Menu
A+ A A-

The College Baseball Hall of Fame announces their 2019 Class

The College Baseball Hall of Fame has announced their Class of 2019.

The nominees are:

Dave Chalk:  Chalk competed at the University of Texas from 1969 to 1972 where he batted .362 and would lead the Longhorns to three College World Series appearances.  He would later be a two-time All-Star with the California Angels.

Andre Dawson:  Dawson played at Florida A&M, leading the All-Southern Intercollegiate Athletic Conference in hits, doubles, home runs and RBIs in 1974 and 1975.  He would enter the Baseball Hall of Fame in 2010.

Wally Hood:  Hood played at USC, where in 1948, he went 21-2 in 1948.  He would later have a cup of coffee with the New York Yankees.

Mark Kotsay:  Kotsay was an absolute stud at the Cal-State Fullerton where he was a two-time All-American and took his school to a College World Series Championship in 1995.  That year he won the Golden Spikes Award and was also named the College World Series Most Outstanding Player.  A regular Outfielder, he pitched the final five outs to win the title that year. Kotsay would go on to hit 127 Home Runs in the Majors in a career that spanned over eight teams.

Mike Martin:  Martin finished his legendary career this year after helming Florida State since 1980.  He retired with 2,029-736-4 with a tournament record of 142-83.  No manager has more wins in College Baseball and although the Seminoles did not win a championship under his tenure, he never missed the post-season and his teams appeared in 17 College World Series.  He is also a two-time Baseball America Coach of the Year.

Dennis Poppe:  Poppe worked for the NCAA for 39 years, specifically earning this honor for overseeing the College World Series from 1987 to 2013.

Lloyd Simmons:  Simmons won 1,804 Games as the Manager of Seminole State.  He led 13 teams to the NJCAA College World Series.

Billy Wagner:  Wagner played at Division III Ferrum College where he averaged 16 Strikeouts per nine innings.  He would go 17-3 with a 1.63 ERA.

The ceremony will take place on November 1stand 2ndin Baton Rouge.

We here at Notinhalloffame.com would like to congratulate the College Baseball Hall of Fame Class of 2019.

 

 

Read more...

The International Tennis Hall of Fame names its 2020 Finalists

The International Tennis Hall of Fame has announced the four Finalists for the Class of 2020.

The nominees are:

Jonas Bjorkman:  As a Singles player, Bjorkman would reach the #4 ranking while winning six titles.  The Swede’s biggest success was in Doubles where he won 54 Titles including 9 Grand Slams.

Sergi Bruguera: From Spain, Brugera won 14 Titles, most notably the French Open in both 1993 and 1994.  He was ranked as high as #3 in 1994.

Goran Ivanisevic: From Croatia, Ivanisevic would reach the Wimbledon Finals three times in the 1990s, and would also win two Bronze Medals at the 1992 Olympic Games, which was extra special because this was the first Olympics for the country.  He will always be best known for his spectacular Wimbledon Championship in 2001, where he entered ranked #125 and entered as a wildcard.  Nobody ever won it before or since as a wildcard.

Conchita Martinez: Conchita Martinez would win the Wimbledon Title in 1994 making her the first Spaniard to do so.  She climbed to #2 in the rankings (1995) and was also a Finalist in the Australian Open (1998) and the French Open (2000). Overall, she would win 13 Titles on the WTA.

The Class of 2020 will be announced in January where the ceremony will take place on July 18 in Newport, Rhode Island.

 

 

Read more...

Stanford announces their 2019 Hall of Fame Class

Regular visitors of Notinhalloffame.com know that we are slowly working on the top 50 of every major team in the NHL, NBA, NFL and MLB. Once that is done, we intend to look at how each team honor their past players and executive. Eventually, we will look at major Universities and as such it is news to us that the Stanford has announced their franchise Hall of Fame Class of 2019.

The newest member are:

Foluke Akinradweo, Women’s Volleyball ’09:  Akinradewo was named the National Player and Pac-10 Player of the Year in both 2007 and 2008 and she would take Stanford to a runner-up spot in the NCAA Tournament three years in a row.  She would represent the United States in the Olympics winning Silver in 2012 London Games and Bronze in the 2016 Rio de Janeiro Games.

Jeff Austin, Baseball ’99:  Austin pitched for the Cardinal where he would help them reach 1997 College World Series.  He would throw 309.2 Innings with 317 Strikeouts and a 3.61 ERA and was named the Baseball America National Player of the Year.  He would go on to pitch in 38 Games in the Majors.

Tanner Gardner, Wrestling ’08:  Gardner won 145 matches for Stanford and is the all-time school leader. Wrestling at 125 pounds, Gardner would win the Pac-10 title in 2007 and 2008.

Mark Madsen, Men’s Basketball ’00:  Madsen was a two-time All-American at Stanford and would average 10.9 Points and 7.9 Rebounds per Game.  He would be a major factor in the school’s Final Four appearance in 1998.  Madsen would later win two NBA Championships with the Los Angeles Lakers.

Susan Hagey Wall & Diane Morrison, Women’s Tennis ’79:  Hagey Wall was the first four-time All-American in the program’s history and with Morrison they would win the AIAW doubles title in 1975 and 1976.  Together they helped Stanford win the AIAW Title in 1978.

Bill Tarr, Football ’55:  Tarr at one time was the leading rusher in school history with 1,593 Rushing Yards and defensively he played at Linebacker.

Tabitha Yim, Women’s Gymnastics ’08:  Yim was a fourteen-time All-American and as a Senior was named the Pac-10 Gymnast of the Year.  In 2017, she would return to Stanford as the Head Coach of Women’s Gymnastics Team.

The Stanford Athletic Hall of Fame was created in 1954 and now boasts 441 members.  The group will be inducted on September 20 and will be formally recognized on the following day during Stanford’s home football game against Oregon.

We here at Notinhalloffame.com would like to newest members of Stanford Athletic Hall of Fame.

Read more...

The Oakland Athletics announce their 2019 HOF Class

Regular visitors of Notinhalloffame.com know that we are slowly working on the top 50 of every major team in the NHL, NBA, NFL and MLB. Once that is done, we intend to look at how each team honor their past players and executive.  As such it is news to us that the Oakland Athletics have announced their franchise Hall of Fame Class of 2019.

The six-member class is:

Ron Bergman:  Bergman becomes the first journalist to enter the Hall and going forward there will be the Ron Bergman Award, which will be given annually to the journalist for “contributions to the coverage of Athletics”.

Vida Blue:  Blue was a member of the A’s three straight World Series wins in the 70s where he was a three-time All-Star.  Blue would win the MVP and Cy Young in 1971 when he went 24 and 8 with a 1.82 ERA and 0.952 WHIP.  He would win 124 Games with 1,315 Strikeouts.

Bert Campaneris:  The Shortstop played for the Athletics from 1964 to 1976 and like Blue was part of A’s dynasty of the early 70s.  As an Athletic, Campaneris went to five All-Star Games, would lead the AL in Stolen Bases six times and would accumulate 1,882 Hits.

Walter Hass:  Haas bought the team in 1980 and is credited with keeping the team in Oakland.  Under his watch, Oakland won the World Series in 1989.

Tony La Russa:  La Russa managed Oakland from 1986 to 1995 and had a record of 798 and 673.  He would win three American League Pennants (1988-90) with a World Series Title in 1989.

Mark McGwire:  McGwire won the Rookie of the Year in 1987 and he would go to nine All-Star Games as an Athletic.  He would win the Home Run title twice with Oakland and blasted 363 with an OPS of .931 for the team.

This group joins Dennis Eckersley, Rollie Fingers, Charlie Finlay, Rickey Henderson, Catfish Hunter, Reggie Jackson and Dave Stewart who were in the inaugural class.

The 2019 class will be honored in a pregame ceremony on September 21.

We here at Notinhalloffame.com would like to newest members of Oakland Athletics Hall of Fame.

Read more...

Awards=HOF? Part Thirty-Six: The Hutch Award

We here at Notinhalloffame.com thought it would be fun to take a look at the major awards in North American team sports and see how it translates into Hall of Fame potential.

Needless to say, different awards in different sports yield hall of fame potential.  In basketball, the team sport with the least number of players on a roster, the dividend for greatness much higher.  In baseball, it is not as much as a great individual season does not have the same impact.

For our next selection we look at the Hutch Award.  This award is given annually to the player who “best exemplifies the fighting spirit and competitive desire” of Fred Hutchinson. Hutchinson was a former player and manager who died in 1964 after a long battle with lung cancer.  This award was created a year later by his friends and reporters who covered him to honor his memory.

So, how many Hutch Award winners have been enshrined in the Baseball Hall of Fame?

Let’s find out!

*Please note that as statistics are not as relevant for this award so as opposed to how we normally list players, we will simply just list the winners as opposed to go into that year’s accomplishments.  This is the same position that we took with the Roberto Clemente Award.

The following are the past players who have won the Hutch Award in the MLB who are eligible for the Baseball Hall of Fame and have been enshrined.

Mickey Mantle, New York Yankees (1965)

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1974.

Sandy Koufax, Los Angeles Dodgers (1966)

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1972.

Carl Yastrzemski, Boston Red Sox (1967)

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1989.

Al Kaline, Detroit Tigers (1969)

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1980.

Joe Torre, St. Louis Cardinals (1971)

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2014.

Willie McCovey, San Francisco Giants(1977)

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1986.

Willie Stargell, Pittsburgh Pirates(1978)

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1988.

Lou Brock, St. Louis Cardinals(1979)

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1985.

George Brett, Kansas City Royals(1980)

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1999.

Johnny Bench, Cincinnati Reds(1981)

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1989.

Paul Molitor, Milwaukee Brewers(1987)

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2004.

Andre Dawson, Boston Red Sox(1994)

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2010.

Trevor Hoffman, San Diego Padres(2004)

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2018.

Craig Biggio, Houston Astros(2005)

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2015.

The following are the players who have won the Hutch Award in MLB who are eligible for the Baseball Hall of Fame and have not been selected:

Pete Rose, Cincinnati Reds (1968)

Rose has been banned from the Baseball for gambling and the Baseball Hall of Fame has not allowed him on the ballot.  Ranked #1A on Notinhalloffame.com

Tony Conigliaro, Boston Red Sox (1970)

Conigliaro did not play the mandatory ten seasons to qualify for the Baseball Hall of Fame.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Bobby Tolan, Cincinnati Reds (1972)

Tolan was on the ballot for one year in 1985 but he did not receive any votes.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

John Hiller, Detroit Tigers (1973)

Hiller was on the ballot for one year and received 2.6% of the vote.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Danny Thompson, Minnesota Twins (1974)

Thompson did not play the mandatory ten seasons to qualify for the Baseball Hall of Fame.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Gary Nolan, Cincinnati Reds (1975)

Nolan was on the ballot for one year in 1983 but he did not receive any votes.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Tommy John, Los Angeles Dodgers (1976)

John was on the ballot for 15 years and finished as high as 31.7% in 2009.  Ranked #12 Notinhalloffame.com.

Andre Thornton, Cleveland Indians (1982)

Thornton was on the ballot for one year in 1993 and received 0.5% of the vote.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Ray Knight, New York Mets (1983)

Knight was on the ballot for one year in 1994 and received 0.2% of the vote.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Don Robinson, Pittsburgh Pirates (1984)

Although Robinson was eligible for the Hall of Fame in 1998, he was not on the ballot.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Rick Reuschel, Pittsburgh Pirates (1985)

Reuschel was on the ballot for one year in 1997 and received 0.4% of the vote.  Ranked #93 Notinhalloffame.com.

Dennis Leonard, Kansas City Royals (1986)

Leonard was on the ballot for one year in 1992 and received 0.2% of the vote.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Ron Oester, Cincinnati Reds (1988)

Although Oester was eligible for the Hall of Fame in 1996, he was not on the ballot.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Dave Dravecky, San Francisco Giants (1989)

Dravecky did not play the mandatory ten years to qualify for the Hall of Fame.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Sid Bream, Pittsburgh Pirates (1990)

Although Bream was eligible for the Hall of Fame in 2000, he was not on the ballot.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Bill Wegman, Milwaukee Brewers (1991)

Although Wegman was eligible for the Hall of Fame in 2001, he was not on the ballot.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Carney Lansford, Oakland Athletics (1992)

Lansford was on the ballot for one year in 1998 and received 0.6% of the vote.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

John Olerud, Toronto Blue Jays (1993)

Olerud was on the ballot for one year in 2011 and received 0.7% of the vote.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Jim Abbott, Chicago White Sox (1995)

Abbott was on the ballot for one year in 2005 and received 2.5% of the vote.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Omar Vizquel, Cleveland Indians (1996)

Vizquel has been on the ballot for two years and finished as high as 42.8% in 2019.  Ranked #51 Notinhalloffame.com.

Eric Davis, Baltimore Orioles (1997)

Davis was on the ballot for one year in 2007 and received 0.6% of the vote.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

David Cone, New York Yankees (1998)

Cone was on the ballot for one year in 2009 and received 3.9% of the vote.  Ranked #48 Notinhalloffame.com.

Sean Casey, Cincinnati Reds (1999)

Casey was on the ballot for one year in 2014 but did not receive any votes.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Jason Giambi, Oakland Athletics (2000)

Giambi is entering his first year of eligibility. Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Curt Schilling, Arizona Diamondbacks (2001)

Schilling has been on the ballot for seven years and has finished as high as 60.9% in 2019.  Ranked #5 Notinhalloffame.com.

Tim Salmon, Anaheim Angels (2002)

Salmon was on the ballot for one year in 2012 and received 0.9% of the vote.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Jamie Moyer, Seattle Mariners (2003)

Moyer was on the ballot for one year in 2018 and received 2.4% of the vote.  Ranked #105 Notinhalloffame.com.

Mark Loretta, Boston Red Sox (2006)

Although Loretta was eligible for the Hall of Fame in 2015, he wasn’t on the ballot.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Mike Sweeney, Kansas City Royals (2007)

Sweeney was on the ballot for one year in 2016 and received 0.7% of the vote.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Mark Teahen, Kansas City Royals (2009)

Teahen did not play the mandatory ten years to qualify for the Hall of Fame.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Raul Ibanez, Seattle Mariners (2013)

Ibanez is entering his first year of eligibility. Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Let’s update our tally, shall we?

Award in Question

Percentage of recipients who have entered the HOF

Percentage of recipients by year who have entered the HOF.

NBA MVP

100%

100%

NHL Norris

90.5%

96.4%

NBA All Star Game MVP

89.5%

91.7%

NHL Conn Smythe

74.2%

85.4%

NHL Lady Byng

63.8%

76.0%

NFL Super Bowl MVP

60.6%

64.9%

NBA Defensive Player of the Year

58.3%

56.5%

NBA Rookie of the Year

56.5%

56.5%

NFL Pro Bowl MVP

52.3%

54.8%

MLB Lou Gehrig Award

51.9%

51.9%

MLB Roberto Clemente Award

47.4%

47.4%

MLB/NL/AL Cy Young Award

44.4%

55.4%

MLB Babe Ruth Award

37.0%

39.3%

NHL Frank J. Selke Trophy

33.3%

36.7%

MLB Hutch Award

33.1%

33.1%

NFL Offensive Rookie of the Year

28.6%

28.6%

MLB Edgar Martinez Award

26.7%

17.2%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Designated Hitter)

25.0%

30.8%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Shortstop)

23.5%

52.6%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove

21.7%

36.8%

NFL Defensive Rookie of the Year

20.6%

20.6%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Catcher)

20.0%

22.5%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Second Base)

18.8%

39.8%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Shortstop)

18.2%

35.1%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Pitcher)

18.2%

20.1%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Second Base)

16.7%

32.7%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Outfield)

16.7%

30.1%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Outfield)

15.7%

25.2%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Third Base)

14.3%

14.3%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Third Base)

13.6%

14.3%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (First Base)

13.6%

13.3%

MLB (NL/AL) Rookie of the Year

13.3%

13.3%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Catcher)

10.3%

15.2%

NBA Most Improved Player of the Year

5.3%

3.2%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (First Base)

3.8%

3.2%

So, who is up next?

The following are the players who have won the Hutch Award in the Major League Baseball who have retired but have not met the mandatory years out of the game to qualify for the Baseball Hall of Fame:

Tim Hudson, Atlanta Braves(2010)

Hudson is eligible for the Hall of Fame in 2021.

Billy Butler, Kansas City Chiefs(2011)

Hudson is eligible for the Hall of Fame in 2022.

Barry Zito, San Francisco Giants(2012)

Zito is eligible for the Hall of Fame in 2021.

Dustin McGowan, Miami Marlins(2016)

McGowan is eligible for the Hall of Fame in 2023.

The following are the players who have won the Hutch Award who are still active.

Jon Lester, Boston Red Sox (2008)

35 Years Old, Playing for the Chicago Cubs.

Alex Gordon, Kansas City Royals (2014)

35 Years Old, Playing for the Kansas City Royals.

Adam Wainwright, St. Louis Cardinals (2015)

37 Years Old, Playing for the St. Louis Cardinals.

Jake Diekman, Texas Rangers (2017)

32 Years Old, Playing for the Oakland Athletics.

Stephen Piscotty, Oakland Athletics (2018)

32 Years Old, Playing for the Oakland Athletics.

The Hutch Award winners don’t focus on elite players like other tertiary, or any other baseball related award.  Since its namesake was not a Hall of Famer himself, this is not exactly a surprise.

We are finally finished with the tertiary Baseball Awards and we are going to go back to Football with a major award in the Offensive Player of the Year.

As always, we thank you for that support and look for that soon!

Read more...

The Cincinnati Reds will induct Marty Brennaman to their franchise HOF

Regular visitors of Notinhalloffame.com know that we are slowly working on the top 50 of every major team in the NHL, NBA, NFL and MLB. Once that is done, we intend to look at how each team honor their past players and executive.  As such it is news to us that the Cincinnati Reds have announced that next year, they will be inducting their long-time broadcaster, Marty Brennaman, to their franchise Hall of Fame in 2020.

Brennaman is wrapping up his final season as a broadcaster for the Reds, this being his 46thwith the organization.  For his work in Baseball, he was honored by the Baseball Hall of Fame with the Ford C. Frick Award in 2000.

Out of respect to Brennaman, he will be the sole inductee next year.

We here at Notinhalloffame.com would like to congratulate Marty Brennaman for earning this impending honor.

Read more...

14. Torry Holt

A member of the St. Louis Rams for all but his final season (which was in Jacksonville) the 6th Overall Pick from North Carolina State, Torry Holt had a really good rookie season where he joined the famed (yes we are saying it again) "Greatest Show on Turf" and would be a Super Bowl Champion as a rookie.  Holt would promptly lead the NFL in Receiving Yards (1,635) in his second year and would do it again in 2003 with a career-high 1,696 Yards with an NFL leading 117 Receptions.  Holt was consistent with his production with six straight 1,300 Yard seasons 2000-2005 with a pair of 1,100 Yard campaigns after that.  The seven-time Pro Bowl Selection totaled 12,660 Receiving Yards with 74 Touchdowns as a Ram.
Read more...
Subscribe to this RSS feed