WWE

Compared to the other Halls of Fame that we discuss on our website, this one is hands down the most fun and the hardest to calculate. Keep in mind, that there is no actual WWE Hall of Fame where fans can go and see their heroes. There are no set criteria to get in the WWE Hall of Fame. Wins and losses don’t exactly matter when the matches are predetermined. It does not even seem to matter if you even wrestled for the WWE as some of their inductees never drew a paycheck from Stamford. This is as subjective as they come so with that we made a criterion of our own which did incorporate (in no particular order) impact, ability, innovation championships won, legacy and their use in the WWE. The only two rules we set was that the wrestler in question was not currently an active competitor on a full-time basis unless that wrestler was 46 or over.  Once a wrestler becomes 46 that individual moves from the Futures to the Main List at the time of revision.

Until Then, Whatcha gonna do when Notinhalloffame.com runs wild on you!
 
Sincerely,
 
The Not in Hall of Committee.
A big man who had few peers as powerful as he, Fred Ottman was at his best when he was Typhoon; one half of the Natural Disasters with Earthquake.  He was initially brought into the WWE as Hulk Hogan’s buddy Tugboat, but as that first run ended he slid too far down the card to have a solid program with…
Like many Native American wrestlers, Jay Youngblood was only portraying one as he was actually Hispanic.   Youngblood found a lot of success in the Mid Atlantic area teaming up with Ricky Steamboat where the pair captured the NWA Tag Title.  Youngblood may have been a very successful tag team wrestler, but in Pacific Northwest Wrestling he was able to flex…
Is it probable that most wrestling fans would have no idea who Jose Lothario was had he not trained Shawn Michaels and managed him during his first WWE World Championship Run?  We admit we are in that group and largely missed the hybrid of American and Mexican wrestling that he developed in Texas.  Lothario may never have been a main…
The WWE Hall of Fame has shown as of late that they respect women and Japan. If Aja Kong had had a run in the WWR, would this be a solid candidate?
Blessed (or cursed) with excessive facial hair and about as legitimate a tough guy as it came, Fred Koury became the “tough man” Bull Curry at the circus to provide for his family at age sixteen. He would later become a professional wrestler, but it was not until the 1950’s when he was in his late thirties that he became…
A legitimate Olympian who competed for the United States in the 1968 Olympics, Bob Roop translated amateur credibility to a professional one.  Roop competed for the Grahams in Florida for the bulk of his career and though he held their Heavyweight Championship three times and was a technical marvel, he may have achieved his greatest notoriety as Kevin Sullivan’s crazy…
Often a debate may ensue as to who is the best wrestler pound for pound.  Mike Shaw may have tipped the scales at nearly 400 pounds, but pound for pound he was saddled with the worst gimmicks in wrestling history.  A far better wrestler then he was allowed to show, Shaw was an escaped mental patient, a demented monk and…
The story of Kenji Shibuya mirrors that of so many other Japanese-American professional wrestlers in that Shibuya was born in the U.S. but for the purposes of pro wrestling business he was born and bred in Japan.
I think that we can all agree that the WWE totally dropped the ball with Dan “The Beast” Severn.
Many of the people reading this might think of Miguel Perez as a member of Los Boricuas, Savio Vega’s militant Puerto Rican group from the Attitude Era. While Miguel Perez Jr. was a very good wrestler who probably deserved a better opportunity in the United States than he did get, but he was the son of a major star form…
The Minnesota based American Wrestling Association was still a very relevant promotion in the early 1980’s and winning that company’s World Championship meant something.  Many were shocked when a relatively unknown Austrian named Otto Wanz became their World Champion in 1982.
Although he was best known as the promoter of the Kansas City territory, St. Louis territory and multiple time president of the National Wrestling Alliance, Bob Geigel was a very successful wrestler in his own right and held multiple championships in various territories across the United States. Geigel would mainly focus on the Central States area, where he would hold…
As of this writing, there has yet to be a referee inducted into the WWE Hall of Fame, and we are not counting Teddy Long, who largely got in on his role as a manager and the Smackdown general manager.  If that ever happens, our vote is for Earl Hebner.
“The Butcher” Paul Vachon may have been in the shadow of his brother Maurice “Mad Dog” Vachon, but despite being the latter’s tag team partner, Paul Vachon held his own in the tandem.  Vachon would hold many tag belts (many with Maurice) and would adopt the same type of vicious heel style.  With that said, his stint in the WWE…
When Perry Saturn first gained attention from the wrestling world as one half of the Eliminators with John Kronus it was clear who was the true talent of the team.  WCW rightfully snatched him up and considering that he could wrestle virtually any style, he was an immediate asset to the roster.  Saturn was one of many younger talents who…
The Headbangers were a decent tag team in the fames Attitude Era of the WWE. Mosh and Thrasher took their hybrid Heavy Metal/Goth hybrid to the largest wrestling organization and secured a solid spot and even won the Tag Team Championship. It wasn’t easy, as they were saddled with lame gimmicks before they debuted as the Headbangers, but once they…
Buzz Sawyer’s nickname was the “Mad Dog”, and that could be the most appropriate moniker in wrestling history.  He performed with reckless abandon and he took that attitude outside the ring as he lived his life like a train wreck waiting to happen.  Sawyer’s program with Tommy Rich culminating in the “Last Battle of Atlanta” was considered by some to…
There aren’t many wrestlers who looked as imposing without doing more than just standing there, than the Missouri Mauler, Larry Hamilton. 
So despised that during and after World War II he was booed against Germans, Baron Michele Leone might just be one of the greatest heels of all time.  Leone would sell out arenas for years in Los Angeles and is one of the true forgotten stars in wrestling lore.
We like to think of Minoru Suzuki as the Chuck Norris of professional wrestling.  The older he gets, the more the legend of his toughness grows.