Hockey

Established in 1943, and currently based in Toronto, the Hockey Hall of Fame is a quite simply a tribute to those who achieved excellence in hockey.  Criticized by some for their failure to recognize international stars, the WHA, women and the high amount of players inducted from the Original Six era, the Hockey Hall of Fame is still one of the most impressive facilities despite its lack of size.  The rich history of hockey is certainly well represented there.  For our list, we have focused on players as opposed to the builders and journalists categories; although we have included some people whom we felt could not be ignored.  Current enshrinement for players is based on receiving fourteen votes out of an eighteen member committee.  In terms of NHL players, it is based on being out of the league for three years.  We have selected one hundred figures of hockey (though honestly only a handful really has a reasonable shot) and again we encourage debate as to who you feel deserves enshrinement in Toronto.

 Until Then, keep your stick on the ice.

 Sincerely,

 The Not in Hall of Committee.

While John Ross Roach may not have led the NHL in Goals Against Average he was a workhorse for years.  Roach played every game in the net for nine of his fourteen NHL seasons with a very good career GAA of 2.80.  Twice leading the league in Wins, Roach was…
A very potent offensive defenseman, Steve Duchesne went from undrafted to playing sixteen seasons in the National Hockey League.  That in itself was an impressive feat but Duchesne would be an NHL All Star three times and would finish fifth in Norris Trophy voting twice.
The sniper of the fabled Triple Crown Line, Charlie Simmer scored an impressive 56 goals two seasons in a row for the Los Angeles Kings. Simmer was definitely at his best with L.A., but it wasn’t long before serious injury after serious injury would take their toll. Simmer’s peak would…
The last survivor of the Original Six, Wayne Cashman made the most of what he had. Cashman was not considered a gifted skill player but he was an adept grinder and the last guy you wanted to fight for a puck in the corners. He was also known as one…
The NHL expansion sure was a friend to Bill White as at the age of 28 he found a spot with the Los Angeles Kings and would emerge as their top blueliner.  White’s skills would increase into his 30’s and a trade to the Chicago Blackhawks would see him make…
Like many Canadians of his era, Flash Hollett was a two sport athlete (Lacrosse and Hockey). Thankfully for the Boston Bruins, Hollett focused on hockey was one of the first defenseman who was comfortable rushing the ice. Flash held some of the early scoring records for defensemen. Because Hollett achieved…
Teppo Numminen did not get a lot of press over his NHL career as he spent the majority of his time with the Winnipeg Jets, who would later become the Phoenix Coyotes.  Having said that, Numminen is one of the few players to have played twenty seasons in the National…
In the National Hockey League, Ziggy Palffy did not have the pleasure of playing for a lot of good teams as he was only in the playoffs for three of his twelve seasons in North America.  Still, in a career split with the New York Islanders and Los Angeles Kings…
The Montreal Canadians are one of the most successful franchises in NHL history and Jean Guy Talbot is a significant part of that success.  Talbot was a member of seven Stanley Cup wins and would play in six All Star Games.  A somewhat forgotten member of those teams, Talbot was…
Right when Todd Bertuzzi was hitting his stride in the National Hockey League, he derailed his career. His attack on Steve Moore from behind (which ended his career) caused Bertuzzi to be suspended for over a year. When he returned, he was not nearly the productive player he was, as…
With over 600 NHL Points from the blueline in the NHL, James Patrick eclipsed the 50 Point mark four times.  Patrick was best known for his time with the New York Rangers where he would finish twice in the top ten in Norris Trophy voting and represented Canada in the…
One of the more successful Finnish players in professional hockey history, Kimmo Timonen is one of the few players in the National Hockey League to accrue over 1,100 Games.  A Stay-at-home blueliner, Timonen represented Finland Internationally multiple times which resulted in four Olympic medals.  Timonen is also a Stanley Cup…
Likely because he played the bulk (and peak) of his career with the Washington Capitals, a lot of hockey fans were not watching Kevin Hatcher. The durable defenseman was able to score a lot of points and netted 34 goals in the 1992-93 campaign. On four occasions, Hatcher was able…
If you ask the fans of the Ottawa Senators, you already know the answer to this question. Alexei Yashin may have spurned the fans of Canada’s capital, but even they would agree that the Russian was a talented skill player. Now playing in Russia, Yashin had over 750 points in…
One of two players that won the Hart Trophy without being elected to the Hockey Hall of Fame, Al Rollins would win the Hart in 1954, a season in which he actually led the NHL in Losses.  Rollins then played for the Chicago Blackhawks, which were then the worst team…
Honestly, it is difficult to make a Hall of Fame case for Brian Rolston for the Hall of Fame, but we do tip our caps off to one of the most versatile players in hockey history. Rolston was comfortable at any forward position, and often quarterbacked the power play; a…
Though the focus on the 1970’s Buffalo Sabres lied with the French Connection line, Danny Gare showcased a few seasons that matched what any sniper was doing at the time. Gare enjoyed a pair of 50 goal seasons and was even the co-goal scoring champion in the 1979-1980 campaign. The…
It could be argued that Pat Stapleton is one of the better players who seem to have been forgotten in the National Hockey League.  He shouldn’t be just a footnote, as he would develop into an excellent point man on the blue line with and the owner of an accurate…
It took a while before Miroslav Satan found his groove in pro hockey, but once he did he emerged as the scoring star for the Buffalo Sabres in the late 90’s. Satan was good, but leading Buffalo in scoring still did not put him among the elite in the NHL…
Pit Martin is remembered by many for being at the wrong end of a lopsided trade that sent Phil Esposito, Ken Hodge and Fred Stanfield to the Boston Bruins and created a Stanley Cup Championship team, but Martin was a very highly regarded player in his own right.  Martin would…