WWE

Compared to the other Halls of Fame that we discuss on our website, this one is hands down the most fun and the hardest to calculate. Keep in mind, that there is no actual WWE Hall of Fame where fans can go and see their heroes. There are no set criteria to get in the WWE Hall of Fame. Wins and losses don’t exactly matter when the matches are predetermined. It does not even seem to matter if you even wrestled for the WWE as some of their inductees never drew a paycheck from Stamford. This is as subjective as they come so with that we made a criterion of our own which did incorporate (in no particular order) impact, ability, innovation championships won, legacy and their use in the WWE. The only two rules we set was that the wrestler in question was not currently an active competitor on a full-time basis unless that wrestler was 46 or over.  Once a wrestler becomes 46 that individual moves from the Futures to the Main List at the time of revision.

Until Then, Whatcha gonna do when Notinhalloffame.com runs wild on you!
 
Sincerely,
 
The Not in Hall of Committee.
Don Owen took over the Portland territory in 1952 and for a four decade time frame made it a reputable area for wrestlers.   Owen would become known as a great payoff man and develop the area accordingly and if Wrestlemania was ever in Oregon would have a shot.   Since it won’t, this is not likely to happen.
A former two time World Heavyweight Champion, Everett Marshall was a decent draw in the 1930’s and had classics with Lou Thesz.  As a former recognized world champion the new wing for the WWE Hall of Fame work in his favour, but where does he fall in that pecking order?
Some people have said that Brad Armstrong was the best wrestler never to make it.  This is an unfair statement as Armstrong was a part of the NWA and WCW for a long period of time and never needed to beg for work in the business.  With that said, Brad Armstrong was an amazing talent who was one of the…
Flash Funk may not have set the world on fire, but as 2 Cold Scorpio, he was a high flying innovator who danced his way to stardom.  He would win the Tag Team belts in WCW, but it was in ECW that he was allowed to shine in singles matches and exhibit other aspects of his personality.  The WWE totally…
If you look at the managing track record of Harvey Wippleman in the WWE, it isn’t very good. More often than not, his clients were on the losing end of their PPV matches, and the only championship he held as a manager was the WWF Women’s (Bertha Faye) which coincidentally would be a belt he would himself own. However, after…
Leroy McGuirk should have had a bigger career as a wrestler. McGuirk was the multi time NWA Junior Heavyweight Champion in the 30’s and 40’s but in 1950 a car accident took hampered his good eye (he had already lost the sight in the other one as a child) and his in-ring career was over. However, his wrestling career was…
Marc Mero’s first incarnation in WCW as Johnny B. Badd had such an awful beginning it is hard to imagine he could ever overcome it.  Mero actually got over by playing the character so over the top, but while he was doing it fans were really taking notice of the improvement in his in ring skills.  By 1994, he was…
It may be hard to believe now, but there was a time in the mid 90’s where Ahmed Johnson was the most over babyface in the WWF with the exception of Shawn Michaels.  Johnson was big and powerful and with his quiet yet fierce demeanor, fans bought into his street guy made good image.  Numerous injuries combined with an ill-advised…
On the WWE roster for eight years, former Diva Search winner and Miami Heat cheerleader Layla took a long time to find her groove but when she did, mostly as one half of a heel team with Michelle McCool.  With McCool, she was a co-Diva Champion and at one time was arguably a focal point of the division.  That can’t…
For many years, Dewey Robertson was employed as a wrestler who while was technically sound was somewhat nondescript.  In his mid 40’s, Robertson completely reinvented himself as “The Missing Link”.  This new character was as bizarre as they came, as the bulk of his offensive move set was ramming his head into his opponent.  He had a full page spread…
Another star that competed mostly in Texas, “Iceman” King Parsons was one of the top stars in World Class.  Parsons was a decent wrestler whose skills with the microphone allowed him to be a face or heel with great ease.  With his butt bump and catch phrases, Parsons looked different than anyone else and in a profession full of cookie…
There really are two careers of Atsushi Onita.  The first was as a young Japanese wrestler working his way up the ranks and becoming one of the early figures of All Japan’s Junior Heavyweight Division.  However, that isn’t the career he is known for is it?
The Flying Scotts (George and Sandy) were a very successful tag team all across Canada and other territories. However, it was behind the scenes where both brothers had a greater impact in the business. George Scott was working for the World Wrestling Federation during the time of the 80’s boom, and was an asset with booking, production and is widely…
A master of the sleeper hold who cut his teeth in the Ohio territory and the Pacific Northwest, Ed Francis would become better known for his role in performing and promoting the Hawaii territory throughout the 1960’s. and the 1970’s. 
Suffering from alopecia preventing him from growing hair, the bald head and menacing look of Skull Murphy made the Canadian a natural for the world of professional wrestling.  Murphy would wrestle all over the world, including a successful run in the WWWF, where was a tag team champion and would hold tag team titles in multiple promotions with various partners.
The San Francisco territory was a vibrant territory and it was under the guidance of Roy Shire, who built the Cow Palace into a West Coast Mecca for Professional Wrestling.  While Shire was a major figure in growing the business in Northern California, he did not get inducted during the Wrestlemania festivities in the Bay Area, a clear indication that…
How did Scott Norton never work for the WWE?  With his size and power, he would have seemed like he would have fit in brilliantly with some of the other power based wrestlers that Vince had.  Don’t weep for Scott Norton though…although he was not pushed to the extent of his abilities in WCW, he reached the highest level in…
Predominantly a heel throughout his thirty years plus in the ring, “Bulldog” Bob Brown was a consistent figure in the Midwestern and Canadian territories. Actually, his look was always consistent with his mean face, brush cut and black trunks. Brown was also a booker numerous times in his career, usually in the Central States territory. Had he ventured more East…
A legend on the Canadian Gridiron and a star in the National Wrestling Alliance, Angelo Mosca may be best known now for a viral YouTube video where he fought on stage with another former CFL star.
Buck Robley did not get a lot of the credit he deserved until he passed away, but one of the great minds of the wrestling business was owned by Buck Robley. The “Colonel” perfected the art of the Cowardly heel, and his “Don’t call me yellow” shtick never got old. Had the tail end of his career got seen in…