3. Tris Speaker
  1. General
  2. Awards
  3. Career Stats
  • Born: April 4, 1888 in Hubbard, TX USA
  • Weight: 193 lbs.
  • Height: 5'11"
  • Bats: L
  • Throws: L
  • Debut: September 12, 1907
  • Final Game: August 30, 1928
  • Baseball Magazine All-Star - 1909
  • Baseball Magazine All-Star - 1909
  • Baseball Magazine All-Star - 1910
  • Baseball Magazine All-Star - 1910
  • Baseball Magazine All-Star - 1912
  • Baseball Magazine All-Star - 1912
  • Most Valuable Player - 1912
  • Baseball Magazine All-Star - 1913
  • Baseball Magazine All-Star - 1913
  • Baseball Magazine All-Star - 1914
  • Baseball Magazine All-Star - 1914
  • Baseball Magazine All-Star - 1915
  • Baseball Magazine All-Star - 1915
  • Baseball Magazine All-Star - 1916
  • Baseball Magazine All-Star - 1916
  • Baseball Magazine All-Star - 1917
  • Baseball Magazine All-Star - 1917
  • Baseball Magazine All-Star - 1918
  • Baseball Magazine All-Star - 1918
  • Baseball Magazine All-Star - 1920
  • Baseball Magazine All-Star - 1920
  • Baseball Magazine All-Star - 1921
  • Baseball Magazine All-Star - 1921
  • Baseball Magazine All-Star - 1922
  • Baseball Magazine All-Star - 1922
  • Baseball Magazine All-Star - 1923
  • Baseball Magazine All-Star - 1923
 
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10195188235141171529432 0.345
 

The Boston Red Sox made another regrettable trade before they jettisoned Babe Ruth to the New York Yankees.  A couple of years early, they traded Centerfielder Tris Speaker, who they asked to take a pay cut after an off-year (where he still batted .322!).  Speaker refused, and the former MVP two-time World Series Champion and was traded to Cleveland in 1916.

Speaker set to prove immediately that he was right, and Boston was wrong.  Speaker won the Batting Title in 1916 (.386) and would sweep the rest of the Slash Line (.470 OBP, .503 SLG) as well as lead the American League in Hits (211) and Doubles (41).  As an Indian, Speaker led the AL four times in Doubles, had two more league leads in On Base Percentage, and won the RBI Title with 130 in 1923.  Speaker never had a season where he batted less than .296 as an Indian, and that was the only year he dipped below .300.

Already a leader on the field, Speaker became Cleveland's Player/Manager in 1919, and the year after, he led the Indians to a World Series win. Still a good player in 1926, he resigned at the end of the year, and was released as a player.  He played two more years, one with Washington and one with Philadelphia (AL).

Speaker is the all-time leader in Doubles (792), with 486 coming as an Indian.  He would accumulate 1,965 Hits with a Slash Line of .354/.444/.520 with Cleveland. Speaker was named to the Baseball Hall of Fame Class of 1937 and the first Indians Hall of Fame Class in 1951.

The Bullet Points

  • Position: Outfield
  • Acquired: Traded from the Boston Red Sox for Sad Sam Jones, Fred Thomas and $55,000 4/9/16.
  • Departed:

    Released 1/31/27

  • Games Played: 1,519
  • Notable Statistics:

    1,079 Runs Scored
    1,965 Hits
    486 Doubles
    108 Triples
    73 Home Runs
    886 RBI
    155 Stolen Bases
    .354/.444/.520 Slash Line
    74.3 bWAR

  • Major Accolades and Awards:

    World Series Champion (1920)
    Highest bWAR for Position Players (1916)
    Highest Batting Average (1916)
    Highest On Base Percentage (1916, 1922 & 1925)
    Highest Slugging Percentage (1916)
    Highest OPS (1916)
    Highest OPS+ (1916)
    Most Hits (1916)
    Most Doubles (1916, 1918, 1920, 1921, 1922 & 1923)
    Most Runs Batted In (1923)
    Highest Win Probability Added (1917 & 1918)
    Most Putouts by a Centerfielder (1918 & 1919)
    Most Assists by a Centerfielder (1917, 1923, 1924 & 1926)
    Most Double Plays Turned by a Centerfielder (1916, 1918, 1922, 1923, 1925 & 1926)
    Highest Range Factor per Game by a Centerfielder (1918, 1919 & 1921)
    Highest Fielding Percentage by a Centerfielder (1919, 1921, 1922 & 1926)

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