Awards = HOF?: Part Fifty-Two: The Hart Trophy

Awards = HOF?: Part Fifty-Two: The Hart Trophy
05 Oct
2020
Not in Hall of Fame

We here at Notinhalloffame.com thought it would be fun to take a look at the major awards in North American team sports and see how it translates into Hall of Fame potential.

Needless to say, different awards in different sports yield hall of fame potential.  In basketball, the team sport with the least number of players on a roster, the dividend for greatness much higher.  In baseball, it is not as much as a great individual season does not have the same impact.

Last time, we looked at the Calder Trophy, awarded annually to the top rookie of the year in the NHL.  This time we stayed with hockey, with the Hart Trophy, which is their version of the MVP.

So how many Hart Trophy winners have made the Pro Hockey Hall of Fame?

Let’s find out!

The following are the past players who have won the Hart Trophy who are eligible for the Hockey Hall of Fame and have been enshrined.

Frank Nighbor, Ottawa Senators, Center: 11 G, 6 A, 18 P, 3.3 PS 1924        

The first Hart Trophy goes to the Ottawa Senators with Frank Nighbor, who prior to the win had led the Sens to two Stanley Cup victories.  Nighbor would be a one-time winner of the prestigious Hart, but he won the Lady Byng Trophy the next two seasons, and was third in voting in 1925-26.  The following year, Nighbor hoisted the Cup again. The Center’s last NHL Game was in 1930 after finishing up with the Toronto Maple Leafs, and he would have 237 career Points.

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1947.

Billy Burch, Hamilton Tigers, Centre: 20 G, 6 A, 26 P, 5.9 PS 1925    

In what turned out to be the last year of existence for the Hamilton Tigers, Billy Burch won the only Hart Trophy in franchise existence following a 20 Goal year.  Burch and the rest of the Tigers were upset that year that they were not compensated for the expanded season (24 Games to 30), and they demanded $200 compensation or they would not participate in the playoffs.  They did not get it, and the Tigers were disqualified.  The team basically folded, but the players were sold to a New York group forming the Americans.  Burch was heavily marketed in NYC, as he was born in Yonkers (but was raised in Canada), and he won the Lady Byng in 1927.  Burch would later play for Boston and Chicago and scored 196 total Points.

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1974.

Nels Stewart, Montreal Maroons, Centre: 34 G, 8 A, 42 P, 11.8 PS 1926      

Perhaps because the team in which he did this is now defunct (the Montreal Maroons) the rookie year of Nels Stewart is not nearly as celebrated as it should be.  Winning the Hart in his rookie year, Stewart became the first player to do so, and he also was atop the NHL leaderboard in Goals (34) and Points (26).  He capped off this spectacular regular season by leading the Maroons to the Stanley Cup that year.

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1952.

Herb Gardiner, Montreal Canadiens, Defense: 6 G, 7 A, 13 P, 7.7 PS 1927   

The Montreal Canadiens first Hart Trophy winner also was the first Defenseman to win this award.  Gardiner was technically a rookie, as he was playing in the Western Canada Hockey League for many years with the Calgary Tigers, and at age 35, he is one of the oldest players to win the Hart.  Gardiner only played a few more years in the NHL before finishing his playing career in the American Hockey League.

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1958.

Howie Morenz, Montreal Canadiens, Centre: 33 G, 18 A, 51 P, 15.9 PS 1928        

Morenz was in his fifth season in the NHL (all with the Habs), and he had already won the Stanley Cup as a rookie, and was the Hart runner-up in 1924-25.  This season, Morenz was also third in Lady Byng voting, and he was the NHL-leader in Goals (33), Assists (18), Points and (Point Shares (15.9).  Morenz’ 15.9 Point Shares was the most by any Hart winner until Bobby Orr in 1970.

Roy Worters, New York Americans, Goalie: 16-12-10 Record 1.15 GAA, 8.2 GPS 1929   

Roy Worters played his first three years in the NHL with the Pittsburgh Pirates, but he was one of many players that the soon to fold Pirates sold due to financial problems.  Worters, who was the runner-up for the Hart the year before, won the Hart in his first season as a New York American and would have a career-best 1.15 GAA.  Worters would later win a Vezina and was a two-time Second Team All-Star.  

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1969.

Nels Stewart, Montreal Maroons, Centre: 39 G, 16 A, 55 P, 10.1 PS 1930 (2)        

Following his rookie year and Hart win, Stewart remained a top NHL Center, but he was not posting the same type of numbers.  This was not the case in the 1929-30 season, where he had what was a career-high 39 Goals.  Stewart was fifth in Hart voting the year after.  Stewart was bever in Hart consideration again, but he did lead the NHL in Goals again in 1936-37, a season split between the Boston Bruins and New York Americans.  Stewart’s NHL career ended in 1940, and he had 515 career Points.

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1952.

Howie Morenz, Montreal Canadiens, Centre: 28 G, 23 A, 51 P, 10.5 PS 1931 (2)   

In between his first and second Hart win, Morenz had a 40 Goal year (1929-30) and was seventh in Hart Voting.  Last season and this season, he led Montreal to a Stanley Cup Title, and he was named a First Team All-Star, the first time that this was awarded.

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1945.

Howie Morenz, Montreal Canadiens, Centre: 24 G, 25 A, 49 P, 8.2 PS 1932 (3)     

Morenz became the first man to win the Hart for the third time, and this would be his last.  Named a First Team All-Star this year, Morenz was a Second Team All-Star the year after, and he later played for Chicago and the New York Rangers before returning to Montreal in 1936.  He only played 30 Games in his return as he broke his leg, only to die from complications from blood clots.  Morenz scored 476 career Points.

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1945.

Eddie Shore, Boston Bruins, Defense: 8 G, 27 A, 35 P, 9.8 PS 1933    

A Stanley Cup Champion with the Bruins in 1929, Shore was third in Hart voting in both 1927-28 and 1928-29 and was second in 1930-31.  This season, Shore was a First Team All-Star for the third year in a row.

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1947.

Aurele Joliat, Boston Bruins, Left Wing: 21 G, 15 A, 36 P, 6.5 PS 1934 

This was Joliat’s 12thyear in the NHL, and he would play his entire 16 seasons with the Canadiens.  The Left Wing had previously won three Stanley Cups, and was a Second Team All-Star this season as he was two years before.  The season before that, he was a First Team All-Star for what would be the only time.  After his Hart win, Joliat was a Second Team All-Star and he was fifth in Hart voting.  Joliat played until 1938, and he finished his NHL career with 463 Points.

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1947.

Eddie Shore, Boston Bruins, Defense: 7 G, 26 A, 33 P, 7.7 PS 1935 (2)        

Shore was a First Team All-Star for the fourth time and he was a Second Team All-Star the season before.  This would mark the first time a Defenseman repeated as the Hart trophy winner.

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1947.

Eddie Shore, Boston Bruins, Defense: 3 G, 16 A, 19 P, 6.8 PS 1936 (3)        

Shore became the first Defenseman to win three Harts, this was his first back-to-back win.  Shore was a First Team All-Star for the fifth time.

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1947.

Babe Siebert, Montreal Canadiens, Left Wing/Defense: 8 G, 20 A, 28 P, 3.1 PS 1937 

This was the twelfth of fourteen NHL Seasons for the versatile Siebert, who was the first player to win the Hart playing two positions (Left Wing and Defense).  Siebert was a First Team All-Star as a Boston Bruin the year before, and this was his second of three straight such honors.  Siebert, who had previously won two Stanley Cups (one with the Montreal Maroons and the other with the Rangers), was the second runner-up for the Hart the season after.  Siebert had one more NHL season, and he totaled 294 career Points.

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1964.

Eddie Shore, Boston Bruins, Defense: 3 G, 14 A, 17 P, 6.3 PS 1936 (4)        

Shore’s win made him the first player to win the Hart Trophy, and this was the third season where he led the NHL in Defensive Point Shares.  Shore, who was a First Team All-Star for the sixth time, captured that honor again the following year where he was fifth in Hart voting and helped the Bruins win the Stanley Cup.  Finishing his NHL career with a brief stint with the New York Americans, Shore had 284 career Points.

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1947.

Toe Blake, Montreal Canadiens, Left Wing: 24 G, 23 A, 47 P, 5.7 PS 1939   

The Montreal Canadiens became the first team to have five different Hart Trophy winners, with Toe Blake’s lone win in 1939. The Left Wing played his first year with the cross-town Maroons before joining the Canadiens in 1935-36.  In 1937-38, Blake was a Second Team All-Star, and he won the Hart the year after where he led the NHL in scoring (47) and earned the first of what would be three First Team All-Stars.  Blake would later earn another Second Team All-Star and won a Lady Byng the same year.  Blake’s NHL playing career ended in 1948, and he scored 529 Points and won three Stanley Cups as a player.  He would later become the Head Coach of the Habs where he led them to eight more Cups.

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1966.

Ebbie Goodfellow, Detroit Red Wings, Defense: 11 G, 18 A, 29 P, 6.1 PS 1940      

Goodfellow became the first Red Wing to win the Hart, and the career-Red Wing accomplished this in his eleventh of what would be 14 NHL seasons.  The blueliner was a First Team All-Star for the second (and last) time, and he would score 326 career Points and win two Stanley Cups.

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1963.

Bill Cowley, Boston Bruins, Center: 17 G, 47 A, 64 P, 7.4 PS 1941      

Bill Cowley broke in with the St, Louis Eagles as a rookie, but that was the last year of existence for the Eagles, and Cowley was taken by the Boston Bruins in the Dispersal Draft.  Cowley’s skills improved as a Bruin and in 1938-39, he was a First Team All-Star, led the NHL in Assists, and led the Bruins to a Stanley Cup win.  This year, Cowley was a again a First Team All-Star, and was first in Assists (47) and Points (64).  Cowley again took Boston to a Championship this year.

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1968.

Bill Cowley, Boston Bruins, Center: 27 G, 48 A, 72 P, 6.3 PS 1943 (2)

World War II took away a lot of the NHL talent, but Cowley was not one of them.  This season, Cowley won his third Assists title, was a First Team All-Star for the third time and he led the NHL in Power Play (9) and Game-Winning (6) Goals.  Cowley was a First Team All-Star the next two seasons, with him finishing second in Hart voting (1943-44).  Cowley was in the NHL until 1947, finishing up with the Bruins and he had 549 career Points in the same amount of Games.

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1968.

Babe Pratt, Toronto Maple Leafs, Defense: 17 G, 41 A, 58 P 8.7 PS 1944     

Babe Pratt played his first seven years in the NHL with the New York Rangers, where the Defenseman won a Stanley Cup in 1940. Pratt was traded to the Maple Leafs during the 1942-43 season, and in the World War II depleted NHL, he had his best year ever winning the Hart and earning a First Team All-Star nod.  Pratt was a Second Team All-Star in 1945 and he helped anchor Toronto win the Stanley Cup.  He only played two more years in the NHL, the last as a Boston Bruin and he had 293 career Points.

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1966.

Elmer Lach, Montreal Canadiens, Center: 26 G, 45 A, 80 P 7.7 PS 1945      

This was the fifth season of Lach’s 14-year career, all of which was as a Montreal Canadian.  Lach’s Hart Trophy coincide with him leading the NHL in Assists and Points, and the year was sandwiched in between Second Team All-Star and Stanley Cup wins.  Lach would win two more Assists Titles, an Art Ross, two First Team All-Stars and another Stanley Cup before he retired in 1954.  He would score 623 Points over his career.

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1966.

Max Bentley, Chicago Blackhawks, Center: 31 G, 30 A, 67 P 6.7 PS 1946    

It took until this year for a member of the Chicago Blackhawks to win the Hart, which certainly reflects the lack of success Chicago had up to this time.  Bentley was in his fourth NHL season, and he was coming off a Lady Byng win.  This season, Bentley led the NHL in scoring (61) and Power Play Goals (10), and he was a First Team All-Star for the first and only time.  Bentley was a Second Team the year after, and he would later win three Stanley Cups as a member of the Toronto Maple Leafs.

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1966.

Maurice Richard, Montreal Canadiens, Right Wing: 31 G, 30 A, 67 P 6.7 PS 1947

We have another Hab who won the Hart, but for many, this is THE HAB.  Richard practically owned the Province of Quebec and he had already set the 50 Goal in 50 Games mark in 1944-45, as the game’s first 50 Goal Scorer.  He had also already led Montreal to two Stanley Cups, and he was the runner-up for the Hart in that 1944-45 campaign.  This season, Richard led the NHL in Goals again (43), and was a First Team All-Star.  While Richard never won another Hart, from the 1943-44 Season to the 1956-57 Season, he was either a First Team or Second Team All-Star.  He was second in Hart voting twice, was third three times, and he was a four-time Goal Scoring leader.  Richard also won six more Stanley Cups, giving him eight in total and he amassed 544 Goals over his career, which was spent entirely with the Canadiens. 

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1961.

Buddy O’Connor, New York Rangers, Center: 24 G, 36 A, 60 P 6.3 PS 1948

Buddy O’Connor played for Montreal in the six years before where he helped them win two Stanley Cups.  1947-48 was the first season for O’Connor in New York who was traded there in the summer, and he put forth the best year of his life.  He posted career highs in Goals (24), Assists (36) and Points (60), and O’Connor. 

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1988.

Sid Abel, Detroit Red Wings, Center: 28 G, 26 A, 54 P, 7.3 PS  1949   

Abel made his NHL debut in the 1938-39 and in 1941-42, he was named a Second Team All-Star.  The Center helped the Red Wings win the Stanley Cup the following season, and Abel missed the next two years due to World War II.  Abel returned in 1946, and in his Hart Trophy winning year, he was named a First Team All-Star while leading the NHL in Goals (28) and Power Play Goals (8).  Abel followed that with a second straight First Team All-Pro, a fourth place finish in Hart voting and helped Detroit win the Cup.  Abel won a third Cup in 1952, and played two final NHL seasons with Chicago, concluding a career with 472 Points.

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1969.

Chuck Rayner, New York Rangers, Goalie: 28-30-11, 12.3 PS  1950    

Chuck Rayner debuted for the New York Americans in 1940, and when the renamed Brooklyn Americans folded, Rayner left the NHL to serve Canada in World War II.  Rayner returned in 1945 as a New York Ranger, but like the Americans with whom he played before, the Rangers were not particularly good.  The Goalie had a three-year streak from 1948-49 to 1950-51, and his Hart win was in the center year of that run.  A knee injury ended his NHL run in 1953, and he while his record was a losing one (138-197-78), he kept many bad teams competitive.

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1973.

Milt Schmidt, Boston Bruins, Center: 22 G, 39 A, 61 P, 7.0 PS  1951  

Playing his entire career with the Boston Bruins, Schmidt debuted in 1936, and would win the scoring title in 1939-40.  Before his Hart win, Schmidt was named a First Team All-Star twice (1940 & 1947) and won two Stanley Cups and had three top five Hart finishes.  In his Hart Trophy win, Schmidt was a First Team All-Star, which he followed by a Second Team All-Star with a fourth place Hart finish.  Schmidt played three more seasons in the NHL, and would have 575 career Points

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1961.

Gordie Howe, Detroit Red Wings, Right Wing: 47 G, 39 A, 86 P, 13.1 PS  1952     

This was the sixth NHL season for the legendary Gordie Howe, who had already won a Stanley Cup two years earlier. The Right Wing was a Second Team All-Star in both the 1948-49 and 1949-50 Seasons, the latter of which seeing him win his first Stanley Cup.  Howe was a First Team All-Star the year before, and this was his second one.  Howe was also on his second straight Art Ross Trophy win this year and would take Detroit to another Stanley Cup Title.

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1972.

Gordie Howe, Detroit Red Wings, Right Wing: 49 G, 46 A, 95 P, 15.5 PS  1953 (2)

Following Howe’s first Hart Trophy win, the Right Wing won his third straight Art Ross, and in this year, Howe had a career high in Points with 95.  Howe was also on his third straight First Team All-Star and would win the scoring title the year after.

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1972.

Ted Kennedy, Toronto Maple Leafs, Center: 10 G, 42 A, 52 P, 5.3 PS  1954

Playing his entire career with the Toronto Maple Leafs, Ted Kenendy was in his 13thof what would be 14 NHL Seasons.  Prior to this year, Kennedy was a five-time Stanley Cup Champion, three-time Second Team All-Star, and he led the NHL in Assists in 1950-51.  Kennedy was a surprise winner for the Hart this year and with all due respect to Kennedy, this award was more the result of a “lifetime achievement award”, as statistically speaking there were better candidates.  Kennedy was also the first Hart winner in the era of post-season All-Star awards not to be named to either a First or Second Team.  He retired after the Hart win, but did briefly come back the year after only to retire again.  Kennedy left the sport with 560 career Points.

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1966.

Jean Beliveau, Montreal Canadiens, Center: 47 G, 41 A, 88 P, 13.0 PS  1956       

The year before, Jean Beliveau established himself as a star, winning a First Team All-Star spot.  This season, the Center did it again, also capturing the Art Ross Trophy with 88 Points and leading the NHL in Goals (47).  In Beliveau’s first Hart Trophy win, he would win the first of what would be ten Stanley Cups.

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1972.

Gordie Howe, Detroit Red Wings, Right Wing: 44 G, 45 A, 89 P, 11.8 PS  1957 (3)

In between his second and third Hart Trophy, Howe led the Red Wings to two Stanley Cup Championships.  The man who was half-scorer and half/bruiser also had another First and Second Team All-Star in his resume, and this year he secured his fifth First Team All-Star.

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1972.

Gordie Howe, Detroit Red Wings, Right Wing: 33 G, 44 A, 77 P, 8.8 PS  1958 (4)  

Howe made history in the NHL as the first player regardless of position to be a four-time Hart Trophy winner.  This also coincided with his sixth First Team All-Star Selection.

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1972.

Andy Bathgate, New York Rangers, Right Wing: 40 G, 48 A, 88 P, 9.9 PS  1959    

Bathgate was in his seventh NHL campaign, which up until this time had all been with the New York Rangers.  Bathgate was a Second Team All-Star the year before and was also the runner-up for the Hart.  This season he was a First Team All-Star, and his 88 Points would be a career-high. Bathgate was again a First Team All-Star in 1962, and a Second Team All-Star in 1963, but he was traded the year after to Toronto where he won his first and only Stanley Cup.  Bathgate later played for Detroit and Pittsburgh, and a brief return in Vancouver of the WHA.  Overall, Bathgate scored 973 Points.

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1978.

Gordie Howe, Detroit Red Wings, Right Wing: 28 G, 45 A, 73 P, 7.4 PS  1960 (5)  

Who better than Gordie Howe to become the first Hart Trophy winner of the 1960s?  Howe was a Second Team All-Star in between his fourth and fifth Hart win, and he was the first player to be a five-time Hart Trophy winner.

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1972.

Bernie Geoffrion, Montreal Canadiens, Right Wing: 50 G, 45 A, 95 P, 11.6 PS  1961     

Bernie Geoffrion won the Calder Trophy in 1952, and he was a Second Team All-Star and Art Ross winner in 1954-55.  The Right Wing had to wait four more years before he was a post-season All-Star (Second Team in 1959-60), and this season he was finally a First Team All-Star, winning his second Art Ross and first and only Hart. Geoffrion also led the NHL in Goals (50), the second team he accomplished that feat.  A six-time Stanley Cup winner, Geoffrion played until 1968, with his last two years playing for the New York Rangers. Geoffrion scored 822 Points over 883 Games.

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1972.

Jacques Plante, Montreal Canadiens, Goalie: 42-12-14 Record, 2.37 GAA, 15.6 PS  1962       

Jacques Plante made history as the first Goalie in history to wear a facemask but this player was more than just a man who had a footnote in hockey history.  Plante was in his tenth season in Montreal where he won his sixth Vezina Trophy, and this was his third First Team All-Star win.  Already a six-time Stanley Cup Champion, Plante tied his career-high 42 Wins, and he won his sixth GAA Titles (2.37).  His 15.6 Goalie Point Shares, also tied his previous best. Plante played one more year with Montreal and two more with the Rangers for two years before he retired in 1965. Three years later, he came out of retirement with the St. Louis Blues where he won another Vezina.  He joined the Toronto Maple Leafs in 1971, where at age 42, he was a Second Team All-Star.  Plante finished off his career with stints with Boston and Edmonton in the WHA.  He had 437 career Games.

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1978.

Gordie Howe, Detroit Red Wings, Right Wing: 38 G, 48 A, 86 P, 9.5 PS  1963 (6)  

In what would be the sixth and final Hart trophy win for Gordie Howe, the legend secured had a pair of Second Team All-Star Selections in between his fifth and sixth win.  Howe won the Art Ross for the final time in his career and he would later be named a First Team All Star four more times and a Second Team All-Star three more times.  Following his last Hart win, Howe had five more Hart Trophy top-five finishes.  He retired in 1971, and was inducted into the Hockey Hall the year after, but he would join his sons later in the World Hockey Association, where the HOFer was twice an WHA First Team All-Star.  Howe’s last year happened in 1980 when his Hartford Whalers were now in the NHL.  

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1972.

Jean Beliveau, Montreal Canadiens, Center: 28 G, 50 A, 78 P, 8.7 PS  1964 (2)    

In between Beliveau’s first and second Hart win, the Center would be named to four more First Team All-Stars, a Second Team All-Star and would help lead Montreal to four more Stanley Cups.  This season, Beliveau was a Second Team All-Star (Stan Mikita was the First Team Center), and even though he was getting older (32), he had a lot left to offer.  He played until 1971, winning five more Stanley Cups, earning two more Second Team All-Star selections, and won the Conn Smythe in 1965.  Beliveau played his entire career with Montreal and scored 1,219 Points.

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1972.

Bobby Hull, Chicago Blackhawks, Left Wing: 39 G, 32 A, 71 P, 9.0 PS  1965         

The “Golden Jet” had better seasons before he won his first Hart Trophy, but this doesn’t take away from what was another good year by Bobby Hull.  Prior to this win, Hull led the NHL in Goals three times, won the Art Ross twice, and this was his fourth First Team All-Star Selection. Hill also won the Lady Byng this year for the first and only time in his career.

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1983.

Bobby Hull, Chicago Blackhawks, Left Wing: 54 G, 43 A, 97 P, 10.6 PS  1966 (2) 

Hull went to back-to-back in Hart Trophy wins, and he would again lead the NHL in Goals (54) and won his third and final Art Ross with a 97 Point year.  Hull was a First Team All-Star again, and he would be a ten-time First Team All-Star overall.  Hull also finished in the top five in Hart voting five other times.  In 1972, Hull stunned the hockey world when he signed with the Winnipeg Jets of the World Hockey Association, and he was a three-time First Team All-Star in that league.  He was still with the Jets when they merged with the NHL, and he finished off that year with a brief stint as a Hartford Whaler.

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1983.

Stan Mikita, Chicago Blackhawks, Center: 35 G, 62 A, 97 P, 10.2 PS  1967          

Stan Mikita helped the Blackhawks win the Stanley Cup in 1961 and this was his ninth year of what would be a 22-year run in hockey. Mikita had already been a First Team All-Star four times, and an Art Ross winner twice, and he repeated both of those honors while adding the Lady Byng.

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1983.

Stan Mikita, Chicago Blackhawks, Center: 40 G, 47 A, 87 P, 10.0 PS  1968 (2)     

Like he did the year before, Mikita won the Hart, Art Ross and Lady Byng, marking the first time that a player did that back-to-back.  This was the last season that Mikita was named a First Team All-Star, but he would be a Second Team All-Star in 1970.  Mikita played until 1980 in a career spent entirely with Chicago accumulating 1,467 Points.

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1983.

Phil Esposito, Boston Bruins, Center: 49 G, 77 A, 126 P, 15.1 PS  1969      

Phil Esposito’s 1968-69 season gave fits to the Chicago Blackhawks.  Why? Because they traded away the first man to score 100 Points in the NHL two years before.  Esposito did not just become the first player to get three digits, he shattered it with 126 Points!  He set a then record in Assists (77), and he also led the NHL in Plus/Minus (55).  Esposito was a Second Team All-Star the year before, was a First Team All-Star this season, and he added the Art Ross to that trophy case.

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1984.

Bobby Orr, Boston Bruins, Defense: 33 G, 87 A, 120 P, 19.5 PS  1970

There have been Defenseman who won the Hart before Bobby Orr, but none of them revolutionized the position.  We will go one step further.  Orr rewrote the game of hockey.  In his fourth pro year, Orr won his third Norris Trophy, and he was the first Defenseman to score 100 Points, and the first to win the Art Ross.  He would lead the Bruins to a Stanley Cup win, while also being named the Conn Smythe Trophy winner as the playoff MVP.  As spectacular as this year was, the best was yet to come.

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1979.

Bobby Orr, Boston Bruins, Defense: 37 G, 102 A, 139 P, 22.8 PS  1971 (2)   

Bobby Orr and the Bruins did not repeat as Stanley Cup champions, nor did he win the Art Ross, despite having 139 Points, a career-high, and the all-time record for a Defenseman.  What he did do was become the first player to have over 100 Assists (102), and he remains one of two players to do so (the other is Wayne Gretzky). Orr also became the first player to have at least 100 in Plus/Minus, and his +124 is the best all-time.  He would also set another record with 22.8 Point Shares, again making him the first player to have 20 in that category and it is also a number that has yet to be matched.  The more we look at this year, the more our jaws drop to the floor.

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1979.

Bobby Orr, Boston Bruins, Defense: 37 G, 80 A, 117 P, 20.1 PS  1972 (3)     

Orr pulled the “three-peat” with the Hart, and of course, he won the Norris Trophy. This was also the third year for Orr where he led the NHL in Assists, and he would do so again in 1973-74 and 1974-75. Orr led the Bruins to another Stanley Cup, where he also grabbed his second Conn Smythe.  Over the next three seasons, Orr won his sixth, seventh and eighth Norris Trophy, and he was third for the Hart in all of those years.  He would win his second Art Ross trophy in 1974-75, and to date he was the first, last and only blueliner to win that honor.  A knee injury derailed his career, and he only scored 55 Points over his final three years in hockey, the latter two being in a Blackhawks uniform.  He was fast-tracked into the Hall, and there will never be another Defenseman like him again.

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1979.

Bobby Clarke, Philadelphia Flyers, Center: 37 G, 67 A, 104 P, 10.3 PS  1973        

For the first time, an expansion team had a player win the Hart when Bobby Clarke took it for the first of three times.  The Center, who had won the Bill Masterton Award the year before, was the Second Team All-Star behind Phil Esposito, but bested the Bruin as much of Philadelphia’s success this season was led by Clarke, but the best was coming for Philadelphia and the “Broad Street Bullies”

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1987.

Phil Esposito, Boston Bruins, Center: 68 G, 77 A, 145 P, 17.0 PS  1974 (2)  

This was Esposito’s second Hart Trophy and had it not been for his teammate, Bobby Orr, he would have easily won at least another. In between his two Hart wins, Esposito won two Stanley Cups, three Art Ross Trophies and he set what seemed at the time to be an unreachable mark of 76 Goals in a season.  That year was arguably better than this year, where Esposito won his fifth Art Ross Trophy, was a First Team All-Star for the sixth time, and was also the winner of the Lester B. Pearson.  Esposito was also the NHL’s Goal leader for the sixth consecutive season, and this was also the fifth straight year a Bruin won the Hart.  The charismatic Center was a Second Team All-Star the year after, and he was then traded to the New York Rangers where he played until he retired in 1981.  Esposito accumulated 717 Goals and 1,590 Points over his career.

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1984.

Bobby Clarke, Philadelphia Flyers, Center: 27 G, 89 A, 116 P, 11.2 PS  1975 (2)   

In between Clarke’s first and second Hart win, Clarke was a Second Team All-Star, but more importantly his Philadelphia Flyers made history as the first expansion team to win the Stanley Cup. Clarke would take them to a second Cup this year, while earning First Team All-Star accolades for the first time. The man with the most famous missing front teeth led the NHL in Assists for the first time with 89.

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1987.

Bobby Clarke, Philadelphia Flyers, Center: 30 G, 89 A, 119 P, 11.7 PS  1976 (3)   

The Flyers did not win a third Stanley Cup, but Clarke repeated many of his regular season honors from the season before. The Center was a First Team All-Star, again led the NHL in Assists with 89, and he had a career-high in points with 119. Also, for the first time, he was first in the league in Plus/Minus with +83.  Clarke was the runner-up for the Hart the year after, and he played the entirety of his career with Philadelphia, retiring in 1984 with 1,210 career Points.

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1987.

Guy Lafleur, Montreal Canadiens, Right Wing: 56 G, 80 A, 136 P, 15.7 PS  1977  

The Montreal Canadiens were in year two of their four-year dynasty in winning Stanley Cups, and it was Gut Lafleur who was their offensive leader.  Lafleur, who also won his second straight Lester B. Pearson Award, captured his second Art Ross and third First Team All-Star Selection.  This would be the only season where he won the Conn Smythe as well as leading the league in Assists (80).

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1988.

Guy Lafleur, Montreal Canadiens, Right Wing: 60 G, 72 A, 132 P, 15.8 PS  1978 (2)      

Lafleur was named a First Team All-Star for the fourth of what would be six straight selections, and would also mark his third and final Art Ross and Lester B. Pearson Award.  The Right Wing played with Montreal until he was forced to retire in the 1984-85 Season.  After being inducted into the Hockey Hall of Fame, he came out of retirement for three seasons, one with the New York Rangers and two with Quebec.  He would retire for good in 1991, leaving the NHL with 1,353 Points.

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1988.

Bryan Trottier, New York Islanders, Center: 47 G, 87 A, 134 P, 13.6 PS  1979      

Bryan Trottier became the first player in Islanders history to win the Hart Trophy, and you could say it was the siren of what was to come for the franchise.  Winning the Calder three years before, Trottier was a First Team All-Star for the second straight year, though this would be the last time he would be one. Nevertheless, Trottier would help lead the Islanders to the four Stanley Cups (1980-83) and was a Second Team All-Star twice.  Trottier would later aid the Pittsburgh Penguins win their first two Stanley Cups. He would have 1,425 career Points in the NHL.

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1997.

Wayne Gretzky, Edmonton Oilers, Center: 51 G, 86 A, 137 P, 12.6 PS  1980        

Buckle up.  This is going to take a while as we begin to look at the most prolific Hart Trophy winner ever, Wayne Gretzky.  Along with three other WHA teams, the Edmonton Oilers joined the NHL, and with them was Wayne Gretzky, who had only played one year of professional hockey but was already “The Great One”.  In his first NHL year, Gretzky led the NHL in Assists (86) and was a Second Team All-Star behind Marcel Dionne, who beat him for the Art Ross (they tied in Points, but Dionne had more Goals).  Gretzky also won the Lady Byng this year.

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1999.

Wayne Gretzky, Edmonton Oilers, Center: 51 G, 86 A, 137 P, 14.3 PS  1981 (2)   

Gretzky might have had stiff competition in Marcel Dionne for the Hart in 1980, but this year he erased all doubt.  The Center built on his numbers from the previous year, and he became the second player to accumulate over 100 Assists, with 109, a new record.  He missed out on the Art Ross last year, but not this season, winning his first, and along with it, his first First Team All-Star Selection.

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1999.

Wayne Gretzky, Edmonton Oilers, Center: 92 G, 120 A, 212 P, 19.7 PS  1982 (3)

92 Goals.  When Phil Esposito lit the lamp 76 times, that record seemed unbreakable, but this year, Gretzky had 92 Goals and hit the 50 Goal mark after only 39 Games! Not only the Gretzky set new records in Goal scoring, he broke his own Assists mark (120), and broke the 200 Point plain with his personal best 212.  Gretzky also for the first time was the NHL leader in Plus/Minus (+80).  This was Gretzky’s second Art Ross and First Team All-Star, but for the first time he won the Lester B. Pearson Award, meaning his peers could no longer deny his talent.

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1999.

Wayne Gretzky, Edmonton Oilers, Center: 71 G, 125 A, 196 P, 18.0 PS  1983 (4)

Gretzky was again an offensive juggernaut, and for the third year in a row, he broke the single-season Assists mark.  He repeated the awards he won last year, with an Art Ross, Lester B. Pearson and First Team All-Star, but this year he led the Oilers to their first Stanley Cup appearance.  They lost to the New York Islanders, but we knew was set to come.  Notably, Gretzky became the first player to win the Hart four years in a row.

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1999.

Wayne Gretzky, Edmonton Oilers, Center: 87 G, 118 A, 205 P, 19.6 PS  1984 (5)

Imagine having a season where you score 87 Goals, 118 Assists and 205 Points, and none of those are personal highs.  Gretzky was just that good.  This was Gretzky’s fifth straight Hart (becoming the first to do have five straight), and he also won his fourth Art Ross and First Team All-Star, and he captured his third Lester B. Pearson Award.  The coup de gras for Gretzky was leading Edmonton to their first Stanley Cup win.

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1999.

Wayne Gretzky, Edmonton Oilers, Center: 73 G, 135 A, 208 P, 19.6 PS  1985 (6)

Gretzky matched his idol’s (Gordie Howe) mark in Hart wins, but unlike Howe, Gretzky did it in six consecutive years.  This would be the fourth straight year the Gretzky led the NHL in Goals, and he also set a career-high in Plus/Minus with +100.  In regards to his trophy case, Gretzky repeated as the Art Ross winner, Lester B. Pearson winner and First Team All-Star, but this time he added a new award, the Conn Smythe Trophy, as the Oilers won their second Stanley Cup.

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1999.

Wayne Gretzky, Edmonton Oilers, Center: 52 G, 163 A, 215 P, 17.0 PS  1986 (7)

Seven straight years.  Seven Hart Trophies.  A new record for obtaining Hockey’s greatest individual honor.  As what was typical for Gretzky, he set another record this season with the most Assists and Points in a season, and does it look like this record has any chance of being broken. Gretzky once again was a First Team All-Star and won the Art Ross again.  Sadly, for the Oilers, they were upset along the way in the playoff by the Calgary Flames.

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1999.

Wayne Gretzky, Edmonton Oilers, Center: 62 G, 121 A, 183 P, 17.6 PS  1987 (8)

Gretzky did it again with an unprecedented eighth Hart Trophy, and he did so while collecting yet another First Team All-Star and Art Ross while leading the NHL in Goals for the fifth and final time.  Gretzky took the Oilers to their third Stanley Cup win, and he would also win the Lester B. Pearson for the fifth and final time.

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1999.

Mario Lemieux, Pittsburgh Penguins, Center: 70 G, 98 A, 168 P, 16.2 PS  1988   

How do you break an eight-year streak of Hart Trophies by a legend?  By inserting a legend.  Mario Lemieux brought the Pittsburgh Penguins their first Hart Trophy winner, and playing at Center, he did the unthinkable by unseating Gretzky as the First Team All-Star.  Lemieux led the NHL in Goals for the first time, and this year he also notched his first Art Ross and Lester B. Pearson Award.

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1997.

Wayne Gretzky, Los Angeles Kings, Center: 54 G, 114 A, 168 P, 14.1 PS  1989 (9)        

Gretzky did not win the Hart the year before, which turned out to be the last one in an oilers uniform.  He was traded to the Los Angeles Kings, and this was his first year playing in California, where in his ninth (and final) Hart, he also became the first player to win the Hart for two different teams.  This season, Gretzky was a Second Team All-Star (behind Mario Lemieux).  Gretzky went on to win three more Art Ross Trophies, one more First Team All-Star, four more Second Team All-Stars and four Lady Byngs.  After a brief stint with St. Louis in 1996 and three final years with the Rangers, Gretzky retired as the all-time leader in Goals (894), Assists (1,963) and Points (2,857).

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1999.

Mark Messier, Edmonton Oilers, Center: 45 G, 84 A, 129 P, 11.3 PS  1990  

The Edmonton Oilers traded Wayne Gretzky to the Los Angeles Kings, which meant that Mark Messier would become the Oilers’ leader. Messier did what Gretzky couldn’t without the other…win the Stanley Cup.  Messier’s 129 Points were a career-high, and he was named a First Team All-Star this year.  What Messier this season should be celebrated a lot more than it is.

Brett Hull, St. Louis Blues, Right Wing: 86 G, 45 A, 131 P, 15.4 PS  1991   

Brett Hull led the NHL in Goals for three seasons in a row, and in all three of them, he had at least 70.  This was Hull’s highwater mark, and he would also secure the Lester B. Pearson Award.  A three-time First Team All-Star, Hull later won a Stanley Cup as a Dallas Star in 1999 and a Detroit Red Wing in 2002.  Retiring in 2006, Hull had 527 career Goals.

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2009.

Mark Messier, New York Rangers, Center: 35 G, 72 A, 107 P, 9.9 PS  1992 (2)      

Messier followed his former teammate, Wayne Gretzky, as a Hart Trophy winner for two different teams.  Messier was now the leader of the Rangers, and he was also the winner of the Lester B. Pearson Award and a First Team All-Star.  Messier’s leadership would take the Rangers to a 1994 Stanley Cup, and he was so good at that role, that the National Hockey League would create a “Mark Messier Leadership Award”.   When he retired, Messier scored 1,887 career Points.

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2007.

Mario Lemieux, Pittsburgh Penguins, Center: 69 G, 91 A, 160 P, 16.2 PS  1993 (2)        

Before we get to what Lemieux accomplished this season, Lemieux probably should have won the Hart in Gretzky’s last Hart win. The French Canadian was the First Team All-Star, and he was one Point shy of 200 with 85 Goals.  Nevertheless, Lemieux went on to win the 1991 and 1992 Stanley Cup, and injuries prevented him from full seasons, which kept the Hart from his grabs.  This year, he only played 60 Games, but he won the Art Ross with 160 Points and led the NHL in Plus/Minus (+55).  Lemieux would also win the Lester B. Pearson, was a First Team All-Star and he was the Bill Masterton Award winner.  Why did he only play 60 Games?  Lemieux was diagnosed with Hodgkin’s lymphoma, yet came back to finish the season.

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1997.

Sergei Fedorov, Detroit Red Wings, Center: 56 G, 64 A, 120 P, 13.8 PS  1994      

Making history as the first non-Canadian and first European to win the Hart, Sergei Fedorov was in his fourth NHL season and this was best statistical season by far.  Fedorov was a First Team All-Star, Lester B. Pearson and Frank J. Selke winner this year, and he would later win three Stanley Cups for Detroit.  The Russian later won another Selke Trophy and he would later play for Anaheim, Columbus and Washington.  Fedorov scored 1,179 career Points.

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2015.

Eric Lindros, Philadelphia Flyers, Center: 29 G, 41 A, 70 P, 8.8 PS  1995    

The Philadelphia Flyers gave an awful lot to get Eric Lindros, and while it might not have been worth it, it was still a Hart winner.  Lindros was a First Team All-Star this year as well as Lester B. Pearson Award winner in this strike-shortened year.  Lindros also won his only Art Ross this year, and he was a 1.14 PPG player over his 13 NHL Seasons.

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2016.

Mario Lemieux, Pittsburgh Penguins, Center: 69 G, 91 A, 160 P, 16.2 PS  1996 (3)        

Before we get to what Lemieux accomplished this season, Lemieux probably should have won the Hart in Gretzky’s last Hart win. The French Canadian was the First Team All-Star, and he was one Point shy of 200 with 85 Goals.  Nevertheless, Lemieux went on to win the 1991 and 1992 Stanley Cup, and injuries prevented him from full seasons, which kept the Hart from his grabs.  This year, he only played 60 Games, but he won the Art Ross with 160 Points and led the NHL in Plus/Minus (+55).  Lemieux would also win the Lester B. Pearson, was a First Team All-Star and he was the Bill Masterton Award winner.  Why did he only play 60 Games?  Lemieux was diagnosed with Hodgkin’s lymphoma, yet came back to finish the season.

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1997.

Dominik Hasek, Buffalo Sabres, Goalie 37-20-10 Record P, 17.2 GPS  1997          

Dominik Hasek was already considered one of the best Goalies in Hockey, but this year he was elevated to the best player in the world. This season, Hasek won his third Vezina Trophy and earned his third First Team All-Star, and he was also named the Lester B. Pearson Award winner. Hasek was also first in Save Percentage for the fourth year in the row.  He also made history as the first Czech player to win the Hart.

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2014.

Dominik Hasek, Buffalo Sabres, Goalie 33-23-13 Record P, 18.6 GPS  1998 (2)     

In terms of accolades, Hasek repeated his efforts of 1997 with a Hart, Lester B. Pearson, a Vezina and a First Team All-Star, and he again led the NHL in Save Percentage.  Hasek would later win two more Vezina Trophies.  In 1999, Hasek took Buffalo on his back and carried them to a Stanley Cup Final.  The Czech Goalie grew frustrated and asked for a trade, which he got when he was sent to Detroit.  He would win two Stanley Cups with Detroit and then played in Europe, retiring in 2011.

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2014.

Chris Pronger, St. Louis Blues, Defense 14 G, 48 A, 62 P, 14.8 PS  2000

Pronger debuted in the NHL with the Hartford Whalers in 1994, and two years later he was a St. Louis Blue and, on his way, to becoming a star.  A Second Team All-Star in 1997-98, and two years later he won the Hart and Norris and was a First Team All-Star for the first and only time.  Pronger was a Second Team All-Star again in 2003-04, and he joined the Edmonton Oilers as a Free Agent, but he was unhappy there and looked for a trade.  He was dealt to Anaheim and helped them win a Stanley Cup and was a Second Team All-Star in 2007.  Pronger played until 2012, with his last three years coming as a Flyer.  He would accumulate 698 career Points.

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2015.

Joe Sakic, Colorado Avalanche, Center 54 G, 64 A, 118 P, 15.9 PS  2001

Sakic was the first Nordiques/Avalanche player to win the Hart, which he did in his 13thseason.  Sakic had a career-high 54 Goals, was the NHL leader in Plus/Minus (+45) and he was also the winner of the Lady Byng and the Lester B. Pearson Award.  This year, Sakic and the Avs won the Stanley Cup, which was their second, having won it in 1996.  The Center was also named a First Team All-Star, and would be again in two of the next three years.  Sakic played his entire career with Quebec/Colorado, retiring in 2009 with 1,641 Points.

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2015.

Peter Forsberg, Colorado Avalanche, Center 29 G, 77 A, 106 P, 13.6 PS  2003

A Calder winner in 1995, Forsberg had already won two Stanley Cups and was already twice a First Team All-Star.  This year, Forsberg was a First Team All-Star for the third and final time, and he was the league-leader in Assists (77), Points (106) and Plus/Minus (+52).  He would later play for Philadelphia, Nashville and Colorado before retiring in 2011 with 885 Points in 708 Games.

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2014.

Martin St. Louis, Tampa Bay Lightning, Right Wing 38 G, 56 A, 94 P, 13.2 PS  2004

It was a breakout campaign for St. Louis who was in his sixth season, and fourth in Tampa Bay after playing for Calgary in seasons one and two.  St. Louis became the first Lightning player to win the Hart, and he also won the Art Ross, was a First Team All-Star and was the NHL leader in Plus/Minus (+35).  St. Louis led Tampa to the Stanley Cup that year. After this year, St. Louis was a Second Team All-Star four times, won another Art Ross and would also win three Lady Byng Trophies.  He played until 2015, after a year and a half with the Rangers.

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2018.

 

The following are the players who have won the Hart Trophy who are eligible for the Hockey Hall of Fame and have not been selected:

Tom Anderson, Brooklyn Americans, Defense: 12 G, 29 A, 41 P, 6.0 PS 1942       

The New York Americans were rebranded the Brooklyn Americans for the 1941-42 Season, and the team was on life support. This would be the final year of existence for the Americans, and they produced an unlikely Hart Trophy winner in Defenseman, Tom Anderson.  If Anderson’s numbers seem high for a blueliner, he was also playing at Left Wing. Anderson first made the NHL in 1934 with the Red Wings, but he was with the Americans since 1935.  Following the folding of the Americans, Anderson returned to Canada (Calgary) to play semi-pro.  Anderson is not only the first player to win the Hart who is not in the Hockey Hall of Fame (we feel safe to say that he won’t ever) but was the first to win the Hart who never played in the NHL in the year after he won it.

Eligible since 1946.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Al Rollins, Chicago Blackhawks, Goalie: 12-43-7 Record 3.21 GAA, 4.3 PS 1954   

Rollins was a Stanley Cup Champion with the Toronto Maple Leafs and he joined the Chicago Blackhawks in 1952.  The Goalie joined a bad team, and in this season, he led the NHL in Losses (47) but was the only reason that Chicago was even worse.

Eligible since 1956.  Ranked #103 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Jose Theodore, Montreal Canadiens, Goalie: 30-24-10 Record 2.11 GAA, 17.4 PS 1954

This was easily Jose Theodore’s best year in hockey, as not only did the Goalie win the Hart and the Vezina, it was the only time over his career where he finished in the top ten for those awards.  Interesting enough, despite winning both the Vezina and Hart, he was a Second Team All-Star at Goalie behind Patrick Roy.  Theodore played until 2013, and he was also a member of Colorado, Washington, Minnesota and Florida.

Eligible since 2016.  Ranked #184 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Let’s update our tally, shall we?        

Award in Question

Percentage of recipients who have entered the HOF

Percentage of recipients by year who have entered the HOF.

NBA MVP

100%

100%

NHL Art Ross

100%

100%

NHL Hart Trophy

93.6%

96.3%

NBA Finals MVP

91.3%

94.9%

NHL Norris

90.5%

96.4%

NBA All-Star Game MVP

89.5%

91.7%

NHL Conn Smythe

74.2%

85.4%

NFL Bert Bell Award

73.7%

71.4%

NFL AP Offensive Player of the Year

73.1%

79.4%

NFL AP MVP

68.3%

74.0%

NFL Walter Payton Man of the Year

66.7%

66.7%

NHL Lady Byng

63.8%

76.0%

NFL Defensive Player of the Year

60.8%

71.1%

NFL Super Bowl MVP

60.6%

64.9%

NBA Defensive Player of the Year

58.3%

56.5%

NHL Vezina

57.1%

66.3%

NBA Rookie of the Year

56.5%

56.5%

MLB MVP

55.0%

60.2%

NFL Pro Bowl MVP

52.3%

54.8%

MLB Lou Gehrig Award

51.9%

51.9%

MLB Roberto Clemente Award

47.4%

47.4%

NHL Calder Trophy

46.5%

46.5%

NBA J. Walter Kennedy Citizenship Award

46.0%

46.0%

MLB/NL/AL Cy Young Award

44.4%

55.4%

MLB Babe Ruth Award

37.0%

39.3%

NHL King Clancy Award

36.8%

36.8%

NHL Frank J. Selke Trophy

33.3%

36.7%

MLB World Series MVP

33.3%

36.8%

MLB Hutch Award

33.1%

33.1%

NFL Offensive Rookie of the Year

28.6%

28.6%

NHL Bill Masterton Memorial Trophy

27.9%

27.9%

MLB Edgar Martinez Award

26.7%

17.2%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Designated Hitter)

25.0%

30.8%

MLB Comeback Player of the Year

25.0%

25.0%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Shortstop)

23.5%

52.6%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove

21.7%

36.8%

NFL Defensive Rookie of the Year

20.6%

20.6%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Catcher)

20.0%

22.5%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Second Base)

18.8%

39.8%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Shortstop)

18.2%

35.1%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Pitcher)

18.2%

20.1%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Second Base)

16.7%

32.7%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Outfield)

16.7%

30.1%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Outfield)

15.7%

25.2%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Third Base)

14.3%

14.3%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Third Base)

13.6%

14.3%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (First Base)

13.6%

13.3%

MLB (NL/AL) Rookie of the Year

13.3%

13.3%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Catcher)

10.3%

15.2%

NBA Most Improved Player of the Year

5.3%

3.2%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (First Base)

3.8%

3.2%

NFL AP Comeback Player of the Year

0.0%

0.0%

So, who is up next?

The following are the players who have won the Hart Trophy in the NHL who have retired but have not met the mandatory years out of the game to qualify for the Hockey Hall of Fame:

Henrik Sedin, Vancouver Canucks, Center: 29 G, 83 A, 113 P, 13.5 PS, 2010

Along with his twin brother, Daniel, Henrik Sedin played his entire 17-year career with the Vancouver Canucks, with his best season coming right in the middle of it.  Sedin led the NHL in Assists (83) and won his first Art Ross Trophy while earning First Team All-Star honors.  Sedin was a First Team All-Star the year later, and he finished with 1,070 Points.

Eligible in 2021.

The following are the players who have won the Hart Trophy who are still active.

Jaromir Jagr, Pittsburgh Penguins, Right Wing 44 G, 83 A, 127 P, 14.6 PS  1998

This was Jagr’s ninth season in the NHL, and they were all spent with the Pittsburgh Penguins. Winning his third Art Ross Trophy, Jagr had career highs in Assists (83) and Points (127), and he was also the Lester B. Pearson winner, an honor he won twice more.  The two-time Stanley Cup champion would later play for Washington, New York Rangers, Philadelphia, Dallas, Boston, New Jersey, Florida and Calgary.  Still playing in Europe, Jagr scored 1,921 Points in the NHL.

48 Years Old,Playing in Europe.

Joe Thornton, Boston Bruins & San Jose Sharks, Centre: 29 G, 96 A, 125 P, 13.3 PS 2006

In his seventh NHL Season, the Boston Bruins felt that Joe Thornton was not the leader they needed, and Thornton believed that the Bruins brass were not committed to winning.  23 Games into the 2005-06 season, Thronton was traded to San Jose, and he finished the season winning the Art Ross and leading the NHL in Assists.  Named a First Team All-Star this year, Thornton had two Second Team All-Star years after this one.

41 Years Old,Playing for the San Jose Sharks.

Sidney Crosby, Pittsburgh Penguins, Center: 36 G, 84 A, 120 P, 13.3 PS, 2007

“Sid the Kid” did not win the Calder, as that went to his longtime rival, Alex Ovechkin.  Crosby would however beat him to a Hart win, which he collected in his sophomore season. Crosby would also win his first Art Ross, was named a First Team All-Star, and his peers named him their MVP, when he won the Lester B. Pearson Award.  There was a lot more to come for Crosby.

33 Years Old,Playing for the Pittsburgh Penguins.

Alex Ovechkin, Washington Capitals, Left Wing: 65 G, 47 A, 112 P, 17.2 PS 2008

Ovechkin won his first Hart Trophy in his third season, which was also the first by a Washington Capital.  A First Team All-Star in all of his seasons to date, Ovechkin also won the Lester B. Pearson Award, the Art Ross Trophy, and the Rocket Richard Award for his 65 Goals.  

35 Years Old,Playing for the Washington Capitals.

Alex Ovechkin, Washington Capitals, Left Wing: 56 G, 54 A, 110 P, 14.5 PS 2009 (2)

The Russian Center repeated most of his honors in his back-to-back Hart win.  Ovechkin repeated as the Rocket Richard winner, and was a First Team All-Star for his fourth consecutive season.  He would also win the Lester B. Pearson Award.

35 Years Old,Playing for the Washington Capitals.

Corey Perry, Anaheim Ducks, Right Wing: 50 G, 48 A, 98 P, 13.3 PS 2011

Perry won the Stanley Cup in his second season, and this, his sixth season in hockey was by far his best.  Perry won the Hart, was a First Team All-Star, the Rocket Richard winner, and the first ever Duck to win the MVP.  The Right Wing was a First Team All-Star again in 2014, and he played with the Ducks until 2019 where he joined the Dallas Stars afterward.

35 Years Old,Playing for the Dallas Stars.

Evgeni Malkin, Pittsburgh Penguins, Center: 50 G, 59 A, 109 P, 13.4 PS 2012

The first three seasons for Evgeni Malkin was nothing short of stunning.  Malkin won the Calder in 2006-07, was a First Team All-Star in all three years, and was the Art Ross Winner in 2008-09, while winning the Stanley Cup and the Conn Smythe. Malkin’s two years after was riddled with injuries, but he made up for it in 2011-12 with a second Art Ross, and his first Hart.  Malkin was a First Team All-Star for the fourth time, and he also won the Ted Lindsay Award.  He would go on to win two more Cups with Pittsburgh.

34 Years Old,Playing for the Pittsburgh Penguins.

Alex Ovechkin, Washington Capitals, Left Wing: 32 G, 24 A, 56 P, 8.0 PS 2013 (3)

When Ovechkin won his second Hart Trophy in 2009, he was already established as the top goal scorer in hockey.  In his third Hart win for years later, nothing had changed.  Ovechkin led the NHL in Goals for the third time, and would over the next three years.  In 2018, he achieved the ultimate goal and led the Capitals to their first Stanley Cup.

35 Years Old,Playing for the Washington Capitals.

Sidney Crosby, Pittsburgh Penguins, Center: 36 G, 84 A, 120 P, 13.3 PS, 2014 (2)

It was a seven-year gap between Crosby’s first and second Hart Trophy, but he accomplished a lot in that span.  Crosby won a Stanley Cup in 2009, and added another First Team All-Star (2013), a Second Team All-Star (2010), a Mark Messier Leadership Award (2010), a Rocket Richard Trophy (2009), and his second Lester B. Pearson (2013), which was now named the Ted Lindsay Award.  This season he collected another Art Ross, a Ted Lindsay, and a First Team All-Star Selection.  Crosby later won two more Stanley Cups with the Pens in 2016 and 2017.

33 Years Old,Playing for the Pittsburgh Penguins.

Corey Price, Montreal Canadiens, Goalie: 44-16-5 Record, 1.96 GAA, 16.2 PS, 2015

This was the eighth NHL season for Price, who as of this writing has only played for the Montreal Canadiens.  Price led the NHL in Wins (44), Save Percentage (.933) and Goals Against Average (1.96), and he not only won the Hart, he also captured the Vezina, William M. Jennings, Ted Lindsay Award, and he was also a First Team All-Star. This is the only year that Price was a post-season All-Star.

33 Years Old,Playing for the Montreal Canadiens.

Patrick Kane, Chicago Blackhawks, Right Wing: 46 G, 60 A, 106 P, 15.0 PS, 2016

This was Kane’s ninth season in the NHL and the Chicago Blackhawk had already accomplished so much before his Hart win.  Kane won the Calder, and was already a two-time First Team All-Star, and a three-time Stanley Cup winner.  This season, Kane was a First Team All-Star for a third time, and also won his first Art Ross and Ted Lindsay Award.  Kane has been a First Team All-Star for a fourth time and earned a Second Team All-Star.  He is already a member of the 1,000 Point club.

31 Years Old,Playing for the Chicago Blackhawks.

Connor McDavid, Edmonton Oilers, Center: 30 G, 70 A, 100 P, 12.8 PS, 2017

McDavid was in his second season, where he not only won the Hart, but was the winner of the Art Ross and the Ted Lindsay.  This season also brought in the first of three First Team All-Stars and while he was not the Hart winner in 2017-18, he won the Ted Lindsay and Art Ross that year.

24 Years Old,Playing for the Edmonton Oilers.

Taylor Hall, New Jersey Devils, Left Wing: 39 G, 54 A, 93 P, 12.2 PS, 2018

It could be argued that Hall’s Hart Trophy was a bit of a surprise as he while he was a very good player in his first seven seasons, a Hart was not pegged for him by many pundits.  This season he was also a First Team All-Star, and he brought the Devils their first Hart Trophy.

28 Years Old,Playing for the Arizona Coyotes.

Nikita Kucherov, Tampa Bay Lightning, Right Wing: 41 G, 87 A, 128 P, 14.6 PS, 2019

Kucherov was in his sixth NHL season (all with Tampa) and he would win not only the Hart but his first Art Ross and Ted Lindsay Award.  Kucherov was a First Team All-Star for the Second straight time and the year after he was a Second Team All-Star and led the Lightning win the Stanley Cup in 2020.

27 Years Old,Playing for the Tampa Bay Lightning.

Leon Draisaitl, Edmonton Oilers, Center: 43 G, 67 A, 110 P, 12.8 PS, 2020

Draisaitl’s Hart Trophy win marked the first time that a German player won the most coveted individual award in Hockey.  Draisaitl was in his sixth season in hockey (all with Edmonton) and this year he also won the Ted Lindsay, Art Ross, and was a First Team All-Star.

25 Years Old,Playing for the Edmonton Oilers.

For the most part, the Hart Trophy is a way to punch your ticket into the Hockey Hall of Fame.

So, what is up next?

We stay with the NHL and look at the trophy that means just as much as the Hart, and for some players, even more.  The Ted Lindsay Award, which is the MVP as voted by the players.

As always, we thank you for your support, and look for that soon.

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Committee Chairman

Kirk Buchner, "The Committee Chairman", is the owner and operator of the site.  Kirk can be contacted at [email protected] .

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