WWE

Compared to the other Halls of Fame that we discuss on our website, this one is hands down the most fun and the hardest to calculate. Keep in mind, that there is no actual WWE Hall of Fame where fans can go and see their heroes. There are no set criteria to get in the WWE Hall of Fame. Wins and losses don’t exactly matter when the matches are predetermined. It does not even seem to matter if you even wrestled for the WWE as some of their inductees never drew a paycheck from Stamford. This is as subjective as they come so with that we made a criterion of our own which did incorporate (in no particular order) impact, ability, innovation championships won, legacy and their use in the WWE. The only two rules we set was that the wrestler in question was not currently an active competitor on a full-time basis unless that wrestler was 46 or over.  Once a wrestler becomes 46 that individual moves from the Futures to the Main List at the time of revision.

Until Then, Whatcha gonna do when Notinhalloffame.com runs wild on you!
 
Sincerely,
 
The Not in Hall of Committee.
The older brother of longtime figurehead president, Jack Tunney, was the longtime promoter for the Toronto territory and was the man who had the vision that made that city a hotbed for professional wrestling, which it still is today. Frank Tunney's negotiations with the NWA and promotion of Whipper Billy Watson should be recognized somewhere.   Sadly, it won’t be here.
A sentimental favorite for many ECW fans, Stevie Richards went from “clueless putz” to a certified ECW Heavyweight Title contender.  Amidst the parodies and comedy routines lied a very good in ring wrestler who while he never really found his niche in the WWE (though he did work there for a few years) will always be remembered in Philadelphia…and should…
Frank Sexton was one of the top stars in the 1940s where he would win multiple championships.  Sexton's apex was in Boston where he became the AWA World Heavyweight Champion two times, the second reign lasting five years.  He would also win championships in Montreal, Toronto, Ohio and San Francisco.
Best known for her long run in the World Wrestling Federation in the 1980’s, Velvet McIntyre was a good face female wrestler who was one of the better high flyers of her day.  Wrestling barefoot, McIntyre received numerous title shots, and actually was a champion for a week, albeit in an unacknowledged one week run on a tour in Australia.
Despite how much respect that many American wrestling fans have towards Japanese grapplers, it is hard to get noticed if you remain exclusively in Japan.  For many wrestling fans, Nobuhiko Takada may be the best wrestler from Asia that they never heard of.
The WWE may be the elite in every capacity, but when they put a jockstrap on the head of poor Peter Polaco they showed that their wardrobe team can certainly swing and miss.  Polaco would have a lower card spot as Aldo Montoya, but it was in ECW where he had a gimmick that matched his skills. 
Tony “Cannonball” Parisi may be remembered now mostly as lower card wrestler in the WWE in the early 1980’s, but decades before the Italian-Canadian had done very well in the Toronto area and the then named World Wide Wrestling Federation, capturing various championships there and was used as a link to Bruno Sammartino where he was billed as his cousin.
Penny Banner had quite a life as she not only was a championship wrestler, but she dated Elvis Presley.  Later, she was married to fellow wrestler Johnny Weaver and competed in the Senior Games.  With her pin-up looks and kick ass skill, Banner was an NWA World Tag Team Champion and was the inaugural AWA Women’s World Champion.  She would…
A former recognized two time World Heavyweight Champion in wrestling, Dick Shikat would join the post World War One circuit and would become a World Heavyweight Champion himself.  Shikat should be considered a dark horse candidate in terms of the WWE Hall of Fame and its legends wing.
An exceptional wrestler, yet forgotten combatant (in terms of American folklore) El Solitario was initially billed as the son of El Santo, but would shed that moniker and carve his own niche as a Lucha Libre superstar. He would become a huge star in the upper card for years but as he was not the active in the U.S. he…
Crash Holly may have been undersized regardless of the era, but he became the “Houdini of Hardcore” and became the face of the Hardcore division.  He pluckily fought any competitor regardless of his weight disadvantage and when he won the WWE Hardcore Championship and boldly stated that he would fight any contender 24/7, he unleashed a new era in the…
He may not be remembered as much as he should be, but in his day Cyclone Negro was a very good heel and one of the more successful Hispanic wrestlers of all time. Negro was from Venezuela, and the barrel chested brawler found success throughout the territories across the United States as well as Japan and Australia. To this day,…
Considered one of the good guys of the business and a premier tag team wrestler, Johnny Weaver competed all across the National Wrestling Alliance for many decades.  Weaver was a popular grappler who may never have been the top man of a promotion but he was a great hand for whatever area he was in.  Weaver has been given credit…
At the turn of the 20th century, Tom Jenkins was a top Heavyweight contender, and he would hold the prestigious American Heavyweight Championship three times.  Jenkins would have memorable matches against Frank Gotch and Dan McLeod and was one of the top wrestlers of the first decade of the 1900s.
Tony Marino had a decent run in the WWWF and in the NWA.  His WWWF performances saw him win the WWWF International Tag Team Title twice, one with Bruno Sammartino, who would bring him into the Pittsburgh territory where he would compete as Battman, and yes we mean that Batman; completely decked out as the Caped Crusader.
It may have taken Eric Embry ten years to really get into a position of prominence, but once he did he certainly made the most of it.  Embry toiled around in multiple promotions competing in lighter weight divisions, but a couple years after he returned to Texas he would become the booker there.  World Class wasn’t the promotion it used…
A major staple in the Pacific Northwest on both sides of the border, Dutch Savage would become a huge name as both a heel (predominately in the 60’s) and a face through the 70’s. He held the Vancouver and Portland belts multiple times, and was not just a huge name there, but would book and promote in those territories. Savage…
Like Leilani Kai, for years Judy Martin could be counted on as a heel to always provide challenges in both singles and tags.  Martin would have many shots at the WWE Ladies Championship, but she will always be best known as one half of the Glamour Girls with Leilani Kai.
We actually have no problem admitting that we liked the “Berzerker” character.  John Nord had a lot of success in the AWA where he was essentially a disciple of the late Bruiser Brody, but it was as a demented Viking in the WWE that Nord would achieve his biggest fame.  He was big and athletic and delivered a series of…
Before there were the Crush Gals and the Jumping Bomb Angels (who for many were the first Japanese female wrestlers that many American saw), there was the Beauty Pair (Jackie Sato & Maki Ueda).  They were massive stars that crossed over in the pop singing world, and they changed the way that women wrestlers were marketed and thought of in…