Awards = HOF? Part Twenty-Two: The Conn Smythe Trophy

Awards = HOF?  Part Twenty-Two: The Conn Smythe Trophy
28 Oct
2016
Not in Hall of Fame
We here at Notinhalloffame.com thought it would be fun to take a look at the major awards in North American team sports and see how it translates into Hall of Fame potential.

Needless to say, different awards in different sports yield hall of fame potential.  In basketball, the team sport with the least amount of players on a roster, the dividend for greatness much higher.  In baseball, it is not as much as a great individual season does not have the same impact.

We are now taking a look at the Conn Smythe Award, given annually to the best MVP in the Stanley Cup Playoffs.

How will this one turn out?

Let’s take a look!



The following are the past players who have won the Conn Smythe Award who are eligible for the Hockey Hall of Fame and have been enshrined.



Jean Beliveau, Montreal Canadians (1965)

8 Goals, 8 Assists, 16 Points.  This was Beliveau’s 6th Stanley Cup, and while this was his only Conn Smythe, he would lead in Playoff Assists two more times.  He would score 172 Points in NHL Playoff hockey and has the most all time for the Montreal Canadians.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1972.

Dave Keon, Toronto Maple Leafs (1967)

3 Goals, 5 Assists, 8 Points.  This was the 4th and final Stanley Cup of Dave Keon’s career, and as of this writing was the last one for the Toronto Maple Leafs.  Keon won the Calder, twice won the Lady Byng and was a two time post season NHL All Star.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1986.

Glenn Hall, St. Louis Blues (1968)

8 Wins, 10 Losses, 2.43 GAA.  Yes this was a losing record but the hockey pundits knew that Hall was the reason that the Blues were as competitive as they were in the Finals.  Hall had already won the Stanley Cup before with Chicago and had one more good season in him left.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1975.

Serge Savard, Montreal Canadians (1969)

4 Goals, 6 Assists, 10 Points.  A member of the Habs’ “Big Three” of their great defensive corps, Serge Savard would win 7 Stanley Cups and score 68 Points in 138 Playoff Games.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1986.

Bobby Orr, Boston Bruins (1970)

9 Goals, 11 Assists, 20 Points.  Was this the best season of Bobby Orr’s career?  It might be as he won hos first Stanley Cup, Conn Smythe and Hart Trophy this year.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1979.

Ken Dryden, Montreal Canadians (1971)

12 Wins, 8 Losses, 3.00 GAA.  Is this not one of the coolest facts in sports?  Ken Dryden won the Conn Smythe BEFORE he won the Calder Trophy!  Dryden was called up late in the 1970-71 season and played only 6 games but one the starting job.  Dryden’s overall playoff record is 80 and 32 with a 2.40 GAA.  This was Dryden’s only Conn Smythe, but he put together much better statistical performances in later playoff years.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1975.

Bobby Orr, Boston Bruins (2) (1972)

5 Goals, 19 Assists, 24 Points.  If you were to tell us that Bobby Orr was the greatest hockey player of all time we would certainly listen!  This was Orr’s best playoff run of his career.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1979.

Yvan Cournoyer, Montreal Canadians (1973)

15 Goals, 10 Assists, 25 Points.  This season would be Cournoyer’s fourth Second Team All Star nod.  The Right Winger would win 8 Stanley Cups, and this season he would lead everyone in Goals and Points.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1982.

Bernie Parent, Philadelphia Flyers (1974)

12 Wins, 5 Losses, 2.02 GAA.  This is where Bernie Parent became a legend and a future Hockey Hall of Famer.  Parent would take the “Broad Steeet Bullies” to the promised land and cement his hockey legacy here.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1984.

Bernie Parent, Philadelphia Flyers (2) (1975)

10 Wins, 5 Losses, 1.89 GAA.  “Lather, Rinse, Repeat.”  Bernie Parent would again state why he was a Hockey Hall of Famer here.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1984.

Guy Lafleur, Montreal Canadians (1977)

9 Goals, 17 Assists, 26 Points.  Lafleur was in the midst of six First Team NHL All Star selections and five Stanley Cups.  For many Montreal fans, Lafleur WAS the Canadians.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1988.

Larry Robinson, Montreal Canadians (1978)

4 Goals, 17 Assists, 21 Points.  Robinson was a two time Norris Trophy winner and a six time Stanley Cup Champion.  It was fitting that he won this award as well.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1995.

Bob Gainey, Montreal Canadians (1979)

6 Goals, 10 Assists, 16 Points.  The Montreal Canadians dynasty ended here, and the Defensive Forward would tally his second of four Selke Trophies.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1992.

Bryan Trottier, New York Islanders (1980)

12 Goals, 17 Assists, 29 Points.  The season before, Bryan Trottier won the Hart Trophy, the Art Ross and the Plus/Minus Award.  This was the first of four consecutive Stanley Cups for Trottier and his Islanders.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1997.

Mike Bossy, New York Islanders (1982)

17 Goals, 10 Assists, 27 Points.  The end of this post season essentially served as the half way point of his ten year career.  Bossy was the offensive leader of the Islanders dynasty and in this year would make his second of his five First Team All Star appearances.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1995.

Billy Smith, New York Islanders (1983)

13 Wins, 3 Losses, 2.68 GAA.  The backstop of the Islanders dynasty, Billy Smith won the William M. Jennings Trophy this season and the Vezina the season before.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1993.

Mark Messier, Edmonton Oilers (1984)

8 Goals, 18 Assists, 26 Points.  The grit of the Edmonton Oilers dynasty, Mark Messier came off his third straight post season All Star Team.  Messier would later win two Hart Trophies.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2007.

Wayne Gretzky, Edmonton Oilers (1985)

17 Goals, 30 Assists, 47 Points.  Gretzky put those numbers together in just 18 Games.  That season, Gretzky won his sixth Hart Trophy and fifth Art Ross.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1999.

Patrick Roy, Montreal Canadians (1986)

15 Wins, 5 Losses, 1.92 GAA.  While this wasn’t exactly pulling a Dryden, Patrick Roy took a team that had no business winning the Stanley Cup to a title.  Roy was a bona fide star after this series.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2006.

Wayne Gretzky, Edmonton Oilers (2) (1988)

12 Goals, 31 Assists, 43 Points.  Consider that this was a “down year” for Gretzky as this was the first time in years that he did win the Hart Trophy.  It was also his last as an Edmonton Oiler as he would be famously traded to the Los Angeles Kings the next year.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1999.

Al MacInnis, Calgary Flames (1989)

7 Goals, 24 Assists, 31 Points.  A rare feat for a Defenceman to lead the playoffs in scoring, Al MacInnis took Calgary to their first Stanley Cup.  He was a Second Team All Star this year, and would later on win the Norris.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1999.

Mario Lemieux, Pittsburgh Penguins (1991)

16 Goals, 28 Assists, 44 Points.  This was the only individual accolade that Mario Lemieux would win this year (he only played 26 Games that season) was punctuated by taking Pittsburgh to their first Stanley Cup.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1997.

Mario Lemieux, Pittsburgh Penguins (2) (1992)

16 Goals, 18 Assists, 34 Points.  Lemieux would also win the Art Ross Trophy this season (despite playing only 64 Games) and to date is the only back-to-back winner of the Conn Smythe.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1997.

Patrick Roy, Montreal Canadians (2) (1993)

16 Wins, 4 Losses, 2.13 GAA.  This was a weaker regular season for Roy but he was coming off of three Vezina Trophies.  Roy again took a team that should not have won the Cup and delivered the Holy Grail of Hockey to Montreal.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2006.

Brian Leetch, New York Rangers (1994)

11 Goals, 23 Assists, 34 Points.  Leetch led the Playoffs in Points and would win the Norris before and after this magical Stanley Cup winning season.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2009.

Joe Sakic, Colorado Avalanche (1996)

18 Goals, 16 Assists, 34 Points.  Joe Sakic took the Colorado Avalanche to their first ever Championship.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2009.

Steve Yzerman, Detroit Red Wings (1998)

6 Goals, 18 Assists, 24 Points.  For many, “Stevie Y” was the Detroit Red Wings for year.  This would be the second straight Stanley Cup win for Yzerman and the Red Wings.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2009.

Joe Nieuwendyk, Dallas Stars (1999)

11 Goals, 10 Assists, 21 Points.  This would be the first Stanley Cup in Stars history and the second of three Cup wins for Nieuwendyk.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2011.

Scott Stevens, New Jersey Devils (2000)

3 Goals, 8 Assists, 11 Points.  This would be Scott Stevens’ second of third Stanley Cup wins with the Devils.  He would go to 13 All Star Games in his career.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2007.

Patrick Roy, Colorado Avalanche (3) (2001)

16 Wins, 7 Losses, 1.70 GAA.  Patrick Roy is the first player to win this award three times.  Roy would take Colorado to their first title.  How bitter were the fans in both Montreal and Quebec City.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2006.

Niklas Lidstrom, Detroit Red Wings (2002)

5 Goals, 11 Assists, 16 Points.  Niklas Lidstrom would win his second of seven Norris Trophies season as well as his third of four Stanley Cups.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2015.

Scott Niedermayer, Anaheim Ducks (2007)

5 Goals, 11 Assists, 16 Points.  This would be the third of three straight First Team All Star appearances for Nidermayer, but would be his last major award.  This would also be his fourth Stanley Cup.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2013.





The following are the players who have won the Conn Smythe Award who are eligible for the Hockey Hall of Fame and have not been selected:



Roger Crozier, Detroit Red Wings (1966)

6 Wins, 5 Losses, 2.34 GAA.  Crozier is the first to win the Conn Smythe while playing for the losing team.  He was the Calder Trophy winner and a First Team All Star the year before, but after this he was average to mediocre at best and will not be considered for the Hall anytime soon.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Reggie Leach, Philadelphia Flyers (1976)

19 Goals, 5 Assists, 24 Points.  Reggie Leach was a goal scoring machine in the 1975-76 season, scoring 61 Goals (leading the NHL) in the regular season and another 19 in the post season.  Leach was named a Second Team All Star that year.  He never had a season like that again.  Ranked #89 on Notinhalloffame.com.   

Butch Goring, New York Islanders (1981)

10 Goals, 10 Assists, 20 Points.  The season before, Goring was considered the “final piece of the puzzle”.  This season he was the best player on the repeat championship team.  Ranked #44 on Notinhalloffame.com.   

Ron Hextall, Philadelphia Flyers (1987)

15 Wins, 11 Losses, 2.77 GAA.  The rookie season for Ron Hextall was by far the best of his career.  This season, he would not only win the Smythe, but the Calder and earned First Team All Team honors.  Hextall is one of the few winners of the Conn Smythe who did not win the Stanley Cup.  Ranked #34 on Notinhalloffame.com.   

Bill Ranford, Edmonton Oilers (1990)

16 Wins, 6 Losses, 2.53 GAA.  Bill Ranford is one of the forgotten cogs of the Oilers machine where he won the Conn Smythe in the Oilers last Cup win.  Ranford had a good career, but far from a Hall of Fame one.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Claude Lemieux, New Jersey Devils (1995)

13 Goals, 3 Assists, 216 Points.  Claude Lemieux is considered one of the greatest post season players in NHL history.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Mike Vernon, Detroit Red Wings (1997)

16 Wins, 4 Losses, 1.76 GAA.  The second Stanley Cup Championship for Mike Vernon occurred with the most post season wins.  Ranked #19 on Notinhalloffame.com.   

Jean Sebastien Giguere, The Mighty Ducks of Anaheim (2002)

15 Wins, 6 Losses, 1.62 GAA.  While the Ducks would fail to win the Stanley Cup on this attempt, Giguere stood on his head in the playoffs.  This is what he is best known for.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Tim Thomas, Boston Bruins (2011)

16 Wins, 9 Losses, 1.96 GAA.  Is Tim Thomas a two year wonder?  Sort of.  This was his second Vezina Trophy, but he is on the outside looking in for the Hockey Hall of Fame.  Ranked #81 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Let’s update our tally shall we?



Award in Question

Percentage of recipients who have entered the HOF

Percentage of recipients by year who have entered the HOF.

NBA MVP

100%

100%

NHL Norris

90.5%

96.4%

NBA All Star Game MVP

89.5%

91.7%

NHL Conn Smythe

74.2%

85.4%

NHL Lady Byng

63.8%

76.0%

NFL Super Bowl MVP

60.6%

64.9%

NBA Defensive Player of the Year

58.3%

56.5%

NBA Rookie of the Year

56.5%

56.5%

MLB/NL/AL Cy Young Award

44.4%

55.4%

NHL Frank J. Selke Trophy

33.3%

36.7%

NFL Offensive Rookie of the Year

28.6%

28.6%

MLB Edgar Martinez Award

26.7%

17.2%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Designated Hitter)

25.0%

30.8%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Shortstop)

23.5%

52.6%

NFL Defensive Rookie of the Year

20.6%

20.6%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Catcher)

20.0%

22.5%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Pitcher)

18.2%

20.1%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Second Base)

16.7%

32.7%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Outfield)

15.7%

25.2%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Third Base)

13.6%

14.3%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (First Base)

13.6%

13.3%

MLB (NL/AL) Rookie of the Year

13.3%

13.3%





So who is up next?



The following are the players who have won the Conn Smythe Trophy who have retired but have not met the mandatory years out of the game to qualify for the Hockey Hall of Fame:



Brad Richards, Tampa Bay Lightning (2004)

12 Goals, 14 Assists, 26 Points.  Arguably the best season of Brad Richards career, he would also win the Lady Byng Trophy.  Eligible for the Hockey Hall of Fame in 2019.





The following are the players who have won the Conn Smythe Trophy who are still active.

Cam Ward, Carolina Hurricanes (2006)

15 Wins, 8 Losses, 2.14 GAA.  This was Ward’s first individual award, however to date his only one.  He is not on a Hall of Fame trajectory.  32 Years Old, Playing for the Carolina Hurricanes.

Henrik Zetterberg, Detroit Red Wings (2008)

13 Goals, 14 Assists, 27 Points.  This was Zetterberg’s best season as he would also earn Second Team All Star honors.  He is a fringe Hall of Famer at this point.  36 Years Old, Playing for the Detroit Red Wings.

Evgeni Malkin, Pittsburgh Penguins (2009)

14 Goals, 22 Assists, 36 Points.  This season saw Malkin hit 100 Points for the second season in a row and win his first Art Ross Trophy.  He would later win the Hart Trophy, almost guaranteeing him a future Hall of Fame spot.  30 Years Old, Playing for the Pittsburgh Penguins.

Jonathan Toews, Chicago Blackhawks (2010)

7 Goals, 22 Assists, 29 Points.  Toews won two more Stanley Cups since and has been to three All Star Games as of this writing.  28 Years Old, Playing for the Chicago Blackhawks.

Jonathan Quick, Los Angeles Kings (2012)

16 Wins, 4 Losses, 1.41 GAA.  Quick would be a Second Team All Star this season and would later win the William M. Jennings.  His Hall of Fame story is far from written as of this writing.  31 Years Old, Playing for the Los Angeles Kings. 

Patrick Kane, Chicago Blackhawks (2013)

7 Goals, 22 Assists, 29 Points.  Kane would win the Calder previously and the Hart Trophy later.  That Hart should make him a Hall of Fame lock.  28 Years Old, Playing for the Chicago Blackhawks.

Justin Williams, Los Angeles Kings (2014)

9 Goals, 16 Assists, 25 Points.  To date, this is the only individual award that Williams has won, although he is a three time Stanley Cup Champion.  This will ease his pain for not getting inducted.  35 Years Old, Playing for the Washington Capitals.

Duncan Keith, Chicago Blackhawks (2015)

7 Goals, 22 Assists, 29 Points.  This might be the final piece of his HOF resume as with three Cups and two Norris Trophies, a trip to Toronto is looming.  33 Years Old, Playing for the Chicago Blackhawks.

Sidney Crosby, Pittsburgh Penguins (2016)

6 Goals, 13 Assists, 19 Points.  Two Hart Trophies and four First Team All Star Selections?  Crosby is in already!  28 Years Old, Playing for the Pittsburgh Penguins.



Quite the award for Goaltenders isn’t it? 

It is certainly not surprising that this award has yielded a high amount of Hall of Famers as anyone can have a great game.  Having a great playoff, especially a four series playoff is no small task

So what will we look at next?

One that we have putting off for a while, due to the ling and tedious nature of it:

The Gold Glove.

Look for that soon and as always we thank you for your support!



Last modified on Monday, 21 November 2016 18:21
Committee Chairman

Kirk Buchner, "The Committee Chairman", is the owner and operator of the site.  Kirk can be contacted at [email protected] .

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