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Is Mark Buehrle retiring?

It has been alluded that Mark Buehrle, who was left off the Toronto Blue Jays post season roster, will be retiring at the end of the season.  If that is the case, we here at Notinhalloffame.com ask the question is he a Hall of Fame pitcher?

Should this be the end of the road for Buehrle, his Hall of Fame case is aided by a few realities.  Currently, the hurler is first among active Pitchers in bWAR and is 64th overall in that category, a number that is above many HOFers but lower than the average.  His JAWS places him only at 89th overall (47.1) but his traditional 214 Wins is a very impressive number in this era.  He does have one intangible, while rarely discussed, might make his case for induction a lot stronger, his fielding.

Buehrle, a four time Gold Glove winner, has been regarded as one of the best fielding Pitchers throughout his career, and furthermore, the amount of baserunners who dare to try run off him is minimal.  This is not often discussed with the Hall of Fame candidacy of Pitchers, but here we have a fielder worth discussing!

So what do you think?

If Mark Buehrle does retire at this time, is he a Baseball Hall of Famer?

Let us know!



Our 2021 Baseball Futures are now up!

It is time for us to continue our additions here at Notinhalloffame.com. 

We have added to our Baseball Futures section by adding those who will be eligible for Cooperstown in 2021.

The complete list can be found here, but here are each of those who could appear on the ballot for the first time in ’21.

A.J. Burnett: An All Star in 2015 who led the American League in Strikeouts in 2008.  He is currently 31st all-time in that stat.

Aaron Harang: Harang led the NL in Wins and Strikeouts in 2006 and would finish 4th in Cy Young voting.

Adam LaRoche:  A winner of both the Silver Slugger and the Gold Glove in 2012.  He has over 250 Home Runs over his career.

Alex Rios:  An All Star in 2006 & 2007.  Rios would win the World Series with Kansas City in his last season.

C.J. Wilson: A two time All Star in 2011 and 2012.

Corey Hart: A two time All Star who is known most for his time in Milwaukee.

Dan Haren:  Went to three consecutive All Star Games (2007-09) and also led his respective league in SO/BB three times.  He is currently 7th all-time in that category.

Dan Uggla:  A three time All Star and one time Silver Slugger recipient.

Grady Sizemore:  Sizemore went to three straight All Star Games (2006-08) and won a Silver Slugger and two Gold Gloves.  He would lead the AL in bWAR for Position Players.

Grant Balfour:  The first Australian to be named an All Star (2013)

Jason Marquis:  An All Star in 2009 who would win 11 Games six seasons in a row.

Kevin Gregg:  A Relief Pitcher who was in the top ten in Saves four times.

LaTroy Hawkins:  A middle reliever who is 10th all-time in Games Pitched.

Mark Buehrle:  A five time All Star who helped the Chicago White Sox win the World Series in 2005.  He is currently 61st all-time in WAR for Pitchers.

Michael Cuddyer:  A two time All Star who won the National League Batting Title in 2013.

Nick Swisher:  An All Star in 2010 and a World Series Champion with the New York Yankees in 2009.

Rafael Soriano:  A Pitcher with 207 career Saves.

Shane Victorino:  A two time All Star with four Gold Gloves.  Victorino won two World Series Rings in his career.

Skip Schumaker:  A member of the St. Louis Cardinals World Series Championship team in 2011.

Tim Hudson: A four time All Star who led the AL in Wins in 2000.  He is 68th All Time in WAR for Pitchers, 69th in Strikeouts and 75th in Wins.

Torii Hunter:  A five time All Star who also won the Gold Glove nine times.  Hunter is also a two time Silver Slugger.

When you have the chance, take a look at this new section on Notinhalloffame.com and let us know if any of these former baseball players are Hall of Fame worthy!

The Chicago White Sox Retire Mark Buehrle's Number

In a ceremony prior to their home field loss against the Oakland A’s, the Chicago White Sox retired the number 56 of Mark Buehrle.

The lefthander made his debut in 2000 for Chicago where he would send the next twelve seasons of his career.  With the Chi-Sox, Buehrle would go to four All Star Games and would win 161 Games and fan 1,396 batters.  He would help Chicago win the 2005 World Series. 

Buehrle becomes the 11th White Sox player in team history to have his number retired joining Nellie Fox (#2), Harold Baines (#3), Luke Appling (#4), Minnie Minoso (#9), Luis Aparicio (#11), Paul Konerko (#14), Ted Lyons (#16), Billy Pierce (#19), Thomas (#35) and Carlton Fisk (#72).

We here at Notinhalloffame.com would like to congratulate Mark Buehrle for achieving this honor. 

Major Update: Our Notinhalloffame Baseball List has been revised

A few weeks ago, the Baseball Hall of Fame announced their 2020 Baseball Hall of Fame Class.  The result was that Derek Jeter (on his first ballot), and Larry Walker (on his tenth and final) were chosen to enter Cooperstown. The two will join former Catcher, Ted Simmons, who was elected by the Veteran’s Committee.  All three of those former players were ranked in the top ten, and have been removed from the list.

For the first time since we began this list in 2010, there is no new entry in our top 15.  Actually, there is no new entry in the top 50.  This should assist in clearing any existing backlog. 

The new top ten is:

1A. Pete Rose.  Following the bombshell that was the Astros sign-stealing scandal, Rose again lobbied for reinstatement in the Majors.  His reasoning was that since no Astros player was punished, that logic should transfer to his own situation.  That likely won’t happen, but he did remain in the news as President Trump also said he should be in the Hall of Fame.  Since he is ineligible, he has the “1A” designation.

1B. “Shoeless” Joe Jackson. Like Rose, Jackson was banned from baseball, which is now 100 years old.  Jackson was banned for his (alleged) participation in the 1919 Black Sox scandal where players were paid by gamblers to throw games in the World Series to the Cincinnati Reds.  Jackson was a Hall of Fame worthy player, but as such his estate has to settle for his “1B” rank.

1C. Roger Clemens.  Unlike Rose and Jackson, Clemens is Hall of Fame eligible, but the PED stain has kept him out thus far.  He has two more years left and a big mountain to climb, but what looked impossible a few years ago, could be attainable.  

2. Barry Bonds.  Ditto for Bonds, and the only reason he is behind the “Rocket”, is because he has a slightly lower vote total than anyone than Clemens.  The all-time Home Run king is in the same boat as Clemens, as they both are in the low 60s in voting with two years left of eligibility.  

3. Lou Whitaker.  Playing his entire career with the Detroit Tigers, Lou Whitaker was only on the Hall of Fame ballot for one year, but has appeared on the Veteran’s Committee Ballot. There is still a good chance that he could enter via that route and join his double play partner, Alan Trammell, who also had to wait for a Veteran’s Committee admission to Cooperstown.

4. Bill Dahlen. “Bad” Bill Dahlen has been a Veteran’s Committee Nominee before, and could be again. The surly Shortstop was a defensive gem, a World Series Champion with the Giants in 1905, and is still in the top 50 in bWAR for Position Players.

5. Curt Schilling.  Had it not been for the mouth, political views and Twitter account of Curt Schilling, he would likely already have been inducted by now.  As it stands, he is close with a recent tally of 70% on his eight ballot.  Schilling has been on his best behavior in the last year, and with the weakest ballot in memory, he will enter Cooperstown in 2021 if he keeps his nose clean.

6. Manny Ramirez.  Unlike Barry Bonds and Roger Clemens, Manny Ramirez WAS caught using PEDs and did so when the Baseball Player’s Union had an agreement with Major League Baseball.  Ramirez has approached 30% in the last ballot, and statistically he belongs, but induction is unlikely as of this writing.

7. Todd Helton.  Helton could follow Larry Walker into the Baseball Hall of Fame, and his Hall of Fame support approached nearly 30% on his second year on the ballot. Helton is definitely on the right trajectory.  

8. Gil Hodges.  This might surprise you, but one of the most debated players on our baseball list is Hodges.  This is the player who has the most accumulated votes that never got inducted, and his name is synonymous with Dodgers lore.

9. Tommy John.  Tommy John Surgery is actually represented in the Baseball Hall of Fame, but John himself is not.  He has 288 Wins and 2,245 Strikeouts and he will definitely appear in a future Veteran’s Committee ballot.

10. Scott Rolen.  Rolen jumped from 17.2% to 35.3% on his third year of eligibility, and while he was not a Colorado Rockie like Todd Helton, he is the one called the “New Larry Walker” based on belief that he will methodically work his way into Cooperstown.  We agree with that assessment.

As you can see, there are no new entries in the top ten.  There are actually, nobody new in the top fifty.  The only two new entries are Mark Buehrle at #74, and Tim Hudson at #101.

This brings a unique opportunity for those who are on the 2021 ballot as the returning nominees will not be looking to be “slotted” below anyone new. 

We are in the preliminary process of expanding our list to 300.

You know what we want you to do!

Take a look, and if you haven’t done so already, cast your vote and offer your opinion!

Baseball Hall of Fame: Ballot Forecast 2021 to 2025

In a tumultuous year that was not normal for anything and everything including baseball, one thing that might be back to normal is voting for the Baseball Hall of Fame. Granted, the 2021 Baseball Hall of Fame ballot has 14 returning candidates, with just about every one of them owning cases for induction that range from borderline to compelling.

If I Had a Vote in the 2021 Baseball Hall of Fame Election

Is this the year Curt Schilling makes it into the National Baseball Hall of Fame? Will Schilling be the only player elected to the Hall this year? After all the tumultuous voting activity of the 2010s, has voting for the Hall returned to "normal"?

Only a crystal ball, or the patience to wait until voting results for the 2021 Baseball Hall of Fame are announced on January 26, 2021, can give us the definitive answers, but of course that doesn't stop us from prognosticating before we learn the results.

For now, the short answers are:

1. Maybe.

2. Possibly.

3. Likely.

2021 BBWAA Hall of Fame Ballot: Executive Summary

12. Mark Buehrle

The ace of the White Sox staff throughout the first decade of the 2000s, Mark Buehrle relied on his finesse and ability to get batters to hit themselves out.  As it would turn out, he was damned good at it!

80. Mark Buehrle

For over a decade, Mark Buehrle was either considered an ace or a player close to the top of the rotation.  Five times, Buehrle was named an All-Star and is a member of the 200 Win club, a number that is becoming more elusive all of the time.  A finesse pitcher with a wide arsenal to use, Buehrle’s best season was in 2005 where he finished 5th in Cy Young voting and helped the Chicago White Sox win the World Series.
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