Awards=HOF? Part Thirty-Three: The Babe Ruth Award

Awards=HOF?  Part Thirty-Three: The Babe Ruth Award
04 Jun
2019
Not in Hall of Fame

We here at Notinhalloffame.com thought it would be fun to take a look at the major awards in North American team sports and see how it translates into Hall of Fame potential.

Needless to say, different awards in different sports yield hall of fame potential.  In basketball, the team sport with the least number of players on a roster, the dividend for greatness much higher.  In baseball, it is not as much as a great individual season does not have the same impact.

For our next selection we look at the Babe Ruth Award, which until 2007 only constituted the MVP of the World Series, which may seem like overkill considering it is secondary to the World Series MVP, which is awarded right after the World Series.  The Babe Ruth Award is given a few weeks after.  Incidentally, the Babe Ruth Award is older than the World Series MVP, but as it is not sanctioned by Major League Baseball it is not considered nearly as prestigious, but we aren’t letting that stop us here at Notinhalloffame.com!

So, how many Babe Ruth Award winners have been enshrined in the Baseball Hall of Fame?

Let’s find out!

The following are the past players who have won the Babe Ruth Award in the MLB who are eligible for the Baseball Hall of Fame and have been enshrined.

Phil Rizzuto, New York Yankees (1951)

The first Hall of Famer who was also a Babe Ruth Award winner is fittingly a New York Yankee.  Phil Rizzuto played his entire career with the Yankees and he would win the World Series seven times, this being his fifth.  In the Fall Classic, “Scooter” would bat .320 with 8 Hits and a Home Run in New York’s six game win over their crosstown rival, the New York Giants.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1994.

Johnny Mize, New York Yankees (1952)

The Yankees would generate their fourth (in four) straight Babe Ruth winner and this one is especially sweet.  Mize was very late in his career and was a bench player at this stage but he was still clutch and in the 1952 World Series five game win over the Brooklyn Dodgers, he batted .400 with 3 Home Runs and 6 Runs Batted In. He would only play one more year in the Majors.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1981.

Bill Mazeroski, Pittsburgh Pirates (1960)

Bill Mazeroski batted .320 in the World Series with a pair of Home Runs, one of which being the most famous in World Series history as he blasted a walk-off dinger in Game 7, to date the only one of its kind.  Despite the heroics and overall good series (he also had 5 Runs Batted In and a .960 OPS) Bobby Richardson of the New York Yankees (.367 and 12 RBIs) won the World Series MVP despite being on the losing team. As for Mazeroski, he was a seven-time All-Star, eight-time Gold Glove recipient but only had a career On Base Percentage of .299.  The chances are that had Mazeroski not had that World Series winning Home Run we have to wonder if he would have gotten into the Hall of Fame without it.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2001.

Whitey Ford, New York Yankees (1961)

This was the best season of Whitey Ford’s career, though this was 1961 where most people remember the Roger Maris home run chase.  Ford went 25 and 4 won the Cy Young Award and in the 1961 World Series he went 2 and 0 with 14 Innings of scoreless baseball with a 0.500 WHIP.  Ford would also win the World Series MVP this year.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1974.

Sandy Koufax, Los Angeles Dodgers (1963)

This was about as good as a season as you can get as Sandy Koufax won the National League’s Triple Crown with 25 Wins, a 1.88 ERA, 306 Strikeouts and he also had a 0.875 WHIP.  Not only did Koufax win the Cy Young, he was also the MVP.  He kept his dominance in the post-season going 2 and 0 with a 1.50 ERA in their win over the Minnesota Twins.  Koufax also won the World Series MVP.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1972.

Bob Gibson, St. Louis Cardinals(1964)

Gibson had a good 1964 but this year’s World Series was arguably the coming out party of the dominance that was to come as he would go on to win the Cy Young Award twice and the MVP once.  Gibson would go 2 and 1 completing all three games with a 3.00 ERA.  He would also win the World Series MVP.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1981.

Sandy Koufax, Los Angeles Dodgers (2) (1965)

This was almost a carbon copy season of 1963 where Koufax again won the Pitcher’s Triple Crown (26 Wins, 2.04 ERA and 382 Strikeouts) and he would again win the Cy Young and have a WHIP under 0.900.  The only thing he didn’t so was win the MVP (he was second) but in the 1965 World Series he went 2 and 1 over 24 Innings and an ERA of 0.38. Koufax played one more year in baseball before retiring at the peak of his career.  Historically speaking this is the first time that there was a repeat winner for the Babe Ruth Award.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1972.

Frank Robinson, Baltimore Orioles(1966)

Robinson made a lot of history in 1966 as in his first season in Baltimore he won the MVP, making him the first player in baseball history to win the MVP in both leagues (he won the NL version in Cincinnati in 1961).  He would also lead his Orioles to their first World Series win since they moved east from St. Louis.  In the World Series, Robinson batted .286 with a pair of Home Runs in their sweep over the Los Angeles Dodgers.   Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1982.

Lou Brock, St. Louis Cardinals(1967)

Lou Brock is without question one of the greatest tablesetters in baseball history and he did exactly what you would expect him to do in the World Series where he batted .414, had 7 Stolen Bases and 8 Runs. This year was his first of six All-Star trips and he retired with the all-time record in Stolen Bases.  With all due respect to Brock, the World Series MVP was awarded to Bob Gibson who won three Games with a 1.00 ERA and a 0.704 WHIP.  That was the better choice.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1985.

Brooks Robinson, Baltimore Orioles(1970)

Brooks Robinson is one of the best defensive players the game of baseball has ever seen and his bat wasn’t too shabby either.  In the 1970 World Series, Robinson batted .429 with a pair of Home Runs and six RBIs.  He would simultaneously win the World Series MVP.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1983.

Roberto Clemente, Pittsburgh Pirates(1971)

Roberto Clemente is one of the few players who when you say the word, “legend”, there is no inaccuracy in the statement.  Clemente was a 12-time All-Star who had an even 3,000 Hits and probably would have had more had he not perished in a plane crash in 1972.  In 1971, Clemente would lead Pittsburgh to the World Series (his second) and he would bat .414 with two Home Runs in Pittsburgh’s win over Baltimore.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1973.

Johnny Bench, Cincinnati Reds(1976)

The Catcher of “The Big Red Machine” was in the middle of a career that had already seen him win two National League MVP Awards and a World Series the year before.  Bench would bat .533 with a pair of Home Runs in this version of the Fall Classic.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1989.

Reggie Jackson, Oakland Athletics(1977)

Reggie Jackson had already won the World Series MVP (but not the Babe Ruth Award) in 1973 as an Oakland Athletic, but it was his 1977 performance as a New York Yankee that made him forever a legend.  Jackson blasted five Home Runs in the World Series, including three in Game 6, making him the first to do that since Babe Ruth did it in 1928.  Jackson also batted .450 with a 54 On Base Percentage.  This is where he got the nickname of “Mr. October”.  Jackson of course would also win the World Series MVP. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1993.

Willie Stargell, Pittsburgh Pirates(1979)

Willie Stargell was deep into back nine of his career but he shot an eagle in 1979 winning the National League MVP and in the World Series he batted .400 with three Home Runs in their seven game win over the Baltimore Orioles. He would notably also win the NLCS MV batting .455 with two Home Runs against Cincinnati.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1988.

Bruce Sutter, St. Louis Cardinals(1982)

Bruce Sutter was one of the most dominating closers of his day and he was named the Cy Young Award winner in 1979.  In 1982 he would lead the National League in Saves for the fourth straight year and in the World Series he had two more, but had an ERA of 4.70. Sutter would not win the World Series MVP as Darrell Porter would earn that accolade along with the NLCS MVP.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2006.

Jack Morris, Detroit Tigers(1984)

The Detroit Tigers were the dominating team of 1984 and Jack Morris was their ace.  In the 1984 World Series he would win both his starts with 13 Strikeouts, a 2.00 ERA and a WHIP of 0.889.  He would not win the World Series MVP as that went to the Tigers’ Shortstop, Alan Trammell. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2018.

Jack Morris, Minnesota Twins (2)(1991)

In the thrilling seven game series against the Atlanta Braves, Jack Morris would win his second Babe Ruth Award when he went 2 and 0 over 23 Innings and a 1.17 ERA.  His heroic 10 Inning shutout win in Game 7 will never (and should never) be forgotten. This time, Morris would be named the World Series MVP.  It should be mentioned that whether or not the Baseball Hall of Fame Veteran’s Committee were on the fence about his overall stats, his post-season exploits had to put him over the top.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2018.

Dave Winfield, Toronto Blue Jays(1992)

For the first time ever the World Series Championship left the United States as the Toronto Blue Jays would win it all in 1992.  Winfield batted .227 with 5 RBs, including the series winning double in Game 6.  Winfield did not win the World Series MVP as that went to Jays Catcher, Pat Borders who batted .450.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2001.

Paul Molitor, Toronto Blue Jays(1993)

For the second year in a row the Babe Ruth Award winner was a Toronto Blue Designated Hitter.  Paul Molitor would bat .500 with half of his hits being of the extra-base variety.  He would also accumulate eight RBIs and he was also named the World Series MVP.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2004.

Tom Glavine, Atlanta Braves(1995)

The Atlanta Braves finally won a World Series, though I think we can agree that they should have won a lot more in the 1990s.  Glavine won the Cy Young Award in 1991 and would again in 1998 but in 1995 the Babe Ruth Award and World Series MVP where he went 2 and 0 with a 1.29 ERA, 0.714 WHIP and 11 Strikeouts.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2014.

Mariano Rivera, New York Yankees(1999)

This would be the third of Mariano Rivera’s five World Series Championships and in this World Series he appeared in three games, winning one Game, saving two and allowing zero runs.  Rivera is not just the greatest Relief Pitcher of all-time, he is also the greatest post-season closer.  His overall playoff numbers (all for the Yankees) is 8 and 1 with 42 Saves, 78 Games Finished an ERA of 0.70 and WHIP of 0.759.  Is there any wonder that he would become the first person to enter the Baseball Hall of Fame on a perfect ballot.  He would also win the World Series MVP.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2019.

Randy Johnson, Arizona Diamondbacks(2001)

In 2001, both the Babe Ruth Award and World Series MVP were co-awarded to Randy Johnson and Curt Schilling.  Johnson’s 2001 World Series would see him win all three of his starts with a 1.04 ERA, 0.692 WHIP and strikeout 19 batters.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2015.

The following are the players who have won the Babe Ruth Award in MLB who are eligible for the Baseball Hall of Fame and have not been selected:

Joe Page, New York Yankees (1949)

Joe Page was one of the game’s first relief pitchers of note and in 1949 he had already been to three All-Star Games.  1949 was the third and final straight year that he would finish first in Games Finished and he would record 27 Saves with a 13 and 8 record while also finishing third in MVP voting.  In the World Series five game win over the Brooklyn Dodgers, Page pitched in three games winning one, and saving another with a 2.00 ERA and 1.000 WHIP.  Page did not play enough seasons to qualify for the Baseball Hall of Fame. Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Jerry Coleman, New York Yankees (1950)

For the second year of the award’s inception, a New York Yankee would win the award and like the first winner he did not play enough seasons to be on the Baseball Hall of Fame ballot.  This was the second year for Jerry Coleman in the Majors and it was last (and arguably only) good season.  Coleman was an All-Star for what would be the only time in his career and is 150 Hits and .287 Batting Average were career highs.  The Yankees would win the World Series sweeping the Philadelphia Phillies and he would bat .286 with 4 RBIs.  That was not spectacular, but it was enough.  Notably, this was the second of four World Series that he would win, which was all with the Yankees.  Coleman did not play enough seasons to qualify for the Baseball Hall of Fame.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Billy Martin, New York Yankees (1953)

Five Babe Ruth Awards and five New York Yankees.  This one was one by Billy Martin, who would become more associated with the team later as a Manager.  In 1953, the Second Baseman hit 2 Home Runs with 8 RBIs and a .500 Batting Average in their six-game win over Brooklyn.  Martin was on the ballot for one year in 1967 and received 0.3% of the vote.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Dusty Rhodes, New York Giants (1954)

For the first time ever the Babe Ruth Award did not go to a New York Yankee and of course it couldn’t as the Yanks did not make the post-season for the first time in the awards existence.  Rhodes was a clutch Pinch Hitter throughout the series and while he only batted seven times he had a .667 Batting Average with 2 Home Runs and 7 Runs Batted In.  Rhodes did not play enough seasons to qualify for the Hall of Fame.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Johnny Podres, Brooklyn Dodgers (1955)

This is an important year in regards to the Babe Ruth Award as this is the first year that the World Series MVP was also issued.  This year’s winner (and also of the inaugural World Series MVP) was Johnny Podres who would later be a three time All-Star and would help the Dodgers win two more World Series titles after they relocated to Los Angeles.  In this World Series, Podres threw for 18 Innings with a 2 and 0 record and a 1.00 ERA. This was the only title that the Dodgers would win when the team was located on the East Coast.  Podres was on the ballot for three years and finished as high as 0.8% in both 1975 & 1977.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Don Larsen, New York Yankees (1956)

The Babe Ruth Award returned to the New York Yankees and it went to Don Larsen who made history by throwing what has been to date the only perfect game in World Series history.  The Yankees would beat the Brooklyn Dodgers in seven games and Larsen would go on to have a journeyman’s career going 81 and 91 over 14 seasons and nine teams.   Of course, Larsen would also win the World Series MVP.  Larsen was on the ballot for fifteen years and finished as high as 12.3% in 1979.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Lew Burdette, Milwaukee Braves (1957)

1957 was the first and only time that the Braves would win the World Series while playing in Milwaukee thus making Lew Burdette the only Babe Ruth Award winner (and World Series MVP) who was a Milwaukee Brave.  Burdette had a really good season as he was an All-Star this year and would go 3 and 0 with a 0.67 ERA in the World Series. Milwaukee’s opponents, the New York Yankees, could only muster two runs over 27 Innings.  Burdette was on the ballot for fifteen years and finished as high as 23.2% in 1987.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Elston Howard, New York Yankees (1958)

The choice of Elston Howard for the Babe Ruth Award was a little curious as he only batted .222 in the World Series and none of his four Hits were for extra bases.  He did hit the series winning RBI, which may have been why he won the award.  The World Series MVP was given to Bob Turley, who went 2-1 with a Save and he was also named the Cy Young Award winner that year. This marked the first time that the Babe Ruth Award winner and the World Series MVP went to two different people. He would later be named the American League MVP in 1963.  Howard was on the ballot for fifteen years and finished as high as 20.7% in 1981.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Larry Sherry, Los Angeles Dodgers (1959)

This was the official rookie season for Larry Sherry (he played five games the year before) and he would go on to have a good career as a Relief Pitcher securing 82 Saves.  Sherry assisted the Dodgers in winning the 1959 World Series where he pitched in four games, winning two and saving another two.  Over 12.2 Innings he had an ERA of 0.71 and a WHIP of 0.789.  Sherry was also named the World Series MVP.  Although Sherry was eligible for the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1974, he was not on the ballot.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Ralph Terry, New York Yankees (1962)

This was the best year by far for Ralph Terry who in the regular season won a league leading 23 Games and was an All-Star for the only time in his career.  Terry went 2 and 1 with a 1.80 ERA in their World Series win over the San Francisco Giants. He was also named the World Series MVP. Although Terry was eligible for the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1973, he was not on the ballot.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Mickey Lolich, Detroit Tigers (1968)

The 1968 World Series was expected to be the battle between Bob Gibson of the St. Louis Cardinals and Denny McClain of the Detroit Tigers but the best hurler of the World Series was Mickey Lolich who went 3 and 0 with a 1.67 ERA. Lolich would go on to participate in three All-Star Games and win 217 Games in baseball.  He was also the World Series MVP.  Lolich was on the ballot for fifteen years and finished as high as 25.5% in 1988.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Al Weis, New York Mets (1969)

This is one of the most unlikely winners of the Babe Ruth Award, which was fitting considering that the New York Mets were the most unlikely World Series Champions.  Weis, who never had more than 81 Hits in a season and a career Batting Average of .219. In the 1969 World Series, Weis batted .455 with a Home Run and had an OBP of .529.  Donn Clendenon would be named the World Series MVP as he hit three Home Runs with a Batting Average of .357.  With these two heroes, the name “Miracle Mets” really makes a lot of sense. Although Weis was eligible for the ballot in 1977 he was not on the ballot.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Gene Tenace, Oakland Athletics (1972)

Gene Tenace had only 51 Hits in the regular season but by the playoffs he was the team’s Catcher and in the World Series he would bat .348 with four Home Runs and nine Runs Batted In.  Tenace would later be an All-Star in 1985.  Tenace was on the ballot for one year in 1989 and received 0.2% of the ballot.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Bert Campaneris, Oakland Athletics (1973)

Bert Campaneris was a very good player who had 2,249 Hits, which chances are most of you may not have been aware that he is a member of the 2,000 Hit Club.  In the 1973 World Series he batted .290 with three RBIs.  He did not win the World Series MVP as it was given to Reggie Jackson with a .310 Batting Average with six RBIs.  Campaneris was on the ballot for one year in 1989 and received 3.1% of the ballot.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Dick Green, Oakland Athletics (1974)

While Dick Green had a good defensive series engineering six double plays, he didn’t have a hit in the World Series and only had one walk in fifteen Plate Appearances with one Run and one RBI.  Green retired after the World Series but was not the World Series MVP. That honor was given to Rollie Fingers who pitched in four of the five games with a Win and two Saves.  Although Green was eligible for the Hall of Fame in 1980, he was not on the ballot. Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Luis Tiant, Boston Red Sox (1975)

A lot of history with this award took place in 1975 as for the third year in a row the Babe Ruth winner did not match the World Series MVP. Also for the first and only time this award was given to the losing team of the World Series.  The winner, Luis Tiant went 2 and 0 in three games, pitching 25 Innings with a 3.60 ERA.  Pete Rose was named the World Series MVP.  Tiant was on the ballot for 15 years finishing as high as 30.9% in 1988.  Ranked #34 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Bucky Dent, New York Yankees (1978)

Bucky Dent was not known for being a great hitter but in 1978 he was clutch.  Prior to the World Series, Dent hit a three run Home Run to win a one game playoff against the Boston Red Sox to get them into the playoffs.  In the World Series, Dent batted .417 with seven Runs Batted In and he would also be named the World Series MVP.  Dent was on the ballot for one year in 1990 and received 0.7% of the vote.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Tug McGraw, Philadelphia Phillies (1980)

Tug McGraw went 1 and 1 with a 1.17 ERA where he pitched in four of the games in the Phillies’ first World Series win.  This was McGraw’s second World Series championship as he would win his first with the New York Mets in 1969.  McGraw would not win the World Series MVP as that went to Mike Schmidt who batted .381 with two Home Runs and seven RBIs.  McGraw was on the ballot for one year in 1990 and received 1.4% of the vote.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Ron Cey, Los Angeles Dodgers (1981)

Arguably, the best seasons of Ron Cey were behind him as his six All-Star Games were behind him but the Third Baseman was still good and in the 1980 World Series, he would bat .350 with a Home Run and six Runs Batted In. Cey would also be named the World Series MVP.  Cey was on the ballot for one year in 1993 and received 1.9% of the vote.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Rick Dempsey, Baltimore Orioles (1983)

Light hitting but defensively brilliant, Rick Dempsey was an unlikely post-season hero but in the 1983 World Series the Catcher would bat .385 with all five of his hits being extra bases (four doubles and a home run). Dempsey would also be named the World Series MVP.  Cey was on the ballot for one year in 1998 and received 0.2% of the vote.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Bret Saberhagen, Kansas City Royals (1985)

Saberhagen would win the first of two Cy Youngs in 1985 and he took the Royals to win their first World Series.  He would win both of his starts in the World Series with a 0.50 ERA and a WHIP of 0.667.  Saberhagen was on the ballot for one year in 2007 and received 1.3% of the vote.  Ranked #67 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Ray Knight, New York Mets (1986)

Ray Knight would bat .391 in the World Series and he would hit the series winning Home Run in the 7thInning of Game 7.  Knight, who would have five Runs Batted In would also win the World Series MVP.  Knight was on the ballot for one year in 1994 and received 0.2% of the vote.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Frank Viola, Minnesota Twins (1987)

Viola finished 6thin Cy Young voting this year and would hurl the Twins to their first World Series win since they relocated to Minnesota from Washington.  Viola went 2 and 1 with 16 Strikeouts and would also be the World Series MVP. Viola would win the American League Cy Young the year after.  Viola was on the ballot for one year in 2002 and received 0.4% of the vote.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Orel Hershiser, Los Angeles Dodgers (1988)

1988 was a dream season for Orel Hershiser as he would win the National League Cy Young Award and would follow that up with the NLCS and World Series MVP.  In the World Series, Hershiser won both of his starts with a 1.00 ERA, 17 Strikeouts and a 0.722 WHIP.  Hershiser was on the ballot for two years and finished as high as 11.2%.  Ranked #70 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Dave Stewart, Oakland Athletics (1989)

1989 was the third of four straight 20 Win seasons for Dave Stewart who was the ace of a potent offensive Oakland Athletics team.  In the 1989 World Series, he would win both his starts with a 1.69 ERA, 0.750 WHIP and 14 Ks.  He would also win the World Series MVP and would also be named the ALCS MVP the following year.  Stewart was on the ballot for two years and finished as high as 7.4% in 2001.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Billy Hatcher, Cincinnati Reds (1990)

How fitting that the 1990 Babe Ruth Award went to a surprise player considering that the Reds were a surprise themselves sweeping the heavily favored Oakland Athletics.  In the 1990 World Series, Hatcher batted .750 with four Doubles but was not the World Series MVP.  That would go to Jose Rijo who went 2 and 0 with a sparkling Earned Run Average of 0.59. Although Hatcher was eligible for the Hall of Fame in 2001 he was not on the ballot.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Cecil Fielder, New York Yankees (1996)

Cecil Fielder was traded from the Detroit Tigers midway through the season and though his best years were behind him, his greatest team accomplishments were still to come.  Fielder would bat .391 with 2 Runs Batted In in the World Series.  He was not named the World Series MVP as that would go to John Wetteland who saved all four of New York’s wins.  Fielder was on the ballot for one year in 2004 and received 0.2% of the vote.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Moises Alou, Florida Marlins (1997)

Moises Alou was a Florida Marlin for only one season and it was a World Series winning one, the first in franchise history.  Alou would bat .321 with three Home Runs and nine RBIs in the World Series.  Livan Hernandez would win the World Series MVP however as the rookie won both of his starts, though had an ERA of 5.27.  Alou was on the ballot for one year in 2014 and received 1.1% of the vote.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Scott Brosius, New York Yankees (1998)

The New York Yankees would sweep the San Diego Padres, and in the Fall Classic Scott Brosius would bat .471 with a pair of Home Runs. Brosius would help New York win two more World Series Titles.  Brosius was on the ballot for one year in 2007 but did not receive any votes.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Curt Schilling, Arizona Diamondbacks (2001)

Like with the 2001 World Series MVP, Curt Schilling would share the Babe Ruth MVP with Randy Johnson.  Schilling went 1 and 0 with a 1.69 ERA, a 0.656 WHIP with 26 Strikeouts. Schilling has been on the ballot for seven years and has finished as high as 60.9% in 2019.  Ranked #5 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Troy Glaus, Anaheim Angels (2002)

A four-time All-Star, Glaus was enjoying his third straight 100 RBI season.  Glaus would bat .385 with 3 Home Runs and 8 Runs Batted In in the 2002 World Series, which brought the Angels their first title.  Glaus would also be named the World Series MVP.  Glaus was on the ballot for one year in 2016 but did not receive any votes.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Keith Foulke, Boston Red Sox (2004)

The curse ended with the Red Sox sweep of the St. Louis Cardinals and he would finish all four of Boston’s games with one Save and a 1.80 ERA. Foulke would not be named the World Series MVP as that would go to Manny Ramirez.  Although Foulke was eligible for the Hall of Fame in 2014 he was not on the ballot. Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Jermaine Dye, Chicago White Sox (2005)

Also winning the World Series MVP, Jermaine Dye had a really good career where he would have 1,779 Hits and 325 Home Runs.  In the 2005 World Series, he would bat .438 with the series winning RBI.  Dye was on the ballot for one year in 2015 but he did not receive any votes.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

David Eckstein, St. Louis Cardinals (2006)

Eckstein was a two-time All-Star and 2006 was the second of them. The infielder was already a World Series Champion (Anaheim in 2002) and in this World Series he would bat .364 with 4 Runs Batted In.  He would also win the World Series MVP.  Dye was on the ballot for one year in 2015 but he did not receive any votes.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Let’s update our tally, shall we?

Award in Question

Percentage of recipients who have entered the HOF

Percentage of recipients by year who have entered the HOF.

NBA MVP

100%

100%

NHL Norris

90.5%

96.4%

NBA All Star Game MVP

89.5%

91.7%

NHL Conn Smythe

74.2%

85.4%

NHL Lady Byng

63.8%

76.0%

NFL Super Bowl MVP

60.6%

64.9%

NBA Defensive Player of the Year

58.3%

56.5%

NBA Rookie of the Year

56.5%

56.5%

NFL Pro Bowl MVP

52.3%

54.8%

MLB/NL/AL Cy Young Award

44.4%

55.4%

MLB Babe Ruth Award

37.0%

39.3%

NHL Frank J. Selke Trophy

33.3%

36.7%

NFL Offensive Rookie of the Year

28.6%

28.6%

MLB Edgar Martinez Award

26.7%

17.2%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Designated Hitter)

25.0%

30.8%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Shortstop)

23.5%

52.6%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove

21.7%

36.8%

NFL Defensive Rookie of the Year

20.6%

20.6%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Catcher)

20.0%

22.5%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Second Base)

18.8%

39.8%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Shortstop)

18.2%

35.1%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Pitcher)

18.2%

20.1%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Second Base)

16.7%

32.7%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Outfield)

16.7%

30.1%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Outfield)

15.7%

25.2%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Third Base)

14.3%

14.3%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Third Base)

13.6%

14.3%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (First Base)

13.6%

13.3%

MLB (NL/AL) Rookie of the Year

13.3%

13.3%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Catcher)

10.3%

15.2%

NBA Most Improved Player of the Year

5.3%

3.2%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (First Base)

3.8%

3.2%

So, who is up next?

The following are the players who have won the Babe Ruth Award in the Major League Baseball who have retired but have not met the mandatory years out of the game to qualify for the Baseball Hall of Fame:

Derek Jeter, New York Yankees (2000)

This was the Yankees fourth World Series win in five years and this one was the battle of New York.  The Yankees defeated the Mets in five games and he batted .409 with two Home Runs.  Jeter would also win the World Series MVP.  Eligible for the Baseball Hall of Fame in 2020.

Josh Beckett, Florida Marlins (2003)

In the second World Series Championship for the Marlins, Josh Beckett went 1 and 1 with a 1.10 ERA, 19 Strikeouts and a WHIP of 0.714. Beckett would go on to win the ALCS MVP for Boston and help the team win the 2007 World Series.  He would win 138 Games over his career.  Eligible for the Baseball Hall of Fame in 2020.

Jonathan Papelbon, Boston Red Sox (2007)

This was the start of a new era for the Babe Ruth Award now covered the entire post-season as opposed to just the World Series.  Papelbon was in his second season as Boston’s closer and in the post-season he would win one game, record four Saves and would not allow a run in 10.2 Innings of work.  Mike Lowell would be named the World Series MVP.  Eligible for the Baseball Hall of Fame in 2022.

Alex Rodriguez, New York Yankees (2009)

Alex Rodriguez was often criticized for his lack of playoff success but in 2009 he was a huge part of the Yankees’ success in the 2009 World Series. A-Rod’s playoffs would see him bat .365 with 6 Home Runs and 18 Runs Batted In, but he would not win the World Series MVP as that would go to Mariano Rivera.  Eligible for the Baseball Hall of Fame in 2021.

Tim Lincecum, San Francisco Giants (2010)

Tim Lincecum finished 10thin Cy Young voting this year and he won the award the two years previously.  Lincecum would have an excellent playoff with a 4 and 1 record and 2.43 ERA with 43 Strikeouts.  Lincecum would be a member of San Francisco’s 2012 and 2014 World Series wins but he was not nearly as productive as he was here.  Eligible for the Baseball Hall of Fame in 2022.

David Ortiz, Boston Red Sox (2013)

“Big Papi” would win his third World Series ring and he saved the best for last.  Ortiz would hammer five playoff Home Runs with a .353 Batting Average.  He would also win the Worod Series MVP Award.  Eligible for the Baseball Hall of Fame in 2022.

The following are the players who have won the Babe Ruth Award who are still active.

Cole Hamels, Philadelphia Phillies (2008)

In Cole Hamels’ five post-season starts he would go 4 and 0 with a 1.80 ERA. He would also win the World Series MVP and the National League NLCS MVP.  35 Years Old, Playing for the Chicago Cubs.

David Freese, St. Louis Cardinals (2011)

Who else could win this in 2011 other than David Freese?  Freese, who would also win the NLCS and World Series MVP would set playoff records with 50 Extra Base Hits and 21 RBIs and he would bat .397 with five Home Runs.  36 Years Old, Playing for the Los Angeles Dodgers.

Pablo Sandoval, San Francisco Giants (2012)

“Panda” captured the imagination of the Baseball world in 2012 where the popular figure had six post-season Home Runs with 13 RBIs and a .364 Batting Average.  The Third Baseman would also win the World Series MVP and was a member of both the 2010 and 2014 World Series Title with the Giants.  32 Years Old, Playing for the San Francisco Giants.

Madison Bumgarner, San Francisco Giants (2014)

Bumgarner was in the second year of a four-year All-Star stretch and like many of his teammates, he was a part of San Francisco’s 2010 and 2012 World Series wins.  Bumgarner, who also won the World Series and NLCS MVP went 4 and 1 with a 1.03 ERA over 52.2 Innings Pitched.  He would also record the Save in Game 7 of the World Series,.  29 Years Old, Playing for the San Francisco Giants.

Wade Davis, Kansas City Royals (2015)

Davis pitched in eight games, recording a Win, four saves and striking out 18 batters over 10.2 scoreless Innings.  Salvador Perez would be named the World Series MVP.  33 Years Old, Playing for the Colorado Rockies.

Jon Lester, Chicago Cubs (2016)

Lester was named to his third All-Star game and he was already a two-time World Series Champion with the Boston Red Sox.  Lester was a vital part of the Cubs first win in over a century and he was the NLCS MVP while going 3 and 1 with a 2.02 ERA with 30 Strikeouts. The World Series MVP would not go to Lester but to Ben Zobrist.  35 Years Old, Playing for the Chicago Cubs.

Jose Altuve, Houston Astros (2017)

The Babe Ruth Award had a co-winner for the first time since 2001 and in the first World Series win for the Houston Astros, Jose Altuve would go yard seven times in the playoffs with 14 RBIs and a .310 Batting Average.  Neither Altive or his co-winner, Justin Verlander would win the World Series MVP, as that would go to George Springer.  29 Years Old, Playing for the Houston Astros.

Justin Verlander, Houston Astros (2017)

Verlander accomplished what he could not do in Detroit by winning a World Series with the Houston Astros and the move was a rejuvenation of sorts as he returned to elite form.  Verlander went 4 and 1 over 36.2 Innings with 38 Strikeouts.  He did not win the World Series MVP as that would go to George Springer, but he was the ALCS MVP.  35 Years Old, Playing for the Houston Astros.

David Price, Boston Red Sox (2018)

David Price had a bad appearance in the ALDS against the New York Yankees, but he rebounded with three wins in the rest of the playoffs including wins in Game 2 and 5 in the World Series.  Price would not be named the World Series MVP, as that would go to Steve Pearce.  32 Years Old, Playing for the Boston Red Sox.

The Babe Ruth Award winners are all over the map in terms of legends, one-offs and everything in between.

Up next, we are going to stay within the tertiary Baseball Awards and look at the Roberto Clemente Award.

As always, we thank you for that support and look for that soon!

Last modified on Wednesday, 05 June 2019 02:52
Committee Chairman

Kirk Buchner, "The Committee Chairman", is the owner and operator of the site.  Kirk can be contacted at [email protected] .

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