 35 Years Old, Playing for the Arizona Diamondbacks.

Marcus Stroman, AL Toronto Blue Jays (2017)

0.0 dWAR. Stroman finished eighth in Cy Young voting this year and he was the leader in Assists while finishing second in Range Factor per Game. He had a .979 Fielding Percentage. 27 Years Old, Playing for the Toronto Blue Jays.

Zack Greinke, NL Arizona Diamondbacks (4) (2017)

This would be the third season that Zack Greinke would have a 0.0 dWAR.perfect Fielding Percentage, which was complimented by a second place finish in Range Factor per Game. His Caught Stealing Percentage was an excellent 64. 35 Years Old, Playing for the Arizona Diamondbacks.

Dallas Kuechel, AL Houston Astros (4) (2018)

0.0 dWAR. Kuechel had a perfect Fielding Percentage again with a second place in both Range Factor per Game in Putouts. 30 Years Old, Playing for the Houston Astros.

Zack Greinke, NL Arizona Diamondbacks (5) (2018)

0.0 dWAR. Grienke would go back-to-back in terms of a perfect Fielding Percentage and he would also lead all of the National League Pitchers in Putouts and Range Factor per Game. Throw in a 71% in Caught Stealing and you are talking about an extraordinary defensive year! 35 Years Old, Playing for the Arizona Diamondbacks.

We have to be honest, as when we started this we never would have thought that the most successful Gold Glove position to enter the Baseball Hall of Fame would be the Pitcher!   We do however think that this could change with increased sabremetrics in the future!

Honestly, we are happy to be done with the Gold Glove and since we have worked on this for so long, we want leave Baseball for a while.

Up next we are going to the hard court and look at the NBA with a relatively new Award, the Most Improved Player of the Year.

Look for that soon!