1. Stan Musial
  1. General
  2. Awards
  3. Career Stats
  • Born: November 21, 1920 in Donora, PA USA
  • Weight: 175 lbs.
  • Height: 6'0"
  • Bats: L
  • Throws: L
  • Debut: September 17, 1941
  • Final Game: September 29, 1963
  • Baseball Magazine All-Star - 1943
  • Baseball Magazine All-Star - 1943
  • Most Valuable Player - 1943
  • TSN All-Star - 1943
  • TSN Guide MVP - 1943
  • Baseball Magazine All-Star - 1944
  • Baseball Magazine All-Star - 1944
  • TSN All-Star - 1944
  • Baseball Magazine All-Star - 1946
  • Baseball Magazine All-Star - 1946
  • Most Valuable Player - 1946
  • TSN All-Star - 1946
  • TSN Major League Player of the Year - 1946
  • Baseball Magazine All-Star - 1948
  • Baseball Magazine All-Star - 1948
  • Most Valuable Player - 1948
  • TSN All-Star - 1948
  • TSN Player of the Year - 1948
  • Baseball Magazine All-Star - 1949
  • Baseball Magazine All-Star - 1949
  • TSN All-Star - 1949
  • Baseball Magazine All-Star - 1950
  • Baseball Magazine All-Star - 1950
  • TSN All-Star - 1950
  • TSN All-Star - 1951
  • TSN Major League Player of the Year - 1951
  • TSN Player of the Year - 1951
  • TSN All-Star - 1952
  • TSN All-Star - 1953
  • TSN All-Star - 1954
  • Lou Gehrig Memorial Award - 1957
  • TSN All-Star - 1957
  • TSN Player of the Year - 1957
  • TSN All-Star - 1958
 
ABRHHRRBISBAVG
1097219493630475195178 0.331
 

When you talk about the greatest hitter in history Stan “The Man” Musial is often discussed, and why wouldn’t he be?  Musial played his entire career with the St. Louis Cardinals where he smacked 3,630 Hits (amazingly with an even amount Home and Away), which is still enough for fourth all-time and is the most for any single team.  Musial was incredibly consistent for years and he was a six time National League Hits leader with three second place finishes and two third place finishes and with that kind of production you can imagine there would be multiple Batting Titles.  That was in fact the case as he won that accolade in 1943, 1946, 1948, 1950, 1951, 1952 & 1957 and it took until his 18th season to see him bat under .300. 

While some hitters with high Batting Averages don’t necessarily elevate that with an appropriate On Base Percentage that was not the case for “The Man”.  He was a six time leader in OBP with fourteen seasons over .400 with a career number of .417.  In terms of power, Musial was no slouch.  While he never would win the Home Run title he would achieve 30 or more Home Runs six times and finished with 475 overall.  Musial was also a two time RBI Champion with 10 seasons of three digits while also being an eight time Doubles and five time Triples leader.

Arguably, Musial was the best player in baseball in the 1940’s.  He would lead the Redbirds to World Series Championships in 1942, 1944 and 1946 while being named the National League MVP in 1943, 1946 and 1948.  He was the runner-up for that award four times (1949, 1950, 1951 & 1957) and he was a 24 time All Star.  He retired with a Slash Line of .331/.417/.559, the elusive career 3/4/5!

Fittingly, Stan Musial was selected into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1969 on his first year of eligibility.

The Bullet Points

  • Position: First Base, Outfield
  • Acquired: Signed as an Amateur Free Agent before the 1938 Season.
  • Departed: Retired after the 1963 Season.
  • Games Played: 3026
  • Notable Statistics:

    1,949 Runs Scored
    3,630 Hits
    725 Doubles
    177 Triples
    475 Home Runs
    1,951 RBI
    78 Stolen Bases
    .331/.417/.559 Slash Line
    128.2 bWAR

  • Major Accolades and Awards:

    World Series Champion (1942, 1944 & 1946)

    MVP (1943, 1946 & 1948)

    Major League Player of the Year Award (1946 & 1951)

    Lou Gehrig Award (1957)

    All Star (1943, 1944, 1946, 1947, 1948, 1949, 1950, 1951, 1952, 1953, 1954 1955, 1956, 1957, 1958, 1959, 1960, 1961, 1962 & 1963)

    Highest bWAR for Position Players (1943, 1944, 1946 & 1948)

    Highest Batting Average (1943, 1946, 1948, 1950, 1951, 1952 & 1957)

    Highest On Base Percentage (1943, 1944, 1948, 1949, 1953 & 1957)

    Highest Slugging Percentage (1943, 1944, 1955, 1948, 1950 & 1952)

    Highest OPS (1943, 1944, 1946, 1948, 1950, 1952 & 1957)

    Most At Bats (1946)

    Most Plate Appearances (1943 & 1946)

    Most Runs Scored (1946, 1948, 1951, 1952 & 1954)

    Most Hits (1943, 1944, 1946, 1948, 1949 & 1952)

    Most Total Bases (1943, 1946, 1948, 1949, 1951 & 1952)

    Most Doubles (1943, 1944, 1946, 1948, 1949, 1952, 1953 & 1954)

    Most Triples (1943, 1946, 1948, 1949 & 1951)

    Most Runs Batted In (1948 & 1956)

    Most Walks (1953)

    Highest OPS+ (1943, 1944, 1946, 1948, 1950 & 1952)

    Most Hit by Pitch (1955)

    Most Intentional Walks (1957 & 1958)

    Highest Stolen Base Percentage (1966 & 1968)

    Highest Win Probability Added (1946, 1948 & 1950)

    Most Double Plays Turned by a First Baseman (1957)

    Highest Range Factor per Game by a Leftfielder (1951)

    Highest Fielding Percentage by a Leftfielder (1953)

    Highest Range Factor per Game by a Rightfielder (1944)

    Highest Fielding Percentage by a Rightfielder (1943, 1949 & 1954)
Tagged under
More in this category: 2. Albert Pujols »

Add comment


Security code
Refresh