Awards = HOF? Part Four: The Super Bowl MVP (NFL)

Awards = HOF?  Part Four: The Super Bowl MVP (NFL)
24 Nov
2015
Not in Hall of Fame
We here at Notinhalloffame.com thought it would be fun to take a look at the major awards in North American team sports and see how it translates into Hall of Fame potential.

Needless to say, different awards in different sports yield hall of fame potential.  In basketball, the team sport with the least amount of players on a roster, the dividend for greatness much higher.  In baseball, it is not as much as a great individual season does not have the same impact.

Up next, we are going to take a look at the MVP of the most widely watched game in the world, the Super Bowl, and see just how many of them who excelled on the grandest stage of them all have a bust in Canton, Ohio.



The following are the past NFL players who have won the Super Bowl MVP who are eligible for the Pro Football Hall of Fame and have been enshrined.



Bart Starr, Quarterback, Green Bay Packers (Super Bowl I: 1967)

16 for 23, 250 Yards, 2 TD, 1 INT.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1977.

Bart Starr, Quarterback, Green Bay Packers (Super Bowl II: 1968)

13 for 24, 214 Yards, 14 Yards Rushing, 1 TD, 0 INT, Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1977.

Joe Namath, Quarterback, New York Jets (Super Bowl III: 1969)

17 for 28, 201 Yards, 0 TD, 0 INT, Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1985.

Len Dawson, Quarterback, Kansas City Chiefs (Super Bowl IV: 1970)

12 for 17, 142 Yards, 1 TD, 1 INT, 11 Yards Rushing, Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1987.

Roger Staubach, Quarterback, Dallas Cowboys (Super Bowl VI: 1972)

12 for 19, 119 Yards, 2 TD, 0 INT, 18 Yards Rushing, Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1985.

Larry Csonka, Running Back, Miami Dolphins (Super Bowl VIII: 1974)

33 Carries for 145 Yards, 2 TD, Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1987.

Franco Harris, Running Back, Pittsburgh Steelers (Super Bowl IX: 1975)

34 Carries for 158 Yards, 1 TD, Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1990.

Lynn Swann, Wide Receiver, Pittsburgh Steelers (Super Bowl X: 1976)

4 Receptions for 161 Yards, 1 TD, Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2001.

Fred Biletnikoff, Wide Receiver, Oakland Raiders (Super Bowl XI: 1977)

4 Receptions for 79 Yards, Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1988.

Randy White, Defensive Tackle, Dallas Cowboys (Super Bowl XII: 1978)

Led the defense and held Denver to only 61 Passing Yards.  Only time that there was a co-MVP.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1994.

Terry Bradshaw, Quarterback, Pittsburgh Steelers (Super Bowl XIII: 1979)

17 for 30, 318 Yards, 4 TD, 1 INT, Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1989.

Terry Bradshaw, Quarterback, Pittsburgh Steelers (Super Bowl XIV: 1980)

14 for 21, 309 Yards, 2 TD, 3INT, Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1989.

Joe Montana, Quarterback, San Francisco 49ers (Super Bowl XVI: 1982)

14 for 22, 157 Yards, 1 TD, 18 Rushing Yards, 1 TD, Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2000.

John Riggins, Running Back, Washington Redskins (Super Bowl XVII: 1983)

38 Carries for 166 Yards, 1 TD, 1 Reception for 15 Yards, Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1992.

Marcus Allen, Running Back, Los Angeles Raiders (Super Bowl XVIII: 1984)

20 Carries for 191 Yards, 2 TD, 2 Receptions for 18 Yards, Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2003.

Joe Montana, Quarterback, San Francisco 49ers (Super Bowl XIX: 1985)

24 for 35, 331 Yards, 3 TD, 59 Rushing Yards, 1 TD, Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2000.

Richard Dent, Defensive End, Chicago Bears (Super Bowl XX: 1986)

1.5 Sacks, 2 Forced Fumbles, Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2011.

Jerry Rice, Wide Receiver, San Francisco 49ers (Super Bowl XXIII: 1989)

11 Receptions for 215 Yards, 1 TD, 1 Carry for 5 Yards, Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2010.

Joe Montana, Quarterback, San Francisco 49ers (Super Bowl XXIV: 1990)

22 for 29 for 297 Yards, 5 TD, 15 Rushing Yards, Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2000.

Troy Aikman, Quarterback, Dallas Cowboys (Super Bowl XXVII: 1993)

22 for 30, 273 Yards, 4 TD, 28 Rushing Yards, Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2006.

Emmitt Smith, Running Back, Dallas Cowboys (Super Bowl XXVIII: 1994)

30 Carries for 132 Yards 2 TD, 4 Receptions for 26 Yards, Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2010.

Steve Young, Quarterback, San Francisco 49ers (Super Bowl XXIX: 1995)

24 for 36, 325 Yards, 6 TD, 49 Rushing Yards, Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2005.

John Elway, Quarterback, Denver Broncos (Super Bowl XXXIII: 1999)

18 for 29, 336 Yards, 1 TD, 1 INT, 2 Yards Rushing, 1 TD, Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2004.



It is full of a lot of Offensive skill players, and this is not a shock is it?

What about those who didn’t make it?



The following are the players who have won the Super Bowl MVP who are eligible for the Pro Football Hall of Fame who have not been chosen:



Chuck Howley, Linebacker, Dallas Cowboys (Super Bowl V: 1970)

2 INT (Sacks & Tackles not recorded as of yet).  He is the first and only player of a losing team to win the Award.  He is also the first Defensive player and non-Quarterback to win. Howley is ranked #4 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Jake Scott, Safety, Miami Dolphins (Super Bowl VII: 1973)

2 INT for 63 Return Yards.  Unranked at Notinhalloffame.com.

Harvey Martin, Defensive End, Dallas Cowboys (Super Bowl XII: 1978)

Led the defense and held Denver to only 61 Passing Yards.  Only time that there was a co-MVP.  Unranked at Notinhalloffame.com.

Jim Plunkett, Quarterback, Oakland Raiders (Super Bowl XV: 1981)

13 for 21, 261 Yards, 3 TD.  Unranked at Notinhallofame.com.

Phil Simms, Quarterback, New York Giants (Super Bowl XXI: 1987)

22 for 25, 268 Yards, 3 TD.  Simms is Ranked #48 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Doug Williams, Quarterback, Washington Redskins (Super Bowl XXII: 1988)

18 for 29, 340 Yards, 4 TD, 1 INT.  Unranked at Notinhalloffame.com.

Ottis Anderson, Running Back, New York Giants (Super Bowl XXV: 1991)

21 Carries for 102 Yards, 1 Reception for 7 Yards.  Anderson is Ranked #50 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Mark Rypien, Quarterback, Washington Redskins (Super Bowl XXVI: 1992)

18 for 33, 292 Yards, 2 TD, 1 INT.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Larry Brown, Cornerback, Dallas Cowboys (Super Bowl XXX: 1996)

2 INT, 1 TD, Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Desmond Howard, Kick/Punt Returner, Green Bay Packers (Super Bowl XXXI, 1997)

244 Return Yards, 1 TD, Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Terrell Davis, Running Back, Denver Broncos (Super Bowl XXXII: 1998)

30 Carries, 157 Yards, 3 TD, 2 Receptions, 8 Yards.  Davis is ranked #21 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Kurt Warner, Quarterback, St. Louis Rams (Super Bowl XXXIV: 2000)

25 for 45, 414 Yards, 2 TD, 1 Rushing Yard.  Warner is ranked #28 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Dexter Jackson, Safety, Tampa Bay Buccaneers (Super Bowl XXXVII: 2003)

2 Interceptions, 34 INT Return Yards.



Again, it isn’t much different and with a one game scenario and what can really expect, especially in a sport, which celebrates the offensive skill position? 

Warner is likely to get in soon, as he was a finalist last year on his first year of eligibility, and it is worth noting that Terrell Davis broke through to the Finalist round last year.



Let’s update our tally shall we?



Award in Question

Percentage of recipients who have entered the HOF

Percentage of recipients by year who have entered the HOF.

NBA MVP

100 %

100 %

NHL Norris

90.5 %

96.4 %

NFL Super Bowl MVP

60.6%

64.9 %

MLB (NL/AL) Rookie of the Year

13.3%

13.3 %





So who is up next?



The following are the players who have won the Super Bowl MVP who have retired but have met the mandatory years out of the game to qualify:



Ray Lewis, Linebacker, Baltimore Ravens (Super Bowl XXXV: 2001)

3 Tackles, 2 Assisted Tackles, 4 Blocked Passes.  Lewis will be eligible for the Hall of Fame in 2018.

Deion Branch, Wide Receiver, New England Patriots (Super Bowl XXXIX: 2005)  

11 Receptions for 133 Yards.  Branch will be eligible for the Hall of Fame in 2019.

Hines Ward, Wide Receiver, Pittsburgh Steelers (Super Bowl XL: 2006)

5 Receptions for 123 Yards, 1 TD, 18 Yards Rushing.  Ward will be eligible for the Hall of Fame in 2017.

Santonio Holmes, Wide Receiver, Pittsburgh Steelers (Super Bowl XLIII: 2009)

9 Receptions for 131 Yards, 1 TD.  Holmes will be eligible for the Hall of Fame in 2020.



Ray Lewis is a lock for the Hall.  There are many who think Ward will probably get in, but if so that will not be immediate. 

Branch and Holmes will not be making the Hall.





The following are the players who have won the Super Bowl MVP who are still active football players:



Tom Brady, Quarterback, New England Patriots (Super Bowl XXXVI: 2002)

16 for 27, 145 Yards, 1 TD.

Tom Brady, Quarterback, New England Patriots (Super Bowl XXXVIII: 2004)

32 for 48, 354 Yards, 3 TD, 1 INT, 12 Rushing Yards.

Peyton Manning, Quarterback, Indianapolis Colts (Super Bowl XLI: 2007)

25 for 38, 247 Yards, 1 TD, 1 INT.

Eli Manning, Quarterback, New York Giants (Super Bowl XLII: 2008)

19 for 34, 255 Yards, 2 TD, 1 INT, 5 Rushing Yards.

Drew Brees, Quarterback, New Orleans Saints (Super Bowl XLIV: 2010)

32 for 39, 288 Yards, 2 TD.

Aaron Rodgers, Quarterback, Green Bay Packers (Super Bowl XLV: 2011)

24 for 39, 304 Yards, 3 TD.

Eli Manning, Quarterback, New York Giants (Super Bowl XLVI: 2012)

30 for 40, 296 Yards, 1 TD.

Joe Flacco, Quarterback, Baltimore Ravens (Super Bowl XLVII: 2013)

22 for 33, 287 Yards, 3 TD.

Malcolm Smith, Linebacker, Seattle Seahawks (Super Bowl XLVIII: 2014)

1 Interception, 89 Interception Return Yards, 1 TD, 1 Recovered Fumble, 9 Tackles.

Tom Brady, Quarterback, New England Patriots (Super Bowl XVIX: 2015)

37 for 50, 328 Yards, 4 TD, 2 INT.



The bust for Tom Brady has already been made.  I don’t care how many “gates” are attached to him.  That bust is already in a closet next to Tom Brady’s.

Drew Brees and Aaron Rodgers already have their inductions stamped for approval.

Eli may have two Super Bowls MVPs, but he still has a lot of work to do to get there. 

The same can be said for Joe Flacco, who while he has proven to be in the upper have of pivots in the NFL, he has a lot of room left in his trophy case that he needs to fill.

Malcolm Smith had the game of his life, but he is not on a path right now that will get him enshrined.



Basically, with the men who are up next, the percentage is likely to stay the same, which make complete sense as only great teams make it to the big dance and on any given Sunday any star can emerge.  Fifty years from now, I doubt it will be much different.



So what’s up next? 

We are going to back to the ice and look at the least manly named trophy, The Lady Byng, and see how they measure up in regards to the Hockey Hall of Fame.

Look for that this week, and as always thank you for your support!

Last modified on Monday, 21 November 2016 18:39
Committee Chairman

Kirk Buchner, "The Committee Chairman", is the owner and operator of the site.  Kirk can be contacted at [email protected] .

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