67. Blue Oyster Cult

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67.  Blue Oyster Cult

If “Don’t Fear the Reaper” comes on the radio, can you hear that song without thinking “More Cowbell”? Many in the current generation can’t, which is a bit of a shame as The Blue Oyster Cult deserves to be remembered for more than that Saturday Night Live skit.

 The Blue Oyster Cult was one of the top Hard Rock/Heavy Metal bands in the 70’s.  As much of their music was based on more science fiction and literary references than their peers, they were called by some as “the thinking man’s Heavy Metal band”. Simultaneously, they were able to generate some radio friendly songs that were able to expose them to additional audiences that other Hard Rock/Metal bands couldn’t generate. Metal bands are not the most beloved genre in the Hall, but as an American group they may possibly squeak in over some of their British counterparts should the Hall want to induct another “headbanging” band.


Blue Oyster Cult

www.blueoystercult.com

 


Should Blue Oyster Cult be in the Hall of Fame?

Definitely put them in! - 90.7%
Maybe, but others deserve it first. - 5.9%
Probably not, but it wouldn't be the end of the world. - 2.3%
No opinion. - 0%
No way! - 1%

The Bullet Points

  • Previous Rank: 2010: #69
    2011: #73
    2012: #69
    2013: #76
    2014: #73
    2015: #75
    2016: #77
  • Eligible Since: Wednesday, 01 January 1997
  • Country of Origin: U.S.A. (Long Island, NY)
  • Why they will get in: “The thinking man’s Heavy Metal band” could be a surprise inductee should the genre get another look.
  • Why they won't get in: More Cowbell.
  • Essential Albums: Secret Treaties (1974)
    Agents of Fortune (1976)
    Specters (1977)
    Fire of Unknown Origin (1981)
  • Our Five Favorite Songs as Chosen by Each Member of the NIHOF Committee: Transmaniacon MC (From Blue Oyster Cult, 1972)
    Career of Evil (From Secret Treaties, 1974)
    Don’t Fear the Reaper (From Agents of Fortune, 1976)
    Godzilla (From Specters, 1977)
    Veteran of the Psychic Wars (From Fire of Unknown Origin, 1981)

Should Blue Oyster Cult be in the Hall of Fame?

Definitely put them in! - 90.7%
Maybe, but others deserve it first. - 5.9%
Probably not, but it wouldn't be the end of the world. - 2.3%
No opinion. - 0%
No way! - 1%

CHEAP TRICK WITH BLUE OYSTER CULT AT PACIFIC AMPHITHEATRE IN COSTA MESA, CA

Jul 14, 2021

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Cheap Trick
Blue Oyster Cult

BLUE OYSTER CULT AT LIBBEY BOWL IN OJAI, CA

Jul 23, 2021

Buy your Tickets to see Blue Oyster Cult at Libbey Bowl in Ojai, CA HERE for as little as $127!

Blue Oyster Cult

BLUE OYSTER CULT WITH JEFFERSON STARSHIP AT STARLIGHT BOWL IN BURBANK, CA

Jul 27, 2021

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Blue Oyster Cult
Jefferson Starship

BLUE OYSTER CULT AT LIBBEY BOWL IN OJAI, CA

Aug 17, 2021

Buy your Tickets to see Blue Oyster Cult at Libbey Bowl in Ojai, CA HERE for as little as $!

Blue Oyster Cult
 
Last modified on Sunday, 02 February 2020 18:54

Comments   

+6 #4 Darryl Tahirali 2016-06-28 20:04
Quoting Evan Claypool:
In reply to Darryl: I think the so-called "muted" production is actually a boon of their first album. Also, their second album, also one of their best, packs much more of a "kick".


The reason why it "packs much more of a 'kick'" is because by the time of T&M Pearlman and Krugman had got their act together as producers. Think of how much more awesome "Stairway to the Stars" or "I'm on the Lamb, but I Ain't No Sheep" would have sounded had they applied that brightness and clarity to the debut.

Conversely, "Hot Rails to Hell" and "7 Screaming Diz-Busters" wouldn't have the "kick" they do if they were on the debut and its dull production.
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+8 #3 Bruno 2016-01-01 20:28
It'd be hard to justify BOC in over other acts, but it should be mentioned that their influence on other bands is underrated. Just listen to "Godzilla" and then "Smells Like Teen Spirit" back to back.
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+8 #2 Evan Claypool 2015-11-18 01:08
In reply to Darryl: I think the so-called "muted" production is actually a boon of their first album. Also, their second album, also one of their best, packs much more of a "kick".

In terms of whether they should be in the Hall or not, I wouldn't have a problem with inducting them. I like the band, and many of their songs are awesome. Also, Metallica regards them as a big influence on their sound, which could help them get in.
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+7 #1 Darryl Tahirali -0001-11-30 00:00
Does this smart, technically savvy 1970s metal band deserve to be in the Hall? On the one hand, Blue Oyster Cult is much more than the handful of singles ["(Don& #39;t Fear) The Reaper,&quot ; "Burnin ' for You"] known to casual fans, let alone as the butt of Saturday Night Live's "more cowbell&quot ; joke. On the other hand, it's not apparent that the material from the band's '70s heyday adds up to a Hall of Fame career.One of BOC's best albums is its self-titled debut, only its impact is deadened by the thin, muted production job of Murray Krugman and Sandy Pearlman, the band's Svengalis who were learning as they went along. Too bad, because competent sonics would have emboldened strong statements like "Transm aniacon MC" (admittedly the kind of proto-Mad Max sci-fi blather Pearlman was fond of), the waggishly titled "I' m on the Lamb, but I Ain't no Sheep," the riff-happy "Stairw ay to the Stars," and the surprisingly touching drug-deal-go ne-wrong ballad "And Then Came the Last Days of May." Spotlighting a technically proficient band that included keyboardist Allen Lanier and fleet-finger ed guitarist Buck Dharma Roeser, Blue Oyster Cult blended progressive- rock polish, a hard-rock kick, and a vaguely futuristic lyrical outlook that painted the band as bruising, somewhat pretentious brainiacs
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