Awards = HOF?: Part Fifty-Nine: ALCS/NLCS MVP

Awards = HOF?: Part Fifty-Nine: ALCS/NLCS MVP
23 May
2021
Not in Hall of Fame

We here at Notinhalloffame.com thought it would be fun to take a look at the major awards in North American team sports and see how it translates into Hall of Fame potential.

Needless to say, different awards in different sports yield hall of fame potential.  In basketball, the team sport with the least number of players on a roster, the dividend for greatness much higher.  In baseball, it is not as much as a great individual season does not have the same impact.

Last time, we looked at the new Mariano Rivera and Trevor Hoffman Awards, which honor the best reliever of the league.  Some time ago, we looked at the World Series MVP, but we never looked at ALCS or NLCS MVP.  We will now.

For whatever reason, the National League awarded an MVP three years before the American League (1977 to 1980).

So how many League Championship Series MVPs have made the Baseball Hall of Fame?

Let’s find out!

The following are the past players who have won either the ALCS or NLCS MVP who are eligible for the Baseball Hall of Fame and have been enshrined.

Willie Stargell, Pittsburgh Pirates, First Base 1979 NL            

Named the National League MVP this year (though he probably shouldn’t have been), Willie Stargell earned every bit of his NLCS MVP.  In the three-game sweep over Cincinnati, Stargell batted .455 with two Home Runs and six RBIS, and his OPS was 1.753.  He followed that up by leading the Pirates to a World Series win where he had three Home Runs, seven Runs Batted In with a .400 Batting Average. Stargell’s skills fell off a cliff afterward, but he retired with 2,232 Hits, 937 Home Runs and 1,936 RBIs.

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1988.

George Brett, Kansas City Royals, Third Base 1985 AL            

George Brett is by far the best player in Royals history, and that would have been already the case by 1985. Brett was already a past MVP (1980), and this was year 10 of 13 in consecutive All-Star Game years.  This season, Brett was second in MVP voting, and a Gold Glove and Silver Slugger.  In the ALCS against Toronto, he batted .348 with three Home Runs, five RBIS and a 1.326 OPS and he led the Royals to their first World Series win. Brett retired in 1993 with 3,154 Hits, 317 Home Runs and a lifetime Batting Average of .305.

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1999.

Ozzie Smith, St. Louis Cardinals, Shortstop 1985 NL            

Ozzie Smith is considered by many to be the best defensive player in baseball and in 1985 he was in his prime.  In the 1985 NLCS, “The Wizard” batted .435 with a Game 5 walk-off Home Run.  Smith and the Cardinals lost to Kansas City in the World Series, but he already was a champion from 1982.  Smith played until 1996, in a career spent entirely in St. Louis. He was a 15-time All-Star, 13-time Gold Glove recipient and he is the all-time leader in Defensive bWAR (44.2).

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2002.

Dennis Eckersley, Oakland Athletics, Pitcher 1988 AL            

Eckersley had been a decent Starting Pitcher for over a decade, and this was Eckersley second year as a reliever, but the first where he was a star in this new role.  This year, Eckersley led the American League in Saves (45) and was second in Cy Young voting.  In the ALCS against Boston, he appeared in four Games, gaining four Saves with a 0.00 ERA and 0.500 WHIP.  Eckersley became the first Relief Pitcher to win an LCS MVP.  Oakland lost to Los Angeles in the World Series, but Eckersley got that ring the next year.  

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2004.

Kirby Puckett, Minnesota Twins, Outfield 1991 AL            

Playing all 12 years of his career with the Twins, Kirby Puckett won two World Series Rings, and was a ten-time All-Star.  Puckett was in year-eight, and in the 1991 ALCS, Puckett batted .429 with a 1.197 OPS and two Home Runs.  Over his career, Puckett accumulated 2,304 Hits, 207 Home Runs with a .318 Batting Average.  

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2001.

Roberto Alomar, Toronto Blue Jays, Second Base 1992 AL            

Roberto Alomar won Toronto’s first ALCS MVP, and it was fitting as it was the trade two years earlier from San Diego that brought him and Joe Carter to Toronto.  Alomar was in year three of twelve consecutive All-Star appearances, and in this ALCS he batted .423 with two Home Runs and four RBIs with a 1.157 OPS.  The Jays won their first World Series that year, and Alomar helped them win another the following season.  Alomar played 17 years in the Majors who won 10 Gold Gloves and batted an even .300.   

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2011.

John Smoltz, Atlanta Braves, Pitcher 1992 NL            

This was early in Smoltz’ career, and while he was an All-Star for the second time, his best was yet to come. Smoltz went 2-0 in their series win over Pittsburgh, starting three games with a 2.66 ERA.  The Braves lost the World Series to Toronto, but he would get his championship in 1995.  He would win the National League Cy Young in 1996 and over his long career he had a 213-155 record with 3,084 Strikeouts.   

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2015.

Mariano Rivera, New York Yankees, Pitcher 2003 AL            

Mariano Rivera was already the best closer in Baseball and it wasn’t even close.  Rivera already won the World Series four times, and this season he continued his greatness.  In this ALCS, Rivera pitched in four Games, winning one, saving two, over eight Innings. He would have an ERA of 1.12 and WHIP of 0.625.  The Yankees lost the 2003 World Series to Florida but Rivera earned his fifth title in 2009.  Rivera retired as the all-time leader in Games Finished (952), Saves (652) and ERA+ (205).     

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2019.

Ivan Rodriguez, Florida Marlins, Catcher 2003 NL            

Ivan Rodriguez played his first dozen seasons in Texas where he was the best Catcher in the 1990s.  It was a strange sight to see “Pudge” change uniforms and sign with the Marlins in 2003 as a Free Agent, but it was in this single season in Florida where he won his only World Series Ring.  In the NLCS, I-Rod batted .321 with an OPS od 1.031 in what would be forever known as the “Bartman” series against the Cubs, and he added two Home Runs with ten RBIs.  Rodriguez would then play with Detroit for four years, adding four more All-Star Games to his resume.  He finished his career with brief stops in New York (AL), Houston, Texas and Washington. The career numbers for Rodriguez were spectacular for a Catcher; 2,844 Hits, 311 Home Runs, 1,474 RBIs and a .296 Batting Average

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2017.

The following are the players who have won either the ALCS or NLCS MVP who are eligible for the Baseball Hall of Fame and have not been selected:

Dusty Baker, Los Angeles Dodgers, Outfield, 1977 NL            

This was Baker’s second year with the Dodgers and his first playoff series.  Baker had two Home Runs, including a Grand Slam, and he drove in eight Runs with an OPS of 1.295.  Los Angeles would lose the World Series to the New York Yankees that year, but Baker would get that ring with L.A. in 1981.  The two-time All-Star would later win three Manager of the Year Awards.  

Eligible Since 1992.  Baker was on the ballot for one year in 1992 and received 0.9% of the vote.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com  

Steve Garvey, Los Angeles Dodgers, First Base, 1978 NL             

Steve Garvey was in his prime, with 1978 seeing the First Baseman go to fifth of eight straight All-Star Games, and he was the runner-up for the MVP.  In this NLCS, Garvey belted four Home Runs with 8 RBIs with an OPS of 1.611.  Garvey and the Dodgers sputtered against New York, but he won his elusive ring in 1981 with L.A.  

Eligible Since 1992.  Garvey was on the ballot for fifteen years finishing as high as 41.2% in 1998.  Ranked #21 on Notinhalloffame.com

Frank White, Kansas City Royals, Second Base, 1980 AL            

In Kansas City’s three-game sweep over the Yankees, White batted .545 with a Home Run and three RBIs.  His OPS was 1.455.  The Royals lost the World Series to Philadelphia but he would win one in 1985 when the Royals beat St. Louis.  

Eligible Since 1996. White was on the ballot for one year in 1996 and received 3.8% of the vote.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com  

Manny Trillo, Philadelphia Phillies, Second Base, 1980 NL            

Trillo had already won a World Series Ring with the Oakland Athletics, and this year, Trillo batted .381 with four RBIs, and Philadelphia went on to beat Kansas City in the World Series.  Trillo would be an All-Star the next three seasons, and he retired in 1989 with 1,562 Hits.  

Eligible Since 1995.  Trillo was on the ballot for one year in 1995 but did not receive any votes.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com  

Graig Nettles, New York Yankees, Third Base, 1981 AL            

Prior to 1981, Nettles has gone to five All-Star Games and won two World Series Rings in the 70s with the Yankees.  This year, Nettles had the best playoff series of his career, batting .500 with a 1.488 OPS with one Home Run and nine RBIs.  New York would lose to Los Angeles in that year’s World Series.

Eligible Since 1994.  Nettles was on the ballot for four years finishing as high as 7.9% in 1996.  Ranked #53 on Notinhalloffame.com

Burt Hooton, Los Angeles Dodgers, Pitcher, 1981 NL            

Hooton became the first Pitcher to win an LCS MVP, and he did so in a year where he was an All-Star for the first and only time.  Against the Montreal Expos, Hooton took to the mound twice, throwing 14.2 Innings without allowing a run.  He went 2-0 with seven Strikeouts, and he helped the Dodgers win the World Series, where he went 1-1.  Hooton had a career record of 151-136, most of which as a Dodger.  

Eligible Since 1991. Hooton was on the ballot for one year in 1991 and received 0.2% of the vote.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com  

Fred Lynn, California Angels, Outfield, 1982 AL            

Lynn was in his second year in California but it was his eighth on nine consecutive All-Star seasons. The Angels had not yet gone to World Series, and that didn’t change in 1982, as California lost in five Games to Milwaukee.  This made Lynn the first player to win an LCS MVP on the losing side.  Lynn’s stats could not be denied, as he batted .611 with a Home Run, five RBIs and a 1.539 OPS.  

Eligible Since 1996.  Lynn was on the ballot for two years and finished as high as 5.5% in 1996.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com 

Darrell Porter, St. Louis Cardinals, Catcher, 1982 NL            

Darrell Porter was a four-time All-Star, spending time with Milwaukee and Kansas City.  1982 was Porter’s second season in St. Louis and in the three-game sweep of Atlanta to win the NLCS, Porter batted .556 with three Doubles and a 1.603 OPS.  He would also win the World Series MVP that year.  

Eligible Since 1993. Porter was on the ballot for one year in 1993 but did not receive any votes.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com  

Mike Boddicker, Baltimore Orioles, Pitcher, 1983 AL            

Mike Boddicker was the first player to win an LCS MVP as a rookie, and he was also third in Rookie of the Year voting.  In the ALCS win over Chicago, Boddicker had a Complete Game Shutout.  The Orioles won the World Series, where Boddicker won a Game. He would have an overall record of 134-116, with stops in Boston, Kansas City and Milwaukee.  

Eligible Since 1999.  Boddicker was on the ballot for one year in 1999 but did not receive any votes.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.  

Gary Matthews, Philadelphia Phillies, Outfield, 1983 NL            

The National League Rookie of the Year in 1973 with San Francisco, Matthews was in his third and final year in Philadelphia.  In the NLCS, Matthews batted .429 with three Home Runs, eight RBIs with a 1.571 OPS. He joined the Cubs after and played until 1987, retiring as a Seattle Mariner.  Overall, Matthews had 234 Home Runs with 2,011 Hits.  

Eligible Since 1993. Matthews was on the ballot for one year in 1993 but did not receive any votes.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.   

Kirk Gibson, Detroit Tigers, Outfield, 1984 AL            

Kirk Gibson helped the Tigers win the World Series this year in what was the first of five straight 24-plus Home Run Seasons.  Detroit swept Kansas City in the ALCS with Gibson batting .417 with an OPS of 1.250.  Gibson would later win the National League MVP in 1988, and that year he belted one of the most famous Home Runs in Dodgers history in their World Series win over Oakland.

Eligible Since 2001. Gibson was on the ballot for one year in 2001 finishing with 2.5% of the vote.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.   

Steve Garvey, San Diego Padres, First Base, 1984, NL (2)            

Now a San Diego Padre, Garvey was still a productive hitter, and he was an All-Star for the ninth time. Garvey hit a walk-off Home Run in Game 4, and batted .400 with 7 RBIs in the five-game series win over the Chicago Cubs. Sadly, Garvey and San Diego were destroyed by the Detroit Tigers in the World Series, and this was Garvey’s last taste of the playoffs.

Eligible Since 1992. Garvey was on the ballot for fifteen years finishing as high as 41.2% in 1998.  Ranked #21 on Notinhalloffame.com

Marty Barrett, Boston Red Sox, Second Base, 1986, AL             

Barrett had his best year in baseball with a career-high in Hits (179) and OPS (.733).  In the ALCS, Barrett batted .367 with five RBIs, and by winning the ALCS MVP, he won his only individual award.  The Red Sox went on to lose to the New York Mets in the World Series, and you all likely know the story there.

Eligible Since 1997. Although Barrett was Hall of Fame eligible in 1997, he was not on the ballot.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.   

Mike Scott, Houston Astros, Pitcher, 1986, NL             

Mike Scott was an All-Star for the first time in his career, and he won the Cy Young, leading the NL in ERA (2.22), Innings Pitched (275.1), ERA+ (161), FIP (2.16), WHIP (0.923), H/9 (5.9), SO/9 (10.0) and SO/BB (4.25).  Without Scott, the Astros would not have made the playoffs, and Scott was again electric in the NLCS against the Mets.  He pitched two games, winning both, and only allowing one run in two complete games, with a 0.500 WHIP.  Despite his performance, the Mets were too much for Houston, and Scott became the second person to win an LCS MVP on the losing side.  Scott went to appear in two more All-Star Games, and finished second for the Cy Young in 1989.  He would have an overall career record of 124-108 with 1,316 Strikeouts. 

Eligible Since 1997. Scott was on the ballot for one year and received 0.4% of the vote.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.   

Gary Gaetti, Minnesota Twins, Third Base, 1987, AL             

Gary Gaetti was coming off one of his best seasons, where he had 31 Home Runs, 109 RBIs and won a Gold Glove. Gaetti and the Twins beat the Tigers in five, with the Third Baseman batting .300 with a .998 OPS and two Home Runs and five RBIs.  Minnesota beat St. Louis for their first World Series win that year, and Gaetti would later go to All-Star Games.  Gaetti later played for California, Kansas City, St. Louis, Chicago (NL) and Boston, retiring in 2000 with 2,280 Hits, 360 Home Runs and 1,341 RBIs.

Eligible Since 2006.  Gaetti was on the ballot for one year and received 0.8% of the vote.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.   

Jeffrey Leonard, San Francisco Giants, Outfield, 1987, NL            

This was the eleventh year that Leonard was in the Majors, but the first for the Outfielder as an All-Star. The Giants lost the NLCS and for the first time we had back-to-back NLCS MVPS from the losing side.  Leonard had four Home Runs, five RBIS, batted .417 with an OPS of 1.417.  Leonard played four more years, finishing off his career with Milwaukee and Seattle.

Eligible Since 1996.  Leonard was on the ballot for one year but did not receive any votes.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.   

Orel Hershiser, Los Angeles Dodgers, Pitcher, 1988, NL            

1988 was a dream season for Hershiser as he won the Cy Young, the Gold Glove, the World Series, World Series MVP, and for the purposes of this article, the NLCS MVP.  In this series against the Mets, Hershiser appeared in four Games, starting three, and going 1-0, with a 1.09 ERA and a Save.  

Eligible Since 2006.  Hershiser was on the ballot for two years finishing as high as 11.2% in 2006.  Ranked #71 on Notinhalloffame.com.  

Will Clark, San Francisco, First Base, 1989, NL             

Will “The Thrill” Clark was at his best in the late 80s, with 1989 seeing him finish second in MVP voting with a .333 Batting Average with 23 Home Runs and 111 RBIs.  Clark batted .650 with a pair of Home Runs and eight RBIs with an OPS of 1.882.  The World Series was not as good for the Giants as they were swept by Oakland. Clark would have a very good career with 2,176 Hits, 284 Home Runs and a .303 Batting Average.

Eligible Since 2006. Clark was on the ballot for one year and received 4.4% of the vote.  Ranked #50 on Notinhalloffame.com.  

Dave Stewart, Oakland Athletics, Pitcher, 1990, AL             

The ace of Oakland’s staff when they were the beasts of the American League in the late 80s and early 90s, Dave Stewart, won the World Series MVP the year before, and he brought them to another one in 1990.  In this year’s ALCS, Stewart went 2-0 against Boston with a 1.13 ERA and 0.625 WHIP.  

Eligible Since 2001. Stewart was on the ballot for two years and finished as high as 7.4% in 2001.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.   

Randy Myers, Cincinnati Reds, Pitcher, 1990, NL (co-winner)          

For the first time in LCS MVP history, we have dual winners.  The first is Randy Myers, who had already won a World Series ring with the New York Mets in 1986.  This was Myers’ first season in Cincinnati, and he was named to his first All-Star Game and was second in Saves (31) and fifth in Cy Young voting.  In the NLCS, Myers appeared in four games, saving three without allowing a run.  He would later go to three more All-Star Games; two with Chicago (NL) and one with Baltimore.  Myers retired in 1998 with 347 Saves.  

Eligible Since 2004. Myers was on the ballot for one year in 2004 and finished with 0.2% of the vote.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.   

Rob Dibble, Cincinnati Reds, Pitcher, 1990, NL (co-winner)          

For the first time in LCS MVP history, we have dual winners.  The second is Rob Dibble, part of the “Nasty Boys” relievers of the Reds in 1990.  Dibble was an All-Star this year and the one after.  In the NLCS, Dibble pitched in four games, recording one Save without allowing a run.  Dibble had 89 career Saves.

Eligible Since 2001. Dibble did not play the minimum ten years to qualify for the Hall.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.   

Steve Avery, Atlanta Braves, Pitcher, 1991, NL           

Avery was in his second year in the game, where his 18-8 season helped get Atlanta to the playoffs.  In the NLCS, Avery won both of his starts, pitching 16.1 shutout innings.  He was not as effective in the World Series, and Atlanta lost to Minnesota.  Avery and the Braves would win it all in 1995.

Eligible Since 2009. Although Avery was eligible for the Hall in 2009, he was not on the ballot.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.   

Dave Stewart, Toronto Blue Jays, Pitcher, 1993, AL (2)            

Stewart was no longer an ace, but he brought a veteran presence to a Blue Jays team looking to get over the hump.  The crafty Pitcher took what he had left to go 2-0 in the ALCS against Chicago with a 2.03 ERA.  

Eligible Since 2001. Stewart was on the ballot for two years and finished as high as 7.4% in 2001.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.   

Curt Schilling, Philadelphia Phillies, Pitcher, 1993, NL            

Schilling went 16-7 this year, and it would be a harbinger for great seasons to come.  This was Schilling’s first post-season series, and although he did not gain a decision in two starts and 16 Innings, his ERA was only 1.69. Philadelphia lost to Toronto in the World Series, but Schilling later won three World Series Titles, one with Arizona and two with Boston.  Overall, the six-time All-Star had a 216-156 record with 3,116 Strikeouts.  

Eligible Since 2013.  Schilling has been on the ballot for eight years and has finished as high as 70.0% in 2020.  Ranked #5 on Notinhalloffame.com.  

Orel Hershiser, Cleveland Indians, Pitcher, 1995, AL (2)            

Hershiser’s Cy Young contending days were behind him, but he could still contribute to starting rotation.  Now with Cleveland, Hershiser went 2-0 in 14.1 Innings with a 1.29 ERA and 0.857 WHIP.  He would not get a second World Series ring, as the Indians would lose to Atlanta. Hershiser would have a 204-150 record with 2,014 Strikeouts.

Eligible Since 2006. Hershiser was on the ballot for two years finishing as high as 11.2% in 2006.  Ranked #71 on Notinhalloffame.com.  

Mike Deveraux, Atlanta Braves, Outfield, 1995, NL             

Mike Deveraux played a dozen years in the Majors, and only for a brief time in Atlanta, but it was there where he earned his only individual award and a World Series Ring.  Deveraux was traded from the White Sox late in the 1995 Season and in the NLCS he batted .308 with a Home Run and five RBIs.  

Eligible Since 2004.  Although Deveraux was eligible for the Hall in 2004 he was not on the ballot.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.   

Bernie Williams, New York Yankees, Outfield, 1996, AL             

The Yankees run of dominance began this year, and for this matter, this is was when Bernie Williams’s peak started.  Williams batted .474 with two Home Runs, six RBIs and an OPS of 1.531.  New York would win the World Series and following this, Williams went to five straight All-Star Games and aided New York in winning three more titles.  Williams played his entire career with the Yanks, and would collect 2,336 Hits, 287 Home Runs, 1,257 RBIs with a .297 Batting Average.  

Eligible Since 2012.  Williams was on the ballot for two years and he finished as high as 9.6% in 2012.  Ranked #35 on Notinhalloffame.com.  

Javy Lopez, Atlanta Braves, Catcher, 1996, NL             

A World Series winner the year before, Lopez helped the Braves reach the World Series again in 1996, though they lost to the Yankees.  In the ALCS, the Catcher batted .542 with two Home Runs, six RBIs and an OPS of 1.607. Lopez would later go to three All-Star Games, and he would have 1,527 career Hits with 260 Home Runs.  

Eligible Since 2012.  Lopez was on the ballot for one year in 2012 and finished with 0.2% of the ballot.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com  

Marquis Grissom, Cleveland Indians, Outfield, 1997, AL            

Prior to 1997, Marquis Grissom went to two All-Star Games as a Montreal Expo, and won a World Series with Atlanta.  In 1997, Grissom was with Cleveland, a team he only spent one year with.  In the ALCS, Grissom hit the game-winning Home Run in Game 2, stole three bases and batted .261.  He would leave Cleveland for Milwaukee, and later play for the Los Angeles Dodgers and San Francisco.  Grissom retired in 2005 with 2,251 Hits and 429 Stolen Bases.  

Eligible Since 2011. Grissom was on the ballot for one year in 2011 and finished with 0.7% of the ballot.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.  

Livan Hernandez, Florida Marlins, Pitcher, 1997, NL             

Hernandez was the runner-up for the Rookie of the Year, and he had a lot of consolation for not winning, as the Marlins won the World Series that year.  Hernandez played a huge role in that, winning the NLCS MVP off a 2-0 record with a 0.84 ERA and 0.656 WHIP.  Hernandez again went 2-0 in the World Series, winning that MVP (though his other stats were terrible), but he is one of the few players to win the NLCS and World Series MVP in the same season.  Hernandez went on to have a long career, posting a 178-177 record with 1,976 Strikeouts. 

Eligible Since 2018. Grissom was on the ballot for one year in 2018 and finished with 0.2% of the ballot.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.  

David Wells, New York Yankees, Pitcher, 1998, AL             

A popular player everywhere he went, David Wells was already a World Series winner with the Blue Jays in 1992, and after stops in Detroit, Cincinnati and Baltimore, he signed with the New York Yankees in 1997.  In 1998, Wells was an All-Star for the second time, with an 18-4 record and a third-place in Cy Young voting.  In this year’s ALCS, Wells won both of his starts against Cleveland, throwing 15.2 Innings with a 2.87 ERA.

Eligible Since 2013. Wells was on the ballot for one year in 2013 and finished with 0.9% of the ballot.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.  

Sterling Hitchcock, San Diego Padres, Pitcher, 1998, NL             

Hitchcock started two games in the NLCS where he won both games allowing only one run over ten Innings. The Padres beat Atlanta to advance but they were destroyed by the Yankees.  This was Hitchcock’s only award in a 13-year career where he had a 74-76 record.   He also played with the Yankees and St. Louis. 

Eligible Since 2010.  Although Hitchcock was eligible for the Hall in 2010 he was not on the ballot.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.  

Orlando Hernandez, New York Yankees, Pitcher, 1999, AL            

Hernandez played nine seasons in the Majors where his best season was this year, 1999, his second in baseball.  With a 17-9 record, Hernandez’ ALCS saw him have two starts with a 1-0 record and 1.80 ERA. The Yankees went on to win the World Series, which was Hernandez’ second.  He added a third next year, giving him three World Series Rings in four seasons.  Hernandez later played for Chicago, Arizona and the New York Mets. 

Eligible Since 2013. Hernandez did not play the mandatory ten years to qualify for the Hall.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.  

Eddie Perez, Atlanta Braves, Catcher, 1999, NL             

Eddie Perez is an unlikely LCS MVP winner as we have a player who never had a 100 Hit year and his lifetime OBP was under three.  Nevertheless, in the 1999 ALCS, Perez was fantastic in the series against the Mets, where he batted .500 with two Home Runs, five RBIs and an OPS 1.424.

Eligible Since 2011. Although Perez was eligible for the Hall of Fame in 2011, he was not on the ballot.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.  

David Justice, New York Yankees, Outfield, 2000, AL             

David Justice was the National League Rookie of the Year in 1990, and won a World Series in 1995 with Atlanta.  Justice began the 2000 Season with the Cleveland Indians and was traded to the Yankees for their playoff run.  Justice only batted .238, but had two Home Runs and eight RBIs in New York’s ALCS win over Seattle.  He played two more seasons in the Majors, concluding with the “Moneyball” year of 2002. Justice had 305 Home Runs with a Slugging Percentage of .500.

Eligible Since 2008. Justice was on the ballot for one year and received 0.2% of the ballot.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.  

Mike Hampton, New York Mets, Pitcher, 2000, NL             

Mike Hampton was only with the Mets for one season, having been traded from Houston after he was second for the Cy Young.  It was a decent year, as he went 15-10, and then 2-0 in the NLCS.  Hampton did not allow a run in the series over 16 Innings. The Mets lost the World Series to the Yankees, and Hampton lost his own start.  He signed with the Colorado Rockies in the off-season as a Free Agent. Hampton never was great again, but he toiled in the big leagues until 2010 and retired with a 148-115 record with 1,487 Strikeouts.

Eligible Since 2016. Hampton was on the ballot for one year but did not receive any votes.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.  

Andy Pettitte, New York Yankees, Pitcher, 2001, AL             

Andy Pettitte had already won four World Series rings by this point, and this year he was an All-Star for the second time.  In the ALCS against Seattle, Pettitte went 2-0 with a 2.51 ERA and a sub-one WHIP. Pettitte would be rocked by Arizona in his two starts in the World Series, and they lost to the Diamondbacks. Pettitte would later win a fifth ring with the Yankees in 2009, and he had an overall record of 256-156 with 2,448 Strikeouts.

Eligible Since 2019.  Pettitte has been on the ballot for two years and has finished as high as 11.3% in 2020.  Ranked #32 on Notinhalloffame.com

Craig Counsell, Arizona Diamondbacks, Second Base, 2001, NL             

Already a World Series winner with Florida Marlins in 1997, Craig Counsell was in another situation to help a new team win it all with the Arizona Diamondbacks in 2001.  In the NLCS, Counsell batted .381 with three Doubles and eight RBIs.  Arizona would win the World Series that year, and Counsell stayed with the D-Backs until 2003.  He would later play for Milwaukee, Arizona again and then returned to Milwaukee, retiring in 2011 with 1,208 Hits.

Eligible Since 2017. Although Counsell was Hall of Fame eligible in 2017 he was not on the ballot.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.  

Adam Kennedy, Anaheim Angels, Second Base, 2002, AL             

This was Adam Kennedy’s fourth year in the Majors, and it would be the only time that he batted over .300 (.312).  The Infielder batted .357 with a 1.357 OPS, blasting three Home Runs.  The Angels went on to win the World Series, and this would be toe only title of Kennedy’s career.  He would later play for St. Louis, Oakland, Washington, Seattle and the Dodgers and left the game with 1,488 Hits.

Eligible Since 2018. Although Kennedy was Hall of Fame eligible in 2017 he was not on the ballot.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.  

Benito Santiago, San Francisco Giants, Catcher, 2002, NL             

When Santiago was with San Diego, he went to four straight All-Star Games (1989-92).  Six teams and ten years later, Santiago was again an All-Star, now with the San Francisco Giants.  The Catcher batted .300 with two Home Runs and six RBIs in the NLCS, but the Giants would go on to lose to the Angels in the World Series.  Santiago had 1,830 Hits and 217 Home Runs over his 20-year career.

Eligible Since 2011. Santiago was on the ballot for one year and received 0.2% of the ballot.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.  

Paul Konerko, Chicago White Sox, First Base, 2005, AL             

Konerko was already beloved in Chicago, but the slugger’s 2005 playoff performance made him an icon. Konerko was an All-Star for the second time in 2005, and he smacked 40 Home Runs that year, the second best of his career.  In the ALCS against the Angels, Konerko has a pair of Home Runs with a .286 Batting Average, and he later helped them sweep the Astros in the World Series.  Konerko will overall smack 439 Home Runs, 1,412 RBIs with 2,340 Hits.

Eligible Since 2020. Konerko was on the ballot for one year and received 2.5% of the ballot.  Ranked #86 on Notinhalloffame.com

Roy Oswalt, Houston Astros, Pitcher, 2005, NL             

Oswalt was the ace of the Astros staff, winning a league-leading 20 Games and finishing third in Cy Young voting.  In the playoffs, the Astros beat St. Louis, with Oswalt winning both starts with a 1.28 ERA and 12 Strikeouts in 14 Innings.  The hurler stayed with the Astros until he was traded to the Phillies during the 2010 Season, and he finished his career with Texas and Colorado, retiring in 2013.  Oswalt was only a three-time All-Star, but he finished in the top six in Cy Young voting seven times, and had a 163-102 record.

Eligible Since 2019.  Oswalt was on the ballot for one year and received 0.8% of the ballot.  Ranked #105 on Notinhalloffame.com

Placido Polanco, Detroit Tigers, Pitcher, 2006, AL             

Polanco played 16 years in the Majors, with five of them in Detroit.  It was as a Tiger when he had his first All-Star Game appearance, and his lone Silver Slugger and two of three Gold Gloves.  In the 2006 ALCS sweep of Oakland, Polanco batted .529 with nine Hits, but he was 0-17 in that year’s World Series.  Polanco amassed 2,142 Hits over his career.

Eligible Since 2019.  Polanco was on the ballot for one year and received 0.5% of the ballot.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com  

Jeff Suppan, St, Louis Cardinals, Pitcher, 2006, NL             

Suppan had a long career in the Majors, spanning 17 years where he was mostly a middle-of-the-rotation Starter, though it is evident that his best years were with the Cardinals (2004-07). In the 2006 NLCS, Suppan pitched twice, winning one, and allowing only one run on 15 Innings.  The Cardinals would go on to win that year’s World Series.

Eligible Since 2019. Polanco was on the ballot for one year and received 0.5% of the ballot.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.  

Josh Beckett, Boston Red Sox, Pitcher, 2007, AL             

When it mattered the most, Beckett was at his brightest.  In 2003, Beckett won the World Series MVP with the Marlins when they again shocked the baseball world.  Beckett signed with the BoSox in 2007, and that year he went 409 in the playoffs including two wins in the ALCS where he had a 1.93 ERA.  The Red Sox went on to beat Colorado in the World Series, and Beckett had a career record of 138-106.

Eligible Since 2020. Beckett was on the ballot for one year and but did not receive any votes.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.  

Josh Hamilton, Texas Rangers, Outfield, 2010, AL             

Hamilton was in year two of his five consecutive All-Stars, and he was a year away from winning the MVP. The Outfielder smacked four Home Runs and batted .350 in Texas’ six-game series win over New York, but the Rangers fell to San Francisco in the World Series.  Hamilton had an even 200 Home Runs over his career.

Eligible Since 2021. Hamilton did not play the minimum 10 years, and will likely not be on the ballot.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.  

Cody Ross, San Francisco Giants, Outfield, 2010, NL             

Ross was traded from the Florida Marlins during the season, and he batted .350 with three Home Runs in the NLCS.  The Giants would win the World Series, which would be Ross’s only title.  He bounced around the Majors until 2015, and had 904 total Hits.

Eligible Since 2021.  Although Ross was eligible for the Hall in 2021, he was not on the ballot.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.  

Delmon Young, Detroit Tigers, Outfield, 2012, AL             

This was arguably Young’s last good year in the Majors, and the last of two with Detroit.  In the 2012 ALCS against New York, he had a pair of Home Runs, six RBIs and a 1.186 OPS.  Young also played for Tampa, Minnesota, Philadelphia and Baltimore.

Eligible Since 2021. Although Young was eligible for the Hall in 2021, he was not on the ballot.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.  

Marco Scutaro, San Francisco Giants, Shortstop, 2012, NL             

Scutaro was traded from Colorado during the year, and this was his 11thMajor League season. The Infielder batted .500 in the NLCS against the Cardinals with four RBIs.  The Giants would win the World Series, and in the following year, Scutaro was an All-Star for the only time.  He would have 1,355 career Hits. 

Eligible Since 2020. Although Scutaro was eligible for the Hall in 2021, he was not on the ballot.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.  

 

Let’s update our tally, shall we?      

Award in Question

Percentage of recipients who have entered the HOF

Percentage of recipients by year who have entered the HOF.

NBA MVP

100%

100%

NHL Art Ross

100%

100%

NHL Hart Trophy

93.6%

96.3%

NBA Finals MVP

91.3%

94.9%

NHL Norris

90.5%

96.4%

NHL Ted Lindsay Award

90.0%

 

NBA All-Star Game MVP

89.5%

91.7%

NHL Conn Smythe

74.2%

85.4%

NFL Bert Bell Award

73.7%

71.4%

NFL AP Offensive Player of the Year

73.1%

79.4%

NFL AP MVP

68.3%

74.0%

NFL Walter Payton Man of the Year

66.7%

66.7%

NHL Lady Byng

63.8%

76.0%

NFL Defensive Player of the Year

60.8%

71.1%

NFL Super Bowl MVP

60.6%

64.9%

NHL Mark Messier Leadership Award

60.0%

60.0%

NBA Defensive Player of the Year

58.3%

56.5%

NHL Vezina

57.1%

66.3%

NBA Rookie of the Year

56.5%

56.5%

MLB MVP

55.0%

60.2%

NFL Pro Bowl MVP

52.3%

54.8%

MLB Lou Gehrig Award

51.9%

51.9%

MLB Roberto Clemente Award

47.4%

47.4%

NHL Calder Trophy

46.5%

46.5%

NBA J. Walter Kennedy Citizenship Award

46.0%

46.0%

MLB/NL/AL Cy Young Award

44.4%

55.4%

MLB Babe Ruth Award

37.0%

39.3%

NHL King Clancy Award

36.8%

36.8%

NHL Frank J. Selke Trophy

33.3%

36.7%

MLB World Series MVP

33.3%

36.8%

MLB Hutch Award

33.1%

33.1%

NFL Offensive Rookie of the Year

28.6%

28.6%

NHL Bill Masterton Memorial Trophy

27.9%

27.9%

MLB Edgar Martinez Award

26.7%

17.2%

MLB Delivery Man of the Year

25.0%

50.0%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Designated Hitter)

25.0%

30.8%

MLB Comeback Player of the Year

25.0%

25.0%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Shortstop)

23.5%

52.6%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove

21.7%

36.8%

NHL William M. Jennings Trophy

20.7%

40.4%

NFL Defensive Rookie of the Year

20.6%

20.6%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Catcher)

20.0%

22.5%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Second Base)

18.8%

39.8%

MLB Rolaids Reliever of the Year

18.6%

33.3%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Shortstop)

18.2%

35.1%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Pitcher)

18.2%

20.1%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Second Base)

16.7%

32.7%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Outfield)

16.7%

30.1%

MLB NLCS/ALCS MVP

16.1%

15.3%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Outfield)

15.7%

25.2%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Third Base)

14.3%

14.3%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Third Base)

13.6%

14.3%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (First Base)

13.6%

13.3%

MLB (NL/AL) Rookie of the Year

13.3%

13.3%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Catcher)

10.3%

15.2%

NBA Most Improved Player of the Year

5.3%

3.2%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (First Base)

3.8%

3.2%

NFL AP Comeback Player of the Year

0.0%

0.0%

So, who is up next?

The following are the players who have won either the ALCS MVP or NLCS MVP in MLB who have retired but have not met the mandatory years out of the game to qualify for the Baseball Hall of Fame: 

David Ortiz, Boston Red Sox, Designated Hitter, 2004, AL             

The Boston Red Sox had been “cursed” ever since they traded Babe Ruth to the New York Yankees in 1919, and this looked to be much of the same, as the Yanks went up 3-0 in the ALCS.  The ghosts of the past were flying over Boston, but something magical was in the air.  The Red Sox won the next four, and then went on to sweep the Cardinals to win the World Series.  In this ALCS, Ortiz had three Home Runs, 11 RBIs and an OPS of 1.199.  Ortiz won two more World Series Rings with the Red Sox (2007 & 2013) and would smack 541 Home Runs with 1,768 career RBIs.    

Eligible in 2022.

Matt Holliday, Colorado Rockies, Outfield, 2006, NL             

2006 was Holliday’s third Major League season, but it was his breakout campaign with a 34 HR/.334 year.  The Rockies destroyed Arizona in the NLCS with Holliday hitting a pair of taters and batting .333.  Holliday’s Rockies failed to win the World Series, but later in his career as a Cardinal, he won a ring in 2011.  He would be a six-time All-Star, four-time Silver Slugger, and won the 2007 Batting Title. Holliday finished his career with 2,096 Hits, 316 Home Runs, 1,220 RBIs and a lifetime .299 Batting Average.    

Eligible in 2024.

Matt Garza, Tampa Bay Rays, Pitcher, 2008, AL             

Garza was in his third year in baseball, but it was his first as a regular Staring Pitcher, and also his first in Tampa, as he was with Minnesota the two years previous.  Garza had an 11-9 Regular Season record, and won both his starts against Boston in the ALCS where he had a 1.38 ERA in 13 Inning.  He would later pitch for Chicago (NL), Texas and Milwaukee and retired with a 93-106 record with 1,380 Strikeouts.

Eligible in 2023.

C.C. Sabathia, New York Yankees, Pitcher, 2009, AL             

Sabathia won the Cy Young Award as a Cleveland Indian in 2007, and in 2009, he was in Yankee pinstripes, leading the AL in Wins (19), and finishing fourth in Cy Young voting.  In the 2009 ALCS, Sabathia won both of his starts and had 1.13 ERA, and New York went on to defeat Philadelphia in the World Series. Sabathia played ten more years with New York and retired with 3,093 Strikeouts and a 251-161 Record.

Eligible in 2025.

Ryan Howard, Philadelphia Phillies, First Base, 2009, NL             

Howard had already won two Batting Titles, and in 2009, he was close with 45 taters, and was third in MVP voting.  In this year’s NLCS, he batted .333 with two Home Runs and eight RBIs, but the Phillies lost to New York in the World Series. Howard played his entire career with the Phillies, blasting 382 Home Runs and 1,194 RBIs.

Eligible in 2025.

David Freese, St. Louis Cardinals, Third Base, 2011, NL             

2011 was Freese’s breakout year, though mostly due to the 2011 playoffs.  Freese hit safely in 13 straight playoff games, and in the NLCS, he batted .545 with three Home Runs and nine RBIs against the Milwaukee Brewers.  In that year’s World Series, Freese again won the MVP, and was the hero in Game 6 and 7.  Freese would later play for Los Angeles (AL), Pittsburgh, and Los Angeles (NL) and had 1,041 career Hits.

Eligible in 2025.

Koji Uehara, Boston Red Sox, Pitcher, 2013, AL             

Japanese Pitcher, Koji Uehara, did not debut in the Majors until he was 34, first with the Baltimore Orioles in 2009.  After a stop in Texas, Uehara went to Boston, working late relief and recording 21 Saves in 2013.  In that year’s ALCS, Uehara appeared in five Games, saving three and not allowing a run in six Innings of work.  The Red Sox won the World Series, with Uehara again appearing in five Games without an Earned Run.  He had 95 career Saves.

Eligible in 2023.

Alcides Escobar, Kansas City Royals, Shortstop, 2015, AL             

Escobar was an All-Star and Gold Glove this year, which was the only time he won either.  In the ALCS, Escobar batted .478 with five RBIs, and the Royals advanced to win the World Series over the Mets.  Escobar played until 2018, and he accumulated 1,367 Hits.

Eligible in 2024.

Daniel Murphy, New York Mets, Second Base, 2015, NL             

Daniel Murphy was an All-Star in 2014, 2016 and 2017, but in 2015, he batted .529 with four Home Runs, propelling the Mets over Cubs in the NLCS.  The Infielder’s Mets lost in the World Series to Kansas City, and Murphy later played for Washington, Chicago (NL) and Colorado.  Murphy accrued 1,572 Hits over his career.

Eligible in 2026.

Howie Kendrick, Washington Nationals, First Base, 2019, NL             

Howie Kendrick debuted in 2006, was an All-Star in 2011, and while this was the tail end of his career, it was in 2019 that he had his greatest playoff success.  In the Nationals NLCS against St. Louis, Kendrick batted .333 with four RBIs, and Washington went on to win their first World Series by beating Houston in seven.

Eligible in 2026.

 

The following are the past players who have won either the ALCS or NLCS MVP who are eligible for the Baseball Hall of Fame and are still active.

Albert Pujols, Los Angeles Dodgers, First Base, 2004, NL             

Pujols was already an established star, as he led the NL in Runs Scored (133) for the second straight year, and also belted 46 Home Runs with 123 RBIs and an OPS of 1.072.  The Cardinals beat Houston in seven, with Pujols batting .500 with 4 Home Runs and 9 RBIs. The Cards would fall to the Boston Red Sox in four in the World Series.  Pujols and the Cardinals would win the 2006 and 2011 World Series, and he would win the National League MVP in 2005, 2008 & 2009.  The future first ballot Hall of Famer signed with the Angels in 2012.    

41 Years Old, Playing for the Los Angeles Angels.

Cole Hamels, Philadelphia Phillies, Pitcher, 2008, NL             

Hamels was in his third season and he led the NL in WHIP (1.082) and he had a 14-10 record with 196 Strikeouts.  In the NLCS, Hamels went 2-0 with a 1.93 ERA, and he was also the World Series MVP when the Phillies beat Tampa.

37 Years Old, Free Agent.

Nelson Cruz, Texas Rangers, Outfield, 2011, AL             

Cruz hit 28 Home Runs this year, and he smacked another six in the ALCS against Detroit.  He also had 13 RBIs with a 1.273 OPS.  Cruz currently has well over 400 career Home Runs.

40 Years Old, Playing for the Minnesota Twins.

Michael Wacha, St. Louis Cardinals, Pitcher, 2013, NL             

Wacha was a rookie, who appeared in 15 Games, starting nine and posting a 4-1 Record.  It looked like he arrived in the 2013 NLCS, winning both starts and pitching 13.2 Innings of shutout baseball.  Wacha did not fare as well in the World Series (1-1 7.45 ERA), and the Cardinals lost to the Red Sox.  He was an All-Star in 2015.

29 Years Old, Playing for the Tampa Bay Rays.

Lorenzo Cain, Kansas City Royals, Outfield, 2014, AL             

Cain had a breakout year, batting ,301 with 28 Stolen Bases, and the spark plug batted .533 against the Orioles in the ALCS.  The Royals lost to San Francisco in the World Series, but Cain was good, collecting four RBIs with a .308 Average.

35 Years Old, Playing for the Milwaukee Brewers.

Madison Bumgarner, San Francisco Giants, Pitcher, 2014, NL             

If Madison Bumgarner ever gets close to the Baseball Hall of Fame, it will be based on what he did in the 2014 playoffs, where he won both the NLCS and World Series MVP.  In the NLCS, Bumgarner had two starts, won one, and had an ERA of 1.72.

31 Years Old, Playing for the Arizona Diamondbacks.

Andrew Miller, Cleveland Indians, Pitcher, 2016, AL             

Miller had a career-high 36 Saves in 2015, but was traded to Indians during the next season, where the reliever had only 12 Saves, but a 1.45 ERA, and was named to his first All-Star.  In the ALCS, he pitched in four Games, recording a Save while not allowing a run over 7.2 Innings.  The Indians would fall to the Cubs in the World Series.

36 Years Old, Playing for the St. Louis Cardinals.

Javier Baez, Chicago Cubs, Third Base, 2016, NL Co-Winner          

Baez became a regular player in the Cubs lineup in 2016, and in the four-game sweep of the Giants, he batted .375 with a Home Run.  The Cubs won the World Series that year, ending the dreaded drought.  Baez was the runner-up for the MVP in 2018.

28 Years Old, Playing for the Chicago Cubs.

Jon Lester, Chicago Cubs, Pitcher, 2016, NL Co-Winner          

Jon Lester helped the Red Sox win two World Series Championships (2007 & 2013), and after being traded to Oakland in 2014, he joined the Cubs in 2015.  2016 was Lester’s best year as he had a 19-5 Record and was second in Cy Young voting. In the NLCS allowed only two Runs in 13 Innings, while also winning a game.  He had another Win (against one Loss) in Chicago’s World Series triumph over Cleveland.

37 Years Old, Playing for the Washington Nationals.

Justin Verlander, Houston Astros, Pitcher, 2017, AL

Justin Verlander won the Cy Young and MVP with Detroit in 2011, but by 2017, it was generally believed that his best days were behind him.  The surging Astros traded for him during the season, and Verlander went 5-0 with a 1.06 ERA to close the season.  In the NLCS, he remained electric and won both starts with a 0.56 ERA with 21 Strikeouts.  The Astros would win their first World Series that year.  In the two years after, Verlander was second for the Cy Young, and he won his second in 2019.

38 Years Old, Playing for the Houston Astros.

Chris Taylor, Los Angeles Dodgers, Outfield, 2017, NL co-winner

This was Taylor’s first season as a regular player in the Majors, and in the NLCS, he had a pair of Home Runs, while batting .316.  The Dodgers went down to defeat against Houston, but Taylor got his ring with Los Angeles in 2020.

29 Years Old, Playing for the Los Angeles Dodgers.

Justin Turner, Los Angeles Dodgers, Third Base, 2017, NL co-winner

Justin Turner was an All-Star for the first time this season, and he finished eighth in MVP voting.  The enigmatic Third Baseman batted .333 with a pair of Home Runs and seven RBIs in the NLCS, but the Dodgers lost to Houston in the World Series. Turner would however taste champagne in 2020 when L.A. won it all.

36 Years Old, Playing for the Los Angeles Dodgers.

Cody Bellinger, Los Angeles Dodgers, Outfield, 2018, NL 

Cody Bellinger was the Rookie of the Year the season before and in the 2018 NLCS, Bellinger only batted .200, but had two game-winning-RBIs, including the decider in Game 7.  The Dodgers lost to Boston in the World Series that year, but he would be back. Bellinger was the National League MVP the next season, and was a member of L.A.’s 2020 World Series Championship Team. To date, Bellinger is the youngest player to win the NLCS.

25 Years Old, Playing for the Los Angeles Dodgers.

Jackie Bradley Jr., Boston Red Sox, Outfield, 2018, AL 

An All-Star in 2016 and a Gold Glove winner this year, Bradley Jr. only batted .200 in the ALCS, but had a .400 OBP, two Home Runs, nine RBIs and an OPS well over 1.000 in the five-game series win over Houston.  The Outfielder helped lead Boston to a World Series win over the Los Angeles Dodgers.

31 Years Old, Playing for the Milwaukee Brewers.

Jose Altuve, Houston Astros, Second Base, 2019, AL 

Altuve was at this point a six-time All-Star, a one-time MVP and a World Series Champion, and was still the leader of the Astros.  In the ALCS against the Yankees, he had a pair of Home Runs with a .348 Batting Average.  The Astros would not win the World Series this year, as they fell to the Washington Nationals.

31 Years Old, Playing for the Houston Astros.

Randy Arozarena, Tampa Bay Rays, Outfield, 2020, AL 

After playing only 19 Games for St. Louis in 2018, Randy Arozarena was traded to Tampa, and became a starter in the Outfield.  In his first ALCS, the Cuban-born player blasted four Home Runs with six RBIs and a .321 Batting Average in the Rays’ seven game series win over Houston.

26 Years Old, Playing for the Tampa Bay Rays.

Corey Seager, Los Angeles Dodgers, Shortstop, 2020, NL 

Corey Seager was the 2016 National League Rookie of the Year had won two Silver Sluggers leading up to the 2020 season, and this year Los Angeles was not going to be denied.  He batted .310 in the NLCS with five Home Runs, and he swept the post-season awards with a World Series MVP.  Seager batted over .300 in the NLDC, NLCS and World Series with eight playoff Home Runs.

27 Years Old, Playing for the Los Angeles Dodgers.

 

 

As expected, the LCS MVPs are much like World Series MVPs, in that it can be won from journeyman to stars.

So, what is up next?

We stay with baseball, and look at the Hank Aaron Award.

As always, we thank you for your support, and look for that soon.

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Committee Chairman

Kirk Buchner, "The Committee Chairman", is the owner and operator of the site.  Kirk can be contacted at [email protected] .

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