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Committee Chairman

Committee Chairman

Kirk Buchner, "The Committee Chairman", is the owner and operator of the site.  Kirk can be contacted at [email protected] .

RIP: John Prine

John Prine passed away due to complications from COVID-19. He was 73 years old.

Based in Chicago, Prine was an active musician from 1971, spinning blue collar tales with a country-folk flair.  Prine may not have ever become a superstar in musical terms, but his peers viewed him as one of the greatest songwriters of his generation. For his work, Prine was nominated in 2018 for the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame.

We here at Notinhalloffame.com would like to extend our condolences to the friends and family of John Prine.

We look at the 2010s All-Decade Team, and their PFHOF chances

Finally, the NFL 2010s All-Decade Team has been announced, and history has shown that it is a huge catapult to Pro Football Hall of Fame entry. 

Initially, we were going to look at the ten players who benefited the most from the selection, but since at some point they will all be referred to anyway, let’s look at them all!

Quarterbacks:

Tom Brady, New England Patriots: 156 Games, 64.2 Completion Percentage, 43,727 Passing Yards, 316 Touchdown Passes, 80 Interceptions, 99.6 Quarterback Rating, 160 Approximate Value.  2 MVPs, 1 OPOY, 2 First Team All-Pros, 9 Pro Bowls, 3 Super Bowls.

A unanimous pick, Brady doesn’t need this accolade for enshrinement, and he already was an All-Decade choice in the 2000s.  He was ranked #1 on our pre-2019 active HOF list, and he is the GOAT.

Aaron Rodgers, Green Bay Packers: 142 Games, 64.7 Completion Percentage, 38,145 Passing Yards, 305 Touchdown Passes, 63 Interceptions, 103.6 Quarterback Rating, 150 Approximate Value, 2 MVPs, 2 First Team All-Pros, 7 Pro Bowls, 1 Super Bowl. 

Rodgers likely eked out Drew Brees, who could have easily gotten this spot, and if anyone is considered a snub for this All-Decade list, it is Brees.  Like Brady and Brees, Rodgers is already Hall of Fame worthy.  He was ranked #5 on our pre-2019 active HOF list.

Running Backs: 

Frank Gore, San Francisco 49ers, Indianapolis Colts, Miami Dolphins & Buffalo Bills:  153 Games, 9,786 Rushing Yards, 47 Rushing Touchdowns, 2,065 Receiving Yards, 11 Receiving Touchdowns, 78 Approximate Value, 3 Pro Bowls.

This should be a huge line in the resume of Frank Gore for Canton.  While he did go to three Pro Bowls in the first half of the decade, he has never finished in the top five in Rushing Yards or Rushing Touchdowns, and his highest finish in Yards from Scrimmage was fourth.  In that stat, he was only in the top ten three times.  Gore is one of four Running Backs to be named to the All-Decade team, but was he ever considered to be among the best four Running Backs ever? This is the ultimate compiling Running Back, and he could be in Jim Marshall/Clay Matthews territory.  With no sign that he is looking to retire, Gore is currently third all-time in Rushing Yards, 1,379 behind Walter Payton for second. That won’t happen in one season for Gore, but it could in two.  No player benefits more being an All-Decade player than Frank Gore.  He was ranked #18 on our pre-2019 active HOF list.

Marshawn Lynch, Buffalo Bills, Seattle Seahawks & Oakland Raiders:  153 Games, 7,812 Rushing Yards, 68 Rushing Touchdowns, 1,551 Receiving Yards, 8 Receiving Touchdowns, 69 Approximate Value, 1 First Team All-Pro, 4 Pro Bowls, 1 Super Bowl.

In terms of yardage, Lynch may not measure up in this era, but his impact certainly does.  “Beast Mode” returned late last season with the Seattle Seahawks, looking to extend his legacy, and if he returns for 2020, he will do just that.  He is notably six TDs away from 100.  

LeSean McCoy, Philadelphia Eagles, Buffalo Bills & Kansas City Chiefs: 144 Games, 10,434 Rushing Yards, 69 Rushing Touchdowns, 3,489 Receiving Yards, 16 Receiving Touchdowns, 96 Approximate Value, 2 First Team All-Pros, 6 Pro Bowls.

As good as LeSean McCoy has been, it can be argued that he has flown under the radar in some circles. That should not be the case as he was close to 14,000 in Yards from Scrimmage for the decade, and this All-Decade selection is a reminder of how good he has been.  He was ranked #35 on our pre-2019 active HOF list.

Adrian Peterson, Minnesota Vikings, Arizona Cardinals, New Orleans Saints & Washington Redskins:  118 Games, 9,732 Rushing Yards, 71 Rushing Touchdowns, 1,536 Receiving Yards, 5 Receiving Touchdowns, 81 Approximate Value, 1 OPY, 2 First Team All-Pros, 4 Pro Bowls.

While Adrian Peterson was unanimous amongst the voters, you could argue that he statistically not the best Running Back of the decade.  That really doesn’t matter, as AP belongs here, and he is still adding to his stats. He was ranked #4 on our pre-2019 active HOF list.

Despite what may have looked like a knock on Gore, there was not really any credible person to replace him. (Ezekiel Elliott, maybe?)  It should be noted that no Full Back was part of the All-Decade Team, which had to anger (and did) Kyle Juszczyk.

 

Wide Receivers:

Antonio Brown, Pittsburgh Steelers & New England Patriots:  131 Games, 11,263 Receiving Yards, 74 Receiving Touchdowns, 102 Approximate Value, 4 First Team All-Pros, 7 Pro Bowls.

Did anyone do more to delay his Hall of Fame chances than Antonio Brown?  This All-Decade Selection was more than earned, and he was definitely in a Canton conversation, but what did he cost himself this year?  What might he cost himself next year?  Brown has a new accolade, but a brand-new reputation.  This All-Decade doesn’t do much for his chances but not because he was already there, but more because on-field accomplishments are no longer his talking point.   He was ranked #14 on our pre-2019 active HOF list.

Larry Fitzgerald, Arizona Cardinals:  142 Games, 9,212 Receiving Yards, 57 Receiving Touchdowns, 74 Approximate Value, 6 Pro Bowls.

With the Arizona Cardinals since 2004, Fitzgerald seems to never age.  At 37, he looks like he has a lot left, and is second all-time in Receiving Yards, but more than 5,000 behind Jerry Rice.  Fitzgerald is however eight Touchdowns away from tying Marvin Harrison for fifth.  He was ranked #3 on our pre-2019 active HOF list.

Julio Jones, Atlanta Falcons:  126 Games, 12,125 Receiving Yards, 57 Receiving Touchdowns, 113 Approximate Value, 2 First Team All-Pros, 7 Pro Bowls.

Jones is a two-time leader in Receiving Yards, and is still at the top of his game.  Statistically speaking, Jones is the best Wide Receiver of the decade, which was cemented by Brown’s inaction in 2019.  He was ranked #19 on our pre-2019 active HOF list.

Calvin Johnson, Detroit Lions:  61 Games, 6,257 Receiving Yards, 45 Receiving Touchdowns, 70 Approximate Value, 3 First Team All-Pros, 6 Pro Bowls.

“Megatron” retired in his prime, but the first half of this decade would see him as the best Wide Receiver. In this period, he would lead the NFL twice in Receiving Yards.  Johnson is eligible for the Hall in 2021. 

Other Wide Receivers who could have been considered were A.J. Green or Demaryus Thomas, but neither were as dominant as Johnson, who arguably could be considered the “fourth” Wide Receiver. Green, however, did not play in 2019 due to injury, and he was 1,093 Yards away from five digits.  

Flex:

Darren Sproles, San Diego Chargers, New Orleans Saints & Philadelphia Eagles:  115 Games, 2,599 Rushing Yards, 17 Rushing Touchdowns, 3,936 Receiving Yards, 23 Receiving Touchdowns, 3 Pro Bowls, 1 Super Bowl.

The first of one All-Decades that Sproles would win, Sproles retired this year and was one of the most unique offensive weapons in football since 2000.

 

Tight Ends:

Rob Gronkowski, New England Patriots:  115 Games, 7,861 Receiving Yards, 79 Receiving Touchdowns, 82 Approximate Value, 4 First Team All-Pros, 5 Pro Bowls, 3 Super Bowls.

Gronkowski was an absolute phenom, and there was no doubt that when he was healthy, that he was the best Tight End in the game.  “Gronk” is a Hall of Famer, and the only question is which ballot.

Travis Kelce, Kansas City Chiefs: 96 Games, 6,465 Receiving Yards, 37 Receiving Touchdowns, 66 Approximate Value, 2 First Team All-Pros, 5 Pro Bowls, 1 Super Bowl.

Kelce arguably picked up where Gronkowski left off, and he is coming off his fifth straight Pro Bowl, and fourth straight 1,000 Yard plus year.  Some might see him as a Hall of Famer now, and this accolade combined with another dominant year and a Super Bowl may have put him there.  He was ranked #34 on our pre-2019 active HOF list. 

If any Tight End was arguably left off, it was Jason Witten, who had 7,012 Yards, 45 Touchdowns, five Pro Bowls and one First Team All-Pro.  Witten likely will get into Canton, but this would have been a nice honor, but was as he good as Kelce at his best?  The answer is no.

Offensive Tackles:

Jason Peters, Philadelphia Eagles:  125 Games, 88 Approximate Value, 2 First Team All-Pros, 6 Pro Bowls, 1 Super Bowl.

Jason Peters’ career might be deep in the back nine, but he adds another one here, in what should be Canton bound.  He was ranked #11 on our pre-2019 active HOF list.

Tyron Smith, Dallas Cowboys: 131 Games, 91 Approximate Value, 2 First Team All-Pros, 7 Pro Bowls.

Smith is currently on a seven-year streak of Pro Bowls, and he could easily add to this.  If his career stalls, this honor could be critical for future Hall consideration.  He was ranked #34 on our pre-2019 active HOF list.

Joe Staley, San Francisco 49ers: 140 Games, 88 Approximate Value, 6 Pro Bowls.

As good as Staley has been, he has never been a First Team All-Pro, though does have three Second Team All-Pros over his career.  The All-Decade Team Selection should assist Staley, as his Pro Bowl days are likely behind him.  He was ranked #42 on our pre-2019 active HOF list.

Joe Thomas, Cleveland Browns: 112 Games, 77 Approximate Value, 5 First Team All-Pros, 7 Pro Bowls.

Thomas was a unanimous selection, and he has an excellent chance to be a first ballot inductee in 2023. 

As it is not an offensive skill position, there are no real “controversies” but Kansas City’s Mitchell Schwartz (128 G, 84 AV), has been sneaky good.  Don’t let his lone First Team All-Pro fool you.  Andrew Whitworth (153 G, 115 AV) had to have received strong consideration, and likely should have taken Staley’s spot.  This could be a critical snub in terms of any remote Hall of Fame shot he had. 

Offensive Guards:

Jahri Evans, New Orleans Saints & Green Bay Packers:  105 Games, 96 Approximate Value, 3 First Team All-Pros, 5 Pro Bowls.

Evans played all but his last season in football with the Saints, and he is Hall of Fame eligible in 2023.

Logan Mankins, New England Patriots & Tampa Bay Buccaneers:  91 Games, 67 Approximate Value 1 First Team All-Pro, 5 Pro Bowls.

Mankins never did win a Super Bowl with the New England Patriots, but securing an All-Decade spot should help him overall.  He is Hall of Fame eligible in 2021.

Zack Martin, Dallas Cowboys: 94 Games, 74 Approximate Value, 4 First Team All-Pros, 6 Pro Bowls.  

As of this writing, Martin is arguably the best Tackle in the NFL, and he is on a Hall of Fame path.  He was ranked #38 on our pre-2019 active HOF list.

Marshal Yanda, Baltimore Ravens: 140 Games, 101 Approximate Value, 2 First Team All-Pros, 8 Pro Bowls, 1 Super Bowl.

Yanda retired with his eighth Pro Bowl selection, which along with this honor, should cement him as a future Hall of Fame inductee.  Yanda was one of seven unanimous selections.  He was ranked #27 on our pre-2019 active HOF list. 

There had to be some consideration for Mike Iupati (130 G, 76 AV) and Trent Williams (120 G, 78 AV).

Centers:

Alex Mack, Cleveland Browns & Atlanta Falcons:  149 Games, 89 Approximate Value, 5 Pro Bowls.

Having played for Cleveland and Atlanta, Mack has not received a lot of national attention, and this accolade certainly should help.  He was ranked #44 on our pre-2019 active HOF list.

Maurkice Pouncey, Pittsburgh Steelers:  121 Games, 86 Approximate Value, 2 First Team All-Pros, 8 Pro Bowls.

Pouncey earns this All-Decade nod, and he is on a streak of five straight Pro Bowls.  This should put him over.  He was ranked #25 on our pre-2019 active HOF list. 

Other Centers worthy of consideration is the recently retired Travis Frederick (96 G, 61 AV) and Jason Kelce (126 G, 79 AV).  

Defensive Ends:

Calais Campbell, Arizona Cardinals & Jacksonville Jaguars:  154 Games, 118 Approximate Value, 81.0 Sacks, 620 Tackles, 1 First Team All-Pro, 5 Pro Bowls.

Campbell has been on fire with five Pro Bowls in the last six years.  In 2013, an All-Decade Selection would have been improbable for Campbell, but here we are, and this is a validation for all of the work he has done. He still has more work to do for a Canton home.  He was ranked #45 on our pre-2019 active HOF list.

Cameron Jordan, New Orleans Saints:  144 Games, 92 Approximate Value, 87.0 Sacks, 463 Tackles, 1 First Team All-Pro, 5 Pro Bowls.

Jordan is on a three-year run of Pro Bowls, and this could be considered a mild surprise for him to make All-Decade. He was ranked #70 on our pre-2019 active HOF list.

Julius Peppers, Chicago Bears, Green Bay Packers & Carolina Panthers:  128 Games, 88 Approximate Value, 73.5 Sacks, 330 Tackles, 1 First Team All-Pro, 4 Pro Bowls.

Like Tom Brady, Peppers was also selected to the 2000s All-Decade Team, though we don’t see a lot of press on that!  Peppers retired in 2018, and is Hall of Fame eligible in 2024.  He will be an early Hall of Fame inductee.

J.J. Watt, Houston Texans:  112 Games, 112 Approximate Value, 96.0 Sacks, 479 Tackles, 3 DPOYs, 5 First Team All-Pros, 5 Pro Bowls.

Watt was a unanimous selection, and with three Defensive Player of the Year Awards, he doesn’t need any other accolades for Canton.

Defensive Tackles:

Geno Atkins, Cincinnati Bengals: 153 Games, 104 Approximate Value, 75.5 Sacks, 383 Tackles, 2 First Team All-Pros, 8 Pro Bowls.

Geno Atkins is a Cincinnati Bengal, and that means he needs all the accolades he can get to enter Canton! He has been a Pro Bowl Selection in eight of his ten seasons, and he is on six-year streak.  He was ranked #26 on our pre-2019 active HOF list.

Fletcher Cox, Philadelphia Eagles:  125 Games, 88 Approximate Value, 48.0 Sacks, 367 Tackles, 1 First Team All-Pro, 5 Pro Bowls, 1 Super Bowl.

To date, Cox has played his entire career with the Eagles, and he is on a five-year streak of Pro Bowls. The next two years should be critical for Cox’ overall HOF chances. He was ranked #54 on our pre-2019 active HOF list.

Aaron Donald, Los Angeles Rams: 94 Games, 90 Approximate Value, 72.0 Sacks, 367 Tackles, 2 DPOYs, 5 First Team All-Pros, 6 Pro Bowls.

Like Watt, Donald was a unanimous selection, and the two-time Defensive Player of the Year is likely a Hall of Famer right now.  He was ranked #23 on our pre-2019 active HOF list.

Ndamukong Suh, Detroit Lions, Miami Dolphins, Los Angeles Rams & Tampa Bay Buccaneers:  158 Games, 106 Approximate Value, 58.5 Sacks, 519 Tackles, 2 First Team All-Pros, 5 Pro Bowls. 

Suh’s profile hasn’t been the same as he was a Detroit Lion, but this one great decade that will follow him in terms of legacy.  This could be huge for Suh in regards to future consideration.  He was ranked #37 on our pre-2019 active HOF list.

Linebackers:

Chandler Jones, New England Patriots & Arizona Cardinals:  119 Games, 77 Approximate Value, 96.0 Sacks, 421 Tackles, 2 First Team All-Pros, 3 Pro Bowls, 1 Super Bowl.

Jones could be considered a mild surprise, and realistically, it can be argued he spent more time on Defensive End.  He was not considered by most to be a Hall of Famer, but in 2019 he was a First Team All-Pro for the second time and set a career-high with 19 Sacks.  He is just four away from 100, and he could arguably be the player who is helped the most from this honor.

Luke Kuechly, Carolina Panthers: 118 Games, 107 Approximate Value, 12.5 Sacks, 1,092 Tackles, 1 DPOY, 5 First Team All-Pros, 7 Pro Bowls.

Kuechly retired at the end of this year, and he has likely done more than enough to enter the Hall of Fame. He was ranked #17 on our pre-2019 active HOF list.

Khalil Mack, Oakland Raiders & Chicago Bears:  94 Games, 76 Approximate Value, 61.5 Sacks, 398 Tackles, 1 DPOY, 3 First Team All-Pros, 5 Pro Bowls.

Mack is in the prime of his career, and this accolade will go a long way in terms of his legacy.  He was ranked #47 on our pre-2019 active HOF list.

Von Miller, Denver Broncos: 135 Games, 117 Approximate Value, 106.0 Sacks, 490 Tackles, 3 First Team All-Pros, 8 Pro Bowls, 1 Super Bowl.

Miller is one of the seven unanimous selections, and he has been a Pro Bowl Selection in all but one of his nine NFL seasons.  If anything, this All-Decade Selection could cement him as a first-ballot inductee.  He was ranked #13 on our pre-2019 active HOF list.

Bobby Wagner, Seattle Seahawks. 119 Games, 112 Approximate Value, 19.5 Sacks, 1,075 Tackles, 5 First Team All-Pros, 6 Pro Bowls, 1 Super Bowl.

Wagner may not have been the most recognized defensive player for the Seattle Seahawks, but he is the most decorated.  This adds to his already impressive list.  He was ranked #21 on our pre-2019 active HOF list.

Patrick Willis, San Francisco 49ers.  64 Games, 58 Approximate Value, 11.5 Sacks, 483 Tackles, 3 First Team All-Pros, 4 Pro Bowls, 1 Super Bowl.

Willis had a relatively brief career, but it was still good enough to make the All-Decade Team.  Willis has already been a Semi-Finalist for the Hall. 

Before we get to the Defensive Backs, there a few who feel like they were left off, though it would be hard to determine whose spot they would take.  Terrell Suggs (119 G, 75 AV) could conceivably have taken Willis’ spot, and Cameron Wake (141 G, 92 AV) also had a great decade.

Cornerbacks:

Patrick Peterson, Arizona Cardinals:  138 Games, 100 Approximate Value, 25 Interceptions, 438 Tackles, 3 First Team All-Pros, 8 Pro Bowls, 1 Super Bowl.

Peterson is coming off his worst season, and that does take into account that he was suspended, as he when he did come back, he was sub-par.  This won’t matter here, as he had already locked up the All-Decade.  He was ranked #15 on our pre-2019 active HOF list.

Darrelle Revis, New York Jets, Tampa Bay Buccaneers, New England Patriots & Kansas City Chiefs:  97 Games, 67 Approximate Value, 15 Interceptions, 296 Tackles, 3 First Team All-Pros, 5 Pro Bowls, 1 Super Bowl.

Revis island shut down in 2017, and he is Hall of Fame eligible in 2023.  Add this to the accolades of what should be a future Hall of Fame inductee.

Richard Sherman, Seattle Seahawks & San Francisco 49ers:  134 Games, 103 Approximate Value, 35 Interceptions, 466 Tackles, 3 First Team All-Pros, 5 Pro Bowls, 1 Super Bowl. 

With a comeback year of sorts, Sherman probably did not need it to make the All-Decade Team, but it does bode well for his future Canton possibilities.  He was ranked #29 on our pre-2019 active HOF list.

Safeties:

Eric Berry, Kansas City Chiefs: 89 Games, 57 Approximate Value, 14 Interceptions, 445 Tackles, 3 First Team All-Pros, 5 Pro Bowls.

The fact that Berry came back at all from cancer is heartwarming, but is that story and this All-Decade enough? It will have to be, as even though he has not officially retired, his career appears to be over.  

Eric Weddle, San Diego Chargers, Baltimore Ravens & Los Angeles Rams:  157 Games, 94 Approximate Value, 25 Interceptions, 916 Tackles, 2 First Team All-Pros, 6 Pro Bowls.  

Weddle may have two First Team All-Pros, but was he ever considered to be the best Safety in the NFL?  He had no trouble entering this All-Decade Team, which should show how good he was to many for who he flew under the radar.  He was ranked #30 on our pre-2019 active HOF list.

Earl Thomas, Seattle Seahawks & Baltimore Ravens:  140 Games, 92 Approximate Value, 30 Interceptions, 713 Tackles, 3 First Team All-Pros, 6 Pro Bowls, 1 Super Bowl.  

Thomas finished the decade with a sixth Pro Bowl and he was ranked #31 on our pre-2019 active HOF list.  

It is hard to argue with this trio, but on some lists, Kam Chancellor (109 G, 51 AV) was considered. Was the former Seahawk snubbed?

Defensive Backs:

Chris Harris, Denver Broncos: 139 Games, 73 Approximate Value, 20 Interceptions, 518 Tackles, 1 First Team All-Pro, 4 Pro Bowls, 1 Super Bowl. 

As we will outline before, this could be massive for Harris, but it feels like an add-on based on the vague position. He was ranked #75 on our pre-2019 active HOF list. 

Tyrann Mathieu, Arizona Cardinals, Houston Texans and Kansas City Chiefs:  98 Games, 44 Approximate Value, 17 Interceptions, 472 Tackles, 2 First Team All-Pros, 1 Pro Bowl, 1 Super Bowl.

See below, as we aren’t sure what this really does for his chances, if anything.

This is a little strange as this generic defensive category did not exist last time, and arguably it took the spot of the Full Backs from the previous decade.  Granted, this is in line with what the AP has done recently, but this is not universally liked.  With a vague position, does this do that much for their Hall of Fame chances?  It certainly paces them at a metaphoric level that they were not in before.

 

Punters:

Johnny Hekker, St. Louis/Los Angeles Rams:  128 Games, 23 Approximate Value, 608 Punts, 28,600 Punt Yards, 4 First Team All-Pros, 4 Pro Bowls.

Hekker has been brilliant over his career, but in a position that only has Ray Guy as the representative. He was ranked #62 on our pre-2019 active HOF list.

Shane Lechler, Oakland Raiders & Houston Texans:  128 Games, 28 Approximate Value, 666 Punts, 31,865 Punt Yards, 1 First Team All-Pro, 2 Pro Bowls. 

Lechler also was named to the 2000s All-Decade Team and he is Hall of Fame eligible in 2023.

Place Kickers:

Stephen Gostkowski, New England Patriots:  136 Games, 34 Approximate Value, 264 Field Goals, 88.3 Field Goal Percentage, 1 First Team All-Pro, 3 Pro Bowls, 3 Super Bowls.

Following in the footsteps of Adam Vinatieri, Gostkowski became a star in his own right.  He was ranked #49 on our pre-2019 active HOF list.

Justin Tucker, Baltimore Ravens: 128 Games, 41 Approximate Value, 265 Field Goals, 90.8 Field Goal Percentage, 4 First Team All-Pros, 3 Pro Bowls, 1 Super Bowl.

Tucker is the only Special Teams player to be voted unanimously, and regardless of the position, a unanimous vote helps you in future Hall of Fame consideration.  He was ranked #84 on our pre-2019 active HOF list.

Punt Returners:

Tyreek Hill, Kansas City Chiefs: 59 Games, 1,009 Punt Return Yards, 2 First Team All-Pro Selections, 4 Pro Bowls, 1 Super Bowl.

With all due respect to this accomplishment, this does nothing for his Hall of Fame chances, as moving forward, it is all about what he does as a Wide Receiver.  To date he has 4,115 Yards in that role, and that is where three of his Pro Bowls and one of his First Team All-Pro is generated from.

Darren Sproles, San Diego Chargers, New Orleans Saints, Philadelphia Eagles:  121 Games, 2,192 Punt Return Yards, 3 Pro Bowls, 1 Super Bowl.

Sproles is also an All-Decade Selection as a Flex, and when all of this is put together, do we have a Hall of Famer here?  He should receive more consideration than people will give him credit for, and this is the reason why.

Kick Returners:

Devin Hester, Chicago Bears, Atlanta Falcons, Baltimore Ravens and Seattle Seahawks:  96 Games, 2,059 Kick Return Yards, 1 First Team All-Pro, 2 Pro Bowls.

Named to the 2000s All-Decade Team as a Punt Returner, many people feel that Hester will get into the Hall of Fame as the next Special Teams player.  He is eligible for the Hall in 2022, so we will find out soon!

Cordarelle Patterson, Minnesota Vikings, Oakland Raiders, New England Patriots & Chicago Bears:  96 Games, 6,101 Kick Return Yards, 3 First Team All-Pros, 3 Pro Bowls, 1 Super Bowl.

Patterson has been great in this role, but he will need a lot more for the Hall.

In the last 15 years, only one Kicker and one Punter have entered Canton, so All-Decade Teams don’t do much to shine a light on these perpetually undervalued positions. 

What are everyone’s thoughts as to who benefited the most, and whose omissions hurt their Hall of Fame chances.  As always, we want your input, and we thank you from Notinhalloffame.com.  

 

RIP: Al Kaline

The world of Baseball lost a legend today as it was announced that Al Kaline passed away today at the age of 85.  The cause of death was not disclosed.

The Outfielder debuted in 1953 as a teenager, and he would play a total of 22 seasons in the Majors, all of which were with the Detroit Tigers.  Kaline would become a star quickly, going to the All-Star Game in 15 of his seasons, and finishing in the top ten in MVP voting nine times.  His other accolades included winning the 1955 Batting Titles, ten Gold Gloves, and he would help Detroit win the 1968 World Series.

He retired after the 1974 season, one Home Run shy of 400. While he could have likely played another season, he had reached the 3,000 Hit mark late that year, finishing with 3,007 total.

After his career was over, he remained with the Tigers in some capacity until he died.  He served as their color commentator from 1975 to 2002, and he would be a Special Assistant to the President afterward.  With an over six-decade association with the club, could there be anyone else could possibly be called “Mr. Tiger”?

Kaline was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1980, which was his first year of eligibility.  

We here at Notinhalloffame.com would like to extend our condolences to the friends and family of Al Kaline.  

RIP: Bobby Mitchell

Pro Football lost one of its greats as Bobby Mitchell passed away today at the age of 84.

A star at the University of Illinois, Mitchell was chosen by the Cleveland Browns with their seventh round pick in 1958.  Mitchell would share the backfield with the legendary Jim Brown, where he would play four seasons, totalling 3,759 Yards from Scrimmage with 32 Touchdowns.

In 1962, the Washington Redskins were under pressure from the NFL, as they were not yet integrated, and they would trade for Mitchell. He was moved to Flanker, and he would promptly lead the NFL in Receiving Yards in both 1962 and 1963 with seasons of 1,384 and 1,436 Yards respectively.  Mitchell led the league in Touchdown Receptions in 1964, and would manage to accrue at least 800 Receiving Yards from 1964 to 1967.

He retired after the 1968 season after accumulating 14,078 All-Purpose Yards with 88 Touchdowns.  The four-time Pro Bowl Selection would later serve as in the Redskins Front Office for over three decades.

Mitchell would enter the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 1983, and he earned three Super Bowl Rings as a Redskins Executive.

We here at Notinhalloffame.com would like to extend our condolences to the friends and family of Bobby Mitchell