Awards - HOF? Part Sixty: The Hank Aaron Award

Awards - HOF?  Part Sixty:  The Hank Aaron Award
29 Oct
2021
Not in Hall of Fame

We here at Notinhalloffame.com thought it would be fun to take a look at the major awards in North American team sports and see how it translates into Hall of Fame potential.

Needless to say, different awards in different sports yield hall of fame potential.  In basketball, the team sport with the least number of players on a roster, the dividend for greatness much higher.  In baseball, it is not as much as a great individual season does not have the same impact.

Last time, we looked at the ALCS or NLCS MVPs.  We have one major baseball award left, the Hank Aaron Award, which is given annually to the best hitter in each league.  It is named after Aaron, who was one of the most prolific hitters of all-time.

The trophy first came into existence in 1999, with one awarded in each league.

So how many Hank Aaron Award winners have made the Baseball Hall of Fame?

Let’s find out!

The following are the past players who have won the Hank Aaron Award who are eligible for the Baseball Hall of Fame and have been enshrined.

2006 AL: Derek Jeter, New York Yankees, Third Base, 14 HR, 97 RBI, .343/.417/.483            

Derek Jeter is one of the most popular players in Yankees history, which is incredible considering how many legends wore the pinstripes.  In 2006, Jeter had already won the World Series four times, and he went to his seventh All-Star Game, while earning his first Silver Slugger.  Jeter was the runner-up for the MVP this year.

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2020.

2009 AL: Derek Jeter, New York Yankees, Third Base, 18 HR, 66 RBI, .334/.406/.465 (2)            

Jeter finished third in MVP voting this year, and he collected his fourth consecutive Silver Slugger.  He would lead New York to another World Series win, his fifth, and he played until 2014, collecting 3,465 Hits with a .310 lifetime Batting Average.  Jeter was overall a 14-time All-Star, five-time Silver Slugger, five-time Gold Glove winner, who also smacked 260 Home Runs with 1,311 RBIs.

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2020.

 

The following are the players who have won the Hank Aaron Award who are eligible for the Baseball Hall of Fame and have not been selected:

1999 AL: Manny Ramirez, Cleveland Indians, Outfield, 44 HR, 165 RBI, .333/.442/.633.            

Ramirez had already proven himself as a star, but this season, he led the American League in RBIs with 165, which would be a career-high.  An All-Star for the third time, Ramirez also led the league in Slugging Percentage, OPS (1.105) and was third in MVP voting.  He also won the Silver Slugger.

Eligible Since 2017.  Ramirez has been on the ballot for five years, finishing as high as 28.2% in both 2019 and 2020.  Ranked #7 on Notinhalloffame.com  

1999 NL: Sammy Sosa, Chicago Cubs, Outfield, 63 HR, 141 RBI, .288/.367/.635, 1999, NL            

Sosa was the 1998 National League MVP, and was ninth this year in voting.  He was also a Silver Slugger winner, winning it for the third of six times.  While Sosa is a seven-time All-Star with 609 career Home Runs, PED suspicion has kept him out of Cooperstown.

Eligible Since 2013.  Sosa has been on the ballot for nine years, finishing as high as 17.0% in 2020.  Ranked #31 on Notinhalloffame.com  

2000 AL:  Carlos Delgado, Toronto Blue Jays, First Base, 41 HR, 137 RBI, .344/.470/.664, 2000, AL            

Delgado was an All-Star for the first time, and he led the AL in Doubles (57) and was fourth in MVP voting.  The First Baseman earned the second of his third Silver Sluggers this year, and he would later play for Florida and New York (NL), retiring on 2009.  Delgado had 473 Home Runs with 1,512 RBIs over his career.

Eligible Since 2015.  Delgado was on the ballot for one year in 2015 and received 3.6% of the vote.  Ranked #82 on Notinhalloffame.com  

2000 NL:  Todd Helton, Colorado Rockies, First Base, 42 HR, 147 RBI, .372/.463/.698, 2000, NL            

2000 was arguably Helton’s best year in baseball as he led the NL in Hits (216), Doubles (59), RBIs, and all three Slash Line components.  This began a five-year streak of All-Star Game appearances, and a four-year run of Silver Sluggers.  Helton, who was fifth in MVP voting this year, played his entire career with the Rockies, and had 2,519 Hits, 369 Home Runs, 1,406 RBIs with a Slash Line of .316/.414/539.

Eligible Since 2018.  Helton has been on the ballot for three years, finishing as high as 44.9% in 2021.  Ranked #9 on Notinhalloffame.com  

2001 AL:  Alex Rodriguez, Texas Rangers, Shortstop, 52 HR, 135 RBI, .318/.399/.622, 2001, AL            

After establishing himself as a superstar in Seattle, Rodriguez signed what was then the biggest contract in baseball with the Texas Rangers.  Rodriguez delivered with his best year to date, though he was only sixth in MVP voting.  He led the AL in Home Runs (52), Runs Scored (133), and was a Silver Slugger for the fifth time.

Eligible Since 2022.  Rodriguez is on the ballot for the first time this year.  Ranked #3 on Notinhalloffame.com  

2001 NL:  Barry Bonds, San Francisco Giants, Outfield, 73 HR, 137 RBI, .328/.515/.863, 2001, NL            

This was the year that Bonds set the single season record in Home Runs, and Slugging Percentage, and while he was wildly unpopular outside of San Francisco, he was the runaway winner for the MVP, his fourth and first since 1993 when he was a Pirate.  Bonds also led the NL in OBP, OPS, and won his ninth Silver Slugger this year.

Eligible Since 2013.  Bonds has been on the ballot for nine years and finished as high as 61.8% in 2021.  Ranked #1C on Notinhalloffame.com  

2002 AL:  Alex Rodriguez, Texas Rangers, Shortstop, 57 HR, 142 RBI, .300/.392/.623, 2001, AL (2)           

A-Rod was incredible this year, leading the AL in Home Runs for the second straight year, and winning his first RBI Title.  Rodriguez finished second for the MVP, won his sixth Silver Slugger, and defensively won the Gold Glove for the first time. 

Eligible Since 2022.  Rodriguez is on the ballot for the first time this year.  Ranked #3 on Notinhalloffame.com  

2002 NL:  Barry Bonds, San Francisco Giants, Outfield, 46 HR, 110 RBI, .370/.582/.799, 2002, NL (2)         

Bonds was again putting up PlayStation like numbers, and while his Home Runs were “only” 46, his OBP rocketed up to .582.  Basically, nobody wanted to pitch to him unless they had to.  Bonds repeated as MVP, winning his fifth overall, and also was a Silver Slugger for the tenth time.

Eligible Since 2013.  Bonds has been on the ballot for nine years and finished as high as 61.8% in 2021.  Ranked #1C on Notinhalloffame.com  

2003 AL:  Alex Rodriguez, Texas Rangers, Shortstop, 47 HR, 118 RBI, .298/.396/.600 (3)           

While arguably this was his weakest of his three years in Texas, Rodriguez captured his first MVP.  A-Rod led the AL in Home Runs for the third straight season (47), and he won his first Slugging Title (.600).  Silver Slugger number seven came to Rodriguez as did his second Gold Glove. 

Eligible Since 2022.  Rodriguez is on the ballot for the first time this year.  Ranked #3 on Notinhalloffame.com 

2004 AL: Manny Ramirez, Boston Red Sox, Outfield, 43 HR, 130 RBI, .308/.397/.613 (2)           

Ramirez joined the Red Sox in 2001, and in 2004, he won his first Home Run Title.  This season, he won his third Slugging Title, third OPS Title, and was third for the AL MVP.  Again winning the Silver Slugger, Ramirez and the Red Sox broke the curse this year, by winning their first World Series since 2019.  Ramirez played until 2012, blasting 555 Home Runs, 1.831 RBIs, with a lifetime Slash Line of .312/.411/.585.

Eligible Since 2017.  Ramirez has been on the ballot for five years, finishing as high as 28.2% in both 2019 and 2020.  Ranked #7 on Notinhalloffame.com  

2004 NL:  Barry Bonds, San Francisco Giants, Outfield, 45 HR, 101 RBI, .362/.609/.812 (3)         

Bonds did not win the Hank Aaron Award in 2003, but he won the MVP that year, his third in a row.  He reclaimed the Hank Aaron Award in 2004, along with his fourth straight MVP, where he set a MLB record with a 1.422 OPS season.  Injuries and age caught up with Bonds, and despite being an All-Star in 2007 with a National League leading OBP of .480, he was not signed by any other team afterward.  He finished his career with 762 Home Runs, and 2,558 Walks, both of which are all-time records.  He retired with a lifetime OPS of 1.051.

Eligible Since 2013.  Bonds has been on the ballot for nine years and finished as high as 61.8% in 2021.  Ranked #1C on Notinhalloffame.com  

2005 AL:  David Ortiz, Boston Red Sox, Designated Hitter, 47 HR, 148 RBI, .300/.397/.604.         

Ortiz became the first primary Designated Hitter to win the Hank Aaron Award, and the popular player won the RBI Title for the first of what would be three times.  This was his second year in Boston, his second All-Star season, and he also won his second Silver Slugger.  Ortiz was the runner-up for the MVP.

Eligible Since 2022.  Ortiz is on the ballot for the first time this year.  Ranked #8 on Notinhalloffame.com  

2005 NL:  Andruw Jones, Atlanta Braves, Outfield, 51 HR, 128 RBI, .263/.347/.575.          

This was the best season of Jones’ career, and he won the Home Run (51) and RBI (128) Titles for the only time this year.  Jones also captured his only Silver Slugger this year, and he was the runner-up for the National League MVP.  Jones stayed with Atlanta until 2007, after which he played with the Dodgers, Rangers, White Sox and Yankees, and retired with 434 Home Runs.

Eligible Since 2017.  Jones has been on the ballot for four years and finished as high as 33.9% in 2021.  Ranked #40 on Notinhalloffame.com  

2006 NL:  Ryan Howard, Philadelphia Phillies, First Base, 58 HR, 149 RBI, .313/.425/.659.          

In what was his third Major League season, Ryan Howard was spectacular, and produced his best year in Baseball.  Howard was first in Home Runs (58), Runs Batted In (149), and his Slash Line of .313/.425/.659 were career highs.  Justifiably, Howard won the MVP and the Silver Slugger, and over the next three seasons, he blasted at least 45 Home Runs and 136 RBIs.  Howard slumped after that, losing facets of his game, which considering he couldn’t field or run fast, took him out of any Hall of Fame consideration.  He played his entire career with the Phillies, accumulating 1,475 Hits, 382 Home Runs and 1,194 RBIs.

Eligible Since 2022.  Howard is on the ballot for the first time this year.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com

2007 AL:  Alex Rodriguez, New York Yankees, Shortstop, 47 HR, 118 RBI, .298/.396/.600. (4)           

Rodriguez joined the Yankees in 2004, and to say it was a tumultuous period would be an understatement.  This did not mean that he did not produce colossal numbers in the Bronx, as he did.  He won his second MVP in 2005, and his third this year, winning his fifth Home Run Title (54), second RBI Title (156), third Slugging Title (.645) and second OPS Title (1.067).  A-Rod also won the ninth of what would be ten Silver Sluggers.  Rodriguez drama began after this season, but he did win a World Series Ring in 2009.  He finished his career with 3,115 Hits, 696 Home Runs, 2,086 RBIs, 329 Stolen Bases and a lifetime Batting Average of .295.

Eligible Since 2022.  Rodriguez is on the ballot for the first time this year.  Ranked #3 on Notinhalloffame.com 

2007 NL:  Prince Fielder, Milwaukee Brewers, First Base, 50 HR, 119 RBI, .288/.395/.618.          

Prince Fielder followed in the footsteps of his father, Cecil, as he became a stocky power-hitting First Baseman, and this was his breakout year.  Fielder led the American League in Home Runs (50), was third in MVP voting, and won the Silver Slugger.  He had five more 30 Home Run seasons, would become a six-time All-Star and collected three Silver Sluggers.  His career ended abruptly at age 32 due to injuries, and he retired with 319 Home Runs.

Eligible Since 2022.  Fielder is on the ballot for the first time this year.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com

2008 AL:  Kevin Youkilis, Boston Red Sox, First Base, 29 HR, 115 RBI, .312/.390/.569.          

This was the best year of Youkilis’ career, where he had career-bests in Home Runs (29), RBIs (115) and Batting Average (.312), and was an All-Star for the first time.  Youkilis was third in MVP voting, and he helped the BoSox win two previous World Series.  He went to two more All-Star Games, and played with Boston until 2012, finishing his career with brief stops in Chicago (AL) and New York (AL) before retiring in 213.  He had 1,053 career Hits.

Eligible Since 2019.  Youkilis was on the ballot for one year in 2019, but did not receive any votes.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com

2008 NL:  Aramis Ramirez, Chicago Cubs, Third Base, 27 HR, 112 RBI, .289/.380/.518.          

Ramirez was an All-Star in 2005, and in 2008, his 11th Season, He was an All-Star for the second and final time.  This year, he was tenth in MVP voting, equalling his finish in 2004.  Ramirez later played for Milwaukee, going to a third All-Star Game in 2014, and was a Silver Slugger (while still a Cub) in 2011.  He retired in 2015, finishing with 2,303 Hits, 386 Home Runs and 1,417 RBIs.

Eligible Since 2021.  Ramirez was on the ballot for one year in 2021, and received 1.0% of the vote.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com

2016 AL:  David Ortiz, Boston Red Sox, Designated Hitter, 38 HR, 127 RBI, .315/.401/.620, AL (2)         

Ortiz had one of the best farewell seasons ever, and fittingly it resulted in his second Hank Aaron Award, 11 years after his first.  For the only time in his career, he led the AL in Doubles (48), and his 127 RBI gave him his third RBI title.  Ortiz also led the AL in Slugging Percentage (.620) and OPS (1.021), and he won the Silver Slugger for the seventh time.  Over his career, Ortiz had 2,473 Hits, 541 Home Runs, 1,768 RBIs with a lifetime OPS of .931.  He was also instrumental in the Red Sox winning three World Series.

Eligible Since 2022.  Ortiz is on the ballot for the first time this year.  Ranked #8 on Notinhalloffame.com  

 

Let’s update our tally, shall we?       

Award in Question

Percentage of recipients who have entered the HOF

Percentage of recipients by year who have entered the HOF.

NBA MVP

100%

100%

NHL Art Ross

100%

100%

NHL Hart Trophy

93.6%

96.3%

NBA Finals MVP

91.3%

94.9%

NHL Norris

90.5%

96.4%

NHL Ted Lindsay Award

90.0%

 

NBA All-Star Game MVP

89.5%

91.7%

NHL Conn Smythe

74.2%

85.4%

NFL Bert Bell Award

73.7%

71.4%

NFL AP Offensive Player of the Year

73.1%

79.4%

NFL AP MVP

68.3%

74.0%

NFL Walter Payton Man of the Year

66.7%

66.7%

NHL Lady Byng

63.8%

76.0%

NFL Defensive Player of the Year

60.8%

71.1%

NFL Super Bowl MVP

60.6%

64.9%

NHL Mark Messier Leadership Award

60.0%

60.0%

NBA Defensive Player of the Year

58.3%

56.5%

NHL Vezina

57.1%

66.3%

NBA Rookie of the Year

56.5%

56.5%

MLB MVP

55.0%

60.2%

NFL Pro Bowl MVP

52.3%

54.8%

MLB Lou Gehrig Award

51.9%

51.9%

MLB Roberto Clemente Award

47.4%

47.4%

NHL Calder Trophy

46.5%

46.5%

NBA J. Walter Kennedy Citizenship Award

46.0%

46.0%

MLB/NL/AL Cy Young Award

44.4%

55.4%

MLB Babe Ruth Award

37.0%

39.3%

NHL King Clancy Award

36.8%

36.8%

NHL Frank J. Selke Trophy

33.3%

36.7%

MLB World Series MVP

33.3%

36.8%

MLB Hutch Award

33.1%

33.1%

NFL Offensive Rookie of the Year

28.6%

28.6%

NHL Bill Masterton Memorial Trophy

27.9%

27.9%

MLB Edgar Martinez Award

26.7%

17.2%

MLB Delivery Man of the Year

25.0%

50.0%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Designated Hitter)

25.0%

30.8%

MLB Comeback Player of the Year

25.0%

25.0%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Shortstop)

23.5%

52.6%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove

21.7%

36.8%

NHL William M. Jennings Trophy

20.7%

40.4%

NFL Defensive Rookie of the Year

20.6%

20.6%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Catcher)

20.0%

22.5%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Second Base)

18.8%

39.8%

MLB Rolaids Reliever of the Year

18.6%

33.3%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Shortstop)

18.2%

35.1%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Pitcher)

18.2%

20.1%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Second Base)

16.7%

32.7%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Outfield)

16.7%

30.1%

MLB NLCS/ALCS MVP

16.1%

15.3%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Outfield)

15.7%

25.2%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Third Base)

14.3%

14.3%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Third Base)

13.6%

14.3%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (First Base)

13.6%

13.3%

MLB (NL/AL) Rookie of the Year

13.3%

13.3%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Catcher)

10.3%

15.2%

MLB Hank Aaron Award

9.1%

14.3%

NBA Most Improved Player of the Year

5.3%

3.2%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (First Base)

3.8%

3.2%

NFL AP Comeback Player of the Year

0.0%

0.0%

So, who is up next?

The following are the players who have won the Hank Aaron Award in MLB who have retired but have not met the mandatory years out of the game to qualify for the Baseball Hall of Fame: 

2010 AL: Jose Bautista, Toronto Blue Jays, Outfield, 54 HR, 124 RBI, .260/.378/.617           

Jose Bautista seemingly came out of nowhere to become an offensive star, as at age 29, he went from 13 to 54 Home Runs.  Bautista led the AL in Home Runs this year, and earned his first Silver Slugger.  He was also fourth in MVP voting, and began a six-year run of All-Stars.  

Eligible In 2024. 

2011 AL: Jose Bautista, Toronto Blue Jays, Outfield, 43 HR, 103 RBI, .302/.447/.608 (2)           

As great as Bautista’s power numbers were in 2011, they were down from what he did in 2010.  Nevertheless, Bautista became a more complete hitter, leading the AL in Walks (132), had his first (and only) .300 season, and he led the league in Slugging (.608) and OPS (1.056).  Bautista was third in MVP voting, and won his second Silver Slugger.  He won a third Silver Slugger in 2014, and had 344 Home Runs over his career, most of which happened after he turned 29.

Eligible In 2024. 

2011 NL: Matt Kemp, Los Angeles Dodgers, Outfield, 39 HR, 126 RBI, .324/.399/.586            

This was by far the nest season of Matt Kemp’s career, where he led the National League in Runs Scored (115), Home Runs (39) and RBIs, all of which were career-highs.  Kemp was the runner-up for the MVP, and this was his second and final Silver Slugger year.  The three-time All-Star would later play for San Diego, Atlanta, Cincinnati and Colorado, and he had 287 Home Runs.

Eligible In 2026. 

The following are the past players who have won the Hank Aaron Award who are eligible for the Baseball Hall of Fame and are still active.

2004 NL: Albert Pujols, St. Louis Cardinals, First Base, 2004, 43 HR, 124 RBI, .359/.439/.667.

Pujols was in his third season, and the second of which where he finished second in MVP voting behind Barry Bonds.  This year, Pujols, who won his second Silver Slugger, led the NL in Hits (212), Doubles (51) and Batting Average (.359). 

41 Years Old, Playing for the Los Angeles Angels.

2009 NL: Albert Pujols, St. Louis Cardinals, First Base, 2009, 47 HR, 135 RBI, .327/.443/.658 (2)            

After winning his first Hank Aaron Award in 2003, Pujols won the National League MVP in 2005 and 2008, and 2009 saw the slugger win his third.  Pujols won the Home Run title for the first time this year, and he also captured his first OBP crown.  This was also his third time winning the Slugging and OPS Title.  Silver Slugger number five happened this year for Pujols.

41 Years Old, Playing for the Los Angeles Angels.

2010 NL: Joey Votto, Cincinnati Reds, First Base, 37 HR, 113 RBI, .324/.424/.600            

This was Votto’s fourth year in the Majors, and it was his breakout campaign.  Not only did Votto win the Hank Aaron award, the First Baseman won the MVP.  Votto was an All-Star for the first time this year, and he would win his first of seven OBP Titles, and the first of two OPS Titles.

37 Years Old, Playing for the Cincinnati Reds.

2012 AL: Miguel Cabrera, Detroit Tigers, First Base, 44 HR, 139 RBI, .330/.393/.606            

Cabrera was a World Series Champion with Florida in 2007, and like all of their stars, he was traded, in his case to Detroit.  Cabrera got better in Motown, and this year he went to his seventh All-Star Game, won his second Home Run Title, his second Batting Title, and he won his first MVP.

38 Years Old, Playing for the Detroit Tigers.

2012 NL: Buster Posey, San Francisco Giants, Catcher, 24 HR, 103 RBI, .336/.408/.549      

This year, Posey became the first Catcher to win the Hank Aaron Award, which he did in a campaign that earned him the MVP.  Posey, who two years before won the Rookie of the Year, captured the Batting Title this year and he also won the Silver Slugger.

34 Years Old, Playing for the San Francisco Giants.

2013 AL: Miguel Cabrera, Detroit Tigers, First Base, 44 HR, 137 RBI, .348/.442/.636      

Cabrera went back-to-back for Hank Aaron Awards, and did the same for MVPs.  He was first in the AL in all aspects of the Slash Line, and was first in OPS (1.078), which was a career-high.  Cabrera won his fifth Silver Slugger this year, and would win two more.  Still playing, Cabrera became a member of the 500 Home Run club in 2021.

38 Years Old, Playing for the Detroit Tigers.

2013 NL: Paul Goldschmidt, Arizona Diamondbacks, First Base, 36 HR, 125 RBI, .302/.401/.651      

Goldschmidt broke out this year, leading the National League in Home Runs (36), RBIs (125), Slugging Percentage (.551) and Slugging Percentage (.952).  He was the runner-up for the MVP, and also won his first Gold Glove and Silver Slugger, while also beginning a six-year streak of All-Stars.

33 Years Old, Playing for the St. Louis Cardinals.

2014 AL: Mike Trout, Los Angeles Angels, Outfield, 36 HR, 111 RBI, .287/.377/.561      

Two years after winning the Rookie of the Year, Mike Trout was the proven best player in baseball.  Trout was second in MVP voting in his first and second full year, and this season, he did not only win the Hank Aaron but his first MVP.  This year, Trout led the AL in Runs (115), RBIs (111) and won his third straight Silver Slugger.

30 Years Old, Playing for the Los Angeles Angels.

2014 NL: Giancarlo Stanton, Miami Marlins, Outfield, 37 HR, 105 RBI, .288/.395/.555      

This is Stanton’s fifth season, and he led the National League in Home Runs for the first time (37), and won his second Slugging Title (.555).  Stanton was second in MVP voting and he won his first Silver Slugger this year.

31 Years Old, Playing for the New York Yankees.

2015 AL: Josh Donaldson, Toronto Blue Jays, Third Base, 41 HR, 123 RBI, .297/.371/.568      

Donaldson broke out the year before, going to his first All-Star Game, but it would be his last year in Oakland, as he was traded to Toronto.  In his first year as a Blue Jay, Donaldson had his best year in Baseball, leading the American League in Runs (122), RBIs (123), and he won the MVP and his first Silver Slugger.

35 Years Old, Playing for the Minnesota Twins.

2015 NL: Bryce Harper, Washington Nationals, Outfield, 42 HR, 99 RBI, .330/.460/.649      

Harper won the National League Rookie of the Year in 2012, and this year he had his monster campaign, leading the NL in Runs Scored (118), Home Runs (42), OBP (.460), Slugging Percentage (.649) and OPS (1.109). He also won his first Silver Slugger this year.

28 Years Old, Playing for the Philadelphia Phillies.

2016 NL: Kris Bryant, Chicago Cubs, Outfield, 39 HR, 102 RBI, .292/.385/.554      

This was Bryant’s second season, and he also won the MVP.  Bryant also led the NL in Runs Scored (121), Offensive bWAR (6.4), was fourth in OPS, OPS+ (146) and third in Home Runs.  More importantly, Bryant led the Cubs to their first World Series win in over 100 years.

29 Years Old, Playing for the San Francisco Giants.

2017 AL: Jose Altuve, Houston Astros, Second Base, 24 HR, 81 RBI, .346/.410/.547      

For the fourth year in a row, Altuve led the National League in Hits (204), and won his third Batting Title.  Altuve also won the Silver Slugger and MVP, and the Astros won the World Series, their first.

31 Years Old, Playing for the Houston Astros.

2017 NL: Giancarlo Stanton, Miami Marlins, Outfield, 59 HR, 132 RBI, .281/.376/.631      

In between his first and second Hank Aaron Award, Stanton remained a competent power hitter, but this year he was outstanding, finishing first in Home Runs (59), RBIs (132), Slugging Percentage (.631).  Stanton won the MVP this year and earned his second Silver Slugger.  Stanton signed with the Yankees after this year.

31 Years Old, Playing for the New York Yankees.

2018 AL: J.D. Martinez, Boston Red Sox, Outfield, 43 HR, 130 RBI, .330/.402/.629      

In his first year with the Red Sox, Martinez was fourth in MVP voting, and was also the league-leader in RBIs.  An All-Star for the second time this year, Martinez won the Silver Slugger both as an Outfielder and Designated Hitter. Martinez was also second in Batting Average, Slugging Percentage and third in OPS.

33 Years Old, Playing for the Boston Red Sox.

2018 NL: Christian Yelich, Milwaukee Brewers, Outfield, 36 HR, 110 RBI, .326/.402/.598      

The acquisition of Christian Yelich paid instant dividends for the Brewers, with the Outfielder winning the Batting Title, Slugging Title and OPS Title in his first year there.  Yelich also won the Silver Slugger and won the MVP.

29 Years Old, Playing for the Milwaukee Brewers.

2019 AL: Mike Trout, Los Angeles Angels, Outfield, 45 HR, 104 RBI, .291/.438/.645 (2)     

In between Trout’s first and second Hank Aaron Award, won his second MVP, three more Silver Sluggers, three OBP Titles, one Slugging Title and two OPS Titles.  This year, Trout led the American League in OBP (.439), Slugging Percentage (.645) and OPS (1.083).  Trout won his third MVP this year and captured his seventh Silver Slugger.

30 Years Old, Playing for the Los Angeles Angels.

2019 NL: Christian Yelich, Milwaukee Brewers, Outfield, 44 HR, 97 RBI, .329/.429/.671 (2)      

Yelich almost won the MVP again, as his late-season injury that cost him significant games kept him from it.  Regardless, he swept the Slash Line, and won his second Silver Slugger.

29 Years Old, Playing for the Milwaukee Brewers.

2020 AL: Jose Abreu, Chicago White Sox, First Base, 19 HR, 60 RBI, .317/.370/.617.      

This was the second straight year that Abreu led the American League in RBIs, and he also topped the league in Hits (76), Slugging Percentage and Total Bases (148).  Abreu won the MVP this year, his first.

35 Years Old, Playing for the Chicago White Sox.

2021 NL: Freddie Freeman, Atlanta Braves, First Base, 13 HR, 53 RBI, .341/.462/.640.      

Freeman earned his second Silver Slugger this year, and after four previous top ten finishes in MVP voting, he won it this year.  He was the league-leader in Runs Scored (51) and Doubles (23), and was second in OPS (1.102).

32 Years Old, Playing for the Atlanta Braves.

The PED situation has lowered the bar significantly for Hank Aaron Award winners to enter Cooperstown, but this average will rise in time.

So, what is up next?

We have another look in Baseball, with the MLB All-Star Game MVP.

As always, we thank you for your support, and look for that soon.

Committee Chairman

Kirk Buchner, "The Committee Chairman", is the owner and operator of the site.  Kirk can be contacted at [email protected] .

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