WWE

Compared to the other Halls of Fame that we discuss on our website, this one is hands down the most fun and the hardest to calculate. Keep in mind, that there is no actual WWE Hall of Fame where fans can go and see their heroes. There are no set criteria to get in the WWE Hall of Fame. Wins and losses don’t exactly matter when the matches are predetermined. It does not even seem to matter if you even wrestled for the WWE as some of their inductees never drew a paycheck from Stamford. This is as subjective as they come so with that we made a criterion of our own which did incorporate (in no particular order) impact, ability, innovation championships won, legacy and their use in the WWE. The only two rules we set was that the wrestler in question was not currently an active competitor on a full-time basis unless that wrestler was 46 or over.  Once a wrestler becomes 46 that individual moves from the Futures to the Main List at the time of revision.

Until Then, Whatcha gonna do when Notinhalloffame.com runs wild on you!
 
Sincerely,
 
The Not in Hall of Committee.
With a decade plus tenure in the WWE and a won/loss record that resembles NBA expansion franchises, Sho Funaki was a great entertainer and a decent worker. Funaki is one of those wrestlers whose winning percentage does not reflect what he did in the ring. Initially a member of Kaientai in Japan, and then in the United States, Funaki was…
As the son of Afa of the Wild Samoan, Samu reached the big time early as the third member of the Samoan clan and even helped to defend the WWF World Tag Team Title when Sika was on the shelf for a bit.  Despite his young age, he was not out of place and held is own against much more…
A journeyman wrestler in the eyes of many, Ed Wiskoski became a successful commodity in the industry when he adopted the gimmick of a South African mercenary.  Wiskoski played a “Polish Prince”, a “Maharaji” but once he decided he was an African racist in the American Wrestling Association, he struck gold in the last half of the 1980’s.  
A fixture in the Light Heavyweight division for two decades, Danny McShain would win the NWA Light Heavyweight Title ten times.  McShain would also win a myriad of other championships throughout his career and the legitimate tough guy was an underrated heel from his day.
A champion rower for his native Ireland, Steve Casey would go on to greater success in the wrestling ring becoming one of the first Irish champions.  An incredibly gifted athlete, Casey would win the NWA and Boston version of the AWA Championship multiple times.
Dump Matsumoto was one of the most vicious “puroresu” female heels of all time and throughout the 1980’s she was not just a destroyer of female babyfaces in Japan but a serious ratings draw on television and an arena filler. If the WWE Hall of Fame ever looks to induct a female combatant, they could do a lot worse than…
Buff Bagwell’s one week stint in the WWE may have been a disaster, but Buff Bagwell had a ten year run in WCW where he won many titles, became an entertaining performer and was on the cusp of main event stardom. It didn’t happen, but he did a lot more in World Championship Wrestling than most people remember.
We would have loved to have seen what Vince would have done with “The Handsome Half-Breed”, Gino Hernandez.  In World Class Championship Wrestling, he established himself as one of the best heels in the business and his combination of skill, slime and arrogance had the chemical make up of what could have been a legend.  Sadly, Hernandez succumbed to the…
We have to WAY BACK for this one.  In the late 1800s, William Muldoon was recognized as the World’s Greco-Roman Champion.  He would defend that championship against all comers and retired undefeated.  While his work in the ring bared little resemblance to what it would become this is a bona fide pioneer and more than worthy of Legacy Wing consideration.
From GoDaddy.com commercial spokesgirl to WWE Diva, Candice Michelle parlayed her looks to a WWE Women’s Championship.  Michelle was far from a great wrestler when she began, but she did work at her craft to become a passable woman’s wrestler and credible champion.
One of the few professional wrestlers to defeat Ed “Strangler” Lewis, Gus Sonnenberg was also a former NFL Champion and a fixture in the American Northeast wrestling scene.  Sonnenberg was a major fixture in the New England area, which can’t hurt him in regards to what is essentially a Hall of Fame based in Connecticut.
Oliver Humperdink had a few decent runs as a wrestler, but it was as a manager that he made his biggest impact.  Humperdink was very successful in Florida and was a long time heel manager there.  He did reach the WWE as a face manager of Bam Bam Bigelow and Paul Orndorff, but he was largely mute in that role…
While Hayabusa was not often seen in large wrestling promotions, the legend of the man born Eiji Ezaki cast a large shadow.
While Angelo Poffo is best known as the father of WWE Hall of Famer, Randy “Macho Man” Savage it can’t be forgotten that he was a decent wrestler in his own right and one hell of an athlete.
A former WWF Women’s Champion, Rockin’ Robin was the face of the women’s division for a time in the then named World Wrestling Federation.  While that is the good news, the fact is that as the face of the champion, the title was abandoned and the women’s division went into hibernation for over a decade.  That fact does the half-sister…
The Canadian flagbearer in the 1928 Olympics, Earl McCready would go on to be one of the most successful collegiate wrestlers of all time, winning the NCAA Title for the University of Oklahoma three years straight (1928-30).  McCready would become a major star in the professional ranks in Canada and the United Kingdom winning the British Empire Title three times.
Nepotism runs rampant in wrestling (like almost every other industry) and it has led to some people who have competed in the ring who had no business being in the squared circle.  Mike Graham may not have been a superstar on a national level, nor was he the main draw (though fairly high up in Florida) regionally, but the undersized…
When you look at the history of early wrestling promotors Billy Sandow is a name that has to come up as he is a part of the famed “Gold Dust Trio” that was an integral part of early wrestling promotions.  Along with Ed “Strangler” Lewis and Toots Mondt he triumvirate helped to alter the sport to a more “sports entertainment”…
Johnny Powers challenged Bruno Sammartino for the WWWF Heavyweight Championship many times in the early 60’s in Pennsylvania and Toronto and he main evented in Minnesota, Detroit and Texas but his biggest contribution was as a promoter in the Cleveland area with the NWF promotion.
Some fans may remember a Kendo Nagasaki who competed in various promotions in North America as a mid card heel.  However, in the United Kingdom the original Kendo Nagasaki was a white British man named Peter Thornley who was actually the biggest draw in England for years.  Thornley was not a well built man, nor was he technically skilled, but…