Committee Chairman

Committee Chairman

Kirk Buchner, "The Committee Chairman", is the owner and operator of the site.  Kirk can be contacted at [email protected] .

We here at Notinhalloffame.com thought it would be fun to take a look at the major awards in North American team sports and see how it translates into Hall of Fame potential.

Needless to say, different awards in different sports yield hall of fame potential.  In basketball, the team sport with the least number of players on a roster, the dividend for greatness much higher.  In baseball, it is not as much as a great individual season does not have the same impact.

Last time, we looked at the Hank Aaron Award.  We now have one of our last Baseball awards, the MLB All-Star Game MVP.

The trophy first came into existence in 1962, thirty years after Major League Baseball first gave us the mid-season classic.   It goes without saying that to win this award, you first have to be good enough that year to have made it to the game.

Let’s find out!

The following are the past players who have won the All-Star Game MVP who are eligible for the Baseball Hall of Fame and have been enshrined.

1963 Willie Mays, San Francisco Giants, Outfield, 1 for 3, 2 R, 2 RBI, 1 BB, 2 SB.

Mays was in the prime of his career, and he finished the year with 38 Home Runs, 103 RBIs and a Slash Line of .314/.380/.582.  He finished fifth in MVP voting.

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1979.

1965 Juan Marichal, San Francisco Giants, Pitcher, 1 for 1, 1 R, 3 IP, 1 H, 0 ER, 0 SO, 0 BB.

Marichal became the first Pitcher to win the All-Star Game MVP, and would finish the year with 22-13, with a 2.13 ERA, and a league-leading 159 in ERA+.  He finished ninth in MVP voting this year, and appeared in ten All-Star Games.

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1983.

1966 Brooks Robinson, Baltimore Orioles, Third Base, 3 for 4, 1 R, 1 2B.

Robinson went to eighteen All-Star Games over his career, and he finished the season with 23 Home Runs, 100 RBIs, and a Gold Glove, which would be one of his sixteen.  He would lead Baltimore to a World Series win this year.

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1983.

1967 Tony Perez, Cincinnati Reds, Third Base, 1 for 2, 1 R, 1 HR, 1 RBI.

This was Perez’ first of seven All-Star Games, and he amassed 26 Home Runs, 102 RBIs and batted .290.  Perez finished ninth in MVP voting, and would later win two World Series Rings with the Reds.

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2000.

1968 Willie Mays, San Francisco Giants, Outfield, 1 for 4. (2)

It is not surprising that a legend like Willie Mays became the first man to win the All-Star Game MVP twice, although maybe it should be as Mays did nothing remarkable to win this award.  Nevertheless, he finished the year with 23 HR, a .289 Batting Average and was 13th in MVP voting.  Mays would overall participate in 24 All-Star Games.

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1979.

1969 Willie McCovey, San Francisco Giants, First Base, 2 for 4, 2 R, 3 RBI, 2 HR.

McCovey was an All-Star for the fourth of six times this season, and he would lead the National League in Home Runs (45), RBIs (126), On Base Percentage (.453), Slugging (.656) and OPS (1.108), all of which were career highs.  He would win the MVP this year.

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1986.

1970 Carl Yastrzemski, Boston Red Sox, Outfield, 4 for 6, 1 R, 1 RBI, 1 2B.

Yastrzemski played his entire career with the BoSox and in 1970, he led the American League in Runs (125), On Base Percentage (.452), Slugging (.592), OPS (1.044) and OPS+ (177).  He finished fourth in MVP voting.

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1989.

1971 Frank Robinson, Baltimore Orioles, Outfield, 1 for 2, 1 R, 1 RBI, 1 HR.

Robinson went to 14 All-Star Games, with this being his 13th.  This year, he would smack 28 Home Runs with a .510 Slugging Percentage and was third in MVP voting.

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1989.

1972 Joe Morgan, Cincinnati Reds, Second Base, 1 for 4, 1 RBI, 1 BB, 1 SB.

This was Morgan’s first year in Cincinnati, and third All-Star Game, with this year beginning an eight-year streak.  He finished this season leading the NL in Runs (122), Walks (115), On Base Percentage (.417), and was fourth in MVP voting.  Morgan later won two MVPs and two World Series rings with the Reds.

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1990.

1977 Don Sutton, Los Angeles Dodgers, Pitcher. Win, 3 IP, 4 SO, 1 BB, 1 H.

This was Suttons last of four All-Star Games, but he played another 11 years.  This season, Sutton finished the year with a 14-8 record with a 3.18 ERA and 154 Strikeouts.

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1998.

1981 Gary Carter, Montreal Expos, Catcher.  2 for 3, 1 R, 2 HR, 2 RBI.

Carter was an All-Star for the fourth time this year, and the third season of what would be a ten-year run.  He finished the strike-impaired season with 16 HR, 68 RBI and was sixth in MVP voting.

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2003.

1984 Gary Carter, Montreal Expos, Catcher.  1 for 2, 1 R, 1 HR, 1 RBI. (2)

Carter repeated as All-Star Game MVP, and was the NL leader in RBIs this season (106).  He was 14th in MVP voting this year, and captured his third of five Silver Sluggers.

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2003.

1987 Tim Raines, Montreal Expos, Outfield.  3 for 3, 1 3B, 1 SB, 2 RBI.

Raines was an All-Star for the seventh and final time, which were all consecutive.  He concluded the year as the NL leader in Runs (123), with a .330 Batting Average and 50 Stolen Bases.  He was seventh in MVP voting, and though this year ended his era as an elite player, Raines played until 2002.

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2017.

1991 Cal Ripken Jr., Baltimore Orioles, Shortstop.  2 for 3, 1 R, 1 HR, 3 RBI.

Ripken was a perennial All-Star from 1983 to 2001, one of the longest runs of the sport.  This season, Ripken won his second MVP in a year where he had career-highs in Home Runs (34), RBIs (114), and batted .323.  Ripken also secured his sixth of eight Silver Sluggers.

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2007.

1992 Ken Griffey Jr., Seattle Mariners, Outfield.  2 for 3, 2 R, 1 2B, 1 HR, 2 RBI.

With this win, the Griffeys became the first father and son combination to become All-Star Game MVPs.  Griffey Jr. was an All-Star for the third of eleven straight years, and he finished the year with 27 HR, 103 RBIs and a 17th place finish in MVP voting.

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2016.

1993 Kirby Puckett, Minnesota Twins, Outfield.  2 for 3, 1 R, 1 2B, 1 HR, 2 RBI.

Puckett went to All-Star Game number eight of ten this year, and the former MVP and World Series Champion had a 22 HR season with a ,296 Batting Average.

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2001.

1996 Mike Piazza, Los Angeles Dodgers, Catcher.  2 for 3, 1 R, 1 2B, 1 HR, 2 RBI.

A 12-time All-Star, Piazza went to his fourth one this year, and would smack 36 Home Runs, 105 RBIs and batted .336.  Piazza won the Silver Slugger this year, and was second in MVP voting.

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2016.

1998 Roberto Alomar, Baltimore Orioles, Second Base.  3 for 4, 2 R, 1 HR, 1 SB, 1 RBI.

A two-time World Series winner with Toronto, Alomar went to 12 consecutive All-Star Games, with this year being number nine.  Alomar also won the Gold Glove and batted .282 with 166 Hits this season.

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2011.

1999 Pedro Martinez, Boston Red Sox, Pitcher.  Win, 2 IP, 0 H, 0 BB, 5 SO.

Martinez won the Cy Young this year, the second of three times he would do so.  He led the AL in ERA (2.07, Strikeouts (313), ERA+ (243), FIP (1.39), WHIP (0.923), SO/9 (13.2) and was second in MVP voting.  Martinez was also an All-Star eight times.

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2015.

2000 Derek Jeter, New York Yankees, Shortstop.  3 for 3, 1 R, 1 2B, 2 RBI.

Jeter had already won four World Series Rings by this point, and he was in his third All-Star Game, with 11 more coming in his career.  This year, Jeter was tenth in MVP voting with a .339 Batting Average, 15 Home Runs and 201 Hits.

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2020.

2001 Cal Ripken Jr., Baltimore Orioles, Shortstop.  1 for 2, 1 R, 1 HR, 1 RBI. (2)

This was Ripken’s farewell year, and realistically, he was not an All-Star worthy player at this point, only collecting 114 Hits with a .239 Batting Average in his swansong.  Nevertheless, the All-Star Game MVP was earned with a Home Run in the game.

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2007.

2013 Mariano Rivera, New York Yankees, Pitcher.  1 IP, 0 H, 0 BB, 0 SO.

Rivera was given the MVP nod over other worthy ASG competitors, but whatever, as this was his swansong.  He finished his last season in the Majors with 44 Saves and a 2.11 ERA.

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2019.

The following are the players who have won the All-Star Game MVP who are eligible for the Baseball Hall of Fame and have not been selected:

1962-1 Maury Wills, Los Angeles Dodgers, Outfield, 1 for 1, 2 R, 1 SB.            

This was the second year that Wills would be an All-Star, and he would be in three more seasons.  Wills would be the NL MVP this year, and led the NL in Stolen Bases (104), Triples (10), and batted .299.

Eligible Since 1978.  Wills was on the ballot for 15 years, and finished as high as 40.6% in 1981.  Ranked #73 on Notinhalloffame.com.  

1962-2 Leon Wagner, Los Angeles Angels, Outfield, 3 for 4, 1 R, 1 HR, 2 RBI.            

1962 would be Wagner’s first of two All-Star years, and it was also his best season in Baseball, finishing fourth in MVP voting with career-highs in Hits (164), Home Runs (37) and RBIs (107).

Eligible Since 1975.  Although Wagner was Hall of Fame eligible in 1975, he was not on the ballot.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com 

1964 Johnny Callison, Philadelphia Phillies, Outfield, 1 for 3, 1 R, 1 HR, 3 RBI.            

This was Callison’s third of four All-Star Game appearances, and he went on to have the best year of his career, with 31 Home Runs, 104 RBIs and a second place finish for the MVP.

Eligible Since 1979.  Callison was on the ballot for one year and received 0.2% of the vote.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com. 

1973 Bobby Bonds, San Francisco Giants, Outfield, 2 for 2, 1 R, 1 2B, 1 HR, 2 RBI.            

Bonds went to his second All-Star Game (of what would be three), and he finished this season leading the NL in Runs (131) with career-highs in Home Runs (39) and Slugging (.530).  Bonds was third in MVP voting this year.

Eligible Since 1979.  Bonds was on the ballot for eleven years and finished as high as 10.6% of the vote.  Ranked #67 on Notinhalloffame.com

1974 Steve Garvey, Los Angeles Dodgers, First Base, 2 for 4, 1 R, 1 2B, 1 RBI.            

This was Garvey’s breakout year, and he won the MVP with a 21 HR, 111 RB and .312 BA year.  This was the first of his ten All-Star years.

Eligible Since 1993.  Garvey was on the ballot for fifteen years and finished as high as 41.6% in 1993.  Ranked #23 on Notinhalloffame.com

1975 Jon Matlack, New York Mets, Pitcher, Win, 3 OP, 0 ER, 4 SO. Co-Winner

This was the second of Matlack’s three All-Star years, and he finished the year with a 16-12 Record with a 3.38 ERA and 154 SO.

Eligible Since 1989.  Matlack was on the ballot for one year but did not receive any votes.  Ranked #274 on Notinhalloffame.com

1975 Bill Madlock, Chicago Cubs, Third Base, 1 for 2, 2 RBI. Co-Winner.

Madlock was an All-Star three times, this year being the first.  He would win the first of four Batting Titles this year and was 12th in MVP voting.

Eligible Since 1993.  Madlock was on the ballot for one year and received 4.5% of the vote.  Ranked #208 on Notinhalloffame.com

1976 George Foster, Cincinnati Reds, Outfield, 1 for 3, 1 R, 1 HR, 3 RBI. 

This was the first of five All-Star Games for Foster, and the first of his three straight league-leading RBI years.  He was second for the MVP this year, won the World Series this season (his second), but win the MVP the following year.  

Eligible Since 1992.  Foster was on the ballot for four years and received as much as 6.9% in 1993.  Ranked #126 on Notinhalloffame.com

1978 Steve Garvey, Los Angeles Dodgers, First Base, 2 for 3, 1 R, 1 3B, 1 BB, 2 RBI. (2)           

This was Garvey’s fifth All-Star Game and his second as the game’s MVP.  He finished the year leading the NL in Hits (202) with a .316 Batting Average.  This year, he was the runner-up for the MVP.

Eligible Since 1993.  Garvey was on the ballot for fifteen years and finished as high as 41.6% in 1993.  Ranked #23 on Notinhalloffame.com

1979 Dave Parker, Pittsburgh Pirates, Outfield, 1 for 3, 1 BB, 1 SF, 1 RBI.            

An MVP the year before, Parker was an All-Star for the second of seven times, and he was tenth in MVP voting this year.  He completed the year with 25 Home Runs, 94 RBIs and a Slash Line of .310/.380/.526.

Eligible Since 1997.  Parker was on the ballot for fifteen years and finished as high as 24.5% in 1998.  Ranked #19 on Notinhalloffame.com

1980 Ken Griffey, Cincinnati Reds, Outfield, 2 for 3, 1 HR, 1 RBI.            

This was Griffey’s third and final All-Star Game and he was a previous two-time World Series winner with the Reds.  Griffey batted .294 this year with 13 Home Runs, and was 22nd in MVP voting.

Eligible Since 1997.  Griffey was on the ballot for one year and finished with 4.7% in 1998.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

1982 Dave Concepcion, Cincinnati Reds, Shortstop, 1 for 2, 1 R, 1 HR, 2 RBI.            

This was Concepcion’s ninth and final All-Star Game appearance, and the two-time World Series winner completed the year with a Silver Slugger and a .287 Batting Average.

Eligible Since 1994.  Concepcion was on the ballot for fifteen years and finished as high as 16.9% in 1998.  Ranked #54 on Notinhalloffame.com.

1983 Fred Lynn, California Angels, Outfield. 1 for 3, 1 R, 1 BB, 1 HR, 4 RBI.            

This was the last of Lynn nine consecutive All-Star Games, and the former MVP concluded his season with 22 HR, 79 RBI with a .272 Batting Average.

Eligible Since 1996.  Lynn was on the ballot for two years and finished as high as 5.5% in 1996.  Ranked #110 on Notinhalloffame.com.

1985 LaMarr Hoyt, San Diego Padres, Pitcher. Win, 2 H, 0 ER, 0 SO.            

Hoyt was only a one-time All-Star, but was a previous Cy Young winner.  He finished this season with a 16-8 record, a 3.47 ERA, and the league lead in BB/9 (0.9).

*Eligible Since 1992.  Hoyt did not play the ten years needed to make the ballot.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.

1985 Roger Clemens, Boston Red Sox, Pitcher. Win, 0 H, 0 ER, 0 BB, 2 SO.            

This was the first of Clemens’ 11 All-Star Games, and he would win both the American League MVP and Cy Young off of a 24-8 year, where he led the league in Wins, ERA (2.48), ERA+ (169), FIP (2.81), WHIP (0.969) and H/9 (6.3).  He was also second in Strikeouts (238). 

Eligible Since 2013.  Clemens had been on the ballot for nine years and has finished as high as 61.6% in 2021.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.

1988 Terry Steinbach, Oakland Athletics, Catcher.  1 for 2, 1 R, 1 HR 1 SF, 2 RBI.            

Steinbach was an All-Star three times, with this being the first of them.  He would be injured for a chunk of this year and he only appeared in 104 Games with 93 Hits and a .265 Batting Average.

Eligible Since 2005.  Steinbach was on the ballot for one year and received 0.2% of the vote.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.

1989 Bo Jackson, Kansas City Royals, Outfield.  2 for 4, 1 R, 1 HR 1 SB, 2 RBI.            

This was Jackson’s lone All-Star year, and the two-sport star belted 32 Home Runs, 105 RBIs and batted .256.  Jackson was tenth in MVP voting for the year.

*Eligible Since 2000.  Jackson did not play the minimum ten years to qualify for the Hall.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.

1990 Julio Franco, Texas Rangers, Second Base.  1 for 3, 1 2B, 2 RBI.            

Franco was a three-time All-Star, this being the second, and he would win the third of what were five Silver Sluggers.  He finished the season with 172 Hits, batted .26 and had 31 Stolen Bases.  Franco amazingly played in 23 MLB seasons, and more outside of the United States.

Eligible Since 2013.  Franco was on the ballot for one year and had 1.1% of the vote.  Ranked #95 on Notinhalloffame.

1994 Fred McGriff, Atlanta Braves, First Base.  1 for 1, 1 R, 1 HR, 2 RBI.            

“The Crime Dog” participated in five All-Star Games, this being his second.  He concluded the season with 34 Home Runs, 94 RBIs, batted .318, and was eighth in MVP voting.

Eligible Since 2013.  McGriff was on the ballot for ten years and finished as high as 39.8% in 2019.  Ranked #29 on Notinhalloffame.

1995 Jeff Conine, Florida Marlins, First Base.  1 for 1, 1 R, 1 HR, 1 RBI.            

Conine was an All-Star twice in his career, with 1995 being his second time.  A future two-time World Series winner with the Marlins, Conine had 146 Hits this year with 25 Home Runs, 105 RBIs and a .302 Batting Average.  He was 22nd in MVP voting this year.

Eligible Since 2013.  Conine did not receive any votes in his lone year on the ballot.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

1997 Sandy Alomar, Cleveland Indians, Catcher.  1 for 2, 1 R, 1 HR, 2 RBI.            

This was Alomar’s fifth of six All-Star Games, and he completed the season with career-highs in Hits (146), Home Runs (21), RBIs (83) and Batting Average (.324).  This was also the only season in which Alomar received MVP votes, and he was fourteenth in balloting.

Eligible Since 2013.  Alomar was on the ballot for one year and received 2.8% of the vote.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

2003 Garrett Anderson, Anaheim Angels, Outfield.  3 for 4, 1 R, 1 2B, 1 HR, 2 RBI.            

Anderson led the Angels to their first World Series win last year, and this season was All-Star number two of three for the Outfielder.  He finished 2003 as the American League leader in Doubles (49), hit 29 Home Runs, with 116 RBIs and a .315 Batting Average.  Anderson also won his second and final Silver Slugger and was 14th in MVP voting.

Eligible Since 2016.  Anderson was on the ballot for one year and received 0.2% of the vote.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

2004 Alfonso Soriano, Texas Rangers, Second Base.  2 for 3, 1 R, 1 HR, 3 RBI.            

Soriano went to seven consecutive All-Star Games, and this was the third in the streak.  He added his second Silver Slugger and would belt 28 Home Runs, 91 RBIs with a .280 Batting Average.

Eligible Since 2020.  Soriano was on the ballot for one year and received 1.5% of the vote.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

2005 Miguel Tejada, Baltimore Orioles, Shortstop.  1 for 3, 1 R, 1 HR, 2 RBI.            

Tejada was an All-Star for the third of six times in 2005, and he won his second and final Silver Slugger this season.  He concluded the season with 26 Home Runs, a league-leading 50 Doubles and a .304 Batting Average.  Tejada was 15th in MVP voting this year.

Eligible Since 2019.  Tejada was on the ballot for one year and received 1.2% of the vote.  Ranked #103 on Notinhalloffame.com.

2006 Michael Young, Texas Rangers, Second Base.  1 for 2, 1 3B, 2 RBI.            

Young was an All-Star for the third time this year with four more coming in his career.  This season, Young had 217 Hits with a .314 Batting Average, and was 30th in MVP voting.

Eligible Since 2019.  Young was on the ballot for one year and received 2.1% of the vote.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

2008 J.D. Drew, Boston Red Sox, Outfield.  2 for 4, 1 R, 1 HR, 1 SB, 1 BB, 2 RBI.            

A year after winning the World Series with the Red Sox, Drew was one of Boston’s All-Star representatives, the first and only time he made one.  He finished the season with 19 Home Runs, 64 RBIs, and batted .260.

Eligible Since 2017.  Drew was on the ballot for one year but did not receive any votes.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

2009 Carl Crawford, Tampa Bay Rays, Outfield.  1 for 3.

This was Crawford’s third of four All-Star Games, all of which occurring with Tampa.  He batted .305 with 15 Home Runs and 185 Hits.

Eligible Since 2022.  Crawford is in his first year of eligibility.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

2011 Prince Fielder, Milwaukee Brewers, First Base.  1 for 2, 1 R, 1 HR, 3 RBI.

Fielder was an All-Star for the third of six times, with the First Baseman hitting 38 Home Runs with 120 RBIs over the year.  He would also win his second of three Silver Sluggers, and was third in MVP voting.

Eligible Since 2022.  Fielder is in his first year of eligibility.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

*This would be the year of eligibility should he be given an exemption.

Let’s update our tally, shall we?       

Award in Question

Percentage of recipients who have entered the HOF

Percentage of recipients by year who have entered the HOF.

NBA MVP

100%

100%

NHL Art Ross

100%

100%

NHL Hart Trophy

93.6%

96.3%

NBA Finals MVP

91.3%

94.9%

NHL Norris

90.5%

96.4%

NHL Ted Lindsay Award

90.0%

 

NBA All-Star Game MVP

89.5%

91.7%

NHL Conn Smythe

74.2%

85.4%

NFL Bert Bell Award

73.7%

71.4%

NFL AP Offensive Player of the Year

73.1%

79.4%

NFL AP MVP

68.3%

74.0%

NFL Walter Payton Man of the Year

66.7%

66.7%

NHL Lady Byng

63.8%

76.0%

NFL Defensive Player of the Year

60.8%

71.1%

NFL Super Bowl MVP

60.6%

64.9%

NHL Mark Messier Leadership Award

60.0%

60.0%

NBA Defensive Player of the Year

58.3%

56.5%

NHL Vezina

57.1%

66.3%

NBA Rookie of the Year

56.5%

56.5%

MLB MVP

55.0%

60.2%

NFL Pro Bowl MVP

52.3%

54.8%

MLB Lou Gehrig Award

51.9%

51.9%

MLB Roberto Clemente Award

47.4%

47.4%

NHL Calder Trophy

46.5%

46.5%

NBA J. Walter Kennedy Citizenship Award

46.0%

46.0%

MLB/NL/AL Cy Young Award

44.4%

55.4%

MLB All-Star Game MVP

41.3%

44.0%

MLB Babe Ruth Award

37.0%

39.3%

NHL King Clancy Award

36.8%

36.8%

NHL Frank J. Selke Trophy

33.3%

36.7%

MLB World Series MVP

33.3%

36.8%

MLB Hutch Award

33.1%

33.1%

NFL Offensive Rookie of the Year

28.6%

28.6%

NHL Bill Masterton Memorial Trophy

27.9%

27.9%

MLB Edgar Martinez Award

26.7%

17.2%

MLB Delivery Man of the Year

25.0%

50.0%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Designated Hitter)

25.0%

30.8%

MLB Comeback Player of the Year

25.0%

25.0%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Shortstop)

23.5%

52.6%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove

21.7%

36.8%

NHL William M. Jennings Trophy

20.7%

40.4%

NFL Defensive Rookie of the Year

20.6%

20.6%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Catcher)

20.0%

22.5%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Second Base)

18.8%

39.8%

MLB Rolaids Reliever of the Year

18.6%

33.3%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Shortstop)

18.2%

35.1%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Pitcher)

18.2%

20.1%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Second Base)

16.7%

32.7%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Outfield)

16.7%

30.1%

MLB NLCS/ALCS MVP

16.1%

15.3%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Outfield)

15.7%

25.2%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Third Base)

14.3%

14.3%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Third Base)

13.6%

14.3%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (First Base)

13.6%

13.3%

MLB (NL/AL) Rookie of the Year

13.3%

13.3%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Catcher)

10.3%

15.2%

MLB Hank Aaron Award

9.1%

14.3%

NBA Most Improved Player of the Year

5.3%

3.2%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (First Base)

3.8%

3.2%

NFL AP Comeback Player of the Year

0.0%

0.0%

So, who is up next?

The following are the players who have won the All-Star Game in MLB who have retired but have not met the mandatory years out of the game to qualify for the Baseball Hall of Fame: 

2010 Brian McCann, Atlanta Braves, Catcher, 1 for 3, 1 2B, 3 RBI.   

McCann was a seven-time All-Star, with this season being the fifth of them.  This was his only Silver Slugger year, and the only one where he added an MVP vote; 21st.   McCann had 21 Home Runs this year. 

Eligible In 2025. 

2012 Melky Cabrera, San Francisco Giants, Outfield, 2 for 3, 1 R, 1 HR, 3 RBI.   

This was the only year that Cabrera was a Giant, and coincidentally the only season he was an All-Star.  Cabrera batted .346 with 159 Hits, but his campaign was struck short when he was suspended 50 Games due to PED use.  The Giants went on to win the World Series that year, without him in the lineup. 

Eligible In 2025. 

2012 Melky Cabrera, San Francisco Giants, Outfield, 2 for 3, 1 R, 1 HR, 3 RBI.   

This was the only year that Cabrera was a Giant, and coincidentally the only season he was an All-Star.  Cabrera batted .346 with 159 Hits, but his campaign was struck short when he was suspended 50 Games due to PED use.  The Giants went on to win the World Series that year, without him in the lineup. 

Eligible In 2025. 

2017 Robinson Cano, Seattle Mariners, Second Base, 2 for 3, 1 R, 1 HR, 3 RBI.   

Cano went to his eighth and final All-Star Game this year, and he would smack 23 Home Runs with 97 RBIs this year.  He would also bat .280. 

Eligible In 2026. 

The following are the past players who have won the MLB All-Star Game MVP who are eligible for the Baseball Hall of Fame and are still active.

2014 Mike Trout, Los Angeles Angels, Outfield, 2 for 3, 1 R, 1 2B, 1 3B, 2 RBI.   

An All-Star for the third time, Trout won his first MVP, two years after he was the Rookie of the Year.  Trout led the AL in Runs (115) and RBIs (111) and would also belt 36 Home Runs with an OPS of .939.  Trout also win his third Silver Slugger.

30 Years Old, Playing for the Los Angeles Angels.

2015 Mike Trout, Los Angeles Angels, Outfield, 1 for 2, 1 R, 1 HR, 1 BB, 1 RBI. (2)  

Trout became the first player to become back-to-back All-Star Game MVPs and he was second for the MVP.  He also was a Silver Slugger, and the Slugging Champion (.590) with 41 Home Runs and a .299 Batting Average.

30 Years Old, Playing for the Los Angeles Angels.

2016 Eric Hosmer, Kansas City Royals, First Base, 2 for 3, 1 R, 1 HR, 2 RBI.   

To date, this was Hosmer’s only All-Star Game, and he would belt 25 Home Runs with 104 RBIs this year.  He also batted .263.

31 Years Old, Playing for the San Diego Padres.

2018 Alex Bregman, Houston Astros, Third Base, 1 for 3, 1 R, 1 HR, 1 RBI.   

This was Bregman’s first All-Star Game, and he would lead the American League in Doubles (51), and had 31 Home Runs, 103 RBIs and a .926 OPS.  He finished fifth in MVP voting.

28 Years Old, Playing for the Houston Astros.

2019 Shane Bieber, Cleveland Indians, Pitcher, 1 IP, 0 H, 0 BB, 0 ER, 3 S0.

Bieber was an All-Star for the first time, and he led the AL in BB/9 (1.7), with a 15-6 Record with 259 Strikeouts and a 3.28 ERA.  He was fourth in Cy Young voting.

27 Years Old, Playing for the Cleveland Indians.

2021 Vladimir Guerrero Jr., Toronto Blue Jays, First Base, 1 for 2, 1 R, 1 HR, 1 RBI.

Guerrero Jr. led the AL in Runs Scored (122), Home Runs (58), On Base Percentage (.401), Slugging Percentage (.601) and OPS (1.002), while having 121 RBIs and batting .311.  He won the Silver Slugger and was the runner up to Shohei Ohtani for the MVP.

23 Years Old, Playing for the Toronto Blue Jays.

So, what is up next?

We go back to Basketball, with the Sixth Man of the Year.

As always, we thank you for your support, and look for that soon.

It’s Thanksgiving week in the United States, and we here at Notinhalloffame.com have a lot to be thankful for.

Days after the 2022 Baseball Hall of Fame ballot was released, the Pro Football Hall of Fame announced the 26 men who gave advanced to the Semi-Final round.  This group was pared down form 123 Preliminary candidates.

The 26 Semi-Finalists are:

Eric Allen.  Cornerback, PHI 1988-94, NOR 1995-97 & OAK 1998-01.      Eligible since 2007, Allen has never been a Finalist, though is a returning Semi-Finalist, with his first coming last year.  Allen had 54 Interceptions over his career, 34 of which as an Eagle.  Five of his six Pro Bowls were with Philadelphia, and he was a First Team All-Pro in 1989. Ranked #43 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Jared Allen.  Defensive End, KAN 2004-07, MIN 2008-13, CHI 2014-15 & CAR 2015.  Last year, Allen was a Finalist in his first year of eligibility, and it is expected he will be again in 2022.  A five-time Pro Bowl Selection and four-time First Team All-Pro, Allen twice led the NFL in Sacks, is a one-time leader in Tackles for Loss, and was the runner-up for the Defensive Player of the Year in 2011.  Allen is 4th all-time in Tackles for Loss (171), 16th all-time in Sacks (136.0), and 22nd all-time in Forced Fumbles (32).  Ranked #24 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Willie Anderson.  Offensive Tackle, CIN 1997-07, BAL 2008.  Anderson has been eligible since 2013, and made the Semi-Finals for the first time last year.  He played in 195 Games, went to four Pro Bowls and is a three-time First Team All-Pro.  Ranked #268 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Ronde Barber.  Cornerback/Safety, TB 1997-12.  Barber has been a Semi-Finalist all of the five years he has been eligible, and he broke through to the Finals for the first time last year.  A Super Bowl Champion, Barber was a three-time First Team All-Pro, five-time Pro Bowl Selection, and he led the NFL in Interceptions in 2001 (10).  Barber is in rare company as a 25/25 player (Sacks & Interceptions), accumulating 47 Interceptions and 28.0 Sacks.  Ranked #12 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Anquan Boldin.  Wide Receiver, ARI 2003-09, BAL 2010-12, SFO 2013-15 & DET 2016.  Boldin is eligible for the first time this year, and he is a three-time Pro Bowler.  He accumulated 13,779 Receiving Yards with 82 Touchdowns.  Ranked #73 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Tony Boselli.  Offensive Tackle, JAX 1995-01.  Boselli is now a seven-time Semi-Finalist and has been a Finalist the last five years.  He went to five Pro Bowls and was a three-time First Time All-Pro.  Ranked #36 on Notinhalloffame.com.

LeRoy Butler.  Safety, GB 1990-01.  A Super Bowl Champion, Butler is a Semi-Finalist for the fifth consecutive year and has been a Finalist the last two years.  Butler was named to four Pro Bowls and four First Team All-Pros, and would record 38 Interceptions and 20.5 Sacks.  Ranked #69 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Eddie George.  Running Back, TEN 1996-03 & DAL 2004.  George has been eligible since 2010, but this is the first time that he has made the Semi-Final cut.  George rushed for 10,441 Yards, and had 12,668 Yards From Scrimmage with 78 Touchdowns.  Ranked #173 on Notinhalloffame.com.  

Devin Hester.  Wide Receiver, Punt Returner, Kick Returner, CHI 2006-13, ATL 2014-15, BAL 2016 & SEA 2016.  Hester is in his first year of eligibility, and was a three-time First Team All-Pro as a Returner.  Hester amassed 14,455 All-Purpose Yards and is 12th all-time in Kick Return Yards (7,333), and 3rd all-time in Punt Return Yards (3,695).  He is also the all-time leader in Punt Return Touchdowns (14).  Ranked #103 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Torry Holt.  Wide Receiver, STL 1999-08 & JAX 2009.  Holt is now an eight-time Semi-Finalist and was a Finalist the last two years.  Holt won a Super Bowl with the Rams, led the NFL in Receiving Yards twice, and went to seven Pro Bowls.  He totalled 13,382 Yards with 74 Touchdowns.  Ranked #6 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Andre Johnson. Wide Receiver, HOU 2003-14, IND 2015 & TEN 2016.  Johnson is a Semi-Finalist on his first year of eligibility, and is a former two-time leader in Receiving Yards.  Johnson was a seven-time Pro Bowl Selection and two-time First Team All-Pro, and would amass 14,185 Yards and 70 Touchdowns.  Ranked #30 on Notinhalloffame.com.  

Robert Mathis.  Defensive End, IND 2003-16.  Entering his first year of eligibility, Mathis makes the Semi-Finals.  A Super Bowl Champion, five-time Pro Bowler and one-time First Team All-Pro, Mathis led the NFL in Forced Fumbles three times, and Sacks once, and had 123.0 Sacks in total.  Ranked #111 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Richard Seymour.  Defensive End/Defensive Tackle.  NE 2001-08 & OAK 2009-12.  Seymour has been a Semi-Finalist all five years of his eligibility and a Finalist the last three.  A three-time Super Bowl winner with the Patriots, Seymour went to seven Pro Bowls, was named to three First Team All-Pros, and had 57.5 Sacks.  Ranked #35 on Notinhalloffame.com.

 

Sam Mills.  Linebacker, NO 1986-94 & CAR 1995-97.  Mills in his last year of eligibility, and he is now a five-time Semi-Finalist, and was. A Finalist the last two years.  Mills had 20.5 Sacks, 1,265 Tackles and went to five Pro Bowls.  Ranked #40 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Steve Smith.  Wide Receiver, CAR 2001-13 & BAL 2014-16.  Smith is a Semi-Finalist in his first year on the ballot, and he is a five-time Pro Bowl and two-time First Team All-Pro.  He led the league in Receiving Yards and Receiving Touchdowns in 2005, and he had 14,731 Yards with 81 Touchdowns.  Ranked #12 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Steve Tasker.  Special Teams/Wide Receiver.  HOU 1985-86 & BUF 1986-97.  Tasker is now a nine-time Semi-Finalist but has never been named a Finalist.  The Special Teams superstar is in his last year of eligibility and was named to seven Pro Bowls.  Ranked #108 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Fred Taylor.  Running Back, JAX 1998-08 & NE 2009-10.  Taylor is now a three-time Semi-Finalist but has never been a Finalist.   Taylor rushed for 11,695 Yards, had 14,079 Yards From Scrimmage and had 74 Touchdowns.  He was a one-time Pro Bowl Selection.  Ranked #169 on Notinhalloffame.com.  

Zach Thomas.  Linebacker, MIA 1996-07 & DAL 2008.  Thomas is now a four-time Semi-Finalist and was a Finalist the last two years.  The Linebacker twice led the NFL in Combined Tackles, was a five-time First Team All-Pro and went to seven Pro Bowls.  He would accumulate 17 Interceptions, 20.5 Sacks and 1,734 Combined Tackles, which is currently fifth all-time.   Ranked #21 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Hines Ward.  Wide Receiver, PIT 1998-11.   Ward has been named a Semi-Finalist all six of his years of eligibility but has never been a Finalist.  Ward won two Super Bowls, went to four Pro Bowls and has 12,083 Receiving Yards with 85 Touchdowns.  Ranked #32 on Notinhalloffame.com.

DeMarcus Ware.  Linebacker, DAL 2005-13 & DEN 2014-16.  Ware is in his first year of eligibility, and is a four-time First Team All-Pro as well as a nine-time Pro Bowler.  Twice leading the NFL in Sacks, Ware had 138.5 (13th all-time) in total and was the runner-up in 2008 for the Defensive Player of the Year.  He is also a three-time leader in Tackles for Loss and is fourth all-time (171).  Ware is also 15th all-time in Forced Fumbles (35).  Ranked #1 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Ricky Watters.  Running Back, SF 1992-94, PHI 1995-97 & SEA 1998-01.  Watters has been eligible since 2007, and this is the second time that he made the list of Semi-Finalists.  A five-time Pro Bowler, Watters had 14,891 Yards from Scrimmage with 91 Touchdowns.  Ranked #44 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Reggie Wayne.  Wide Receiver, IND 2001-14.  Wayne has been a Semi-Finalist all three years he has been eligible, and has been a Finalist the last two years.  A Super Bowl Champion, Wayne went to six Pro Bowls, is a one-time First Team All-Pro and has 14,345 Yards with 82 Touchdowns.  Ranked #9 on Notinhalloffame.com.  

Vince Wilfork.  Defensive Tackle, NE 2004-14 & HOU 2015-16.  Wilfork is eligible for the first time this year, and won two Super Bowls with New England.  He is a five-time Pro Bowler, one-time First Team All-Pro, and is one of best Nose Tackles of the last twenty years.  Ranked #145 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Patrick Willis.  Linebacker, SF 2007-14.  Willis has been a Semi-Finalist in all three years of his eligibility but has yet to be a Finalist.  He was a seven-time Pro Bowl, five-time First Team All-Pro and two-time leader in Tackles.  Ranked #15 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Darren Woodson.  Safety, DAL 1992-03.  Woodson is a Semi-Finalist for the sixth time but has never been a Finalist.  He went to five Pro Bowls, was a three-time First Team All-Pro and had 23 Interceptions.  Ranked #89 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Bryant Young.  Defensive Tackle, SF 1994-07.  Young is now a three-time Semi-Finalist, and was a Finalist two years ago.   A four-time Pro Bowler, Young had 89.5 Sacks over his career.  Ranked #159 on Notinhalloffame.com.

We will be doing our Mock Pro Football Hall of Fame Committee to decide who we would advance to the Finals.  A date for that will announced later.

We here at Notinhalloffame.com would like to congratulate the Semi-Finalists for making it to this stage.

One of our pet projects, the Fictitious Rock and Roll Hall of Fame is pleased to announce the Finalists for the Class of 2021, which will be the 7th full class. 

The Semi-Finalists were decided by all of you, after being pared down from other 500 Preliminary Nominees.

Whoever gets inducted this year, will join previous inductees:

The Fictitious Rock and Roll Semi-Finalists are: Spinal Tap, The Monkees, The Blues Brothers, Gorillaz, Tenacious D, Dr. Teeth and the Electric Mayhem, Wyld Stallyns, Alvin and the Chipmunks, The Wonders, Bleeding Gums Murphy, Otis Day and the Nights, Stillwater, Josie and the Pussycats, Marvin Berry and the Starlighters and the Rutles.

To mix things up, just like or Fictitious Athlete Hall of Fame, we have created a contributor’s section.  

This year’s Fictitious Rock and Roll Finalists are:

 

Alice Bowie (Cheech and Chong):  From the minds of Cheech Marin and Tommy Chong first appeared in the comedy duo’s first film.  They are a Finalist for the second time.

Bart Simpson (The Simpsons):  Leading a boy band, and also performing on his own when he was part of the Krusty the Clown show, we have heard Bart sing for decades.  Amazingly, he is still ten, and for the first time is a Finalist

Buckaroo Banzai and the Hong Kong Cavaliers (The Adventures of Buckaroo Banzai Across the Eighth Dimension):  What couldn’t these renaissance men do?   This is their second time as Finalists.

Eddie and the Cruisers (Eddie and the Cruisers):  A previous multi-time Finalist, Eddie and the Cruisers were on the cusp of something great, until the lead singer grew frustrated when management rejected his new sound…so he faked his death.  They are Finalists for the third time.

Figrin D’An and the Modal Nodes (Star Wars):  The house band at the Mos Eisley Cantina was a finalist the last two years.  No band can bounce back after seeing a fatality better than this one.  They are Finalists for the second straight year.

Fingerbang (South Park):  We can argue that this is the most successful boy band of all time…from South Park, Colorado.  It was not until they were joined by 30-something Randy Marsh that they really made it “big”…meaning that they played the mall.  This is their first time as a Finalist.

Hannah Montana (Hannah Montana):  Monatna returns to the Semi-Finals, and she was one of the biggest stars in the world, yet lived a double-life as a regular teenager.  Hannah is a Finalist for the third time.

 

Jem and the Holograms (Jem and the Holograms):  They played pop music and had a huge hologram machine. Enough said.  This is their fourth time reaching the Finals.

Michigan J. Frog (Looney Toons):  This frog would perform classic showtunes, as long as there was no audience.  He has been a Finalist three times before.

Ricky Ricardo (I Love Lucy):  He never le Lucy make it to the club but he was a superstar Cuban bandleader.  Ricardo is also a three-time Finalist.

Schroeder (Peanuts):  The piano-playing devotee of classic music has been a Semi-Finalist three times before.

The Archies (The Archies):  In 1970, they had a number 1 hit in the “Real World” with “Sugar Sugar”.  They have been Finalists three times before.

The Be Sharps (The Simpsons):  Former Grammy winners, the Be-Sharps were on top of the world for a brief period of time.  Comprised of Homer, Barney, Apu and Principal Skinner, they are four-time Finalists.

The Partridge Family (The Partridge Family):  The Southern California family of musicians (except the young kids, who couldn’t do anything) played gigs all over the state in the early 70s and got there on the most amazingly painted bus.  They have been Semi-Finalists twice before.

The School of Rock (The School of Rock):  Dewey Finn pretended to be a substitute teacher and used his class as a band to perform at the Battle of the Bands.  How did he not get in more trouble?  This is their third time as a Finalist.

You can vote for them here.

This year’s Fictitious Rock and Roll Semi-Finalists Contributors are:

Alexandra Cabot (Josie & The Pussycats):  Alexandra didn’t help Josie & The Pussycats, the band her brother Alexander managed.  In fact, she sought to sabotage them anyway she could, though it rarely worked.

Bruce Dickinson (Saturday Night Live):  Dickinson needed more cowbell.  He had a fever for it.  He got it, and the Blue Oyster Cult were forever grateful.

Burton Mercer (The Blues Brothers):  He was the cop who wanted to hear the Blues Brothers perform at the Palace Ballroom.  Perhaps, this wasn’t the best performance of his duties.

Colonel Homer Simpson (The Simpsons):  Homer is nominated in both categories, here for his discovery and early management of country singer, Lurleen Lumpkin.

Curtis (The Blues Brothers):  Had it not been for the mentorship of Curtis, the Blues Brothers would not have become the iconic band that they were.

Dr. Johnny Fever (WKRP in Cincinnati):  John Caravella’s career was resurrected when Andy Travis came in and changed the format to rock and roll.  He renamed himself, Dr. Johnny Fever, and he would eventually become the top morning man in the city.

Ramona Flowers (Scott Pilgrim Vs the World):  Why was Scott Pilgrim fighting the world?  For the love of Ramona Flowers of course!

Rufus (Bill & Ted’s Excellent Adventure):  From the future, Rufus provides Bill S. Preston and Ted “Theodore” Logan a time travelling device so that they can learn history and pass their class.  This allowed them to stay together so that they could unite the world with their music.

Wayne Campbell & Garth Algar (Saturday Night Live, Wayne’s World and Wayne’s World 2):  The hosts of Wayne’s World on Aurora Public Access, Wayne and Garth loved rock, promoted their own concert, and became icons in their own right.

You can vote for them here.

When you can, please support our site and cast your vote for the Class of 2021!

As always, we here at Notinhalloffame.com thank you for your support, and ask you to cast your votes.

Blue Velvet

September 21 – October 11, 1963

Bobby Vinton

Blue Velvet

I have already tackled Bobby Vinton before with his previous number one, “Roses are Red”, but with “Blue Velvet”, I have a haunting song, though we suspect that vibe was unintentional.

The song itself was written by Bernie Wayne and Lee Morris in 1950.  Wayne alleged that he got inspired by a stay at the Jefferson Hotel in Richmond, Virginia, where he saw a lady wearing blue velvet at a party.  According to musical legend, the two hooked up (as the kids say), and a song was envisioned.  I don’t know if any of that is true, but let’s say it is, as it makes a far better story!

The first recorded version of note was by Tony Bennett in 1951.  It charted in the top 20, and within the same year, Arthur Pryscock recorded his version, which coincidentally also went to the top twenty.  Bill Farrell and Norman Kaye would also get in on the “Blue Velvet Gravy Train”, as both charted that year with their versions.  At one time, all four variations were charted at the same time!  

Can you imagine something like that occurring today?  Impossible!

The Clovers took a crack in 1955, and the Statutes had a low-scoring hit with it in the early Rock and Roll era.  With all due respect to the previous versions, most people of a certain age will always attribute it to Vinton.

Bobby Vinton would record a concept album of sorts where every song would have the word “blue” in it.  This included recordings of “Am I Blue”, “Mr. Blue”, “Blue Skies”, “Blue Hawaii”, “Blue Moon”, “Blueberry Hill” and “My Blue Heaven”, but it was “Blue Velvet” that was hidden gem that would become his second number one hit.  I say “hidden”, as Vinton believed that his cover of “Am I Blue”, would be the hit, but the powers that be proved to be right. 

It was a romantic song, but that depended on your impression of it.  Most people just recall that the woman in question wore a blue velvet dress, but they rarely paid attention to the lyrics that followed.  This was not a love song so much as it was about a one-night stand that remained etched in the singer’s mind, and would always be a sly smile on his face that only he understood.

In 1986, the unique filmmaker, David Lynch, wrote and directed the film, Blue Velvet, which incorporated the song, and utilized the Vinton version in the flick.  Anyone who watched this film would be hard-pressed to hear the Vinton tune without seeing Isabella Rossellini at her most sultry.  

Blue Velvet never seemed sexier.

Other Notable Songs that charted but did not go to number one in this time period: September 21, 1963 – October 11, 1963.

9/21/63: Heat Wave by the Martha and the Vandellas went to #4 but would go all the way to the top of the R&B Chart. 

9/21/63: Mickey’s Monkey by Smokey Robinson and the Miracles reached #8, but went as high as #3 on the R&B Chart.  

9/28/63: Sally, Go Round the Roses by The Jaynetts went to #2, and to #4 on the R&B Chart.  

9/28/63: Little Deuce Coupe by The Beach Boys hit #15.