Awards = HOF?: Part Forty-Six: The Art Ross Trophy

Awards = HOF?: Part Forty-Six: The Art Ross Trophy
21 Apr
2020
Not in Hall of Fame

We here at Notinhalloffame.com thought it would be fun to take a look at the major awards in North American team sports and see how it translates into Hall of Fame potential.

Needless to say, different awards in different sports yield hall of fame potential.  In basketball, the team sport with the least number of players on a roster, the dividend for greatness much higher.  In baseball, it is not as much as a great individual season does not have the same impact.

Last time, we looked at the World Series MVP.  This time we went back to hockey, and the Art Ross Trophy.

Named after Hockey Hall of Fame player, coach and general manager, Art Ross, the award began in 1947-48, and is awarded to the player who accumulates the most Points in the regular season.  Unlike most awards, it is not arbitrary at all, as it based purely on one statistic.  Notably, if players tie in Points, the tie-breaker goes to the player with the most Goals.

So how many Art Ross Trophy winners have made the Hockey Hall of Fame?

Let’s find out!

The following are the past players who have won the Art Ross Trophy who are eligible for the Hockey Hall of Fame and have been enshrined.

Elmer Lach, Montreal Canadiens, 30 G, 31 A, 61 P (1948)

How fitting is it that a Montreal player won this award first?  Elmer Lach has already won two Stanley Cups for Montreal, and he won the coveted Hart Trophy in 1944-45.  This season, he won his only Art Ross Trophy, narrowly beating New York’s Buddy O’Connor by one point.  Lach would finish third in Hart Trophy voting, and was a First Team All-Star this season.  Lach played for the Habs until 1954, and he would win another Stanley Cup, and earned another First Team All-Star before retiring.  He would have 623 career Points.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1966.

Roy Conacher, Chicago Blackhawks, 26 G, 42 A, 68 P (1949)      

This was by far the best season of Roy Conacher’s career.  As a rookie with the Boston Bruins, he would lead the NHL in Goals (26), and would win the Stanley Cup.  He won his second two years later, but individually this was his best year, where had a career-high 68 Points, and the then Blackhawk winger would finish third in Hart Trophy voting and was a First Team All-Star for the first and only time. Conacher played three more years and retired with 427 Points.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1998.

Ted Lindsay, Detroit Red Wings, 22 G, 55 A, 78 P (1950)   

This would be Ted Lindsay’s only Art Ross win, with him earning the second First Team All-Star of what would be eight over his career.  Finishing seventh in Hart Trophy voting this season, Lindsay would win his first Stanley Cup, and he won three more in the 1950s.  Lindsay played until 1960, with another season in 1964-65.  He had 851 Points overall in his career.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1966.

Gordie Howe, Detroit Red Wings, 43 G, 43 A, 86 P (1951)  

Gordie Howe had already been established as a star in the NHL after having been named a Second Team All-Star the last two seasons, but this year he destroyed everyone in the race for the Art Ross. His 86 Points were 20 more than the second place finisher (Rocket Richard), and he was third in Hart Trophy voting.  This was just the beginning of Howe’s association with the Art Ross.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1972.

Gordie Howe, Detroit Red Wings, 47 G, 39 A, 86 P (2) (1952)      

Gordie Howe became the first player to repeat as the Art Ross Trophy winner and also the first to win the Hart Trophy in the same season.  Howe helped the Red Wings the Stanley Cup, which was second, as he helped them win in 1950.  Notably, Howe’s closest competitor was his teammate, Ted Lindsay, who was 17 Points behind.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1972.

Gordie Howe, Detroit Red Wings, 47 G, 39 A, 86 P (3) (1953)      

Howe made history again as the first three-time winner, which he accomplished in three straight seasons.  Howe again would see his teammate, Ted Lindsay, and this time he led his closest competitor by 24 Points.  Howe repeated as the Hart Trophy winner. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1972.

Gordie Howe, Detroit Red Wings, 33 G, 48 A, 81 P (4) (1954)      

Another year, and another Art Ross Trophy for Howe, who made it four in a row.  Howe again led the Red Wings to another Stanley Cup, and he was again more than ten Points ahead of his nearest competitor, who this year was Rocket Richard who had 67 Points.  Howe finished fourth in Hart Trophy voting.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1972.

Bernie Geoffrion, Montreal, 38 G, 37 A, 75 P (1955)       

In the province of Quebec, this is the most controversial Art Ross Trophy winner, despite the fact that a member of the Montreal Candiens won it.  Bernie Geoffrion beat his teammate, Rocket Richard, by one Point, which he was able to accomplish when Richard was suspended by the league for striking an official.  Richard was so popular, that they booed Geoffrion for winning the scoring title and it was Richard who was named a First Team All-Star, and not Geoffrion, who was named to the Second Team.  This marked the first time that an Art Ross winner would not be a First Team All-Star. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1972.

Jean Beliveau, Montreal, 47 G, 41 A, 88 P (1956)           

Playing his entire career with the Montreal Canadiens, Jean Beliveau won the Art Ross and the Hart Trophy this year.  This might have been Beliveau’s only Art Ross, but this was the second First Team All-Star of what would be six.  Beliveau would also win the Hart again in 1963-64, and this season he captured the first of his ten Stanley Cups.  The Quebecer played until 1971 and retired with 1,219 career Points.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1972.

Gordie Howe, Detroit Red Wings, 44 G, 45 A, 89 P (5) (1957)      

Howe would help the Red Wings win another Stanley Cup in 1955, and this season not only did he win his fifth Art Ross Trophy, he won his third Hart Trophy.  Howe’s closest competitor was again his teammate, Ted Lindsay, who was only four Points behind.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1972.

Dickie Moore, Montreal Canadiens, 36 G, 48 A, 84 P (1958)        

Dickie Moore would also win his only Goal Scoring Title this season, and he was eighth in Hart Trophy voting.  Moore also helped Montreal win the Stanley Cup this year.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1974.

Dickie Moore, Montreal Canadiens, 41 G, 55 A, 96 P (2) (1959)   

Moore went back-to-back with Art Ross Trophies, and this was also his second (and final) First Team All-Star Selection. Moore again won the Stanley Cup, this being the fourth of what would be six total.  Moore played until 1968, where he would accumulate 607 Points.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1974.

Bobby Hull, Chicago Blackhawks, 39 G, 42 A, 91 P (1960)

Bobby Hull narrowly defeated Bronco Horvath of the Boston Bruins by one Point to win his first Art Ross Trophy.  “The Golden Jet” was a First Team All-Star for the first time, and he also won his first Goal Scoring Title, and he finished second in Hart Trophy voting.  He would help Chicago win the Stanley Cup this season.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1974.

Bernie Geoffrion, Montreal, 50 G, 45 A, 95 P (2) (1961)  

This was Geoffrion’s second and last Art Ross, and considering the drama he dealt with in his first one in 1955, this had to feel so much better.  Geoffrion did finish ahead of another teammate, Jean Beliveau, by five Points but Habs fans were ok this time.  This season, Geoffrion was a First Team All-Star for the only time, and he also captured the Hart Trophy.  While Montreal did not win the Stanley Cup this year, he helped them win the previous five.  Geoffrion played for Montreal until 1966, and had two final seasons with the New York Rangers.  He retired with 822 Points.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1972.

Bobby Hull, Chicago Blackhawks, 39 G, 42 A, 91 P (2) (1962)      

For the first time there was a tie in the Points standings, but Hull had 50 Goals to Andy Bathgate’s 28, thus giving the Blackhawk his second Art Ross trophy.  Hull was third in Hart Trophy voting this season.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1974.

Gordie Howe, Detroit Red Wings, 38 G, 48 A, 86 P (6) (1963)      

This was the last Art Ross of Gordie Howe’s career, and it was also his last Hart Trophy, which coincidentally was also his sixth.  Howe defeated Andy Bathgate by five Points for this honor.  Overall, he was a 12-time First Team All-Star, and he retired in 1971. He would come back in the WHA in 1973, first with the Houston Aeros, and then the New England Whalers, who became the Hartford Whalers of the NHL in 1979.  Howe stayed with the team for their first year in the NHL.  He retired with 2,358 combined Points in the NHL/WHA. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1972.

Stan Mikita, Chicago Blackhawks, 39 G, 50 A, 89 P (1964)

Stan Mikita was a First Team All-Star for the third straight year, and he was fifth in Hart Trophy voting in his first Art Ross winning season.  While this would not be Mikita’s proverbial breakout season, he was cemented as an elite player.  Notably, Mikita won the scoring title by two points over Bobby Hull, his longtime teammate. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1983.

Stan Mikita, Chicago Blackhawks, 28 G, 59 A, 87 P (2) (1965)    

Mikita went back-to-back in Art Ross Trophy wins, but he was not named a First Team All-Star, as that would go to Norm Ullman the person who finished second in scoring to him.   Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1983.

Bobby Hull, Chicago Blackhawks, 39 G, 42 A, 91 P (3) (1966)      

Bobby Hull won his third and final Art Ross Trophy and did so the season after he secured his first Hart and only Lady Byng Trophy.  This year would see Hull win his second straight Hart.  Hull stayed in the NHL until 1972 (and would return in 1980 with the Jets), he was a nine-time First Team All-Star.  Hull would join the Winnipeg Jets in 1972, where he stayed during the NHL/WHA merger, and he played nine final games in pro hockey with the Hartford Whalers before retiring.  His combined NHL/WHA Points totaled 1,808.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1974.

Stan Mikita, Chicago Blackhawks, 28 G, 59 A, 87 P (3) (1967)    

Mikita returned as the scoring leader after Bobby Hull had it the year before, and he was 17 Points ahead of the nearest skater, which was Hull.  Mikita swept the major regular season awards with not only the Art Ross, but also the Hart Trophy and the Lady Byng.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1983.

Stan Mikita, Chicago Blackhawks, 28 G, 59 A, 87 P (4) (1968)    

This was Mikita’s fourth and final Art Ross, and the second back-to-back for the star.  Mikita’s win also marked five consecutive Blackhawks winning the Art Ross. Like the season before, Mikita also won the Hart and Lady Byng.  Mikita played until 1980, in a career that was spent entirely with Chicago.  He finished his career with 1,467 Points.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1983.

Phil Esposito, Boston Bruins, 49 G, 77 A, 126 P (1969)  

As expansion diluted the talent pool, it was only a matter of times before there was a 100 Point Scorer.  This season there were three, with Gordie Howe (103), Bobby Hull (107) and this season’s Art Ross Trophy winner, Phil Esposito (126). The Boston Bruin would win his first Hart Trophy and also made his First Team All-Star debut.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1984.

Bobby Orr, Boston Bruins, 33 G, 87 A, 120 P (1970)       

What Bobby Orr accomplished this year was unprecedented.  This season, Orr became the first, and to date only Defenseman, to win the Art Ross Trophy.  It was such a phenomenal year, that Orr would lead the Bruins to a Stanley Cup Championship, and he won the Conn Smythe Award as the playoff MVP.  Orr would also win the Norris Trophy and the Hart Trophy this year.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1979.

Phil Esposito, Boston Bruins, 76 G, 76 A, 156 P (2) (1971)

The season before, Esposito, Orr and company took Boston to a Stanley Cup win.  They did not win this season, but Esposito shattered the single-season Goal record and his own Points record.  Amazingly, he was not the Hart Trophy winner, as that went to Orr (who had 139 Points). Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1984.

Phil Esposito, Boston Bruins, 66 G, 67 A, 133 P (3) (1972)

The Bruins won the Stanley Cup again, with Esposito having a lot to do with their success.  Orr repeated as the runner up (117), and he was again the Hart Trophy winner with Esposito coming in at third.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1984.

Phil Esposito, Boston Bruins, 55 G, 75 A, 130 P (4) (1973)

Esposito’s 130 Points were 26 more than Bobby Clarke of Philadelphia, his nearest competitor, and he repeated as the runner-up to the Hart, losing to Clarke.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1984.

Phil Esposito, Boston Bruins, 68 G, 77 A, 145 P (5) (1974)

Esposito became the second player to earn five Art Ross Trophies and the second to have four straight wins.  This would be his last Art Ross, and he would also earn his second (and last) Hart Trophy.  Esposito would also have his sixth straight and final First Team All-Star this year. He would be traded to the New York Rangers in 1975, and he retired after the 1980-81 Season, ending his career with 1,590 Points.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1984.

Bobby Orr, Boston Bruins, 33 G, 87 A, 120 P (2) (1975)  

It took Esposito’s teammate, Bobby Orr, to break his Art Ross streak, and while it did end Esposito’s run, this was the seventh year in a row where a Boston Bruin won the Art Ross.  In between his first and second Art Ross Trophy, Orr won another Stanley Cup, another Conn Smythe Trophy, four Norris Trophies and two Hart Trophies.  This season, he would win his eighth and final Norris Trophy, and he was already cemented as the greatest Defenseman that ever lived, a mantle he still holds today. Orr played until 1979, and he was fast-tracked into the Hockey Hall that year.  He retired at the age of 30, as back issues forced hm out of the game, and Orr would have 915 Points in only 657 career Games.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1979.

Guy Lafleur, Montreal Canadiens, 56 G, 69 A, 125 P (1976)        

For the first time in the 1970s, a non-Boston Bruin won the Art Ross Trophy, and it went back to Montreal with Guy Lafleur, who had six more Points than Bobby Clarke of Philadelphia.  Lafleur, who had a Stanley Cup in 1973, would win his second this year.  He was third in Hart Trophy voting this year.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1988.

Guy Lafleur, Montreal Canadiens, 56 G, 80 A, 136 P (2) (1977)   

Two touchdowns of points ahead of Marcel Dionne, Lafleur again won a Stanley Cup Ring with the Canadiens, this time winning the Conn Smythe Trophy.  The Quebecois superstar also won the Hart Trophy for the first time.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1988.

Guy Lafleur, Montreal Canadiens, 60 G, 72 A, 132 P (3) (1978)   

Lafleur won his third straight Art Ross, and this would be his final time winning the coveted award.  This also was his second and last Hart Trophy win, but it was year four of six straight First Team All-Star selections.  Montreal again won the Stanley Cup, and captured another the year after making it four straight.  He played until 1985, and would retire.  That would be short-lived, as he returned as a New York Ranger in 1988, and played two more years after that with the Quebec Nordiques.  Lafleur would have 1,353 career Points.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1988.

Bryan Trottier, New York Islanders, 47 G, 87 A, 134 P (1979)     

It took a dozen years, but Bryan Trottier became the first player from an expansion team to win the Art Ross Trophy. Trottier beat Marcel Dionne by four Points for the Award, and the Islander would also win the Hart Trophy. Following this win, Trottier would lead New York to four consecutive Stanley Cups.  Trottier became a two-time First Team and two-time Second Team All-Star, and he later played for the Pittsburgh Penguins earning two more Stanley Cups.  He retired in 1994 with 1,425 career Points.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1997.

Marcel Dionne, Los Angeles Kings, 53 G, 84 A, 137 P (1980)       

Marcel Dionne tied Wayne Gretzky of the Edmonton Oilers in Points, but Dionne got the nod for the Art Ross over “The Great One”. Dionne became the first King to win this award, and he was the runner-up for the Hart.  Over his career that spanned from 1971 to 1989, Dionne played for Detroit, L.A. and the New York Rangers, and he would have 1,307 Points. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1997.

Wayne Gretzky, Edmonton Oilers, 55 G, 109 A, 164 P (1981)     

Wayne Gretzky tied Marcel Dionne in Points the year before, but lost out on the Art Ross due to a goal differential of two. Gretzky did not have to worry about Dionne, who was second with 135 Points, but that was 29 behind the number of the Edmonton Oiler, who set the new benchmark for Points in a season. Gretzky would win his second straight Hart Trophy this season.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1999.

Wayne Gretzky, Edmonton Oilers, 92 G, 120 A, 212 P (2) (1982)

Wayne Gretzky broke so many records this year. First, he shattered his own record with 212 Points, making him the first player to elevate the single-season Points record two years in a row in the Art Ross era.  Second, he set the single-season Goal mark with 92.  Third, he was the first player to have a 200 Point season.  Mike Bossy of the New York Islanders was the closest competitor with 212 Points. Gretzky would again win the Hart, his third in a row.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1999.

Wayne Gretzky, Edmonton Oilers, 80 G, 71 A, 196 P (3) (1983)  

Gretzky did it again, destroying any competitor for the Art Ross.  His nearest competitor was Peter Stastny, the Nordiques star from Czechoslovakia, who “only” had 124.  Gretzky again won the Hart Trophy, but this time his Oilers reached the Stanley Cup Finals, a harbinger of what was to come.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1999.

Wayne Gretzky, Edmonton Oilers, 87 G, 118 A, 205 P (4) (1984)

Gretzky again reached the 200 Point threshold, and it was his teammate, Paul Coffey at 126 Points who was the closest.  This year the Oilers broke through by winning the Stanley Cup, and Gretzky again captured the Hart Trophy.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1999.

Wayne Gretzky, Edmonton Oilers, 87 G, 118 A, 205 P (5) (1985)

Gretzky repeated as a Stanley Cup Champion, but this year he would win the Conn Smythe as the playoff MVP.  By winning his fifth straight Art Ross Trophy, Gretzky broke the record that was shared by Gordie Howe and Phil Esposito in terms of consecutive Art Ross winners.  Gretzky again destroyed his nearest competitor, Jari Kurri, who was also an Oiler. Not surprisingly, he won his sixth consecutive Hart Trophy.   Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1999.

Wayne Gretzky, Edmonton Oilers, 52 G, 163 A, 215 P (6) (1986)

It was a bittersweet year for Gretzky as he broke his own mark by three Points, and his 215 Points has set a since unbreakable mark.  He won the Hart Trophy again, but in the playoffs, the Oilers were upset in the divisional round, and he did not win a Stanley Cup.  Gretzky was again much further ahead than his nearest rival, but this year it was Mario Lemieux of the Pittsburgh Penguins, who had 141 Points.  This win would also tie Gordie Howe for the most Art Ross Trophies.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1999.

Wayne Gretzky, Edmonton Oilers, 62 G, 121 A, 183 P (7) (1987)

The Edmonton Oilers were back on track, and they won their third Stanley Cup in four years, with Gretzky winning the Conn Smythe.  Gretzky set Art Ross history as he broke Howe’s record of six Art Ross trophies, and he did it in seven straight years, also a record.  “The Great One” also secured his eighth straight Hart Trophy. Once again, nobody was near Gretzky, as Jari Kurri, who was second, had 108 Points.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1999.

Mario Lemieux, Pittsburgh Penguins, 62 G, 121 A, 183 P (1988)

Gretzky had 149 Points this year, but his Art Ross trophy streak ended at seven when Mario Lemieux bet his total by 19. Lemieux became the first Penguin to win the Art Ross, and this year he also was the first Penguin to win the Hart. As you will see, Lemieux was just getting started!  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1997.

Mario Lemieux, Pittsburgh Penguins, 62 G, 121 A, 183 P (2) (1989)     

Lemieux was one Point shy of 200, and his 199 would be a career-high, as he went back-to-back in Art Ross Trophy wins. Despite his 199 Points, Gretzky’s 168 Points for his new team, Los Angeles, was enough to earn him the Hart. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1997.

Wayne Gretzky, Los Angeles Kings, 40 G, 102 A, 142 P (8) (1990)        

After two years of not winning the Art Ross, Gretzky returned to the top of the scoring table, but this time it was as a Los Angeles King.  Gretzky, who won the Hart Trophy as a King the year before finished fourth this year behind Mark Messier, his former teammate who led his former team, Edmonton, to their fifth Stanley Cup.  Messier was second in scoring to Gretzky, 13 behind.  As for Lemieux, he had 129 Points in only 59 Games.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1999.

Wayne Gretzky, Los Angeles Kings, 41 G, 122 A, 163 P (9) (1991)        

Gretzky went back-to-back again, and he was incredible this season.  While he did not win the Hart, he was 32 Points ahead of the one who did win it (and was second), Brett Hull.  Hull would however have 86 Goals, well more than twice as much as Gretzky.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1999.

Mario Lemieux, Pittsburgh Penguins, 44 G, 87 A, 131 P (3) (1992)       

Mario Lemieux may have only finished fifth in Hart voting, but he won the scoring title only with 64 Games.  More importantly, he led the Penguins to their second straight Stanley Cup win.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1997.

Mario Lemieux, Pittsburgh Penguins, 44 G, 87 A, 131 P (4) (1993)       

Lemieux’s 160 Points was a dozen more than his nearest competitor, Pat Lafontaine, but Lemieux had his Points in only 60 Games! Despite only playing 60 Games, what he did was so impressive that the Hart Trophy voters could not help but vote for him.  Lemieux would also win the Bill Masterton Trophy this season.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1997.

Wayne Gretzky, Los Angeles Kings, 38 G, 92 A, 130 P (10) (1994)        

Arguably, his was the end of an era, as this was Gretzky’s tenth and last Art Ross Trophy.  Nobody has won this more than the native of Brantford, Ontario, and it is quite likely that nobody ever will.  Gretzky did not win the Hart, as that went to Sergei Fedorov, who he beat by 10 Points to win Art Ross.  Gretzky actually never received any Hart votes, but he did have nine, which is more than any other player.  This season also saw Gretzky win his fourth of what would be five Lady Byng Trophies. He was an eight-time First Team All-Star, a seven-time Second Team All-Star and he retired with 2,857 Points, well more than any other player.  As expected, the Hockey Hall relaxed their three-year wait, and he was inducted immediately.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1999.

Mario Lemieux, Pittsburgh Penguins, 69 G, 92 A, 161 P (5) (1996)       

Mario Lemieux sat out the entire 1994-95 season due to Hodgkin’s lymphoma.  He came back the year after with a vengeance, winning his fifth Art Ross, beating his teammate, Jaromir Jagr by 12 Points.  Lemieux would win the Hart Trophy for the third and final time.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1997.

Mario Lemieux, Pittsburgh Penguins, 50 G, 72 A, 122 P (6) (1997)       

This was the last Art Ross Trophy win by Mario Lemieux, and he completed it with three two-year runs.  His 122 Points was his lowest Point win, but was still 13 Points higher than Teemu Selanne, who was second.  Lemieux retired after this year, but came back three years later, but this time as a player/owner, as he bought the team in 1999.  He continued to play until 2006, and retired with 1,723 Points. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1997.

Peter Forsberg, Colorado Avalanche, 29 G, 77 A, 106 P (2003)    

Peter Forsberg became the first player in Colorado Avalanche franchise history, and the first Swedish player to win the Art Ross. To win the award, he eked out another Swede, Markus Naslund by two Points.  Forsberg, who had already won two Stanley Cups with the Avalanche, won the Hart Trophy this season.  Forsberg played until 2011, and retired with 885 Points in 708 Games.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2014.

Martin St. Louis, Tampa Bay Lightning, 38 G, 56 A, 94 P (2004)

After two unremarkable seasons with the Calgary Flames, Martin St. Louis became a surprise star with the Tampa Bay Lightning. In the 2003-04 Season, Martin St. Louis won the Art Ross, and also won the Hart Trophy.  St. Louis also took the Lightning to their first Stanley Cup this season.  He was a First Team All-Star this year, and would be a Second Team All-Star four more times. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2018.

Martin St. Louis, Tampa Bay Lightning, 17 G, 43 A, 60 P (2) (2013)     

In the strike-shortened 48-game season, Martin St. Louis’s 60 Points were the lowest ever for an Art Ross winner.  St. Louis would only finish ninth in Art Ross voting, but he did win his third Lady Byng this season. St. Louis played until 2015, with two final years in the New York Rangers.  He retired with 1,033 Points.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2018.

 

The following are the players who have won the Art Ross Trophy who are eligible for the Hockey Hall of Fame and have not been selected:

None.

Let’s update our tally, shall we?

Award in Question

Percentage of recipients who have entered the HOF

Percentage of recipients by year who have entered the HOF.

NBA MVP

100%

100%

NHL Art Ross

100%

100%

NHL Norris

90.5%

96.4%

NBA All Star Game MVP

89.5%

91.7%

NHL Conn Smythe

74.2%

85.4%

NFL Bert Bell Award

73.7%

71.4%

NFL AP Offensive Player of the Year

73.1%

79.4%

NFL AP MVP

68.3%

74.0%

NHL Lady Byng

63.8%

76.0%

NFL Defensive Player of the Year

60.8%

71.1%

NFL Super Bowl MVP

60.6%

64.9%

NBA Defensive Player of the Year

58.3%

56.5%

NHL Vezina

57.1%

66.3%

NBA Rookie of the Year

56.5%

56.5%

MLB MVP

55.0%

60.2%

NFL Pro Bowl MVP

52.3%

54.8%

MLB Lou Gehrig Award

51.9%

51.9%

MLB Roberto Clemente Award

47.4%

47.4%

MLB/NL/AL Cy Young Award

44.4%

55.4%

MLB Babe Ruth Award

37.0%

39.3%

NHL Frank J. Selke Trophy

33.3%

36.7%

MLB World Series MVP

33.3%

36.8%

MLB Hutch Award

33.1%

33.1%

NFL Offensive Rookie of the Year

28.6%

28.6%

NHL Bill Masterton Memorial Trophy

27.9%

27.9%

MLB Edgar Martinez Award

26.7%

17.2%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Designated Hitter)

25.0%

30.8%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Shortstop)

23.5%

52.6%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove

21.7%

36.8%

NFL Defensive Rookie of the Year

20.6%

20.6%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Catcher)

20.0%

22.5%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Second Base)

18.8%

39.8%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Shortstop)

18.2%

35.1%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Pitcher)

18.2%

20.1%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Second Base)

16.7%

32.7%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Outfield)

16.7%

30.1%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Outfield)

15.7%

25.2%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Third Base)

14.3%

14.3%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Third Base)

13.6%

14.3%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (First Base)

13.6%

13.3%

MLB (NL/AL) Rookie of the Year

13.3%

13.3%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Catcher)

10.3%

15.2%

NBA Most Improved Player of the Year

5.3%

3.2%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (First Base)

3.8%

3.2%

NFL AP Comeback Player of the Year

0.0%

0.0%

So, who is up next?

The following are the players who have won the Art Ross Trophy in the NHL who have retired but have not met the mandatory years out of the game to qualify for the Hockey Hall of Fame:

Jarome Iginla, Calgary Flames, 52 G, 44 A, 96 P (2002)

This would be the lone Art Ross for Jarome Iginla, and while he never had a 100 Point season, he would not need to in this era. Iginla played most of his career with the Calgary Flames, and he would have 1,095 career Points.  Eligible in 2020.

Henrik Sedin, Vancouver Canucks, 52 G, 44 A, 96 P (2010)

Henrik Sedin was the first Vancouver Canuck to win the Art Ross, which he won by besting both Sidney Crosby and Alex Ovechkin by three Points.  Sedin would also win the Hart Trophy this year, and he was a First Team All-Star this season, and the one after.  Sedin played until 2018, all with Vancouver, and he would retire with 1,070 career Points. Eligible in 2021.

Daniel Sedin, Vancouver Canucks, 41 G, 63 A, 104 P (2011)

There have been players who have won the Art Ross in back-to-back years.  There have been different teammates who have won this accolade in two straight years. This is the first time, and we think likely the only time where we will have twins capture the Art Ross in two years. Like his brother, Henrik, Daniel Sedin played his entire career with the Canucks, but he did not win the Hart like his brother as he would finish second to Corey Perry.  Sedin played until 2018 and would have 1,041 career Points.  Eligible in 2021.

The following are the players who have won the Art Ross Trophy who are still active.

Jaromir Jagr, Pittsburgh Penguins, 32 G, 38 A, 70 P (1995)

This was Jagr’s first Art Ross, and he narrowly beat Eric Lindros to get it.  Both stars had 70 Points in this strike-shortened year, but Jagr had three more Goals than Lindros.  Lindros would however edge out Jagr for the Hart Trophy.  Jagr was a First Team All-Star for the first time, and he had already won two Stanley Cups with Pittsburgh.  Historically speaking, this is the first time that a non-Canadian would win the Art Ross.  48 Years Old, Playing in the Czech League.

Jaromir Jagr, Pittsburgh Penguins, 32 G, 38 A, 70 P (2) (1998)

Jagr would also lead the NHL in Assists for the first time this season.  The Czech star was a First Team and Second Team All-Star in the two years prior, and this year, it was Peter Forsberg of Colorado who was his closest competitor with 91 Points, and he was second to Dominik Hasek of Buffalo for the Hart.  48 Years Old, Playing in the Czech League.

Jaromir Jagr, Pittsburgh Penguins, 44 G, 83 A, 127 P (3) (1999)

Jagr became the second Penguin to win consecutive Art Ross Trophies, besting Teemu Selanne by 20 Points.  Jagr’s 127 Points would be a career-high, and for the first time in his career, he would win the Hart Trophy.  48 Years Old, Playing in the Czech League.

Jaromir Jagr, Pittsburgh Penguins, 42 G, 54 A, 96 P (4) (2000)

The Czech star made it three in a row, and for the first time in a full season in decades we have an Art Ross Trophy winner under 100 Points.  Jagr narrowly beat Pavel Bure by two Points, though St. Louis Defenseman, Chris Pronger, beat them both for the Hart.  48 Years Old, Playing in the Czech League.

Jaromir Jagr, Pittsburgh Penguins, 52 G, 69 A, 121 P (5) (2001)

This would be Jagr’s last Art Ross Trophy, and he joined the four in a row club.  Jagr was third in Hart voting, behind his teammate (and boss), Mario Lemieux, and Joe Sakic, who won the award, and was only three Points behind Jagr. This would be Jagr’s last season with the Penguins, as he was traded to the Washington Capitals in the offseason. Jagr later played for the New York Rangers, Avangard Omsk of the KHL, Philadelphia, Dallas, Boston, New Jersey, Florida, Calgary, and then the Czech League.  In the NHL, Jagr had 1,921 career Points.  48 Years Old, Playing in the Czech League.

Joe Thornton, Boston Bruins & San Jose Sharks, 52 G, 69 A, 121 P (2006)

For the first time in Art Ross Trophy winner was split between two teams.  In the season prior, Joe Thornton was the Bruins top star, but management questioned his leadership and the Boston fan base began to turn on him.  Furthermore, Thornton was frustrated with the fate of the Bruins, and he needed a change of scenery, which he got 23 games into this season.  Thornton’s Art Ross winning 121 Points was split with 33 in Boston and 92 with San Jose. Thornton was only two Points ahead of Jaromir Jagr, who he also edged out for the Hart Trophy this year.   Thornton, who was a First Team All-Star, would go on to have two more Second Team All-Stars.  40 Years Old, Playing for the San Jose Sharks.

Sidney Crosby, Pittsburgh Penguins, 36 G, 84 A, 120 P (2007)

Sidney Crosby became the third Pittsburgh Penguin to win the Art Ross Trophy, and he did so with a six-Point lead over the previous winner, Joe Thornton.  “Sid the Kid” was just that, as he was only 19 when the year started, and he was in his second year in the NHL.  Crosby also won the Hart Trophy and was a First Team All-Star for the first time in his career.  Two years later, he would hoist the Stanley Cup.  32 Years Old, Playing for the Pittsburgh Penguins.

Alexander Ovechkin, Washington Capitals, 65 G, 47 A, 112 P (2008)

Ovechkin became the first Washington Capital and the first Russian to win the Art Ross this year.  This was Ovechkin’s third season in hockey, and his third consecutive First Team All-Star, and it was Ovechkin who defeated Sidney Crosby for the Calder.  Ovechkin also won the Hart Trophy this year.  Since that win, he went to three more First Team All-Stars, won two more Hart Trophies, and led the Capitals to the Stanley Cup in 2018.  32 Years Old, Playing for the Pittsburgh Penguins.

Evgeni Malkin, Pittsburgh Penguins, 35 G, 78 A, 113 P (2009)

Malkin’s win allowed Russian born players to go back-to-back in Art Ross wins, and he became the fourth Penguin to win trophy. Malkin was only three points ahead of Ovechkin for the Art Ross, but was second for the Hart to Ovechkin.  This season, Ovechkin, Crosby and the Penguins would win the Stanley Cup.  32 Years Old, Playing for the Pittsburgh Penguins.

Evgeni Malkin, Pittsburgh Penguins, 50 G, 59 A, 109 P (2) (2012)

This season, Malkin won his second Art Ross, but this season, he would win the Hart Trophy.  Malkin would lead the Penguins win the 2016 and 2017 Stanley Cups.  32 Years Old, Playing for the Pittsburgh Penguins.

Sidney Crosby, Pittsburgh Penguins, 36 G, 68 A, 104 P (2) (2014)

In between Crosby’s first Art Ross and this one, he had won a Stanley Cup, and was a Second Team and First Team All-Star. This season, he was a First Team All-Star again, and also a Hart Trophy winner.  Crosby and the Penguins would win the Stanley Cup the next two seasons. 32 Years Old, Playing for the Pittsburgh Penguins.

Jamie Benn, Dallas Stars, 36 G, 68 A, 104 P (2015)

Jamie Benn won the Art Ross by only one Point (edging out John Tavares), and it was done in a season that bookended First Team All-Stars.  Benn was a Second Team All-Star this year, and was only 12thin Hart Trophy voting, but he was an Art Ross winner.  This would be the first time that Minnesota North Star/Dallas Star won the Art Ross.  30 Years Old, Playing for the Dallas Stars.

Patrick Kane, Chicago Blackhawks, 46 G, 60 A, 106 P (2016)

Patrick Kane already won three Stanley Cups with Chicago, and he was 16 Points ahead of last year’s winner, Jamie Benn.  Kane would be a First Team All-Star for the second time, and this season he won the Hart Trophy.  31 Years Old, Playing for the Chicago Blackhawks.

Connor McDavid, Edmonton Oilers, 30 G, 70 A, 100 P (2017)

Connor McDavid was one of the most highly touted NHL prospects in years, and in his second year, he would win not only the Art Ross but the Hart Trophy as well.  He was 11 Points ahead of Sidney Crosby, who was also second in Hart Trophy voting.  23 Years Old, Playing for the Edmonton Oilers.

Connor McDavid, Edmonton Oilers, 41 G, 67 A, 108 P (2) (2018)

McDavid won his second straight Art Ross, this time with a six-point lead over Claude Giroux.  The Oiler was fifth in Hart voting, but did win the Lester B. Pearson Award, which was his also his second in a row.  23 Years Old, Playing for the Edmonton Oilers.

Nikita Kucherov, Tampa Bay Lightning, 41 G, 87 A, 128 P (2019)

Connor McDavid was unable to make it three straight, as he was second, 12 Points behind Nikita Kucherov. Kucherov also won the Hart Trophy, and this was his second consecutive year as a First Team All-Star.  26 Years Old, Playing for the Tampa Bay Lightning.

100 Percent.  Every single winner of the Art Ross Trophy has made it to the Hockey Hall of Fame.  The Hart Trophy and the Norris Trophy can’t say that.  From what we can see, it looks like the Art Ross will be perfect in resulting in Hall of Famers for a long time.

So, what is up next?

We are going to return to the court, and look at the NBA Finals MVP.

As always, we thank you for your support, and look for that soon.

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Committee Chairman

Kirk Buchner, "The Committee Chairman", is the owner and operator of the site.  Kirk can be contacted at [email protected] .

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