Awards = HOF?: Part Fifty-Three: The Ted Lindsay Award

Awards = HOF?: Part Fifty-Three: The Ted Lindsay Award
13 Oct
2020
Not in Hall of Fame

We here at Notinhalloffame.com thought it would be fun to take a look at the major awards in North American team sports and see how it translates into Hall of Fame potential.

Needless to say, different awards in different sports yield hall of fame potential.  In basketball, the team sport with the least number of players on a roster, the dividend for greatness much higher.  In baseball, it is not as much as a great individual season does not have the same impact.

Last time, we looked at the Hart Trophy, awarded annually to the top MVP of the year in the NHL.  The Hart is not the only award considered the MVP, as in the 1971-72 Season, the Lester B. Pearson Award was created, which is where the players vote on who they feel is the league MVP.  In 2010, it was renamed the Ted Lindsay Award, in honor of the Hall of Famer who spearheaded the creation of the NHLPA.

So how many Ted Lindsay Award winners have made the Pro Hockey Hall of Fame?

Let’s find out!

The following are the past players who have won the Ted Lindsay Award who are eligible for the Hockey Hall of Fame and have been enshrined.

Phil Esposito, Boston Bruins, Center: 76 G, 76 A, 152 P, 18.5 PS  1971      

A year after he led the Bruins to a Stanley Cup, Phil Esposito won the first ever Lester B. Pearson Award on the strength of hockey’s first ever 76 Goal Season, a number he matched in Assists.  His 152 Points landed him another Art Ross Trophy, and he was a First Team All-Star for the third straight season.  Esposito was not the Hart Trophy winner, as despite his incredible accomplishments, the honor went to Bobby Orr, who had 139 Points and 22.8 Point Shares.

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1984.

Jean Ratelle, New York Rangers, Center: 46 G, 63 A, 109 P, 13.6 PS  1972 

Jean Ratelle had his best season in hockey where he had career-highs in the big three offensive stats (46 Goals, 63 Assists and 109 Points).  Ratelle was the league-leader in Even Strength Goals (40) and Shot Percentage (25.1%) and with only four Penalty Minutes, he was an easy choice for the Lady Byng. Ratelle was only fourth for the Hart this year (Bobby Orr won it), and he was a Second Team All-Star at Center behind Phil Esposito.  Ratelle scored 1,267 Points over his career

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1985.

Bobby Clarke, Philadelphia Flyers, Center: 37 G, 67 A, 104 P, 10.3 PS  1973        

For the first time, an expansion team had a player win the Hart when Bobby Clarke took it for the first of three times. The Center, who had won the Bill Masterton Award the year before, was the Second Team All-Star behind Phil Esposito, but bested the Bruin for the Lester B. Pearson and also the Hart Trophy, as much of Philadelphia’s success this season was led by Clarke, but the best was coming for Philadelphia and the “Broad Street Bullies”.  Clarke would lead the Flyers to the next two Stanley Cups, and he also won a second and third Hart.  Clarke played the entirety of his career with Philadelphia, retiring in 1984 with 1,210 career Points.

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1987.

Phil Esposito, Boston Bruins, Center: 68 G, 77 A, 145 P, 17.0 PS  1974 (2)  

This was Esposito’s second Lester B. Pearson Trophy and making him the first to become a multi-time winner.  In between his two Pearson wins, Esposito won his second Stanley Cup, and two Art Ross Trophies.  This season, Esposito won his fifth Art Ross Trophy, was a First Team All-Star for the sixth time, and was also the winner of the Lester B. Pearson.  Esposito was also the NHL’s Goal leader for the sixth consecutive season, and this was also the fifth straight year a Bruin won the Hart. The charismatic Center was a Second Team All-Star the year after, and he was then traded to the New York Rangers where he played until he retired in 1981.  Esposito accumulated 717 Goals and 1,590 Points over his career.

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1984.

Bobby Orr, Boston Bruins, Defense: 46 G, 89 A, 135 P, 21.5 PS  1975          

You could argue that Bobby Orr’s Lester B. Pearson Trophy 1975 was a surprise.  It was not that he wasn’t worthy, but the shock was that he had never won it before despite the hardware being only five years old.  Previously, Orr won three Hart Trophies, two Stanley Cups, seven Norris Trophies, a Conn Smythe and an Art Ross.  This season, he would win his second Art Ross trophy in 1974-75, and to date he was the first, last and only blueliner to win that honor.  Orr was also the first Defenseman to win the Pearson. A knee injury derailed his career, and he only scored 55 Points over his final three years in hockey, the latter two being in a Blackhawks uniform.  He was fast-tracked into the Hall, and there will never be another Defenseman like him again.

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1979.

Guy Lafleur, Montreal Canadiens, Right Wing: 56 G, 69 A, 125 P, 13.8 PS  1976  

The Montreal Canadiens have had many dynasties over their existence, and in the 1970s, their offensive leader was Guy Lafleur. A First Team All-Star the Year before, Lafleur was so again this year and he won his first Art Ross.  The Right Wing was third this year for the Hart and Lady Byng, but more importantly, he led the Habs to a Stanley Cup win, and his second overall.

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1987.

Guy Lafleur, Montreal Canadiens, Right Wing: 56 G, 80 A, 136 P, 15.7 PS  1977 (2)      

Guy Lafleur took them to their second straight Stanley Cup and he also won the Hart Trophy.   The Habs star won his second Art Ross and earned his third First Team All-Star Selection.  This would be the only season where he won the Conn Smythe as well as leading the league in Assists (80).

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1988.

Guy Lafleur, Montreal Canadiens, Right Wing: 60 G, 72 A, 132 P, 15.8 PS  1978 (3)      

Lafleur was named a First Team All-Star for the fourth of what would be six straight selections, and would also mark his second Hart and third and final Art Ross Trophy.  The Right Wing played with Montreal until he was forced to retire in the 1984-85 Season. After being inducted into the Hockey Hall of Fame, he came out of retirement for three seasons, one with the New York Rangers and two with Quebec.  He would retire for good in 1991, leaving the NHL with 1,353 Points.

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1988.

Marcel Dionne, Los Angeles Kings, Center: 59 G, 71 A, 130 P, 13.3 PS  1979       

Dionne was a First Team All-Star two years before, and this season he was a Second Team All-Star behind Bryan Trottier of the New York Islanders, who also won the Hart Trophy.  Dionne was third for the Hart this season, and was the first King to win the Pearson.

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1992.

Marcel Dionne, Los Angeles Kings, Center: 53 G, 84 A, 137 P, 13.5 PS  1980 (2)  

Dionne went back-to-back with his second Pearson, and he was a First Team All-Star, besting Wayne Gretzky, who beat him for the Hart.  This makes Dionne the only multiple Pearson winner never to win a Hart.  This might be true, but Dionne won the Art Ross Trophy this year and he had three more 100 Point years.  Dionne, who originally played with Detroit, finished his career with the New York Rangers in 1989 and retired with 1,307 Points.

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1992.

Wayne Gretzky, Edmonton Oilers, Center: 92 G, 120 A, 212 P, 19.7 PS  1982      

92 Goals.  When Phil Esposito lit the lamp 76 times, that record seemed unbreakable, but this year, Gretzky had 92 Goals and hit the 50 Goal mark after only 39 Games! Not only the Gretzky set new records in Goal scoring, he broke his own Assists mark (120), and broke the 200 Point plain with his personal best 212.  Gretzky also for the first time was the NHL leader in Plus/Minus (+80).  This was Gretzky’s second Art Ross and First Team All-Star, but for the first time he won the Lester B. Pearson Award, meaning his peers could no longer deny his talent.

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1999.

Wayne Gretzky, Edmonton Oilers, Center: 71 G, 125 A, 196 P, 18.0 PS  1983 (2)

Gretzky was again an offensive juggernaut, and for the third year in a row, he broke the single-season Assists mark.  He repeated the awards he won last year, with an Art Ross, Hart and First Team All-Star, but this year he led the Oilers to their first Stanley Cup appearance.  They lost to the New York Islanders, but we knew was set to come. Notably, Gretzky became the first player to win the Hart four years in a row.

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1999.

Wayne Gretzky, Edmonton Oilers, Center: 87 G, 118 A, 205 P, 19.6 PS  1984 (3)

Imagine having a season where you score 87 Goals, 118 Assists and 205 Points, and none of those are personal highs.  Gretzky was just that good.  This was Gretzky’s fifth straight Hart (becoming the first to do have five straight), and he also won his fourth Art Ross and First Team All-Star, and he captured his fifth Hart Trophy.  The coup de gras for Gretzky was leading Edmonton to their first Stanley Cup win.

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1999.

Wayne Gretzky, Edmonton Oilers, Center: 73 G, 135 A, 208 P, 19.6 PS  1985 (4)

Gretzky matched his idol’s (Gordie Howe) mark in Hart wins, but unlike Howe, Gretzky did it in six consecutive years.  This would be the fourth straight year the Gretzky led the NHL in Goals, and he also set a career-high in Plus/Minus with +100. In regards to his trophy case, Gretzky repeated as the Art Ross winner, Lester B. Pearson winner and First Team All-Star, but this time he added a new award, the Conn Smythe Trophy, as the Oilers won their second Stanley Cup.

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1999.

Mario Lemieux, Pittsburgh Penguins, Center: 48 G, 93 A, 131 P, 10.9 PS  1986   

Mario Lemieux was only in his second season in the NHL, but he already saved the Pittsburgh Penguins from relocating. Lemieux was a Second Team All-Star behind Gretzky, and he was second to him for the Hart too.  He was the first Pearson winner for the Penguins.

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1997.

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1999.

Wayne Gretzky, Edmonton Oilers, Center: 62 G, 121 A, 183 P, 17.6 PS  1987 (5)

Gretzky did it again with an unprecedented eighth Hart Trophy, and he did so while collecting yet another First Team All-Star and Art Ross while leading the NHL in Goals for the fifth and final time.  This would also be Gretzky’s fifth and final Lester B. Pearson Award.  Gretzky took the Oilers to their third Stanley Cup win, and did so again the year after.  He was traded to the Los Angeles Kings, and won his ninth Hart there.  After a brief stint with St. Louis in 1996 and three final years with the Rangers, Gretzky retired as the all-time leader in Goals (894), Assists (1,963) and Points (2,857).

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1999.

Mario Lemieux, Pittsburgh Penguins, Center: 70 G, 98 A, 168 P, 16.2 PS  1988 (2)        

This year, Mario Lemieux brought the Pittsburgh Penguins their first Hart Trophy winner, and playing at Center, he did the unthinkable by unseating Gretzky as the First Team All-Star.  Lemieux led the NHL in Goals for the first time, and this year he also notched his first Art Ross Trophy.  His peers already knew how magnificent he was, as this was Lemieux’s second Pearson Award.

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1997.

Steve Yzerman, Detroit Red Wings, Center: 65 G, 90 A, 155 P, 14.4 PS  1989      

Steve Yzerman never won the Hart, but this season he won the Lindsay on the year he had career-highs in Goals (60), Assists (90) and Points (155).  This was the year that returned the Red Wings to prominence, and Yzerman was the first Red Wing to win the Pearson.  Yzerman led the Red Wings to three Stanley Cups, won a Conn Smythe and had 1,755 career Points.

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2011.

Mark Messier, Edmonton Oilers, Center: 45 G, 84 A, 129 P, 11.3 PS  1990  

The Edmonton Oilers traded Wayne Gretzky to the Los Angeles Kings, which meant that Mark Messier would become the Oilers’ leader. Messier did what Gretzky couldn’t without the other…win the Stanley Cup.  Messier’s 129 Points were a career-high, and he was named a First Team All-Star this year. What Messier this season should be celebrated a lot more than it is, and we say that even though Messier won the Hart that year!

Brett Hull, St. Louis Blues, Right Wing: 86 G, 45 A, 131 P, 15.4 PS  1991   

Brett Hull led the NHL in Goals for three seasons in a row, and in all three of them, he had at least 70.  This was Hull’s highwater mark, and he would also secure the Hart Trophy.  A three-time First Team All-Star, Hull later won a Stanley Cup as a Dallas Star in 1999 and a Detroit Red Wing in 2002.  Retiring in 2006, Hull had 527 career Goals.

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2009.

Mark Messier, New York Rangers, Center: 35 G, 72 A, 107 P, 9.9 PS  1992 (2)      

Messier became the first player to win the Pearson with two different teams.  The Center was now the leader of the Rangers, and he was also the winner of the Hart Trophy and a First Team All-Star.  Messier’s leadership would take the Rangers to a 1994 Stanley Cup, and he was so good at that role, that the National Hockey League would create a “Mark Messier Leadership Award”.   When he retired, Messier scored 1,887 career Points.

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2007.

Mario Lemieux, Pittsburgh Penguins, Center: 69 G, 91 A, 160 P, 16.2 PS  1993 (3)        

Since his second Lester B. Pearson Award, Lemieux went on to win the 1991 and 1992 Stanley Cup, and injuries prevented him from full seasons, which kept the Hart from his grabs.  This year, he only played 60 Games, but he won the Art Ross with 160 Points and led the NHL in Plus/Minus (+55).  Lemieux would also win the Hart, was a First Team All-Star and he was the Bill Masterton Award winner.  Why did he only play 60 Games?  Lemieux was diagnosed with Hodgkin’s lymphoma, yet came back to finish the season.

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1997.

Sergei Fedorov, Detroit Red Wings, Center: 56 G, 64 A, 120 P, 13.8 PS  1994      

Making history as the first non-Canadian and first European to win the Pearson, Sergei Fedorov was in his fourth NHL season and this was best statistical season by far.  Fedorov was a First Team All-Star, Hart Trophy winner and Frank J. Selke winner this year, and he would later win three Stanley Cups for Detroit.  The Russian later won another Selke Trophy and he would later play for Anaheim, Columbus and Washington.  Fedorov scored 1,179 career Points.

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2015.

Eric Lindros, Philadelphia Flyers, Center: 29 G, 41 A, 70 P, 8.8 PS  1995    

The Philadelphia Flyers gave an awful lot to get Eric Lindros, and while it might not have been worth it, it was still a Pearson winner.  Lindros was a First Team All-Star this year as well as the coveted Hart Trophy winner in this strike-shortened year.  Lindros also won his only Art Ross this year, and he was a 1.14 PPG player over his 13 NHL Seasons.

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2016.

Mario Lemieux, Pittsburgh Penguins, Center: 69 G, 92 A, 161 P, 17.4 PS  1996 (4)        

Lemieux also won his third Hart and fifth Art Ross trophy this season, while also earning First Team All-Star honors.  The Center was a First Team All-Star and Art Ross winner the next year, and he retired after that.  He came back in 2000, now as a player/owner albeit on the ice on a reduced role due to his past injuries and fatigue.  He played his last game in 2006, accumulating 1,723 career Points.

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1997.

Dominik Hasek, Buffalo Sabres, Goalie 37-20-10 Record P, 17.2 GPS  1997          

Dominik Hasek was already considered one of the best Goalies in Hockey, but this year he was elevated to the best player in the world. This season, Hasek won his third Vezina Trophy and earned his third First Team All-Star, and he was also won the Hart.  Hasek was also first in Save Percentage for the fourth year in the row. He also made history as the first Czech player to win the Pearson.

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2014.

Dominik Hasek, Buffalo Sabres, Goalie 33-23-13 Record P, 18.6 GPS  1998 (2)     

In terms of accolades, Hasek repeated his efforts of 1997 with a Hart, Lester B. Pearson, a Vezina and a First Team All-Star, and he again led the NHL in Save Percentage.  Hasek would later win two more Vezina Trophies.  In 1999, Hasek took Buffalo on his back and carried them to a Stanley Cup Final.  The Czech Goalie grew frustrated and asked for a trade, which he got when he was sent to Detroit.  He would win two Stanley Cups with Detroit and then played in Europe, retiring in 2011.

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2014.

Chris Pronger, St. Louis Blues, Defense 14 G, 48 A, 62 P, 14.8 PS  2000

Pronger debuted in the NHL with the Hartford Whalers in 1994, and two years later he was a St. Louis Blue and, on his way, to becoming a star.  A Second Team All-Star in 1997-98, and two years later he won the Hart and Norris and was a First Team All-Star for the first and only time.  Pronger was a Second Team All-Star again in 2003-04, and he joined the Edmonton Oilers as a Free Agent, but he was unhappy there and looked for a trade.  He was dealt to Anaheim and helped them win a Stanley Cup and was a Second Team All-Star in 2007.  Pronger played until 2012, with his last three years coming as a Flyer.  He would accumulate 698 career Points.

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2015.

Joe Sakic, Colorado Avalanche, Center 54 G, 64 A, 118 P, 15.9 PS  2001

Sakic was the first Nordiques/Avalanche player to win the Lester B. Pearson, which he did in his 13thseason.  Sakic had a career-high 54 Goals, was the NHL leader in Plus/Minus (+45) and he was also the winner of the Lady Byng and the Hart Trophy.  This year, Sakic and the Avs won the Stanley Cup, which was their second, having won it in 1996.  The Center was also named a First Team All-Star, and would be again in two of the next three years.  Sakic played his entire career with Quebec/Colorado, retiring in 2009 with 1,641 Points.

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2015.

Jarome Iginla, Calgary Flames, Right Wing 52 G, 44 A, 96 P, 14.4 PS  2002

Iginla was a First Team All-Star for the first of what would be three times, and he was also the Maurice Richard and Art Ross Trophy winner this year.  Iginla did not win the Hart as he was the runner-up to the Montreal Goalie, Jose Theodore.  He played with the Flames until 2013, and would later play for Pittsburgh, Boston, Colorado and Los Angeles, and had an even 1,300 career Points.

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2020.

Martin St. Louis, Tampa Bay Lightning, Right Wing 38 G, 56 A, 94 P, 13.2 PS  2004

It was a breakout campaign for St. Louis who was in his sixth season, and fourth in Tampa Bay after playing for Calgary in seasons one and two.  St. Louis became the first Lightning player to win the Pearson, and he also won the Hart, Art Ross, was a First Team All-Star and was the NHL leader in Plus/Minus (+35).  St. Louis led Tampa to the Stanley Cup that year.  After this year, St. Louis was a Second Team All-Star four times, won another Art Ross and would also win three Lady Byng Trophies.  He played until 2015, after a year and a half with the Rangers.

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2018.

 

The following are the players who have won the Ted Lindsay Award who are eligible for the Hockey Hall of Fame and have not been selected:

Mike Liut, St. Louis Blues, Goalie: 33-14-13 Record 3.35 GAA, 11.6 PS 1942       

Mike Liut was named a First Team All-Star and he was the runner-up for the Hart, finishing behind Wayne Gretzky.  Gretzky won his second Hart this year, but his peers named Liut the Pearson winner, making Liut the first Goalie to win the award. Playing until 1992, Liut was a Second Team All-Star in 1986-87 when he was playing with the Hartford Whalers. Liut finished his career with two and a half seasons in Washington, and he had an overall record of 293-271-74.

Eligible since 1995.  Ranked #85 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Markus Naslund, Vancouver Canucks, Left Wing: 48 G, 56 A, 104 P, 11.7 PS 2003        

Naslund was not only the first Vancouver Canuck to win the Pearson, he was also the first from Sweden to capture the trophy. Naslund was in year two of his three-year run as a First Team All-Star, and he was the runner-up for the Hart to Peter Forsberg of the Colorado Avalanche.  Naslund played in the NHL until 2009, with his last year being as a New York Ranger.  The Swedish Wing had 869 NHL Points.

Eligible since 2012.  Ranked #50 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Let’s update our tally, shall we?        

Award in Question

Percentage of recipients who have entered the HOF

Percentage of recipients by year who have entered the HOF.

NBA MVP

100%

100%

NHL Art Ross

100%

100%

NHL Hart Trophy

93.6%

96.3%

NBA Finals MVP

91.3%

94.9%

NHL Norris

90.5%

96.4%

NHL Ted Lindsay Award

90.0%

 

NBA All-Star Game MVP

89.5%

91.7%

NHL Conn Smythe

74.2%

85.4%

NFL Bert Bell Award

73.7%

71.4%

NFL AP Offensive Player of the Year

73.1%

79.4%

NFL AP MVP

68.3%

74.0%

NFL Walter Payton Man of the Year

66.7%

66.7%

NHL Lady Byng

63.8%

76.0%

NFL Defensive Player of the Year

60.8%

71.1%

NFL Super Bowl MVP

60.6%

64.9%

NBA Defensive Player of the Year

58.3%

56.5%

NHL Vezina

57.1%

66.3%

NBA Rookie of the Year

56.5%

56.5%

MLB MVP

55.0%

60.2%

NFL Pro Bowl MVP

52.3%

54.8%

MLB Lou Gehrig Award

51.9%

51.9%

MLB Roberto Clemente Award

47.4%

47.4%

NHL Calder Trophy

46.5%

46.5%

NBA J. Walter Kennedy Citizenship Award

46.0%

46.0%

MLB/NL/AL Cy Young Award

44.4%

55.4%

MLB Babe Ruth Award

37.0%

39.3%

NHL King Clancy Award

36.8%

36.8%

NHL Frank J. Selke Trophy

33.3%

36.7%

MLB World Series MVP

33.3%

36.8%

MLB Hutch Award

33.1%

33.1%

NFL Offensive Rookie of the Year

28.6%

28.6%

NHL Bill Masterton Memorial Trophy

27.9%

27.9%

MLB Edgar Martinez Award

26.7%

17.2%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Designated Hitter)

25.0%

30.8%

MLB Comeback Player of the Year

25.0%

25.0%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Shortstop)

23.5%

52.6%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove

21.7%

36.8%

NFL Defensive Rookie of the Year

20.6%

20.6%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Catcher)

20.0%

22.5%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Second Base)

18.8%

39.8%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Shortstop)

18.2%

35.1%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Pitcher)

18.2%

20.1%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Second Base)

16.7%

32.7%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Outfield)

16.7%

30.1%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Outfield)

15.7%

25.2%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Third Base)

14.3%

14.3%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Third Base)

13.6%

14.3%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (First Base)

13.6%

13.3%

MLB (NL/AL) Rookie of the Year

13.3%

13.3%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Catcher)

10.3%

15.2%

NBA Most Improved Player of the Year

5.3%

3.2%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (First Base)

3.8%

3.2%

NFL AP Comeback Player of the Year

0.0%

0.0%

So, who is up next?

The following are the players who have won the Ted Lindsay Award Trophy in the NHL who have retired but have not met the mandatory years out of the game to qualify for the Hockey Hall of Fame:

Daniel Sedin, Vancouver Canucks, Left Wing: 41 G, 63 A, 104 P, 14.3 PS, 2010

Along with his twin brother, Henrik, Daniel Sedin played his entire 17-year career with the Vancouver Canucks, with his best season coming right in the middle of it.  Sedin was a First Team All-Star this year, and he would also win the Art Ross, the only time in his career he accomplished either of those.  Sedin was second in Hart voting, finishing behind Corey Perry of Anaheim.  Sedin retired with 1,041 career Points. 

Eligible in 2021.

The following are the players who have won the Ted Lindsay who are still active.

Jaromir Jagr, Pittsburgh Penguins, Right Wing 44 G, 83 A, 127 P, 14.6 PS  1999

This was Jagr’s ninth season in the NHL, and they were all spent with the Pittsburgh Penguins. Winning his third Art Ross Trophy, Jagr had career highs in Assists (83) and Points (127), and he was also the Hart Trophy winner, and he previously helped Pittsburgh win two Stanley Cups.

48 Years Old,Playing in Europe.

Jaromir Jagr, Pittsburgh Penguins, Right Wing 42 G, 54 A, 96 P, 12.2 PS  2000 (2)

Jagr went back-to-back for the Pearson, and this was the third straight year he led the NHL in Assists and it was also his third straight Art Ross and First Team All-Star.  Jagr was second for the Hart this year, and the year after he had his fourth consecutive Art Ross and First Team All-Star.

48 Years Old,Playing in Europe.

Jaromir Jagr, New York Rangers, Right Wing 54 G, 69 A, 123 P, 15.5 PS 2006 (3)

This was a comeback year of sorts for Jagr, who had his first three-digit year in scoring since 2000-01.  This was his last season where he hit at least 100, but he remained a scorer, playing for Philadelphia, Boston, New Jersey, Florida and Calgary. He won the Bill Masterton in 2016-17 and accumulated a colossal 1,921 career Points.

48 Years Old,Playing in Europe.

Sidney Crosby, Pittsburgh Penguins, Center: 36 G, 84 A, 120 P, 13.3 PS, 2007

“Sid the Kid” did not win the Calder, as that went to his longtime rival, Alex Ovechkin.  Crosby would however beat him to a Lester B. Pearson win, which he collected in his sophomore season.  Crosby would also win his first Art Ross, was named a First Team All-Star, he also won the prestigious Hart Trophy.  There was a lot more to come for Crosby.

33 Years Old,Playing for the Pittsburgh Penguins.

Alex Ovechkin, Washington Capitals, Left Wing: 65 G, 47 A, 112 P, 17.2 PS 2008

Ovechkin won his first Lester B. Pearson in his third season, which was also the first by a Washington Capital.  A First Team All-Star in all of his seasons to date, Ovechkin also won the Hart Trophy, the Art Ross Trophy, and the Rocket Richard Award for his 65 Goals.  

35 Years Old,Playing for the Washington Capitals.

Alex Ovechkin, Washington Capitals, Left Wing: 56 G, 54 A, 110 P, 14.5 PS 2009 (2)

The Russian Center repeated most of his honors in his back-to-back Pearson win.  Ovechkin repeated as the Rocket Richard winner, and was a First Team All-Star for his fourth consecutive season.  He would also win his second straight Hart.

35 Years Old,Playing for the Washington Capitals.

Alex Ovechkin, Washington Capitals, Left Wing: 50 G, 59 A, 109 P, 15.6 PS 2010 

Ovechkin remained in hickey elite, capturing his third consecutive Lester B. Pearson, which was not renamed the Ted Lindsay Award.  Again, a First Team All-Star, Ovechkin missed out on the Hart, losing to Henrik Sedin of the Vancouver Canucks.

35 Years Old,Playing for the Washington Capitals.

Evgeni Malkin, Pittsburgh Penguins, Center: 50 G, 59 A, 109 P, 13.4 PS 2012

The first three seasons for Evgeni Malkin was nothing short of stunning.  Malkin won the Calder in 2006-07, was a First Team All-Star in all three years, and was the Art Ross Winner in 2008-09, while winning the Stanley Cup and the Conn Smythe. Malkin’s two years after was riddled with injuries, but he made up for it in 2011-12 with a second Art Ross, and his first Hart.  Malkin was a First Team All-Star for the fourth time, and he also won the Hart Trophy. He would go on to win two more Cups with Pittsburgh.

34 Years Old,Playing for the Pittsburgh Penguins.

Sidney Crosby, Pittsburgh Penguins, Center: 15 G, 41 A, 56 P, 7.5 PS, 2013 (2)

In between his first and second Ted Lindsay Award, Crosby won a Stanley Cup in 2009, was a Second Team All-Star (2010), won a Rocket Richard Trophy (2009) and a Mark Messier Leadership Award (2010).  A First Team All-Star this year, Crosby was second for the Hart to Ovechkin.

33 Years Old,Playing for the Pittsburgh Penguins.

Sidney Crosby, Pittsburgh Penguins, Center: 36 G, 84 A, 120 P, 13.3 PS, 2014 (3)

Crosby went back-to-back in Ted Lindsay wins, and this season he collected another Art Ross, a Hart, and a First Team All-Star Selection.  Crosby later won two more Stanley Cups with the Pens in 2016 and 2017.

33 Years Old,Playing for the Pittsburgh Penguins.

Carey Price, Montreal Canadiens, Goalie: 44-16-5 Record, 1.96 GAA, 16.2 PS, 2015

This was the eighth NHL season for Price, who as of this writing has only played for the Montreal Canadiens.  Price led the NHL in Wins (44), Save Percentage (.933) and Goals Against Average (1.96), and he not only won the Hart, he also captured the Vezina, William M. Jennings, Hart Trophy, and he was also a First Team All-Star. This is the only year that Price was a post-season All-Star.

33 Years Old,Playing for the Montreal Canadiens.

Patrick Kane, Chicago Blackhawks, Right Wing: 46 G, 60 A, 106 P, 15.0 PS, 2016

This was Kane’s ninth season in the NHL and the Chicago Blackhawk had already accomplished so much before his Ted Lindsay win.  Kane won the Calder, and was already a two-time First Team All-Star, and a three-time Stanley Cup winner.  This season, Kane was a First Team All-Star for a third time, and also won his first Art Ross and Hart Trophy.  Kane has been a First Team All-Star for a fourth time and earned a Second Team All-Star.  He is already a member of the 1,000 Point club.

31 Years Old,Playing for the Chicago Blackhawks.

Connor McDavid, Edmonton Oilers, Center: 30 G, 70 A, 100 P, 12.8 PS, 2017

McDavid was in his second season, where he not only won the Ted Lindsay, but was the winner of the Art Ross and the Hart.  This season also brought in the first of three straight First Team All-Stars.

24 Years Old,Playing for the Edmonton Oilers.

Connor McDavid, Edmonton Oilers, Center: 41 G, 67 A, 108 P, 13.1 PS, 2018

McDavid won his second straight Ted Lindsay Award, and it coincided with his second Art Ross and First Team All-Star Selection.  The Oiler was only fifth in Hart voting, finishing behind Taylor Hall (winner, New Jersey), Nathan McKinnon (Colorado), Anze Kopitar (Los Angeles) and Claude Giroux (Philadelphia).

28 Years Old,Playing for the Arizona Coyotes.

Nikita Kucherov, Tampa Bay Lightning, Right Wing: 41 G, 87 A, 128 P, 14.6 PS, 2019

Kucherov was in his sixth NHL season (all with Tampa) and he would win not only the Hart but his first Art Ross and Hart Trophy.  Kucherov was a First Team All-Star for the Second straight time and the year after he was a Second Team All-Star and led the Lightning win the Stanley Cup in 2020.

27 Years Old,Playing for the Tampa Bay Lightning.

Leon Draisaitl, Edmonton Oilers, Center: 43 G, 67 A, 110 P, 12.8 PS, 2020

Draisaitl’s Ted Lindsay Award win marked the first time that a German player won the most coveted individual award in Hockey. Draisaitl was in his sixth season in hockey (all with Edmonton) and this year he also won the Hart, Art Ross, and was a First Team All-Star.

25 Years Old,Playing for the Edmonton Oilers.

For the most part, the Ted Lindsay Award is a way to punch your ticket into the Hockey Hall of Fame.

So, what is up next?

We stay with the NHL and look at their newest award, the Mark Messier Leadership Award.

As always, we thank you for your support, and look for that soon.

Committee Chairman

Kirk Buchner, "The Committee Chairman", is the owner and operator of the site.  Kirk can be contacted at [email protected] . Email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

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