WWE

Compared to the other Halls of Fame that we discuss on our website, this one is hands down the most fun and the hardest to calculate. Keep in mind, that there is no actual WWE Hall of Fame where fans can go and see their heroes. There are no set criteria to get in the WWE Hall of Fame. Wins and losses don’t exactly matter when the matches are predetermined. It does not even seem to matter if you even wrestled for the WWE as some of their inductees never drew a paycheck from Stamford. This is as subjective as they come so with that we made a criterion of our own which did incorporate (in no particular order) impact, ability, innovation championships won, legacy and their use in the WWE. The only two rules we set was that the wrestler in question was not currently an active competitor on a full-time basis unless that wrestler was 46 or over.  Once a wrestler becomes 46 that individual moves from the Futures to the Main List at the time of revision.

Until Then, Whatcha gonna do when Notinhalloffame.com runs wild on you!
 
Sincerely,
 
The Not in Hall of Committee.
The Warlord was one of the greatest physical specimens in the history of professional wrestling in terms of strength.  He was not overly mobile or technically gifted but when you tried to imagine what a wrestler would like in the late 80’sand early 90’s it was The Warlord that you imagined.
The WWE Hall of Fame has to date not inducted a referee (we aren't counting Teddy Long), and the belief by many is that if they do it would be Earl Hebner.  If that doesn't happen, then perhaps it would be Nick Patrick who was the son of Jody Hamilton who wrestled professionally as The Assassin.  Patrick trained to be…
One of the earlier high flyers of Lucha Libre, Lizmark signed with EMLL in 1978, and he would become a singles star there winning multiple titles.  He became the second wrestler (Gory Guerrero being the first) to hold all three NWA World Titles in the different weight classes (Welterweight, Middleweight and Light Heavyweight).  Like many wrestlers, Lizmark would jump to…
Paco Alonso is the grandson of Salvador Lutteroth, who we would argue is one of the most important men in Mexican wrestling.  Alonso began working for EMLL in 1975, and by 1987 he took over the promotion.  Now named CMLL, Alonso oversaw a promotion that has seen over 80 million people cross through a turnstile and while he does keep…
In terms of training, Sgt. Buddy Lee Parker is easily in the top twenty-five ever, but in regards to in-ring accomplishments, we realize that is a stretch to put him on here even if we were the extend this list to 2,000. 
One of the most natural adoptees to professional wrestling in New Japan history, Masakatsu Funaki eschewed being one of the best Japanese pro wrestlers to become a pioneer in Mixed Martial Arts.  Funaki would leave New Japan and later co-found Pancrase with Minoru Suzuki wherein the late 90's he was considered one of the greatest fighters in the world.  After…
As Bernard Herman, Ricki Starr was a solid amateur wrestler, but as Ricki Starr, he would take a pair of ballet slippers to incorporate a perceived feminine strut and would sell some tickets in the United States.  Starr would do well in Texas and the East Coast and would become a flamboyant babyface and an improbable one at that.  He…
This is a long shot, but anyone who has followed New Japan knows of the booking prowess of Gedo, who has written the best wrestling television regardless of promotion in the 2010s.  A former junior heavyweight star in both Japan and Mexico, Gedo might have the best wrestling mind of anyone, and perhaps (though not likely) that might be honored here.
Save for a few matches in WCW, Americans fans didn’t see much of Shinjiro Ohtani.  Those that did, saw a man who was one of the most influential light heavyweights of the 90s and early 2000s. In Japan, Ohtani won the coveted J-Crown and with the relationship with WCW, he was the first ever Cruiserweight Champion.  Growing frustrated with the lack of…