Awards = HOF? Part Twenty-Seven: Gold Glove Third Base

Awards = HOF?  Part Twenty-Seven:  Gold Glove Third Base
30 Dec
2017
Not in Hall of Fame
We here at Notinhalloffame.com thought it would be fun to take a look at the major awards in North American team sports and see how it translates into Hall of Fame potential.

Needless to say, different awards in different sports yield hall of fame potential. In basketball, the team sport with the least amount of players on a roster, the dividend for greatness much higher. In baseball, it is not as much as a great individual season does not have the same impact.

We are now taking a look at the Gold Glove Award, given annually to the best defensive player in MLB in each respective position.

This will take awhile, so be patient with us!

We have just tackled Catcher, First, Second Base and Shortstop.

As you can imagine, we are continuing with “the hot corner” of Third Base.

The following are the past players who have won the Gold Glove at Shortstop who are eligible for the Baseball Hall of Fame and have been enshrined.

Brooks Robinson, AL Baltimore Orioles (1960)

2.0 dWAR. Let’s begin with the long story of the man regarded as the greatest defensive player at Third Base shall we? In what would be his first All Star and Gold Glove season, Brooks Robinson would finish third in American League MVP voting. Robinson finished fifth overall in Defensive bWAR and would lead in Putouts, Assists, Total Zone Runs, Range Factor per Game and Fielding Percentage. Get used to seeing the name Brooks Robinson all over this page! Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1983.

Brooks Robinson, AL Baltimore Orioles (2) (1961)

1.9 dWAR. An All Star again, Robinson would finish sixth in the AL in Defensive bWAR. While he would only finish first in Fielding Percentage he was second overall in Total Zone Runs.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1983.

Brooks Robinson, AL Baltimore Orioles (3) (1962)

2.1 dWAR. This year, Robinson was the American League leader in bWAR and fifth in Defensive bWAR. Like the season before, he would finish first in Fielding Percentage and second in Total Zone Runs. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1983.

Brooks Robinson, AL Baltimore Orioles (4) (1963)

1.5 dWAR. Finishing 7th in Defensive bWAR, Brooks Robinson would lead the American League Third Basemen in Assists, Putouts, Double Plays Turned and Fielding Percentage. He was also second in Total Zone Runs and Range Factor per Game. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1983.

Brooks Robinson, AL Baltimore Orioles (5) (1964)

2.2 dWAR. Robinson had his best season as he again led the American League in bWAR and was named the Most Valuable Player. Robinson would also finish seventh in Defensive bWAR. In addition to winning his lone RBI title, he would also finish first at his position in Putouts, Assists, Double Plays Turned and Fielding Percentage and would again finish second in Total Zone Runs. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1983.

Ron Santo, NL Chicago Cubs (1964)

0.8 dWAR. Ron Santo would offensively lead the NL in On Base Percentage while batting over .300 for the first time. An All Star for the second time in his career Santo finished eighth in MVP voting. While his sub 1.0 Defensive bWAR seems low he was still first among the National League Third Baseman in Assists, Putouts, Double Plays Turned and Range Factor per Game. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2012.

Brooks Robinson, AL Baltimore Orioles (6) (1965)

1.2 dWAR. Robinson may be the greatest defensive Third Baseman of all time but he was gifted at least two Gold Gloves. Here is one of them, as he did not lead in any defensive category. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1983.

Ron Santo, NL Chicago Cubs (2) (1965)

1.2 dWAR. Santo was again an All Star and he would finish first at his position in Putouts, Assists, Total Zone Runs and Range Factor per Game. This was the first year where he finished first in Total Zone Runs. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2012.

Brooks Robinson, AL Baltimore Orioles (7) (1966)

0.6 dWAR. …and here is the second unwarranted Gold Glove for Brooks, though he did finish first in Fielding Percentage. In both 1965 and 1966 he failed to be in the top five amongst American League Third Basemen in Total Zone Runs. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1983.

Ron Santo, NL Chicago Cubs (3) (1966)

1.2 dWAR. Lather, rinse, repeat. Santo was again an All Star and he would finish first at his position in Putouts, Assists, Total Zone Runs and Range Factor per Game. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2012.

Brooks Robinson, AL Baltimore Orioles (8) (1967)

4.2 dWAR. Talk about a comeback! His 4.2 was more than enough to lead in Defensive bWAR as was his 32 Total Zone Runs marking the first time he led the American League in those metrics. Robinson also finished first at his position in Assists, Range Factor per Game and Fielding Percentage. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1983.

Ron Santo, NL Chicago Cubs (4) (1967)

2.7 dWAR. In what would be the best season of Ron Santo’s career, he would finish fourth in MVP voting, first in bWAR and second in Defensive bWAR. Santo would again finish first in Putouts, Assists, Double Plays Turned, Total Zone Runs and Range Factor per Game. He was second overall in Total Zone Runs this season. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2012.

Brooks Robinson, AL Baltimore Orioles (9) (1968)

4.5 dWAR. With a 4.5 Defensive bWAR and 33 Total Zone Runs, this season exceed his stellar 1967 defensive run and this was arguably the best of his career. The future Hall of Famer would finish first in Assists and Fielding Percentage. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1983.

Ron Santo, NL Chicago Cubs (5) (1968)

1.5 dWAR. Santo finished tenth in the National League in Defensive bWAR. At his position he would lead in Assists, Double Plays Turned, Total Zone Runs and Range Factor per Game. It was the first and only time he would finish at the top in Fielding Percentage. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2012.

Brooks Robinson, AL Baltimore Orioles (10) (1969)

2.9 dWAR. This was still good enough to finish second overall in Defensive bWAR and had 23 Total Zone Runs, also enough for second in the AL in first overall at Third Base. Robinson would additionally finish first amongst his peers in Assists and Fielding Percentage. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1983.

Brooks Robinson, AL Baltimore Orioles (11) (1970)

0.8 dWAR. Like 1966 & 1967, 1970 was a season where Brooks Robinson should not have been awarded a Gold Glove. He would however help Baltimore win the World Series and was named the MVP of the Fall Classic. Defensively however, Robinson would not come close to finishing first in any defensive category. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1983.

Brooks Robinson, AL Baltimore Orioles (12) (1971)

2.8 dWAR. Robinson rebounded defensively with a third place finish in Defensive bWAR. While he did not finish first in any defensive statistic, he was second in Total Zone Runs amongst the Third Basemen of the American League. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1983.

Brooks Robinson, AL Baltimore Orioles (13) (1972)

2.6 dWAR. Robinson rebounded defensively with a third place finish in Defensive bWAR. Robinson finished first in his position in Total Zone Runs and Fielding Percentage. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1983.

Brooks Robinson, AL Baltimore Orioles (14) (1973)

2.5 dWAR. This season Brooks Robinson finished sixth in Defensive bWAR with a second place finish in Total Zone Runs amongst the AL Third Basemen. He did not finish first in any defensive stat. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1983

Brooks Robinson, AL Baltimore Orioles (15) (1974)

2.1 dWAR. You would think we would be tired of writing about Brooks Robinson, but here we are with another top ten finish in Defensive bWAR (fourth place) here we are again! At his position, Robinson would lead in Assists, Total Zone Runs and Range Factor per Game. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1983.

Brooks Robinson, AL Baltimore Orioles (16) (1975)

2.5 dWAR. This was the final full season of Brooks Robinson’s legendary career and he finished in style with his sixteenth Gold Glove, earned with a third place finish in Defensive bWAR. 1975 would also see him finish first in Total Zone Runs and Fielding Percentage amongst the American League Third Basemen. Robinson’s positional defensive records include the most Putouts, Assists, Double Plays Turned and Total Zone Runs. In the latter category he is first among all players and is third all time in Defensive bWAR. This WAS the best Third Baseman that ever played the game! Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1983.

Mike Schmidt, NL Philadelphia Phillies (1976)

1.9 dWAR. Prior to Mike Schmidt’s first Gold Glove, he had already finished in the top ten in Defensive bWAR twice before. In 1976, Schmidt finished ninth in Defensive bWAR and finished third in MVP voting. The Third Baseman would lead his position in Assists and Range Factor per Game, while finishing second in Total Zone Runs. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1995.

Mike Schmidt, NL Philadelphia Phillies (2) (1977)

2.5 dWAR. This would be Mike Schmidt’s highest single season in Defensive bWAR and he would also finish first overall in the National League in bWAR. Schmidt would also have career highs in Total Zone Runs (20, leading his position) and also finished first in Assists and Range Factor per Game. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1995.

Mike Schmidt, NL Philadelphia Phillies (3) (1978)

1.8 dWAR. Schmidt would finish seventh overall in Defensive bWAR in the NL and would lead in Double Plays Turned and Total Zone Runs at Third Base in the National League. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1995.

Mike Schmidt, NL Philadelphia Phillies (4) (1979)

1.1 dWAR. Mike Schmidt did not finish in the top ten in Defensive bWAR in the NL, though this would be the second of four seasons where he would finish first on the Offensive side of the ledger. Schmidt would finish first at his position in Double Plays Turned and Total Zone Runs. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1995.

Mike Schmidt, NL Philadelphia Phillies (5) (1980)

1.5 dWAR. How good a 1980 was it for Mike Schmidt? He would win the National League MVP Award, the World Series and the World Series MVP. Defensively, he was tenth overall in Defensive bWAR (while being first in Offensive bWAR) and was the National League Third Base leader in Assists, Double Plays Turned, Total Zone Runs and Range Factor per Game. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1995.

Mike Schmidt, NL Philadelphia Phillies (6) (1981)

1.2 dWAR. Schmidt was seventh in Defensive bWAR in the NL, which would be the last time he was in the top ten in that statistic. He would again finish first at his position in Total Zone Runs and Range Factor per Game. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1995.

Mike Schmidt, NL Philadelphia Phillies (7) (1982)

0.7 dWAR. Mike Schmidt may have had a lower Defensive bWAR but he would finish first at Third Base in the NL in Assists and Double Plays Turned. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1995.

Mike Schmidt, NL Philadelphia Phillies (8) (1983)

0.7 dWAR. Matching the Defensive bWAR he had in the season previous, Mike Schmidt would lead in Assists and Double Plays Turned at the Third Base position. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1995.

Mike Schmidt, NL Philadelphia Phillies (9) (1984)

1.4 dWAR. Realistically, this was the last decent season with the glove for Mike Schmidt, while he would not finish first in any defensive metric at Third Base. He would however finish second in Total Zone Runs at Third in the NL. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1995.

George Brett, AL Kansas City Royals (1985)

0.4 dWAR. George Brett had an incredible 1985. He finished second in MVP voting and led the Royals to a World Series win. Brett was a first ballot Hall of Famer and the greatest Kansas City Royal of all-time. However, this does not make him worthy of the ’85 Gold Glove. While he did lead in Assists and Double Plays Turned, he was not in the top five in Total Zone Runs. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1999.

Mike Schmidt, NL Philadelphia Phillies (10) (1986)

-0.1 dWAR. This is hard for us. We love Mike Schmidt and especially that he is a two time MVP, the second of which he obtained this year. Still, he won a Gold Glove here with a negative Defensive bWAR and did not remotely come close to finishing first in any defensive category. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1995.

Wade Boggs, AL New York Yankees (1994)

0.4 dWAR. There was a time when a case could be made for Wade Boggs to win the Gold Glove but that never should have been case when he was with New York.yet here we are. While he did finish first among the AL Third Basemen in Range Factor per Game he was not a top five finisher in Total Zone Runs nor would finish in the top in any other defensive statistic. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2005.

Wade Boggs, AL New York Yankees (1995)

0.7 dWAR. Boggs did have a somewhat better Defensive bWAR and he did lead the American League Third Basemen in Fielding Percentage but he also again failed to finish in the top five in Total Zone Runs and was also not in the top five this year in Range Factor per Game. This is a worthy Hall of Famer but not worthy to own two Gold Gloves. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2005.

The following are the players who have won the Gold Glove at Third Base who are eligible for the Baseball Hall of Fame and have not been selected:

Frank Malzone, ML Boston Red Sox (1957)

1.2 dWAR. The first Gold Glove winner at third base was the runner-up for the Rookie of the Year and would go to fist of six All Star Games. Malzone also finished seventh in MVP voting and would lead in Putouts, Assists, Double Plays Turned, Range Factor per Game and Fielding Percentage. Although Malzone was Hall of Fame eligible in 1972 he was not on the ballot.

Frank Malzone, AL Boston Red Sox (2) (1958)

1.3 dWAR. Again an All Star, Malzone finished eighth overall in Defensive bWAR, the only time he would do so. He would finish atop the American League Third Basemen in Assists, Double Plays Turned, Total Zone Runs and Range Factor per Game. Although Malzone was Hall of Fame eligible in 1972 he was not on the ballot.

Ken Boyer, NL St. Louis Cardinals (1958)

1.7 dWAR. Boyer would finish eighth overall in Defensive bWAR in the National League and finish first in Putouts, Double Plays Turned and Range Factor per Game. He would also finish second in Total Zone Runs. Boyer was on the ballot for fifteen years and finished as high as 25.5% in 1988. He is ranked #58 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Frank Malzone, AL Boston Red Sox (3) (1959)

0.2 dWAR. While Malzone did lead in Assists and Double Plays Turned, this was not a spectacular defensive year overall. He was not in the top ten in Total Zone Runs. Although Malzone was Hall of Fame eligible in 1972 he was not on the ballot.

Ken Boyer, NL St. Louis Cardinals (2) (1959)

1.1 dWAR. An All Star for the second time of his career, Boyer would finish tenth overall in MVP voting. In terms of defense, Boyer still finished eighth in Defensive bWAR while finishing first amongst the NL Third Basemen in Double Plays Turned and Total Zone Runs. Boyer was on the ballot for fifteen years and finished as high as 25.5% in 1988. He is ranked #58 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Ken Boyer, NL St. Louis Cardinals (3) (1960)

1.0 dWAR. This would be Boyer’s third All Star season and he would finish sixth in MVP voting. This year Boyer would only finish first defensively in Double Plays Turned. Boyer was on the ballot for fifteen years and finished as high as 25.5% in 1988. He is ranked #58 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Ken Boyer, NL St. Louis Cardinals (4) (1961)

1.6 dWAR. Boyer would finish seventh in Defensive bWAR and would again be an All Star.   He would finish first in Assists and Total Zone Runs. Boyer was on the ballot for fifteen years and finished as high as 25.5% in 1988. He is ranked #58 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Jim Davenport, NL San Francisco Giants (1962)

1.1 dWAR. Offensively speaking, this was the best season of Jim Davenport’s career as he had career highs in Hits (144), Home Runs (14), Batting Average (.297) and OPS (.813). Whether or not this was the nest defensive year of Davenport’s career can be debated, but this was the season where he won the Gold Glove and was also an All Star. Davenport likely should not have won this as he did not really come close to leading in any defensive category. Although Davenport was Hall of Fame eligible in 1976 he was not on the ballot.

Ken Boyer, NL St. Louis Cardinals (5) (1963)

0.2 dWAR. Of the five Gold Gloves that Ken Boyer would win, this is the one that should be disputed. The only statistic that Boyer would lead in was Errors and he was not a top ten finisher in Total Zone Runs, Range Factor per Game and Fielding Percentage. He would however win the National League MVP and the World Series in 1964. Boyer was on the ballot for fifteen years and finished as high as 25.5% in 1988. He is ranked #58 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Clete Boyer, NL Atlanta Braves (1969)

2.1 dWAR. Had there been no Brooks Robinson, it is possible that Clete Boyer would have won a few Gold Gloves as his defensive prowess as a New York Yankee often rivaled that of the Hall of Fame Oriole. Boyer would finish first in the American League in Defensive bWAR in 1961 and 1962 and in ’69 was fourth in the NL (followed by a second place finish the following year). Boyer would be first amongst National League Third Basemen in Total Zone Runs.   While Clete Boyer would retire with only one Gold Glove, he had a career that easily could have warranted five. Boyer was on the ballot for two years and finished as high as 0.7% in 1979.

Doug Rader, NL Houston Astros (1970)

1.0 dWAR. We just looked at Clete Boyer who won one Gold Glove and probably should have won five. Here we have Doug Radar who won five and probably should have won one, which this one could be argued for. Rader finished first in Putouts, Assists, Double Plays Turned, Range Factor per Game and Fielding Percentage. Boyer was on the ballot for two years and finished as high as 0.7% in 1979.

Doug Rader, NL Houston Astros (2) (1971)

0.2 dWAR. While Doug Rader would not finish with a very impressive 0.2 Defensive bWAR, Rader would however finish first in one defensive category, Errors by a Third Baseman. Boyer was on the ballot for two years and finished as high as 0.7% in 1979.

Doug Rader, NL Houston Astros (3) (1972)

0.8 dWAR. Rader would finish first in the National League Third Baseman in Assists and Double Plays Turned. Boyer was on the ballot for two years and finished as high as 0.7% in 1979.

Doug Rader, NL Houston Astros (4) (1973)

-0.2 dWAR. Ugh, we hate it when a Gold Glove is awarded to someone with a negative Defensive bWAR. He did lead in Putouts (and Errors) at Third and was not a top five finisher in Total Zone Runs. Boyer was on the ballot for two years and finished as high as 0.7% in 1979.

Doug Rader, NL Houston Astros (5) (1974)

0.5 dWAR. In what would be the final Gold Glove in the career for Doug Rader, we again see him as someone who is undeserving. This year, he did not finish first in any defensive statistic. Seriously, we think he won five Gold Gloves simply because he played in the most games at Third over this time frame. Over his five Gold Glove seasons, Rader would have a total Defensive bWAR of 2.2. Not exactly stellar is it? Boyer was on the ballot for two years and finished as high as 0.7% in 1979.

Ken Reitz, NL St. Louis Cardinals (1975)

-1.4 dWAR. Is this for real? Ken Reitz had a career Defensive bWAR of 1.3, which is bad enough but he wins a Gold Glove on his worst ever year with the glove? Reitz did play the most games at Third, but still didn’t come close to finishing first in any defensive stat. Who voted for this? Although Reitz was Hall of Fame eligible in 1988 he was not on the ballot.

Aurelio Rodriguez, AL Detroit Tigers (1976)

0.3 dWAR. While there might have been seasons where Aurelio Rodriguez should have won a Gold Glove, this was not one of those years. He would finish first in Fielding Percentage at his position but was nowhere close in any other category. Although Rodriguez was Hall of Fame eligible in 1989 he was not on the ballot.

Graig Nettles, AL New York Yankees (1977)

1.4 dWAR. Graig Nettles had already secured four seasons of a Defensive bWAR over 2.5, but this was the first campaign where he would win a Gold Glove. Nettles had a good defensive season but did not finish at the top in any defensive statistic, though this was also the Yankees World Series championship team. This might have propelled him to a win. Graig Nettles is ranked #77 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Graig Nettles, AL New York Yankees (1978)

1.8 dWAR. Nettles finished sixth in Defensive bWAR, which would be the seventh and final time he would finish in the top ten. 1978 would also see the Yankees win the World Series again, which certainly doesn’t hurt him winning the Gold Glove. He would finish first in Double Plays Turned by a Third Baseman. Graig Nettles is ranked #77 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Buddy Bell, AL Texas Rangers (1979)

3.7 dWAR. This would be Buddy Bell’s finest defensive season in terms of Defensive bWAR, finishing first overall in the American League, and would also do the same for Total Zone Runs. At Third Base, Bell did not finish first in any other defensive metric than TZR, but was second in Range Factor per Game and Fielding Percentage. Bell was on the ballot for one year in 1995 and received 1.7% of the ballot.

Buddy Bell, AL Texas Rangers (2) (1980)

1.6 dWAR. Buddy Bell would finish eighth in the AL in Defensive bWAR while making his first All Star Game appearance since 1973. Bell would finish first among the American League Third Basemen in Range Factor per Game and Fielding Percentage and was second in Total Zone Runs. Bell was on the ballot for one year in 1995 and received 1.7% of the ballot.

Buddy Bell, AL Texas Rangers (3) (1981)

3.3 dWAR. For the second and final time, Buddy Bell would lead the American League in Defensive BWAR and Total Zone Runs. Bell would be tops amongst the AL Third Basemen in Assists, Total Zone Runs and Range Factor per Game. Bell was on the ballot for one year in 1995 and received 1.7% of the ballot.

Buddy Bell, AL Texas Rangers (4) (1982)

1.8 dWAR. Bell would finish overall in the AL in Defensive bWAR and at the hot corner he would statistically rank first in Putouts, Total Zone Runs, Range Factor per Game and Fielding Percentage. Bell was on the ballot for one year in 1995 and received 1.7% of the ballot.

Buddy Bell, AL Texas Rangers (5) (1983)

2.0 dWAR. Finishing fourth overall in Defensive bWAR in the AL, Bell was first at his position in Putouts and Total Zone Runs. He was also second in Range Factor Per Game. Bell was on the ballot for one year in 1995 and received 1.7% of the ballot.

Buddy Bell, AL Texas Rangers (6) (1984)

2.2 dWAR. This was Buddy Bell’s final top ten finish in Defensive bWAR (he finished seventh) and overall posted an excellent career 23.0 in that. In 1984 Buddy Bell would lead all American League Third Basemen in Range Factor per Game and second in Total Zone Runs. Bell was on the ballot for one year in 1995 and received 1.7% of the ballot.

Tim Wallach, NL Montreal Expos (1985)

2.9 dWAR. The year before, Tim Wallach finished with 2.2 in Defensive bWAR, which was good enough for third in the NL. This year, his 2.9 was enough for second, his highest finish ever. Wallach would also record his first Silver Slugger win. At Third Base, Wallach topped all in the National League in Putouts, Assists, Double Plays Turned, Total Zone Runs and Range Factor per Game. Notably, he would also finish first in Total Zone Runs overall in the league. Wallach was on the ballot for one year in 2002 and received 0.2% of the ballot.

Gary Gaetti, AL Minnesota Twins (1986)

1.2 dWAR. Gaetti actually had a stronger case in the two years previous, but this is not a terrible choice. Gaetti finished first at Third Base in the AL in Double Plays Turned, Total Zone Runs and Range Factor per Game. Gaetti was on the ballot for one year in 2006 and received 0.8% of the ballot.

Gary Gaetti, AL Minnesota Twins (2) (1987)

0.6 dWAR. Gaetti finished first in Putouts amongst the American League Third Basemen but also played the most games that year. He was second in Fielding Percentage but nowhere to be found at the top in Total Zone Runs and Range Factor per Game. Gaetti was however on the World Series Champions and was the past winner. Not a great choice this year. Gaetti was on the ballot for one year in 2006 and received 0.8% of the ballot.

Terry Pendleton, NL St. Louis Cardinals (1987)

0.2 dWAR. Hmmmm. In the two years before, Terry Pendleton finished over 2.0 in Defensive bWAR, but this is the year he wins the Gold Glove? Probably, because this was first offensive season that didn’t suck. Pendleton actually had NEGATIVE Offensive bWARs in the two years before. He did however in 1987 finish first amongst the NL Third Basemen in Assists and Range Factor per Game. Pendleton was on the ballot for one year in 2004 and received 0.2% of the ballot.

Gary Gaetti, AL Minnesota Twins (3) (1988)

-0.2 dWAR. While this would be Gaetti’s first All Star Game, he would win his third Gold Glove with a negative Defensive bWAR. He was second in Fielding Percentage but was not top ten in any other defensive statistic. Gaetti was on the ballot for one year in 2006 and received 0.8% of the ballot.

Tim Wallach, NL Montreal Expos (2) (1988)

1.9 dWAR. Wallach would finish ninth overall Defensive bWAR in what was arguably his last great season defensively. Wallach would lead the National League Third Basemen in Putouts and Double Plays Turned and finished second in Total Zone Runs. Wallach was on the ballot for one year in 2002 and received 0.2% of the ballot.

Gary Gaetti, AL Minnesota Twins (4) (1989)

0.9 dWAR. This was Gary Gaetti’s fourth and final Gold Glove and realistically he probably should not have won any of them, though in 1990 he would have a 2.4 Defensive bWAR. Gaetti finished third in Total Zone Runs and second in Fielding Percentage at his position. Gaetti was on the ballot for one year in 2006 and received 0.8% of the ballot.

Terry Pendleton, NL St. Louis Cardinals (2) (1989)

2.3 dWAR. As opposed to the first Gold Glove that he should not have won, the second one from Terry Pendleton was definitely warranted. He would finish sixth in the NL in Defensive bWAR while leading all league Third Basemen in Assists, Range Factor per Game and Fielding Percentage while finishing second in Total Zone Runs. Pendleton was on the ballot for one year in 2004 and received 0.2% of the ballot.

Kelly Gruber, AL Toronto Blue Jays (1990)

-0.6 dWAR. Here is another strange one. Kelly Gruber had a good career in Toronto and in 1990 he put up career highs in Home Runs, RBIs, Slugging Percentage and OPS. He finished fourth in MVP voting that year, also a career high. He would however also have a career low in Defensive bWAR, which showed how much the Gold Glove voters pay attention to the bat. He would have the most Putouts but had a poor season overall defensively. Although Gruber was Hall of Fame eligible in 1999, he was not on the ballot.

Tim Wallach, NL Montreal Expos (3) (1990)

0.0 dWAR. We already said that Wallach arguably had his last great defensive season but that did not mean that he did not win another Gold Glove, though he clearly shouldn’t have. The Expo might have played the most games at Third but he did not finish at the top in any defensive statistic. Wallach was on the ballot for one year in 2002 and received 0.2% of the ballot.

Robin Ventura, AL Chicago White Sox (1991)

0.7 dWAR. The first of six Gold Gloves for Robin Ventura was a bit of a curious one. Ventura finished first in Putouts at Third, but he also finished first in Errors. He did not come close to leading in any other defensive statistic. Ventura was on the ballot for one year in 2010 and received 1.3% of the ballot.

Matt Williams, NL San Francisco Giants (1991)

1.1 dWAR. Williams had a decent year defensively and while there have certainly been more dynamic Gold Glove winners at Third Base this wasn’t a year where there was great competition. He would finish first in Putouts and Total Zone Runs. Williams was on the ballot for one year in 2009 and received 1.3% of the ballot.

Robin Ventura, AL Chicago White Sox (2) (1992)

1.7 dWAR. Ventura would this year finish ninth overall in Defensive bWAR and would go to his first All Star Game. Among his peers at Third Base in the AL, Ventura was atop in Putouts, Assists, Double Plays Turned, Total Zone Runs and Range Factor per Game. Ventura was on the ballot for one year in 2010 and received 1.3% of the ballot.

Terry Pendleton, NL Atlanta Braves (3) (1992)

0.7 dWAR. Now an Atlanta Brave, Pendleton was coming off an MVP season, Pendleton would finish second this year. This was not a terrible season defensively as he finished first in Assists and Range Factor per Game, but he only had 4 Total Zone Runs and was not exactly elite at the Third. Pendleton was on the ballot for one year in 2004 and received 0.2% of the ballot.

Robin Ventura, AL Chicago White Sox (3) (1993)

1.9 dWAR. This year, Ventura would finish tenth in Defensive bWAR while finishing first in Total Zone Runs and second in Fielding Percentage. Ventura was on the ballot for one year in 2010 and received 1.3% of the ballot.

Matt Williams, NL San Francisco Giants (2) (1993)

1.3 dWAR. Williams would finish sixth in MVP voting and was also a Silver Slugger. Defensively he would finish first in Double Plays Turned and second in Total Zone Runs. Williams was on the ballot for one year in 2009 and received 1.3% of the ballot.

Matt Williams, NL San Francisco Giants (3) (1994)

0.9 dWAR. Williams would win the National League Home Run Title and finished second in MVP voting. Again, this was not a spectacular defensive season for Williams but there were not a lot of competition for this. Amongst the National League Third Basemen he finished first in Assists and Range Factor per Game and second in Total Zone Runs. Williams was on the ballot for one year in 2009 and received 1.3% of the ballot.

Ken Caminiti, NL San Diego Padres (1995)

-1.0 dWAR. Once again we have a case of a bat winning a Gold Glove. Caminiti had two Gold Glove worthy seasons (1989 & 1994) and he did not win in those seasons. In 1995, Caminiti had his first 25 Home Run and .300 season. While Caminiti did finish first in Assists and Double Plays Turned, he also played the most defensive games at Third. He also led in Errors, was not in the top five in Total Zone Runs and Fielding Percentage. Caminiti was on the ballot for one year in 2007 and received 0.4% of the ballot.

Robin Ventura, AL Chicago White Sox (4) (1996)

0.9 dWAR. This is the second time that Robin Ventura won the Gold Glove when he probably should not have. While he did finish first in Putouts and Double Plays Turned, his finish in Total Zone Runs and Range Factor per Game was a pedestrian fifth place. Ventura was on the ballot for one year in 2010 and received 1.3% of the ballot.

Ken Caminiti, NL San Diego Padres (2) (1996)

0.3 dWAR. Caminiti was an offensive beast this year with 40 Home Runs and a .326 Batting Average. He was voted the National League MVP and was named a Silver Slugger. Defensively, he was better than 1995, but far from Gold Glove worthy. He would finish first in Range Factor per Game amongst the NL Third Basemen but again he was not in the top five Total Zone Runs. Caminiti was on the ballot for one year in 2007 and received 0.4% of the ballot.

Matt Williams, AL Cleveland Indians (4) (1997)

1.9 dWAR. With a tenth place finish in Defensive bWAR, this would be the only time that Matt Williams would place in the top ten in this metric. Incidentally, it was also the only season he would play in the American League. Williams would not finish first at Third Base in the AL in any defensive stat, but put up a career high 17 Total Zone Runs, enough for second in that statistic.  Williams was on the ballot for one year in 2009 and received 1.3% of the ballot.

Ken Caminiti, NL San Diego Padres (3) (1997)

-1.0 dWAR. This was the third in final Gold Glove for Caminiti and he went three for three in terms of not deserving any of them. His highest finish defensively was second…in Errors. Hey, the decisions overall do get better! Caminiti was on the ballot for one year in 2007 and received 0.4% of the ballot.

Robin Ventura, AL Chicago White Sox (5) (1998)

3.4 dWAR. There is no doubt that this was the finest defensive season that Robin Ventura had in Major League Baseball. Not only did the Third Baseman finish first in the AL in Defensive bWAR, he would do so in Total Zone Runs. He would also lead all of the AL Third Basemen in Assists and Double Plays Turned. Ventura was on the ballot for one year in 2010 and received 1.3% of the ballot.

Scott Rolen, NL Philadelphia Phillies (1998)

1.4 dWAR. Rolen was the Rookie of the Year in 1997, and this was a better season both offensively and defensively for the Third Baseman. Rolen finished ninth overall in Defensive bWAR while finishing first among the NL Third Basemen in Putouts and was third in Total Zone Runs. As of this writing, Rolen is on the ballot for the first time.

Scott Brosius, AL New York Yankees (1999)

0.9 dWAR. Scott Brosius was only with the New York Yankees but it did not take long for him to become a very popular one. An All Star in 1998, Brosius would win his only Gold Glove in 1999, though it was far from a dominating season with the glove. Either way, Brosius’ selection was not all bad as he did lead all American League Shortstops in Fielding Percentage and was a respectable third in Total Zone Runs. As there was no clear-cut choice, it didn’t hurt that he was Yankee who had just won his second World Series.   Brosius was on the ballot for one year in 2007 but did not receive any votes.

Robin Ventura, NL New York Mets (6) (1999)

2.8 dWAR. While the previous season was arguably the best ever with his glove, 1999 was his best overall. Ventura, now a New York Met would place sixth overall in MVP voting and fourth in Defensive bWAR in his first year in the National League. As for his position, Ventura was tops in Assists, Total Zone Runs and for the first and only time in his career, Fielding Percentage.  Ventura was on the ballot for one year in 2010 and received 1.3% of the ballot.

Travis Fryman, AL Cleveland Indians (2000)

0.3 dWAR. This would be Travis Fryman’s fifth All Star year and his lone Gold Glove win, but you have to openly ask why he got it. Fryman would finish first in Fielding Percentage at Third in the AL, but he was not in the top five in any other category. Fryman was on the ballot for one year in 2008 and received 0.4% of the vote.

Scott Rolen, NL Philadelphia Phillies (2) (2000)

0.9 dWAR. 1999 was actually a better season defensively where he finished second in Total Zone Runs and first in Range Factor per Game among his peers. In 2000 he was second and fourth respectively but did not finish first in any Defensive statistic. As of this writing, Rolen is on the ballot for the first time.

Scott Rolen, NL Philadelphia Phillies (3) (2001)

1.2 dWAR. While this was a good defensive season for Scott Rolen, you can’t really say that it was a spectacular one. Rolen did finish first in Range Factor per Game and was third in Total Zone Runs. As of this writing, Rolen is on the ballot for the first time.

Scott Rolen, NL Philadelphia Phillies/St. Louis Cardinals (4) (2002)

1.8 dWAR. Rolen was traded midway through the season from Philly to St. Louis, and was first among his peers in Total Zone Runs and Range Factor per Game. Overall in the National League he was sixth in Defensive bWAR. Notably, this was also the first time that Rolen would make an All Star Team and he would also win the Silver Slugger for the only time of his year. As of this writing, Rolen is on the ballot for the first time.

Scott Rolen, NL St. Louis Cardinals (5) (2003)

-0.2 dWAR. Scott Rolen took a step back defensively but the voters didn’t notice as he won his fifth Gold Glove this year. His highest finish in any defensive metric was fourth in Assists. As of this writing, Rolen is on the ballot for the first time.

Scott Rolen, NL St. Louis Cardinals (6) (2004)

3.3 dWAR. Talk about a comeback. Rolen went from -0.2 to 3.3 in Defensive bWAR and for the first and only time in his career would finish atop the National League. It was also the last time that he would finish in the top ten, though he wasn’t done collecting Gold Gloves. Amazingly, his career high of 27 Total Zone Runs would not top the National League Third Basemen, as Adrian Beltre of the Dodgers had a better number. As of this writing, Rolen is on the ballot for the first time.

Mike Lowell, NL Florida Marlins (2005)

-0.5 dWAR. This was another strange win, but as bad as Mike Lowell’s Defensive bWAR was he still finished third in Total Zone Runs and was first in Fielding Percentage. Lowell was a player who did not make a lot of mistakes but also never exerted himself out of his comfort zone. This is also a strange case as this was the first time in three years that he was not an All Star and he was not rewarded for his offense, as he was barely a .300 OBP player in 2005. As of this writing, Rolen is on the ballot for the first time.

Scott Rolen, NL St. Louis Cardinals (7) (2006)

1.8 dWAR. This is actually a good number for Defensive bWAR but in 2006 it wasn’t enough to make the top ten in the NL, nor was his other defensive stats enough to win any defensive statistic at Third Base in the league. This could be the best “bad” win in Gold Glove history. As of this writing, Rolen is on the ballot for the first time.

Scott Rolen, NL Cincinnati Reds (8) (2010)

1.2 dWAR. In what would be Scott Rolen’s final Gold Glove, he did so as a member of the Reds, the only time he would do so. This wasn’t the most warranted Gold Glove of his career as his best statistical finishes was second in both Range Factor per Game and Fielding Percentage. Overall, Rolen probably should not have won eight Gold Gloves but his 20.6 career Defensive bWAR is very good. As of this writing, Rolen is on the ballot for the first time.

Let’s update our tally shall we?

Award in Question

Percentage of recipients who have entered the HOF

Percentage of recipients by year who have entered the HOF.

NBA MVP

100%

100%

NHL Norris

90.5%

96.4%

NBA All Star Game MVP

89.5%

91.7%

NHL Conn Smythe

74.2%

85.4%

NHL Lady Byng

63.8%

76.0%

NFL Super Bowl MVP

60.6%

64.9%

NBA Defensive Player of the Year

58.3%

56.5%

NBA Rookie of the Year

56.5%

56.5%

MLB/NL/AL Cy Young Award

44.4%

55.4%

NHL Frank J. Selke Trophy

33.3%

36.7%

NFL Offensive Rookie of the Year

28.6%

28.6%

MLB Edgar Martinez Award

26.7%

17.2%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Designated Hitter)

25.0%

30.8%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Shortstop)

23.5%

52.6%

NFL Defensive Rookie of the Year

20.6%

20.6%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Catcher)

20.0%

22.5%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Second Base)

18.8%

39.8%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Shortstop)

18.2%

35.1%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Pitcher)

18.2%

20.1%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Second Base)

16.7%

32.7%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Outfield)

15.7%

25.2%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Third Base)

14.3%

14.3%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Third Base)

13.6%

14.3%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (First Base)

13.6%

13.3%

MLB (NL/AL) Rookie of the Year

13.3%

13.3%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Catcher)

10.3%

15.2%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (First Base)

3.8%

3.2%

So who is up next?

The following are the players who have won the Gold Glove at Third Base who have retired but have not met the mandatory years out of the game to qualify for the Baseball Hall of Fame:

 

Eric Chavez, AL Oakland Athletics (2001)

1.5 dWAR. Chavez would not commit many errors and would lead the AL Third Basemen in Fielding Percentage while also finishing first in Assists. He was third in Total Zone Runs. Eligible in the Hall of Fame in 2020.

Eric Chavez, AL Oakland Athletics (2) (2002)

0.0 dWAR. While Eric Chavez may have finished atop in Assists, Putouts and Range Factor per Game he was not in the hunt at all for Total Zone Runs. This was an unspectacular defensive season. Eligible in the Hall of Fame in 2020.

Eric Chavez, AL Oakland Athletics (3) (2003)

1.0 dWAR. This was better than the season before for sure. Chavez would again lead the American League Third Basemen in Assists and Putouts and for the first time led in Range Factor per Game, though he was again not in the top five in Total Zone Runs. Eligible in the Hall of Fame in 2020.

Eric Chavez, AL Oakland Athletics (4) (2004)

1.4 dWAR. Again, this was an improvement from the season before. Chavez repeated his feat of finishing first among his peers in Assists, Putouts and Range Factor per Game but for the first and only time he was atop in Double Plays Turned. He was also second in Total Zone Runs. Eligible in the Hall of Fame in 2020.

Eric Chavez, AL Oakland Athletics (5) (2005)

1.5 dWAR. This is probably the most deserving of his Gold Gloves, though mainly because he had far less worthy competition this year. Chavez would finish first in Range Factor per Game and for the first time was first in Total Zone Runs. Eligible in the Hall of Fame in 2020.

Eric Chavez, AL Oakland Athletics (6) (2006)

0.5 dWAR. In his final Gold Glove year, Eric Chavez had the highest Fielding Percentage and turned the most Double Plays amongst the AL Third Basemen. That is the good news. The bad is that he wasn’t in the top five in Range Factor per Game or Total Zone Runs. Eligible in the Hall of Fame in 2020.

Placido Polanco, NL Philadelphia Phillies (2011)

1.2 dWAR. Placido Polanco won two Gold Gloves as a Second Basemen prior to this one at Third. Polanco was an All Star for the second and final time in his career and he finished first in Range Factor per Game and Fielding Percentage. He was also second in Total Zone Runs. Eligible in the Hall of Fame in 2019.

The following are the players who have won the Gold Glove at Third Base who are still active.

Adrian Beltre, AL Seattle Mariners (2007)

0.7 dWAR. Prior to winning his first Gold Glove, Adrian Beltre had three seasons where he should have been considered for the Gold Glove. Unfortunately when he finally won his first, it was in a year where he really should not have. Beltre was first in Putouts amongst the AL Third Basemen, but also in Errors and was not in the top five in Total Zone Runs or Fielding Percentage. This almost feels like they were saying sorry! 39 Years Old, Playing for the Texas Rangers.

David Wright, NL New York Mets (2007)

1.4 dWAR. Finishing fourth in National League MVP voting, David Wright also would win his first Silver Slugger. In regards to his NL Third base peers, Wright did not finish first in any defensive stat and while this was not the best choice for Gold Glove this was not terrible. Sadly, that is relevant when we are talking about Gold Gloves. 33 Years Old, Playing for the New York Mets.

Adrian Beltre, AL Seattle Mariners (2) (2008)

3.1 dWAR. Sabremetircally speaking this was the best defensive season of Adrian Beltre’s career and thankfully he won the Gold Glove this year. Beltre would finish first for the first and only time in Defensive bWAR in the American League while finishing first in Assists. 39 Years Old, Playing for the Texas Rangers.

David Wright, NL New York Mets (2) (2008)

0.7 dWAR. David Wright won his second Gold Glove (and coincidentally another Silver Slugger) but other than leading the NL Third Basemen in Assists, there was nothing special about his defensive season. The only saving grace here is that neither did anyone else. Incidentally, in 2012 he was named a Wilson Defensive Player but lost the Gold Glove to Andrelton Simmons of Atlanta, who had a stronger case. 33 Years Old, Playing for the New York Mets.

Evan Longoria, AL Tampa Bay Rays (2009)

2.2 dWAR. Following his Rookie of the Year win in 2008, Evan Longoria would win his first Silver Slugger and Gold Glove in 2009. Longoria finished seventh in the AL in Defensive bWAR while also finishing first in Double Plays Turned and Total Zone Runs among the American League Third Basemen. 31 Years Old, Playing for the Tampa Bay Rays.

Ryan Zimmerman, NL Washington Nationals (2009)

2.5 dWAR. Ryan Zimmerman won only one Gold Glove in his career but this was the year it definitely should have occurred. Zimmerman, who was also named an All Star for the first time finished third in Defensive bWAR finished first in Assists and Range Factor per Game. 33 Years Old, Playing for the Washington Nationals.

Evan Longoria, AL Tampa Bay Rays (2) (2010)

2.5 dWAR. Longoria would finish third in Defensive bWAR in the American League and at his position was the leader in Double Plays Turned. He was also second in Total Zone Runs. 31 Years Old, Playing for the Tampa Bay Rays.

Adrian Beltre, AL Texas Rangers (3) (2011)

1.5 dWAR. Adrian Beltre also won the Platinum Glove though he did not finish first in any defensive statistic amongst the AL Third Basemen. He did however finish second in Total Zone Runs. 39 Years Old, Playing for the Texas Rangers.

Adrian Beltre, AL Texas Rangers (4) (2012)

1.4 dWAR. Beltre would win the Platinum Glove for the second time while leading the American League Third Basemen in Putouts. 39 Years Old, Playing for the Texas Rangers.

Chase Headley, NL San Diego Padres (2012)

0.0 dWAR. By far this was the best offensive season that Chase Headley ever had and he finished fifth in MVP voting. Defensively, this was not the case. He did play the most games at Third in the NL where he would lead his peers in Assists and Total Zone Runs, but there was not exactly a surefire winner this year. 34 Years Old, Playing for the New York Yankees.

Manny Machado, AL Baltimore Orioles (2013)

4.3 dWAR. In his second season in the Majors, Manny Machado with a good offensive year and stellar defensive one. Finishing first in Defensive bWAR by 1.5, Machado also put together a 32 Total Zone Run season! He was also first in Double Plays Turned, Range Factor per Game and Fielding Percentage amongst the American League Third Basemen. He would also win the Platinum Glove and the Wilson Defensive Player Award. 25 Years Old, Playing for the Baltimore Orioles.

Nolan Arenado, NL Colorado Rockies (2013)

3.6 dWAR. In his rookie season Nolan Arenado had an incredible defensive campaign with a 3.4 Defensive bWAR, which was good enough for fourth overall in the National League. Amongst the NL Third Basemen he finished first in Range Factor per Game. 27 Years Old, Playing for the Colorado Rockies.

Kyle Seager, AL Seattle Mariners (2014)

1.7 dWAR. 2014 was the first and only time that Seager would be an All Star or a Gold Glove winner. Seager had a decent season and he would finish first amongst the American League Third Basemen in Total Zone Runs and Fielding Percentage. 30 Years Old, Playing for the Seattle Mariners.

Nolan Arenado, NL Colorado Rockies (2) (2014)

1.9 dWAR. Aranedo secured his second Gold Glove while again leading the National League Third Basemen in Range Factor per Game. 27 Years Old, Playing for the Colorado Rockies.

Manny Machado, AL Baltimore Orioles (2) (2015)

1.9 dWAR. While this was not as good as his 2013 season (how could it be!) Manny Machado still had a very good 2015 with the glove. Machado finished sixth in the AL in Defensive bWAR and would finish first at Third in Double Plays Turned and Range Factor per Game. 25 Years Old, Playing for the Baltimore Orioles.

Nolan Arenado, NL Colorado Rockies (3) (2015)

2.2 dWAR. This was the season where Nolan Arenado put it altogether offensively while maintaining his defensive acumen. He finished eighth in MVP voting, 6th in Defensive bWAR and was also named a Wilson Defensive Player. Amongst those in his position in the National League Arenado was first in Putouts, Assists, Double Plays Turned and Range Factor per Game. 27 Years Old, Playing for the Colorado Rockies.

Adrian Beltre, AL Texas Rangers (5) (2016)

1.8 dWAR. This was the third time that Beltre would finish first in Total Zone Runs, though only first time where he would win the Gold Glove. Beltre finished second that year in Range Factor per Game. 39 Years Old, Playing for the Texas Rangers.

Nolan Arenado, NL Colorado Rockies (4) (2016)

2.3 dWAR. This was enough for Aranedo to finish third overall in Defensive bWAR in the National League and again (though not relevant here) his offense continued to grow! Aranedo would for the fourth time finish first amongst the National League Third Baseman in Range Factor per Game. He also finished first in Assists and Double Plays Turned and was again the recipient of a Wilson Defensive Award. 27 Years Old, Playing for the Colorado Rockies.

Evan Longoria, AL Tampa Bay Rays (3) (2017)

0.7 dWAR. This should not happen in 2017. Longoria was ok in the field in 2017, but did not come close to finishing first in any defensive category. 31 Years Old, Playing for the Tampa Bay Rays.

Nolan Arenado, NL Colorado Rockies (5) (2017)

2.3 dWAR. This season Nolan Arenedo finished second in Defensive bWAR while also finishing fourth in National League MVP voting. Also, for the fifth straight year, Aranedo was the league leader amongst Third Basemen in Range Factor per Game. He also was first in Putouts, Assists and Double Plays Turned. 27 Years Old, Playing for the Colorado Rockies.

The next one will take us awhile. It’s off to the Outfield next…. Look for that God knows when!

Spring maybe?
Last modified on Sunday, 31 December 2017 04:56
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Kirk Buchner, "The Committee Chairman", is the owner and operator of the site.  Kirk can be contacted at [email protected] .

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