Awards=HOF? Part Thirty-Two: Pro Bowl MVP

Awards=HOF?  Part Thirty-Two: Pro Bowl MVP
04 May
2019
Not in Hall of Fame

We here at Notinhalloffame.com thought it would be fun to take a look at the major awards in North American team sports and see how it translates into Hall of Fame potential.

Needless to say, different awards in different sports yield hall of fame potential.  In basketball, the team sport with the least amount of players on a roster, the dividend for greatness much higher.  In baseball, it is not as much as a great individual season does not have the same impact.

For our next selection we look at the Pro Bowl MVP, which admittedly does not mean so much as the game is not exactly hotly contested but you have to be a really good player to get there.  How many of these past winners have made the Pro Football Hall of Fame?

Let’s find out!

But before we do that…

Usually when we isolate the winner, we mention the accomplishments of the year.  We will do that in addition to what transpired in the Pro Bowl Game itself…if there is any reason to in this annual dud of a game.

The following are the past players who have been named the Pro Bowl MVP in the NFL who are eligible for the Pro Football Hall of Fame and have been enshrined.

Otto Graham, Cleveland Browns (1950)

The Pro Bowl was resurrected after last being played in the form of an All Star Game in 1942.  Graham had just taken the Cleveland Browns to the NFL Championship and was a First Team All Pro the three years before.  The Browns were previously in the AAFC and had won the title the last four years.  This was the icing on the cake that showed that the Cleveland Browns belonged in the NFL and Graham was one of the game’s biggest stars.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1965.

Chuck Bednarik, Philadelphia Eagles (1953)

This was Chuck Bednarik fourth of eight Pro Bowls and he had already helped the Philadelphia Eagles win the NFL Championship as a rookie in 1949. He was a two way player (one of the last who did so regularly and “Concrete Charlie” was also a First Team All Pro six times.  He helped the Eagles win the title again in 1960.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1967.

Ollie Matson, Chicago Cardinals (1955)

In his first five seasons in the NFL, Matson was a Pro Bowler and a First Team All Prom this being the third year of that run.  Matson was also an Olympian, winning a bronze medal in the 400m sprint and a silver in 4 x 400 relay at the 1952 Helsinki Games.  He would later play for the Los Angeles Rams, Detroit Lions and Philadelphia Eagles.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1972.

Ernie Stautner, Pittsburgh Steelers (1956)

Stautner was named the Co-MVP as the game’s outstanding lineman. This was his fourth Pro Bowl and he would go to five more.  He was a First Team All Pro in 1958 and he played all 173 of his Games as a Pittsburgh Steeler.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1969.

Hugh McElhenny, San Francisco 49ers (1957)

This was the fourth Pro Bowl for McElhenny who would go to two more after this one.  He rushed for 478 Yards and caught 37 passes for 458 Yards in 1957.  He would have over 10,000 Yards from Scrimmage, which was a really good number for that era.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1970.

Frank Gifford, New York Giants (1958)

This would be Gifford’s seventh of eight straight Pro Bowls and he was a First Team All Pro for the fifth time and he would add a sixth the following season.  Gifford was a Champion in 1956, which was the year he also won the MVP.  He would become better known as a commentator for Monday Night Football for 27 years.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1970.

Doug Atkins, New York Giants (1958)

The Co MVP of the 1958 Pro Bowl, Doug Atkins would be named the most Outstanding Lineman of the game.  Atkins went to the Pro Bowl for the second of seven straight (he went to eight overall) and this was also his first of four First Team All-Pro Selections. Atkins was a champion in 1954 with the Cleveland Browns and would later help the Chicago Bears win it all in 1963. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1970.

Johnny Unitas, Baltimore Colts (1959)

1959 was the year of Johnny Unitas.  In 1958 he took the Baltimore Colts to the NFL Championship and he would do it again in 1959 where he was also named the MVP of the NFL.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1970.

Johnny Unitas, Baltimore Colts (2) (1960)

Johnny Unitas would become the first player to win the Pro Bowl MVP twice though it was a questionable decision as Norm Van Brocklin threw for a then record 288 Yards and three Touchdowns and this was his last game ever.  Jim Taylor also had three TDs, yet somehow the accolade went to the very popular Johnny Unitas.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1970.

Sam Huff, Baltimore Colts (1960)

Sam Huff was the fifth and final player to be named the (co)-MVP of the Pro Bowl when they were giving that out to the best Lineman of the game. Huff would help the New York Giants win the 1956 Championship as a rookie and this would be his third of five Pro Bowls.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1982.

Jim Brown, Cleveland Browns (1961)

We will (again) go on record and state that Jim Brown is the greatest Running Back who ever played.  Brown played nine seasons in the NFL and he was named to the Pro Bowl in every single one of them.  This was his fifth year in the league and he won the Rushing Title in every single one of them as well as being named a First Team All-Pro.  Brown had was named the MVP in 1957 and 1958.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1971.

Jim Brown, Cleveland Browns (2) (1962)

Brown won his second Pro Bowl MVP and this was the only season that he was not named a First Team All-Pro or win the Rushing Title, though he would in his next three seasons in the NFL.  He would win his third MVP in 1965, his last in the NFL and he would also help the Cleveland Browns in 1964.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1971.

Johnny Unitas, Baltimore Colts (3) (1963)

Johnny Unitas made history again by winning his third Pro Bowl MVP, becoming the first person to do so.  Unitas was named “Back of the Game” while fellow Baltimore Colt, Gino Marchetti was named the “Lineman” of the Game.  Over his career, Unitas would go to 10 Pro Bowls and was a five time First Team All-Pro.  He would also be a three-time NFL Champion and three-time MVP.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1970.

Gino Marchetti, Baltimore Colts (1963)

Named the Lineman of the Game (thus Co-MVP) Gino Marchetti won this along with another Colt, Johnny Unitas.  Marchetti was chosen for 11 Pro Bowls, all consecutive and this was his tenth. Marhcetti was a two-time NFL Champion and a seven-time First Team All-Pro.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1972.

Fran Tarkenton, Minnesota Vikings (1964)

Tarkenton threw for 172 Yards earning him “Back of the Game”. The “Scrambler’s” career was just getting going as this was his first of nine Pro Bowls.  Tarkenton would take the Vikings to three Super Bowl appearances and he was the MVP in 1975.  He retired with 47,003 Passing Yards and rushed for another 3,674.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1970.

Jim Brown, Cleveland Browns (3) (1965)

This was the last game that Jim Brown would ever play and he went out like the Football God he was.  He rushed for 65 Yards and was the Back of the Game, A.K.A., the Co-MVP.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1971.

Gale Sayers, Chicago Bears (1966)

This was Gale Sayers’ second Pro Bowl selection and arguably it was the finest season of his career.  The Chicago Bear would lead the NFL in Rushing Yards (1,231), Yards from Scrimmage (1,678) and All-Purpose Yards (2,440) and he was named to his second First Team All-Pro in as many years.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1977.

Gale Sayers, Chicago Bears (2) (1967)

Sayers was the Back of the Game for the second year in a row and again he was named a First Team All-Pro.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1977.

Dave Robinson, Green Bay Packers (1967)

Dave Robinson went to three Pro Bowls this being his second one. Robinson would be named a First Team All-Pro this season and he was a three-time NFL Champion with the Green Bay Packers.  His Hall of Fame induction would take place via the Senior Committee.   Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2013.

Merlin Olsen, Los Angeles Rams (1968)

Merlin Olsen was named the Lineman of the Game and it was an all-Ram affair as his Quarterback, Roman Gabriel was named the “Back of the Game”. The Defensive Tackle went to 14 straight Pro Bowls (1962-75) and he was in the middle of five straight First Team All-Pro Selections.  He entered the Pro Football Hall of Fame on his first year of eligibility.   Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1982.

Gale Sayers, Chicago Bears (3) (1969)

Gale Sayers became the third player to be named a Pro Bowl MVP three times.  This was the end of an era for Sayers as this was his fifth and final Pro Bowl and he would also win his second Rushing Title.  Sayers would suffer a severe injury and was limited in what he could do. He retired after the 1971 season and he would be inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame in his first year of eligibility.  He was the youngest person ever to enter the Pro Football Hall of Fame.   Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1977.

Mel Renfro, Dallas Cowboys (1970)

In 1970, the Pro Bowl began instituting a new Co-MVP system where there was one winner on offense and one on defense.  Renfro was the 1970’s offensive winner and this was his seventh Pro Bowl of what would be ten straight.  The Defensive Back played his entire career with the Dallas Cowboys and he would help bring the team two Super Bowls (VI & XII).  It should be noted that this is no misprint in terms of offense as he also was a Punt Returner taking two back for a Touchdown in the game.   Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1996.

Jan Stenerud, Kansas City Chiefs (1971)

Jan Stenerud went to six Pro Bowls, four of which being consecutive and this was the last of that stretch.  Stenerud would four times lead the NFL in Field Goal Percentage.  In this Pro Bowl he had three field goals and two extra points.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1991.

Willie Lanier, Kansas City Chiefs (1971)

It was a sweep for the Kansas City Chiefs as his Willie Lanier’s teammate, Jan Stenerud won the Offensive Player MVP to match Lanier’s Defensive Player MVP.  The Linebacker went to eight straight Pro Bowls and this was his fourth.  He had previously aided the Chiefs win Super Bowl IV and he was chosen for three First Team All-Pros, this year being one of them. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1986.

O.J. Simpson, Buffalo Bills (1972)

From 1972 to 1976, O.J. Simpson was the top Running Back in the National Football League and this was the beginning of that stretch.  The Juice won the Rushing Title this year and in the Pro Bowl he rushed for 116 Yards and a Touchdown and caught three passes for 56 Yards.  He was a First Team All-Pro this year and the four years after and he rushed for 11,236 Yards over his career.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1985.

Mel Blount, Pittsburgh Steelers (1976)

The Pittsburgh Steelers were the dynasty of the 1970’s and they generated many Hall of Fame inductees, one of which being Cornerback, Mel Blount. In this season, he was chosen for his second of five Pro Bowls and he helped them win four Super Bowls, two prior and two after this year.  In this Pro Bowl he would record two Interceptions.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1989.

Walter Payton, Chicago Bears (1977)

Walter Payton was one of the greatest Running Backs ever and this was his second of what worked out to be nine Pro Bowls.  “Sweetness” played his entire career with the Chicago Bears and 1977 would see him set his career high of 1,852 Rushing Yards and 2,121 Yards from Scrimmage, both were league leading.  This was also his second of five First Team All-Pro Selections.  In this particular Pro Bowl he rushed for 77 Yards and a Touchdown.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1993.

Kellen Winslow, San Diego Chargers (1981)

Kellen Winslow spent his entire career with the San Diego Chargers where he was a five time Pro Bowl, this being his second trip to the dance. Winslow was a three time a First Team All-Pro with this being the second of the two years where he led the NFL in Receptions.  In this Pro Bowl there was two game MVPs and he was the offensive winner.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1995.

Lee Roy Salmon, Tampa Bay Buccaneers (1981)

Lee Roy Salmon was the co-winner of the Pro Bowl MVP and was the first Tampa Bay Buccaneer to win the Pro Bowl MVP.  Salmon went to six Pro Bowls, and this was his third.  He was also named the 1979 AP Defensive Player of the Year.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1995.

Dan Fouts, San Diego Chargers (1982)

Dan Fouts is one of the best Quarterbacks of his day and this was the fourth of his sixth Pro Bowls.  The Quarterback spent his entire NFL career with the San Diego Chargers and he was a First Team All Pro this year.  In this Pro Bowl he would throw for 274 Yards and a Touchdown and was the Co-MVP.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1993.

Reggie White, Philadelphia Eagles (1986)

This was the first Pro Bowl for Reggie White and it would mark the beginning of a streak that went on until 1998.  White had 18 Quarterback Sacks in 1986 and he would lead the NFL in that category the next two years where “The Minister of Defense” would also be named the Defensive Player of the Year.  Named an eight-time First Team All Pro, White would later in the Super Bowl with the Green Bay Packers.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2006.

Bruce Smith, Buffalo Bills (1987)

Bruce Smith was chosen to play in 11 Pro Bowls and this would be the first one for him.  The Buffalo Bill was named the AFC Defensive Player of the Year and would twice become the NFL Defensive Player of the Year.  He holds the record for Quarterback Sacks with 200 and in the Pro Bowl he would have two.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2009.

Jim Kelly, Buffalo Bills (1990)

Jim Kelly would take the Bills to four straight Super Bowls but the infamously lost them all but this year would be the first of them.  The Bills Quarterback would find some solace winning the Pro Bowl MVP in a game where he threw for 210 Yards and a Touchdown. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2002.

Michael Irvin, Dallas Cowboys (1991)

Playing his entire career with the Dallas Cowboys, Michael Irvin was chosen for five straight Pro Bowls and this was his first one, which would also be the year that he was named a First Team All-Pro and would lead the NFL in Receiving Yards.  He would be a huge part of the Cowboys winning three of the next four years. Irvin caught eight passes for 125 Yards and a Touchdown.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2002.

Marshall Faulk, Indianapolis Colts (1994)

Named to the Pro Bowl as a rookie, Marshall Faulk would go to the Pro Bowl six more times, two with Indianapolis and four with St. Louis. Faulk rushed for 12,279 Yards and was a true dual threat as he also caught 767 receptions for 6,875 Yards. Winning a Super Bowl later in his career with the Rams, in this Pro Bowl he rushed for 180 Yards and a Touchdown while also catching two passes for 27 more Yards.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2011.

Jerry Rice, San Francisco 49ers (1995)

What didn’t Jerry Rice do?  By this time, Rice had been named to his tenth of eleven straight Pro Bowls and he would go two more after.  He had already won the Super Bowl three times with the San Francisco 49ers and was the MVP in one of them.  This year would be the sixth (and final) time that he led the NFL in Receiving Yards and he was on his eighth of nine First Team All-Pro Selections.  Rice is the all-time leader in Receiving Yards with 22,895 and it will be a long time before anyone touches that.  In the Pro Bowl he caught six passes for 82 Yards and a Touchdown.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2010.

Warren Moon, Seattle Seahawks (1997)

Warren Moon had a very long career in football where he was a five time Grey Cup Champion with the Edmonton Eskimos prior to getting his chance at the NFL.  He would go to eight straight Pro Bowls (1988-1995) and in 1997 he went to his last one.  He would throw for 49,325 Yards in the NFL, an incredible amount considering how late he joined.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2006.

Ty Law, New England Patriots (1998)

Ty Law was the Co-MVP of this Pro Bowl, which he shared with Keyshawn Johnson.  This was Law’s first of five Pro Bowls and he was the league leader in Interceptions this year.  Law would later help the New England Patriots win three Super Bowls and in this Pro Bowl he returned an Interception for a Touchdown.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2019.

Randy Moss, Minnesota Vikings (1999)

Randy Moss is one of the game’s most exciting players ever in 1999 he was in his second year in football.  He went to six Pro Bowls, this being his second and he had 15,292 Receiving Yards with 156 Touchdowns over one hell of a career.  In the game, Moss caught 9 passes for 212 Yards with a Touchdown. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2018.

Derrick Brooks, Tampa Bay Buccaneers (2005)

One of the greatest (if not the greatest) defensive players in Buccaneer history, Derrick Brooks won this accolade in what was his tenth of eleven straight Pro Bowls.  Brooks (who would also go to another one before his career ended) led the Buccaneers to their first Super Bowl and in this season, he was chosen for his fifth and final First Team All-Pro.  In this Pro Bowl, the Linebacker had a pick six.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2014.

The following are the players who have won the Pro Bowl MVP in the NFL who are eligible for the Pro Football Hall of Fame and have not been selected:

Dan Towler, Los Angeles Rams (1951)

Towler would also be chosen for the next three Pro Bowls with the season after seeing him being named a First Team All Pro and win the Rushing Title.  The Fullback did not have a long career only playing six years all with Los Angeles.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Don Doll, Detroit Lions (1952)

Doll was in his third season of his four year Pro Bowl streak and he would become the first defensive player to be named the Pro Bowl MVP. Doll was a member of the Detroit Lions 1952 NFL Championship Team though he would be a Washington Redskin the following year.  He only played six years in the NFL.   Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Billy Wilson, San Francisco 49ers (1954)

Billy Wilson was chosen for his first of what would be six consecutive Pro Bowls and he would lead the NFL in Receptions this year.  He would do the same again in 1956 and 1957, the latter being a good enough year to warrant a First Team All Pro nod.  Wilson retired after 1960 playing his entire career with San Francisco.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Bert Rechichar, Baltimore Colts (1956)

Rechichar was the Co-MVP of the Pro Bowl and he was a Defensive Back/Kicker for the Colts.  Rechichar would go to three Pro Bowls, this being his second and at the time of his appearance he held the since broken record of the longest Field Goal of 56 Yards. He had four Interceptions that year. Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Gene Brito, Washington Redskins (1957)

Brito was the Co-MVP as he was named the most Outstanding Lineman. Brito was chosen for five Pro Bowls, this being the fourth and his third and final First Team All-Pro Selection. He was named the NFL Player of the Year in 1955.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Gene Lipscomb, Baltimore Colts (1959)

This was the fourth time that the Pro Bowl would have a Co-MVP that would be given to the best Lineman of the game.  Fittingly, it went to another Baltimore Colt as Johnny Unitas was the other Pro Bowl MVP.  The Colts would win the NFL Championship that year and he was also a First Team All Pro. This was Lipscomb’s second of three Pro Bowls.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Gene Lipscomb, Pittsburgh Steelers (2) (1962)

Lipscomb was a Pittsburgh Steeler making him the first person to win a Pro Bowl MVP with two different teams.  The NFL brought back giving a Co-MVP to the Lineman of the Game, which Lipscomb certainly deserved as he blocked two Field Goals.  This was the last game that “Big Daddy” would play as he dies of a cocaine overdose in May of 1963.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Terry Barr, Detroit Lions (1964)

Barr would go to two Pro Bowls, this being the second where he won the Lineman of the Game Award.  He would play all nine of his seasons with the Detroit Lions and as a rookie he helped the Lions win the NFL Championship.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Dale Meinart, St. Louis Cardinals (1965)

Named the Lineman of the Game, Meinart played nine seasons all with the Cardinals and this was his first of what would be three Pro Bowls.  The Linebacker had previously won two Grey Cups with the Edmonton Eskimos.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Floyd Peters, Philadelphia Eagles (1966)

Named the Lineman of the Game, Peters was chosen for the second of his three Pro Bowls.  He would later be a successful Defensive Coordinator for twenty years in the NFL. Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Roman Gabirel, St. Louis Rams (1968)

This Pro Bowl was all about the St. Louis Rams as Roman Gabriel and Merlin Olsen were named the Back of the Game and Lineman of the Game respectively.  Gabriel would go to four Pro Bowls, this being the second and he would later be would be the MVP the year after.  He threw for 29,444 Yards over his career.  Ranked #37 on Notinhalloffame.com.

George Andrie, Dallas Cowboys (1969)

George Andrie was the first Dallas Cowboy to be named a Pro Bowl MVP when he was named the Lineman of the Game for the 1969 version.  Andrie was a five time Pro Bowl, this being his fifth trip.  He would later help Dallas win Super Bowl VI.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Fred Carr, Green Bay Packers (1970)

Fred Carr would go to three Pro Bowls with this being his first. Carr was chosen as the Defensive MVP and this was the first year where they have an offensive and defensive MVP of the Pro Bowl.  He played all ten of his seasons in the NFL with the Green Bay Packers.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Garo Yepremian, Miami Dolphins (1973)

Yepremian set a still standing record of booting five Field Goals in a Pro Bowl.  The Place Kicker went to three Pro Bowls, this being his second and the first and only year that he would be chosen a First Team All-Pro.  The native of Cyprus would help the Dolphins win two Super Bowls. Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

James Harris, Los Angeles Rams (1974)

This was the only Pro Bowl that James Harris was selected for and he threw for two Touchdowns and 119 Yards.  Harris threw for 1,544 Yards and 11 Touchdowns in 1974 with a 7 and 2 record. He would later play for the San Diego Chargers and prior to his stint with L.A. was a backup for the Buffalo Bills. Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Billy Johnson, Houston Oilers (1975)

Billy “White Shoes” Johnson was one of the greatest return specialists of his day and easily the most exciting.  This was Johnson’s first of what would be three Pro Bowls, the second also coming as an Oiler the last one as an Atlanta.  In the game, Johnson would return a Punt for a 90 Yard Touchdown Return and he also had another return of 55 Yards.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Ahmad Rashad, Minnesota Vikings (1978)

Ahmad Rashad went to four straight Pro Bowls and this was the first of them.  In his 10 year career he caught 495 passes for 6,831 Yards for 44 Touchdowns and in this Pro Bowl he caught five passes for 85 Yards.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Chuck Muncie, New Orleans Saints (1979)

For it was worth, this would be the first of 30 straight Pro Bowls to take place in Honolulu and for the first time a New Orleans Saint would be named the Pro Bowl MVP.  This was the first of three Pro Bowl selections for the Running Back with the other two coming as a San Diego Charger.  Muncie rushed for 1,198 Yards this season and in the Pro Bowl he had rushed for two touchdowns, threw for one and had 79 Yards from Scrimmage.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Eddie Murray, Detroit Lions (1980)

Murray was a rookie this year and he won this award by making four Field Goals in the game.  Murray would later go to two more Pro Bowls and would later win a Super Bowl with the Dallas Cowboys in Super Bowl XXVIII.  He is the first Canadian to win this award.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

John Jefferson, Green Bay Packers (1982)

This was John Jefferson’s fourth and final Pro Bowl appearance and he was the leader in Receiving Yards in 1980.  Jefferson was named the Co-MVP along with his former Quarterback, Dan Fouts, who he played with in San Diego.  In this game he caught four passes for 66 Yards and a Touchdown.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Joe Theismann, Washington Redskins (1983)

This was Joe Theismann’s second and last Pro Bowl but it was capping off the best season he ever had.  The Quarterback was named the NFL Offensive Player of the Year, the MVP and took the Redskins to the a win at Super Bowl XVII.  In Hawaii, he went 21 for 27 for 242 Yards and three Touchdowns. Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Mark Gastineau, New York Jets (1984)

At this point Mark Gastineau was one of the most popular defensive players in the NFL and one of the best.  In 1984 he went to the fourth of five straight Pro Bowls and this was his third and final First Team All Pro Selection.  Gastineau played his entire career with the Jets and in 1984 he led the NFL with 22 Quarterback Sacks.  In the Pro Bowl, Gastineau recorded seven Tackles, and four Sacks.  Ranked #46 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Phil Simms, New York Giants (1985)

Simms only went to two Pro Bowls but he was always considered one of the better Quarterbacks of his day.  Simms would throw for 212 Yards and three TDs in the Pro Bowl.  He would later take the Giants to two Super Bowl wins.  Ranked #57 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Randall Cunningham, Philadelphia Eagles (1988)

One of the most exciting players of his time, Randall Cunningham went to four Pro Bowls with this being his first.  Cunningham would win the Bert Bell Award this year and would win it again two more times.  He would throw for 83 Yards and rush for 49 in this game.  Ranked #33 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Jerry Gray, Los Angeles Rams (1989)

Gray would go to four Pro Bowls, and this was his fourth.  Gray had six picks in the season returning one for a pick six.  The Defensive Back would have six tackles and an interception in the game.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Steve Tasker, Buffalo Bills (1992)

A seven-time Pro Bowl selection, Steve Tasker is considered one of the greatest Special Teams player ever.  Tasker helped the Bills reach four straight (losing) Super Bowls and in this Pro Bowl he recorded four tackles, forced a fumble and blocked a Field Goal. Ranked #88 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Andre Rison, Atlanta Falcons (1993)

Rison was a five time Pro Bowler and this was his fourth of what would be four straight.  The Wide Receiver had a career high of 1,242 Yards and topped the 10,000 mark in total. Rison had six catches for 86 Yards in the game.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Mark Brunell, Jacksonville Jaguars (1996)

Mark Brunell would become the first Jacksonville Jaguar to win the Pro Bowl MVP on what would be his first of three selections.  1996 was an interesting year for Brunell’s as he threw for a league leading 4,367 Yards but also had a TD-INT ratio of 19-20.  In the Pro Bowl he would throw for 236 Yards and a Touchdown.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Keyshawn Johnson, New York Jets (1998)

Keyshawn Johnson went to three Pro Bowls and this was his first as well it being the first season, he had over 1,000 Receiving Yards (1,131). He would accumulate 10,571 Receiving Yards with 64 Touchdowns over his career and he was a key member of Tampa Bay’s first Super Bowl win.  In the Pro Bowl, Johnson had seven Receptions for 87 Yards.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Rich Gannon, Oakland Raiders (2000)

Rich Gannon would go to four straight Pro Bowls (this being his second) but he did so in a somewhat unique fashion as he was in his early 30’s when it started.  Quarterbacking for the Oakland Raiders, in 2000 he would go also be chosen for a First Team All-Pro.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Rich Gannon, Oakland Raiders (2) (2001)

A back-to-back winner, Gannon would have the best season the year after as he was again a First Team All-Pro and he would lead the National Football League in Completions (418) and Passing Yards (4,689) and led the Raiders to the Super Bowl…where they were thrashed by the Tampa Bay Buccaneers. Gannon would suffer injuries in the next two seasons and his career was essentially over after it.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Ricky Williams, Miami Dolphins (2002)

Ricky Williams was known for an awful lot in his career, which included the idiotic trade the New Orleans Saints made to draft him, his pot use and his eccentricities but this was also a Running Back who is a member of the 10,000 Yard club and in 2002 he was a Pro Bowl and First Team All-Pro Selection and his 1,853 Yards won him the Rushing Title.  He would score two Touchdowns in the Pro Bowl.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Marc Bulger, St. Louis Rams (2003)

Marc Bulger went to two Pro Bowls, this being his first where he did not have the best TD-INT line of 22-22 but threw for 3,845 Yards and won 12 Games and took the Rams to the playoffs.  In the game Bulger three for three Touchdowns.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Let’s update our tally, shall we?

Award in Question

Percentage of recipients who have entered the HOF

Percentage of recipients by year who have entered the HOF.

NBA MVP

100%

100%

NHL Norris

90.5%

96.4%

NBA All Star Game MVP

89.5%

91.7%

NHL Conn Smythe

74.2%

85.4%

NHL Lady Byng

63.8%

76.0%

NFL Super Bowl MVP

60.6%

64.9%

NBA Defensive Player of the Year

58.3%

56.5%

NBA Rookie of the Year

56.5%

56.5%

NFL Pro Bowl MVP

52.3%

54.8%

MLB/NL/AL Cy Young Award

44.4%

55.4%

NHL Frank J. Selke Trophy

33.3%

36.7%

NFL Offensive Rookie of the Year

28.6%

28.6%

MLB Edgar Martinez Award

26.7%

17.2%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Designated Hitter)

25.0%

30.8%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Shortstop)

23.5%

52.6%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove

21.7%

36.8%

NFL Defensive Rookie of the Year

20.6%

20.6%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Catcher)

20.0%

22.5%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Second Base)

18.8%

39.8%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Shortstop)

18.2%

35.1%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Pitcher)

18.2%

20.1%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Second Base)

16.7%

32.7%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Outfield)

16.7%

30.1%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Outfield)

15.7%

25.2%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Third Base)

14.3%

14.3%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Third Base)

13.6%

14.3%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (First Base)

13.6%

13.3%

MLB (NL/AL) Rookie of the Year

13.3%

13.3%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Catcher)

10.3%

15.2%

NBA Most Improved Player of the Year

5.3%

3.2%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (First Base)

3.8%

3.2%

So, who is up next?

The following are the players who have won the Pro Bowl MVP in the NFL who have retired but have not met the mandatory years out of the game to qualify for the Pro Football Hall of Fame:

Peyton Manning, Indianapolis Colts (2004)

One of the most prolific Quarterbacks of all-time, Peyton Manning went to 13 Pro Bowls with this being his fourth.  This was also his second of seven First Team All-Pro Selections and he would lead the NFL in Touchdown Passes with 49.  Over his career he would throw for 71,940 Yards and 539 Touchdowns while also taking the Indianapolis Colts and Denver Broncos to Super Bowl wins. He would score three Touchdowns in the game.  Eligible for the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 2021.

Carson Palmer, Cincinnati Bengals (2006)

Carson Palmer went to three Pro Bowls, this being his second also being the second with the Bengals with the third coming as an Arizona Cardinal. Palmer threw for 28 Touchdowns and 4,035 Yards this year and would accumulate 46,247 Yards in total.  Eligible for the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 2023.

DeAngelo Hall, Washington Redskins (2010)

This was the third and final Pro Bowl that DeAngelo Hall would be chosen for and Hall had six Interceptions that season.  In the game Hall returned a fumble for a Touchdown.  Eligible for the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 2023.

Derrick Johnson, Kansas City Chiefs (2013)

In 2013, the Pro Bowl began issuing offensive and defensive Pro Bowl MVPs like they had in the past and Derrick Johnson was the first defensive winner of this new run.  Johnson would go to four Pro Bowls and this was his third.  Eligible for the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 2024.

The following are the players who have won the NFL Pro Bowl MVP who are still active.

Adrian Peterson, Minnesota Vikings (2007)

Adrian Peterson went to the Pro Bowl as a rookie and has gone to six more.  This was his rookie season and he rushed for 1,341 Yards and 12 Touchdowns.  To date he has over 13,000 Rushing Yards and has well over 100 Touchdowns.  He ran for two Touchdowns in the game.  33 Years Old, Playing for the Washington Redskins.

Larry Fitzgerald, Arizona Cardinals (2008)

Larry Fitzgerald was chosen for one First Team All-Pro roster and this was the year.  The Wide Receiver however has been a Pro Bowl fixture as he was named to 11 Pro Bowls, with this being the third.  In this game, Fitzgerald caught five passes for 81 Yards and a pair of TDs.  35 Years Old, Playing for the Arizona Cardinals.

Matt Schaub, Houston Texans (2009)

Matt Schaub went to two Pro Bowls with 2009 being the first.  The Houston Texan led the NFL in Completions (396) and Passing Yards (4,770) and in the Pro Bowl he threw for two Touchdowns. 37 Years Old, Playing for the Atlanta Falcons.

Brandon Marshall, Houston Texans (2011)

Brandon Marshall went to six Pro Bowls and this was his third trip and the only one he would go to as a Miami Dolphin.  The Wide Receiver had a 1,214 Yard Season and to date has over 12,000 Yards.  In this Pro Bowl he would catch a record four Touchdown Passes.  35 Years Old, Free Agent.

Kyle Rudolph, Minnesota Vikings (2012)

This was the first Pro Bowl of Kyle Rudolph’s career and in the game he caught five passes for 129 Yards and a TD.  29 Years Old, Playing for the Minnesota Vikings.

Nick Foles, Philadelphia Eagles (2013)

To date, this is the only Pro Bowl that Nick Foles has gone to. Foles left Philadelphia for two years and came back where he led them to a surprise Super Bowl win when he was their back-up.  29 Years Old, Playing for the Jacksonville Jaguars.

J.J. Watt, Houston Texans (2014)

Watt was the Defensive MVP of the Pro Bowl and this was his third of five Pro Bowls, all of which would see him be named a First Team All-Pro.  29 Years Old, Playing for the Houston Texans.

Matthew Stafford, Detroit Lions (2014)

Matthew Stafford has been one of the better Quarterbacks since he arrived in Detroit but to date 2014 has been his only Pro Bowl arrival.  He had seven straight seasons where he threw for over 4,200 Yards.  31 Years Old, Playing for the Detroit Lions.

Michael Bennett, Seattle Seahawks (2015)

This was Michael Bennett’s first of three straight Pro Bowls and earlier in his career he assisted the Seahawks win the Super Bowl.  33 Years Old, Playing for the Philadelphia Eagles.

Russell Wilson, Seattle Seahawks (2015)

Wilson joined his teammate, Michael Bennett in being the Co-MVP of the Pro Bowl.  The Quarterback led the Seahawks two years before to a Super Bowl win and this was to date the third of five Pro Bowls.  30 Years Old, Playing for the Seattle Seahawks.

Lorenzo Alexander, Buffalo Bills (2016)

Lorenzo Alexander went to his second Pro Bowl and at the age of 33 this was probably the best year of his career.  Alexander was named the Co-MVP as the defensive player of the game.  35 Years Old, Playing for the Buffalo Bills.

Travis Kelce, Kansas City Chiefs (2016)

The Tight End was in his second of four straight Pro Bowls and this year he was named a First Team All-Pro after having his first 1,000 Yard Season.   29 Years Old, Playing for the Kansas City Chiefs.

Von Miller, Denver Broncos (2017)

Miller was named the Defensive MVP this year of the Pro Bowl.  Miller had already won a Super Bowl for the Broncos and this was his sixth of what has been seven Pro Bowls thus far.  30 Years Old, Playing for the Denver Broncos.

Delanie Walker, Tennessee Titans (2017)

This is what was Delanie Walker’s third straight and likely last Pro Bowl appearance.  The Tight End had four consecutive seasons (this being the fourth) of 800 Yards or more.  34 Years Old, Playing for the Tennessee Titans.

Jamal Adams, New York Jets (2018)

This was in Adams’ second year in the NFL and it was his first Pro Bowl appearance, which netted him the Defensive Co-MVP.  He had 115 Combined Tackles this season.  23 Years Old, Playing for the New York Jets.

Patrick Mahomes, Kansas City Chiefs (2018)

This was his second season in the NFL and first as a starter and you could state that it is one of the best years ever by a Quarterback. Mahomes threw for 50 Touchdowns and 5,097 Yards and was named the AP MVP. 23 Years Old, Playing for the Kansas City Chiefs.

From what we can see in terms of the Pro Bowl MVP winners you have someone who at one time was considered an elite player.  While we can all agree that the game itself is meaningless getting there means something but essentially, we are looking at a high-end crapshoot here.

Up next we are going to back to the MLB and the Babe Ruth Award.

As always, we thank you for that support and look for that soon!

Last modified on Tuesday, 07 May 2019 04:55
Committee Chairman

Kirk Buchner, "The Committee Chairman", is the owner and operator of the site.  Kirk can be contacted at [email protected] .

Comments   

0 #1 Michael Zwick 2019-05-07 16:22
Regarding Roman Gabriel, 1968, the Rams were then in Los Angeles, not St. Louis.
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