WWE

Compared to the other Halls of Fame that we discuss on our website, this one is hands down the most fun and the hardest to calculate. Keep in mind, that there is no actual WWE Hall of Fame where fans can go and see their heroes. There are no set criteria to get in the WWE Hall of Fame. Wins and losses don’t exactly matter when the matches are predetermined. It does not even seem to matter if you even wrestled for the WWE as some of their inductees never drew a paycheck from Stamford. This is as subjective as they come so with that we made a criteria of our own which did incorporate (in no particular order) impact, ability, innovation championships won, legacy and their use in the WWE. The only rule we set was that the wrestler in question was not currently an active competitor on a full time basis.

Until Then, Whatcha gonna do when Notinhalloffame.com runs wild on you!
 
Sincerely,
 
The Not in Hall of Committee.
Masa Saito was not your typical Japanese wrestler.  Many of them will never compete outside of Japan, and those that do may do so only for a run or two in the United States.  Saito competed often in the U.S. for various promotions often competing in tag teams with other foreign born heels.  Saito was a compact powerhouse with a…
The father of Jeff Jarrett had a lot more impact in the world of wrestling than casual fans realize.  Jerry Jarrett was a top star in the Memphis territory holding multiple championships in the Volunteer State, but he slowly worked his way into to becoming a promoter, and by the decade’s end, ran one of the tightest organizations.  Jerry “The…
Should Konnan ever get into the WWE Hall of Fame, it certainly won’t be for his handful of matches as the original Max Moon.  The Cuban born wrestler achieved his first level of super stardom in the AAA promotion of Mexico where he excelled as both a heel and a face.  He would later join WCW and after a few…
There have been a plethora of excellent wrestlers from the United Kingdom, but few of them have made a serious dent in the American Market.  Dave Findlay was one of those rare exceptions; a fact that becomes even more remarkable as he really didn’t make an American impact until his late 30’s.
Long before there was Goldust, there was “Exotic” Adrian Street who pushed the sexual boundaries like no other had before.  His character wasn’t just flamboyant, as he played the part of a tough transvestite bedecked with glitter, pigtails and the most garish makeup this side of Gene Simmons.  He created a persona designed to make fans uncomfortable and likely executed…
Recently, Matt Striker referred to Serena as the anti-diva.  That may be somewhat accurate, but had the diva term been associated with wrestling in the past, that designation would have been earmarked for Luna Vachon.  As the daughter of Paul Vachon and the niece of Mad Dog and Vivian Vachon, Luna was bred for the business.  She was compact, strong…
Like many who became premier managers in wrestling, Gary Hart first donned the tights as an in ring competitor.  His career as a wrestler may have been uneventful, but he made his impact as a manager and behind the scenes player especially in the World Class territory where he was the long time booker.  Hart would also lead a heel…
Sam Muchnick was a major force in the creation of the National Wrestling Alliance in 1948 and in 1950 would serve as the President of the most important governing body in professional wrestling from 1950 to 1977 (with the exception of two years). Muchnick would preside over the St. Louis territory making it one of the healthiest in the United…
“Mr. Perfect” Curt Hennig is justifiably in the WWE Hall of Fame.  Curt’s father, Larry “The Ax” Hennig had quite the career himself predominantly in his home state of Minnesota.  In the 1960’s, Hennig was one half of the AWA World Tag Team Champions, three of which he held with the legendary Harley Race.  He would however suffer a severe…
As one of the many strong muscle bound wrestlers in the WWF during the 80’s, Hercules Hernandez still managed to stand out.  Anyone with the moniker of “Hercules” better have the physique to back it up.  Thankfully, that was not an issue for the man who gained his greatest fame as a member of the Bobby Heenan family.
When you think of Jacques Rougeau usually two things will come to mind.  The first is his excellent tag teams with his older brother Raymond and later with Pierre Ouelette.  The second (and our personal favorite) was his work as the evil law enforcement officer, The Mountie.  Regardless of which incarnation you think of the end result was a competent…
A former professional Football player, Wilbur Snyder entered the pro wrestling ranks and made a mark for himself almost immediately.  Snyder competed primarily in the American Mid West and would eventually buy into the Indianapolis based WWA promotion.  While there, he was one of the top draws and constantly was holding championships there.  Although he was a former gridiron great,…
The majority of wrestling fans who remember seeing King Curtis Iaukea would remember him as the mouthpiece for Kamala during his 1987 run and later as the figurehead leader of the unintentionally comical Dungeon of Doom in the mid 90’s.  Prior to his managing stint, Iaukea was one of the most feared wrestlers and wreaked havoc in various promotions in…
Terry Taylor had a nice little career going for him.  He won many regional titles and was considered one of the better workers in professional wrestling; and then he went to the WWE.   Terry Taylor was dubbed the Red Rooster, and after a sub par heel run under the management of Bobby Heenan he went to gimmick hell with the…
Dutch Mantel was a major star in the southern promotions throughout the 70’s and 80’s.  He wasn’t a tall or well built wrestler, but he had the art of wrestling psychology down and could always deliver a good match.  Mantel’s greatest gift to wrestling was what he did outside of the ring utilizing his mind as a booker (he has…
For years, pro wrestling magazines touted Al Snow as “the greatest wrestler you never saw”.  It took a long time for Snow to gain attention; who knew it would take a mannequin head to get it.
Jim Barnett was not a successful wrestler, but as a promoter he had few equals. Barnett first struck gold promoting in Australia and would return to the United States as a very successful promoter of Georgia Championship Wrestling. He does have a tie with the WWE as he used to be an adviser for the WWF, and at one time…
A lot of people only remember General Adnan as the Iraqi mouthpiece of Sgt. Slaughter during the former G.I. Joe pitchman’s run as an Iraqi sympathizer.  Adnan didn’t wrestle much during that final National run, but that wasn’t his role at the time.  With that said, Adnan wrestled a lot more in the past than most people realized.
Another Japanese wrestler who is not well known to North American audiences (although he did have many matches here in the 70’s), Riki Choshu also was one of the top stars in Japan and was a constant fixture in the Heavyweight ranks there for decades.
One of the first to don the “Cowboy” monikers, Bob Ellis was actually a legitimate cowboy. Ellis was a rough customer who was part of sell outs all across the country, not to mention successful stints in Australia. He deliberately seemed to maintain a low profile after he left the industry, which may be why he is not held in…