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Committee Chairman

Kirk Buchner, "The Committee Chairman", is the owner and operator of the site.  Kirk can be contacted at [email protected] .

Awards=HOF? Part Thirty-Five: The Lou Gehrig Memorial Award

We here at Notinhalloffame.com thought it would be fun to take a look at the major awards in North American team sports and see how it translates into Hall of Fame potential.

Needless to say, different awards in different sports yield hall of fame potential.  In basketball, the team sport with the least number of players on a roster, the dividend for greatness much higher.  In baseball, it is not as much as a great individual season does not have the same impact.

For our next selection we look at the Lou Gehrig Memorial Award.  Created by the Phi Delta Theta Fraternity, it is designed to be given annually to the baseball player who is recognized for his work in his community and through his philanthropic work.  Think of this as the Baseball equivalent to the Walter Payton Man of the Year Award.

So, how many Lou Gehrig Memorial Award winners have been enshrined in the Baseball Hall of Fame?

Let’s find out!

*Please note that as statistics are not as relevant for this award so as opposed to how we normally list players, we will simply just list the winners as opposed to go into that year’s accomplishments.  This is the same position that we took with the Roberto Clemente Award.

The following are the past players who have won the Lou Gehrig Memorial Award in the MLB who are eligible for the Baseball Hall of Fame and have been enshrined.

Pee Wee Reese, Brooklyn Dodgers (1956)

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1984.

Stan Musial, St. Louis Cardinals (1957)

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1969.

Warren Spahn, Milwaukee Braves (1961)

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1973.

Robin Roberts, Baltimore Orioles (1962)

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1976.

Brooks Robinson, Baltimore Orioles (1966)

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1983.

Ernie Banks, Chicago Cubs (1967)

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1977.

Al Kaline, Detroit Tigers (1968)

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1980.

Hank Aaron, Atlanta Braves (1970)

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1982.

Harmon Killebrew, Minnesota Twins (1971)

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1984.

Ron Santo, Chicago Cubs (1973)

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2012.

Willie Stargell, Chicago Cubs (1974)

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1988.

Johnny Bench, Cincinnati Reds (1975)

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1989.

Don Sutton, Los Angeles Dodgers (1976)

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1998.

Lou Brock, St. Louis Cardinals (1977)

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1985.

Phil Niekro, Atlanta Braves (1979)

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1997.

Tony Perez, Boston Red Sox (1980)

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2000.

Mike Schmidt, Philadelphia Phillies (1983)

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1995.

George Brett, Kansas City Royals (1986)

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1999.

Ozzie Smith, St. Louis Cardinals (1989)

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2002.

Cal Ripken Jr., Baltimore Orioles (1992)

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2007.

Barry Larkin, Cincinnati Reds (1994)

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2012.

Paul Molitor, Minnesota Twins (1997)

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2004.

Tony Gwynn, San Diego Padres (1998)

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2012.

Jim Thome, Philadelphia Phillies (2004)

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2018.

John Smoltz, Atlanta Braves (2005)

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2015.

Trevor Hoffman, San Diego Padres (2006)

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2018.

The following are the players who have won the Lou Gehrig Memorial Award in MLB who are eligible for the Baseball Hall of Fame and have not been selected:

Al Dark, New York Giants (1955)

Dark was on the ballot for fifteen years and finished as high as 18.5% in 1979.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Gil McDougald, New York Yankees (1958)

McDougald was on the ballot for nine years and finished as high as 1.7% in 1966.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Gil Hodges, Los Angeles Dodgers (1959)

Hodges was on the ballot for fifteen years and finished as high as 63.4% in 1983.  Ranked #11 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Dick Groat, Pittsburgh Pirates (1960)

Groat was on the ballot for nine years and finished as high as 1.8% in 1973.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Bobby Richardson, New York Yankees (1963)

Richardson was on the ballot for three years and finished as high as 2.0% in 1972.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Ken Boyer, St. Louis Cardinals (1964)

Boyer was on the ballot for fifteen years and finished as high as 25.5% in 1983.  Ranked #49 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Vern Law, Pittsburgh Pirates (1965)

Law was on the ballot for seven years and finished as high as 2.4% in 1973.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Pete Rose, Cincinnati Reds (1969)

Rose has been banned from the Baseball for gambling and the Baseball Hall of Fame has not allowed him on the ballot.  Ranked #1A on Notinhalloffame.com

Wes Parker, Los Angeles Dodgers (1972)

Parker did not play the mandatory ten seasons to qualify for the Baseball Hall of Fame.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Don Kessinger, Chicago White Sox (1978)

Kessinger was on the ballot for one year and received 0.5% of the vote.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Tommy John, New York Yankees (1981)

John was on the ballot for fifteen years and finished as high as 31.7% in 2009.  Ranked #12 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Ron Cey, Los Angeles Dodgers (1982)

Cey was on the ballot for one years and finished with 1.9% in 1993.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Steve Garvey, San Diego Padres (1984)

Garvey was on the ballot for fifteen years and finished as high as 42.6% in 1995.  Ranked #12 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Dale Murphy, Atlanta Braves (1985)

Murphy was on the ballot for fifteen years and finished as high as 23.2% in 2000.  Ranked #12 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Rick Sutcliffe, Chicago Cubs (1987)

Sutcliffe was on the ballot for one year and finished with 1.8% in 2000.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Buddy Bell, Texas Rangers (1988)

Bell was on the ballot for one year and finished with 1.7% in 1995.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Glenn Davis, Houston Astros (1990)

While Davis played the minimum 10 years, he was not on the Baseball Hall of Fame ballot.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Kent Hrbek, Minnesota Twins (1990)

Hrbek was on the ballot for one year and finished with 1.0% in 2000.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Don Mattingly, New York Yankees (1993)

Murphy was on the ballot for fifteen years and finished as high as 28.2% in 2001.  Ranked #40 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Curt Schilling, Philadelphia Phillies (1995)

Schilling has been on the ballot for seven years and finished as high as 60.9% in 2019.  Ranked #5 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Brett Butler, Los Angeles Dodgers (1996)

Butler was on the ballot for one year and finished with 0.4% in 2003.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Mark McGwire, St. Louis Cardinals (1999)

McGwire has been on the ballot for ten years and finished as high as 23.7% in 2010.  Ranked #16 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Todd Stottlemyre, Arizona Diamondbacks (2000)

Stottlemyre was on the ballot for one year and finished with 0.2% in 2008.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

John Franco, New York Mets (2001)

Franco was on the ballot for one year and finished with 4.6% in 2011.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Danny Graves, Cincinnati Reds (2002)

Although Graves was eligible for the Hall of Fame in 2012, he was not on the ballot.

Jamie Moyer, Seattle Mariners (2003)

Moyer was on the ballot for one year and finished with 2.4% in 2018.  Ranked #105 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Mike Timlin, Boston Red Sox (2007)

Timlin was on the ballot for one year but did not receive any votes in 2007.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Josh Hamilton, Texas Rangers (2013)

Hamilton did not play the minimum ten years to qualify for the Baseball Hall of Fame.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

 

Let’s update our tally, shall we?

Award in Question

Percentage of recipients who have entered the HOF

Percentage of recipients by year who have entered the HOF.

NBA MVP

100%

100%

NHL Norris

90.5%

96.4%

NBA All Star Game MVP

89.5%

91.7%

NHL Conn Smythe

74.2%

85.4%

NHL Lady Byng

63.8%

76.0%

NFL Super Bowl MVP

60.6%

64.9%

NBA Defensive Player of the Year

58.3%

56.5%

NBA Rookie of the Year

56.5%

56.5%

NFL Pro Bowl MVP

52.3%

54.8%

MLB Lou Gehrig Award

51.9%

51.9%

MLB Roberto Clemente Award

47.4%

47.4%

MLB/NL/AL Cy Young Award

44.4%

55.4%

MLB Babe Ruth Award

37.0%

39.3%

NHL Frank J. Selke Trophy

33.3%

36.7%

NFL Offensive Rookie of the Year

28.6%

28.6%

MLB Edgar Martinez Award

26.7%

17.2%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Designated Hitter)

25.0%

30.8%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Shortstop)

23.5%

52.6%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove

21.7%

36.8%

NFL Defensive Rookie of the Year

20.6%

20.6%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Catcher)

20.0%

22.5%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Second Base)

18.8%

39.8%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Shortstop)

18.2%

35.1%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Pitcher)

18.2%

20.1%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Second Base)

16.7%

32.7%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Outfield)

16.7%

30.1%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Outfield)

15.7%

25.2%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Third Base)

14.3%

14.3%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Third Base)

13.6%

14.3%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (First Base)

13.6%

13.3%

MLB (NL/AL) Rookie of the Year

13.3%

13.3%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Catcher)

10.3%

15.2%

NBA Most Improved Player of the Year

5.3%

3.2%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (First Base)

3.8%

3.2%

So, who is up next?

The following are the players who have won the Lou Gehrig Memorial Award in the Major League Baseball who have retired but have not met the mandatory years out of the game to qualify for the Baseball Hall of Fame:

Shane Victorino, Philadelphia Phillies (2008)

Eligible for the Baseball Hall of Fame in 2021.

Derek Jeter, New York Yankees (2010)

Eligible for the Baseball Hall of Fame in 2020.

Barry Zito, San Francisco Giants (2012)

Eligible for the Baseball Hall of Fame in 2021.

Adrian Beltre, Texas Rangers (2014)

Eligible for the Baseball Hall of Fame in 2014.

The following are the players who have won the Lou Gehrig Memorial Award who are still active.

Albert Pujols, St. Louis Cardinals (2009)

39 Years Old, Playing for the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim.

Ryan Zimmerman, Washington Nationals (2011)

34 Years Old, Playing for the Washington Nationals.

Curtis Granderson, New York Mets (2015)

38 Years Old, Playing for the Miami Marlins.

Jose Altuve, Houston Astros (2016)

29 Years Old, Playing for the Houston Astros.

Joey Votto, Cincinnati Reds (2017)

35 Years Old, Playing for the Cincinnati Reds.

Corey Kluber, Cleveland Indians (2018)

33 Years Old, Playing for the Cleveland Indians.

The Lou Gehrig Memorial Award winners seems to lean toward elite players and we suspect that this will be a pattern to continue.

Up next, we are going to stay within the tertiary Baseball Awards and look at the Hutch Award Winner.

As always, we thank you for that support and look for that soon!

Our Notinhalloffame Hockey List has been revised. Jarome Iginla debuts at #1

The Hockey Hall of Fame recently had their most bizarre Hockey Hall of Fame Class as for the first time in any of our lists we had NOBODT from our top 25 were chosen for their respective Hall of Fame.  

Now before we unveil our new list, a couple of caveats about the impending Class of 2019 and our list in general:

At present, we don’t rank female players.  This is not because we do not respect the women that have been inducted but at this time there has not been a lot of call for us to do so and we have decided at this time not to merge eligible female players with our core list.  Had we done so, Hayley Wickenheiser, who was chosen this year would have likely been ranked #1 by us.

We also don’t rank builders as of yet.  We do have an exception with Don Cherry, but are looking to create a builders list and migrate him to that one.

As such, only two former players were removed from our list, Guy Carbonneau (#29) and Sergei Zubov (#44) and they are slated to join Wickenheiser as the Class of 2019.

Three new names enter our list, which is now at 131.  There will be a future expansion to 150, which will occur later this year.

Let’s look at our new top ten, and based on our new #1 we feel confident that there will not be a repeat of not having a top ten (let alone a top twenty-five) not make the Hockey Hall of Fame Class of 2020.

Our new Notinhalloffame.com Hockey Top Ten is:

#1. Jarome Iginla:  Iginla is entering his first year of eligibility and point blank he is the reason why we feel confident that there will be a top ten entry entering the Hockey Hall of Fame in 2020 as he should enter on his first ballot.  The six-time All-Star was named to the First Team All-Star post season squad three times and he is also a two-time Olympic Gold Medalist with Team Canada.

#2. Alexander Mogilny:  Mogilny drops one spot, as he was our top rank last year.  One of the last creations of the Red Army, Alexander Mogilny was the first Soviet player to defect to play in the NHL and he would have a legendary 76 Goal season for the Buffalo Sabres in 1992/93.  Eligible since 2009, Mogilny is a two-time Second Team All-Star.

#3. Theoren Fleury:  Fleury holds firm at #3.  The scrappy native of Saskatchewan went to seven All-Star Games and was a Second Team All-Star in 1994/95.  He is a Stanley Cup winner with the Calgary Flames (1989) and an Olympic Gold Medalist with Team Canada (2002).

#4. Don Cherry:  Cherry drops to his lowest ranking as we take your votes into consideration, and not all of them are kind to Canada’s favorite (or best known) blowhard.  As mentioned earlier, we are likely to take him out completely in favor of a contributors list.

#5. Daniel Alfredsson:  Alfredsson may have received the most concern regarding his snub this year on social media but that hasn’t translated to votes for him on our site.  As such, he has dropped one spot from #4 to #5, but the six-time All-Star and Olympic Gold Medalist (Sweden in 2006) may have a better shot than those ahead of him, with the exception of Iginla.

#6. Pierre Turgeon:  Turgeon climbs up from #7 and remains the highest scoring player (1,327 Points) who is not in the Hockey Hall of Fame.  Turgeon is a former four-time All-Star.

#7. Bernie Nicholls:  Nicholls drops from #5.  He is one of seven players to have a 70 Goal Season and one of five to have a 150 Point Season.  He was chosen for three All-Star Games.

#8. Jeremy Roenick:  Roenick fell two spots to #8.  At present, he is our highest rated American and he is a nine-time All-Star. 

#9. John LeClair:  For a time, LeClair was the best power forward in the NHL and was a five-time post-season NHL All-Star.  That was a great stretch, but he was not close to that level over the rest of his career.

#10. Marian Hossa:  The second of our third new entries, Marian Hossa was a three-time Stanley Cup Champion with the Chicago Blackhawks and a five-time NHL All-Star.  He is also a four-time Olympian with Slovakia.

The third new entry on this list is career Arizona Coyote, Shane Doan who debuts at #56.

The entire list can be found here.

As always, we here at Notinhalloffame.com encourage you to cast your vote, give us your opinion and we thank you for your support!

 

The Musicians Hall of Fame announces their Class of 2019

We don’t often discuss the Musicians Hall of Fame, and with all due respect, there is a good reason for it. Since its inception in 2007, the Nashville based Hall has only had six classes, including the one we are about to discuss.  After their third class in 2009, the city of Nashville took over their property to make room for the Music City Center and they would reopen in 2013 on the first floor of the Nashville Municipal Auditorium.  They would induct their fourth class in 2014 and fifth in 2016, thus bringing us to the sixth class announced yesterday.

Before we get to that class, let’s look at what the Musicians Hall of Fame is first.  Their mandate is to recognize the contributions of performers, producers in rock and roll, country music and beyond.  As it is based in Nashville, it is not surprising that there has been more of a country flavor to the inductees, but nevertheless, we love the idea of this Hall of Fame, so let’s look at the Class of 2019.

Alabama:  The headliners of this class can make a claim as the most successful country music band of all-time.  Coming into prominence in the 1980s, Alabama would sell over 75 million records and had 40 number one hits.  

Steve Wariner:  Wariner has charted on the Country Music Charts 50 times and has written number 1 hits for Clint Black and Garth Brooks.

Don Everly:  Don Everly was one-half of the Everly Brothers, who are Rock and Roll Hall of Fame inductees.  Everly enters specifically winning the “Iconic Riff Award” for the intro to their hit, “Wake Up Little Susie”.

Felix Cavaliere:  A member of the Rascals and Joey Dee and the Starliters, Felix Cavaliere is a successful keyboardist.  He is a member of the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame with the Rascals.

Owen Bradley:  Bradley enters posthumously in the Musicians Hall of Fame Producer category.  He was a large part of developing the “Nashville Sound” and bringing Country Music sound to the modern era.  He entered the Country Music Hall of Fame in 1974.

Billy Sherrill:  Sherrill enters by receiving the Musicians Hall of Fame Engineer Award. He led recording sessions for George Jones and Tammy Wynette among others.

The Surfaris:  The California surf music group enters by earning the inaugural Musicians Hall of Fame Instrumental Song Award for their 1963 hit, “Wipe Out”.

Three groups of sessions musicians are also being inducted.  They are the modern “A-Team” (Eddie Bayers, Paul Franklin, John Hobbs, Brent Mason, Michael Rhodes), The Original Muscle Shoals Rhythm Section(David Briggs, Jerry Carrigan, Norbert Putnam, Terry Thompson, Earl “Peanut” Montgomery, Joe South and Reggie Young) and The Muscle Shoals Horn Section(Aaron Brown, Harrison Calloway, Ronnie Eades, Charlie Rose and Harvey Thompson). 

The ceremony will take place on October 22.

We here at Notinhalloffame.com would like to congratulate the newest members of the Musicians Hall of Fame and we are hopeful that there will be annual inductions in the future.

 

The Country Music HOF announces Brooks and Dunn exhibit

The Country Music Hall of Fame does a lot right, one of which we would like to focus us on is their regular exhibits on selected musicians in the country music industry.  They will be doing that again, this time focusing on Brooks & Dunn, starting on August 9, running until July 19, 2020.  This will coincide with the duo’s impending induction into the Country Music Hall of Fame this fall.

Titled, Brooks & Dunn: Kings of Neon, will display many of their trophies, custom guitars, stage wear and an early draft of their #1 Hit, “Red Dirt Road”.

While we here at Notinhalloffame.com will not be in proximity to view the festivities in Nashville, we again congratulate the Country Music Hall of Fame for being one of the most progressive in their institutional field.