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Committee Chairman

Committee Chairman

Kirk Buchner, "The Committee Chairman", is the owner and operator of the site.  Kirk can be contacted at [email protected] .

Our All-Time Top 50 Milwaukee Brewers have been revised

Yes, we know that this is taking a while!

As many of you know, we here at Notinhalloffame.com are slowly generating the 50 of each major North American sports team.  That being said, we have existing Top 50 lists out and we always consistently look to update them when we can and based on necessity. As such, we are very happy to present our pre-2021 revision of our top 50 Milwaukee Brewers of all-time.

As for all of our top 50 players in baseball we look at the following: 

1.  Advanced Statistics.

2.  Traditional statistics and how they finished in their League. 

3. Playoff accomplishments.

4. Their overall impact on the team and other intangibles not reflected in a stat sheet.

There is one new addition on out Top 50, but nothing affecting our top five.  As always, we announce them here.

They are:

1. Robin Yount                                

2. Paul Molitor

3. Ryan Braun 

4. Cecil Cooper

5. Teddy Higuera

The complete list can be found here

The only new entry is Josh Hader, who enters at #44.  Active Brewers, Ryan Braun, Christian Yelich and Lorenzo Cain, did not climb up from their existing spots.

We welcome your input and commentsand as always, we thank you for your support.

The St. Louis Cardinals announce five candidates for their Hall of Fame

The St. Louis Cardinals have announced the five former players who fans can vote for to enter their franchise Hall of Fame.

Those players are:

Steve Carlton, Pitcher: 1965-71, 77-62, 3.10 ERA, 1.28 WHIP. Carlton’s career began in St. Louis, where he debuted in 1965, and became a full-time member of the starting rotation in 1967.  He would be named to the All-Star Team in 1968, 1969 and 1971, the last of which saw “Lefty” win 20 Games.  Carlton entered the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1994.

Keith Hernandez, First Base:  1974-83, .299/.385/.448, 1,217 H, 81 HR, 595 RBI.  Hernandez was the co-winner of the 1979 MVP in a year that he won the Batting Title (.344), and led the NL in Doubles (48) and Runs Scored (116).  A two-time All-Star as a Cardinal, Hernandez would also earn six Gold Gloves and one Silver Slugger in St. Louis.

Matt Morris, Pitcher:  1977-2005, 101-62, 3.61 ERA, 1.27 WHIP.  Morris went to two All-Star Games in St. Louis, and he was 14 shy of 1,000 Strikeouts with the team.  Morris led the NL in Wins in 2001, and was third in Cy Young voting that year.

Edgar Renteria, Shortstop:  1999-2004, .290/.347/.420, 973 H, 71 HR, 451 RBI.  Renteria went to three All-Star Games in St. Louis, and in 2002 and 2003 won both the Silver Slugger and Gold Glove.  

Lee Smith, Pitcher:  1990-93, 160 Saves, 2.90 ERA, 1.15 WHIP.  Smith was not with the Cardinals for long, but he led the league in Saves twice.  A three-time All-Star in St. Louis, Smith was the runner-up for the Cy Young in 1991.  Smith was chosen for the Baseball Hall of Fame in 2019.

The leading vote-getter will be the lone inductee for the Class of 2021.  That person will be honored on April 17, along with 2020 inductees, Tom Herr, John Tudor and Bill White.

You can vote for this year’s class here.

The Cardinals Hall of Fame was created in 2014, and had s quickly become one of our favorite franchise halls.  

RIP: Bunny Wailer

We have lost a musical legend today.

Bunny Wailer, who founded the iconic reggae group, the Wailers, passed away at the age of 73.  No cause of death was announced.

Born, Neville Livingstone, Wailer, along with Bob Marley and Peter Tosh were the Wailers, and they would elevate reggae to become world known.  Like Marley and Tosh, Wailer had his own individual success when he left the group.  

We here at Notinhalloffame.com would like to extend our condolences to the fans, friends and family of Bunny Wailer.

44. Josh Hader

Josh Hader was traded twice before he made it to the Majors in 2017, but once he did, the two teams that dealt him previously (Baltimore and Houston) have been regretting it ever since.