NL MVP Ryan Braun suspended for 50 games for PED

So much for the new generation.  In an announcement that shocked us here at notinhalloffame, National League MVP, Ryan Braun has tested positive for a PED and will be suspended for fifty games next season.  Winning a Most Valuable Player Award can be a catalyst for a Hall of Fame slot, but despite being only in the first half of his career, how can we expect any shot for him now with Cooperstown keeping McGwire and Palmeiro out; with the likely trnd occuring for Clemens, Bonds and Sosa?   This is a huge disappointment for baseball.
Last modified on Thursday, 19 March 2015 18:47

Email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Comments   

0 #1 Darryl Tahirali -0001-11-30 00:00
Braun certainly has got off to a flying start in his five seasons in MLB, but it is still a long way to Cooperstown regardless of his suspension.

I would suggest, though, that Braun's situation is different from--and much more problematic than--the one facing current and upcoming players with PED problems. When McGwire, Palmeiro, Bonds, et al, juiced, there was not the formal punitive process for drug testing in place as there is now. Players (including Manny Ramirez) caught now have no excuse--the policy is explicit and formalized.

The rough parallel is gambling: Players such as Cobb and Speaker might have gambled on games before 1919, but MLB didn't have a policy in place to address it until after the 1919 Black Sox scandal; thus, Pete Rose has no excuse.

Same with Braun now. However, if the penalty is a 50-game suspension and not permanent banishment, and if Braun subsequently stays clean for the rest of a career that turns out to be worthy of HoF consideratio n, should he penalized by HoF voters if he indeed paid his penance, as prescribed by MLB rules, and continued with his career? Put another way, is the current punitive process designed to correct behaviour to ensure that the player is not subjected to ongoing ramification s, or is it a permanent Scarlet Letter that could affect post-career recognition?

That could be a very significant distinction in the future.
Quote

Add comment


Security code
Refresh