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1. Brett Favre

Brett Favre was not someone projected to break most of the NFL passing records when the Atlanta Falcons out of Southern Mississippi drafted him but apparently Green Bay (specifically Ron Wolf) did when they pulled the trigger on a trade to land one of the greatest gunslingers of all time.

Brett Favre Retires?

If Brett Favre is indeed retired, he is going out with a whimper instead of a bang.  Stat wise, this has been the grizzled veteran's worst year ever and this coupled with his numerous injuries and texting scandals it is likely a year he wants to forget.  It can be easily debated that Favre made a mistake coming back.  Regardless, Brett Favre retires holding the bulk of the NFL Quarterback records and is usually in the discussion for the top ten QBs of all time.  There should be little doubt that when eligible, he will vault to number one on our football list, but will only be there one year as he is a surefire first ballot inductee.

 

Mr. Favre, please stay retired and enjoy the next phase of your life, you have nothing left to prove on the field.

The Pro Football Semi-Finalists Are Announced.

It’s quite the day for us as the Pro Football Hall of Fame has announced their 25 Semi-Finalists.

Let’s take a quick look shall we?


1. Morten Andersen, Place Kicker.  Fourth Time as a Semi-Finalist: Ranked #83 on Notinhalloffame.com.

2. Steve Atwater, Safety.  Fifth Time as a Semi-Finalist: Ranked #19 on Notinhalloffame.com.

3. Tony Boselli, Offensive Tackle, First Time as a Semi-Finalist:  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com

4. Isaac Bruce, Wide Receiver.  Second Time as a Semi-Finalist:  Ranked #23 on Notinhalloffame.com.

5. Don Coryell, Coach. Eighth Time as a Semi-Finalist.

6. Roger Craig, Running Back.  Eighth Time as a Semi-Finalist:  Ranked #11 on Notinhalloffame.com.

7. Terrell Davis, Running Back.  Tenth Time as a Semi-Finalist:  Ranked #21 on Notinhalloffame.com.

8. Tony Dungy, Coach.  Third Time as a Semi-Finalist.

9. Alan Faneca, Offensive Guard:  First Time as a Semi-Finalist: Ranked #5 on Notinhalloffame.com.

10. Brett Favre, Quarterback:  First Time as Semi-Finalist: Ranked #1 on Notinhalloffame.com.

11. Kevin Greene, Linebacker/Defensive End: Tenth Time as a Semi-Finalist.  Ranked #37 on Notinhalloffame.com.   

12. Marvin Harrison, Wide Receiver, Third Time as a Semi-Finalist.  Ranked #3 on Notinhalloffame.com.

13. Torry Holt, Wide Receiver, Second Time as a Semi-Finalist.  Ranked #9 on Notinhalloffame.com.

14. Joe Jacoby, Offensive Tackle, Sixth Time as a Semi-Finalist.  Ranked #62 on Notinhalloffame.com.

15. Edgerrin James, Running Back, Second Time as a Semi-Finalist.  Ranked #17 on Notinhalloffame.com.

16. Jimmy Johnson, Coach, Third Time as a Semi-Finalist.

17. Mike Kenn, Offensive Tackle, Second Time as a Semi-Finalist.  Ranked #99 on Notinhalloffame.com.

18. Ty Law, Cornerbck, Second Time as a Semi-Finalist.  Ranked #60 on Notinhalloffame.com.

19. John Lynch, Free Safety, Fourth Time as a Semi-Finalist.  Ranked #57 on Notinhalloffame.com

20. Kevin Mawae, Center/Offensive Guard.  Second Time as a Semi-Finalist.  Ranked #16 on Notinhalloffame.com.

21. Karl Mecklenburg, Linebacker.  Fifth Time as a Semi-Finalist.  Ranked #65 on Notinhalloffame.com.

22. Sam Mills, Linebacker.  First time as a Semi-Finalist.  Ranked #85 on Notinhalloffame.com.

23. Terrell Owens, Wide Receiver, First Time as a Semi-Finalist.  Ranked #7 on Notinhalloffame.com.   

24. Orlando Pace, Offensive Tackle, Second Time as a Semi-Finalist.  Ranked #15 on Notinhalloffame.com.  

25. Kurt Warner, Quarterback, Second Time as a Semi-Finalist. Ranked #28 on Notinhalloffame.com.  



The Football Hall of Fame will announce the Finalists in January. 

Which ones will make it to next round?



Brett Favre's number #4 retired tonight.

Thanksgiving is a time of reuniting the family.  That is what is happening in Green Bay, as Brett Favre is returning tonight but not in a Vikings jersey, but there to have his number four retired by the franchise where he became a star.

This is no small honor as while the Packers have the largest Hall of Fame in all of professional sports, this will only be the 6th number retired by the team.  Favre will join Tony Canadeo (#3), Don Hutson (#14), Bart Starr (#15), Ray Nitschke (#66) and Reggie White (#92).  Bart Starr is scheduled to appear at tonight’s festivities.

It was not that long ago that a night like this seemed impossible as Favre left the team acrimoniously and the last time he appeared at Lambeau Field it was in Vikings purple and he was booed on every play.  A lot of healing has taken place on both sides, and in fact, Favre was awarded to the key to the city this afternoon, by the mayor of Green Bay.

Favre would throw 61,655 Yards and 442 TDs for the Packers and would lead them to victory in Super Bowl XXXI and would also win three MVPs.  Favre, who was already inducted into the Packers Hall of Fame this past summer, is expected to enter the Pro Football Hall of Fame next year.  He has already made the semi-finalist list and is ranked #1 on our Notinhalloffame.com list.

We would like to congratulate Brett Favre and the Green Bay Packers as this is an accolade that was meant to be. 



The 2016 Pro Football HOF Finalists are out

“Tis the season to talk about Hall of Fames isn’t it?

The Pro Football Hall of Fame has announced their Finalists, and there is no major surprise, which is usually the norm.

The headliner for most people (and for us) is former Quarterback, Brett Favre who two months ago had his number retired by the Green Bay Packers.  Favre is entering his first year of eligibility and is ranked #1 by us.

Favre is not the only first year eligible player to make the list of Finalists as Wide Receiver, Terrell Owens and Offensive Guard, Alan Faneca have also made the cut.  They are ranked and #7 and #5 respectively on our Notinhalloffame football list.

The remaining Finalists (with their Notinhalloffame rank in parenthesis) are Steve Atwater (#19), Don Coryell, Terrell Davis (#21), Tony Dungy, Kevin Greene (#37), Marvin Harrison (#3), Joe Jacoby (#62), Edgerrin James (#17), John Lynch (#57), Orlando Pace (#15) and Kurt Warner (#28).

This group joins the automatic Senior Finalists, Ken Stabler (#6) and Dick Stanfel (#30), along with Contributing Finalist, Eddie DeBartolo Jr.

To enter the Pro Football Hall of Fame must receive 80 percent of the votes.  A maximum of eight inductees can be chosen per year.

Like the Baseball Hall of Fame, We will be debating each Pro Football Finalist.



   

Brett Favre, Marvin Harrison headline the newest Football Hall of Fame Class

The Super Bowl is tomorrow and for Hall of Fame purposes this means one thing to us.  The Pro Football Hall of Fame has announced the latest class to their prestigious institution.

As expected first year eligible Quarterback, Brett Favre, has been chosen.  A Super Bowl Champion with the Green Bay Packers, Favre set numerous passing records and for years was the most recognizable player in the NFL.  Favre is a three time league MVP.

The Offensive Line has seen another one of their fraternity chosen with former St. Louis Ram, Orlando Pace.  Pace is also a Super Bowl Champion and was chosen for seven consecutive Pro Bowls.

The Indianapolis Colts will be well represented.  Wide Receiver, Marvin Harrison, who entered his third year of eligibility, has been chosen.  Harrison was a thirteen year veteran, all with Indianapolis.  He is an eight time Pro Bowl Selection and a Super Bowl Champion with over 13,000 Yards Receiving.

Harrison’s Super Bowl winning coach, Tony Dungy has also been chosen.  Dungy has a coaching record of 139 and 69 and also has a Super Bowl Ring as a Defensive Back with the Pittsburgh Steelers in the 1970’s.  He is currently a popular studio announcer for NBC’s National Football League Sunday Night telecasts.

Kevin Greene, one of the most feared pass rushers of all time, has also been chosen.   Greene finished his career with 160 Sacks, a number that puts him third all-time in that category.

Both Senior Nominees, Quarterback, Ken Stabler and Offensive Guard, Dick Stanfel have also been chosen. 

The home of Super Bowl 50, San Francisco, will see their popular former owner, Edward DeBartolo Jr. also inducted.  DeBartolo Jr. owned the San Francisco 49ers for twenty-three seasons with the team capturing five Super Bowl during that tenure.

Morten Andersen, Steve Atwater, Don Coryell, Terrell Davis, Alan Faneca, Joe Jacoby, John Lynch, Edgerrin James, Terrell Owens and Kurt Warner were not chosen this year.

We here at Notinhalloffame.com would like to congratulate this latest class, and we will begin work immediately on the revision of our Football List.  Look for that next month!

A quick look at the Pro Football HOF ceremony

We love this weekend here at Notinhalloffame.com!

Today is the official induction of the 2016 Pro Football Hall of Fame Class leading to tomorrow’s first pre-season game, the Hall of Fame Game in Canton, Ohio.

This year’s class sees eight new busts to be included into the Hall, which is quickly becoming the go-to Hall of Fame for all American professional sports.

Former Wide Receiver Marvin Harrison was inducted first by Colts’ owner, Jim Irsay.  Harrison enters on his third ballot, though many (including us) have stated that he should have been chosen in his first year of eligibility.  Harrison caught 1,102 passes for 14,580 Yards and 128 Touchdowns; all of which place him in the top ten all-time.

He is also a three time Pro Bowl Selection and in 2002 he set the single season record for Receptions (143), which still stands.

In his speech, Harrison thanks the Colts fans, calling them the best in the world and notably thanked Quarterback, Peyton Manning and Genera Manager, Bill Polian.

Fittingly, Harrison’s longtime teammate, Offensive Lineman, Orlando Pace was enshrined next by his son, Justin.  Pace anchored the line that protected “The Greatest Show on Turf” and was a huge part of their win in Super Bowl XXXVI.  Pace went to seven straight Pro Bowls.

Up next, Marv Levy had the pleasure of inducting Senior Inductee and five time Pro Bowler, Dick Stanfel.  The Offensive Guard was a two time NFL Champion and has a Super Bowl Ring with the Chicago Bears as he was their Offensive Line Coach during the “Super Bowl Shuffle” run.  This is a posthumous induction as Stanfel passed away last year.

Tony Dungy was inducted next by his former Pittsburgh Steelers teammate, Donnie Shell.  The current Sunday Night Football analyst was an NFL Coach for 13 seasons with the Tampa Bay Buccaneers and the Indianapolis Colts.  It was with the latter where he won the Super Bowl and made history as the first African-American Head Coach in NFL history.

Kevin Greene was then up and was inducted by his longtime coach, Dom Capers.  Greene was a five time Pro Bowler and recorded a whopping 160 Quarterback Sacks, making him third all-time.



The second of two Senior and posthumous inductees, Quarterback, Ken Stabler was inducted next by his former Head Coach, John Madden.  “The Snake” helmed Oakland to four straight AFC Title Games and was the winning Quarterback in Super Bowl XI.  Stabler died last year and many have felt that this was a snub for far too long and is something that he should have lived to see.

His daughter, Lisa, inducted former San Francisco 49ers owner, Eddie DeBartolo Jr.  Under DeBartolo Jr.’s watch, the Niners won five Super Bowls.  How badly do San Francisco fans want him still running the team!

The unquestionable headliner was up last in Quarterback, Brett Farve, who was inducted by his wife Deanna.  Favre was a Pro Bowler in 11 of his 16 seasons and too Green Bay to a win in Super Bowl XXXI.  In a sport known for grit and determination, Favre took those attributes to another level.  Constantly playing through pain and never throwing a ball that he thought couldn’t be caught, Favre set a myriad of records and gave us a litany of memories.

How perfect was it when Favre said he was going to wing his speech and than insinuated that he would ask Packers’ coach, Mike McCarthy (during the speech that he winged) if he could throw the first series in tomorrow’s Hall of Fame Game?

Typical Favre, and we hope he never changes!

We here at Notinhalloffame.com would like to congratulate this latest group of Hall of Famers and encourage you all to tell us who should get in next.

Our 2017 List is here, and ready for your votes and opinions!

Awards=HOF? Part Thirty-Seven: The NFL Offensive Player of the Year

We here at Notinhalloffame.com thought it would be fun to take a look at the major awards in North American team sports and see how it translates into Hall of Fame potential.

Needless to say, different awards in different sports yield hall of fame potential.  In basketball, the team sport with the least number of players on a roster, the dividend for greatness much higher.  In baseball, it is not as much as a great individual season does not have the same impact.

For our next selection we return to the National Football League after a long absence with a major accolade in the Offensive Player of the Year. Considering this is a very important award, it is a little surprising that this has only been in existence since 1972.  Not surprising, is that with the exception of Jerry Rice, it has only gone to Quarterbacks and Running Backs; basically, the sexy skill positions of football. Frankly, we don’t think we will ever see an Offensive Lineman win this regardless of how impressive a season he has. 

So, how many Offensive Players of the Year have been enshrined in the Pro Football Hall of Fame?

Let’s find out!

The following are the past players who have won the AP Offensive Player of the Year in the NFL who are eligible for the Pro Football Hall of Fame and have been enshrined.

O.J. Simpson, Buffalo Bills, Running Back (1973)

Who else could possibly win it in 1973?  O.J. Simpson made history as the first player to exceed 2,000 Rushing Yards (2,003), and while he now has company in the 2,000 club, it is still exclusive company.  This was Simpson’s second rushing title and he would win it two more times (1975 & 1976).  He would also win the Bert Bell Award and the AP MVP. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1985. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1985.

Ken Stabler, Oakland Raiders, Quarterback (1974)

Stabler was a First Team All-Pro in 1974, and was chosen for the Pro Bowl for the second year in a row.  The Quarterback threw for 2,469 Yards and a league leading 26 Touchdowns.  He would have a record of 11-2 this year and was also named the AP MVP.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2016.

Fran Tarkenton, Minnesota Vikings, Quarterback(1975)

Prior to this year, “Scrambling” Fran Tarkenton was chosen for seven Pro Bowls and 1975 was his eighth.  This was the first and only year that he would be named a First Team All-Pro and would the NFL in Touchdown Passes with 25.  The Minnesota Viking would also be named the AP MVP, PFWA MVP and the Bert Bell Award Winner.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1986.

Walter Payton, Chicago Bears, Running Back (1977)

This was Payton’s third season in the NFL, and the only one where he would win the Rushing Title with 1,852 Yards and lead the NFL in Rushing Touchdowns (14).  Payton would have eight more years where he would have 1,200 or more yards on the ground and he retired with 16,726, which as of this writing is second all-time.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1985.

Earl Campbell, Houston Oilers, Running Back (1978)

Campbell was a rookie in 1978 and the number one pick from Texas lived up to the hype.  Campbell had a league leading 1,450 Rushing Yards and he punched 13 into the end zone.  He would also win the AP Offensive Rookie of the Year and was named the PFWA MVP.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1985.

Earl Campbell, Houston Oilers, Running Back (2) (1979)

The Houston Oiler made history as the first ever repeat winner of the Offensive Player of the Year, and he would again win the Rushing Title with increased production of 1,697 Yards.  This time, Campbell would also finish atop the leaderboard in Rushing Touchdowns (19) and he repeated his PFWA MVP while adding the AP Player of the Year and Bert Bell Award.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1985.

Earl Campbell, Houston Oilers, Running Back (3) (1980)

Making waves as the first ever repeat winner of the Offensive Player of the Year, Campbell set a new standard with his third straight win.  Campbell again raised his game by setting a career high 1,934 Rushing Yards with his 13 Rushing TDs leading the NFL.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1985.

Dan Fouts, San Diego Chargers, Quarterback (1982)

Fouts was on his fourth straight year of leading the NFL in Passing Yards and he would throw for 2,883 in the strike-shortened campaign of 1982.  The Quarterback would be invited to the fourth of what would be six Pro Bowls and he would also lead in Touchdown Passes with 17.  He would also win the PFWA MVP.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1993.

Dan Marino, Miami Dolphins, Quarterback (1984)

Marino turned the football world on its head by becoming the first Quarterback to throw for over 5,000 Yards (5,084) and would also throw for a then record 48 Touchdown passes.  He would take Miami to the Super Bowl (they didn’t win) and he would also win the PFWA and AP MVP as well as the Bert Bell Award.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2005.

Marcus Allen, Los Angeles Raiders, Running Back (1985)

Marcus Allen had without a doubt the best regular season of his career with an NFL leading and career-high 1,759 Rushing Yards and 2,314 Yards From Scrimmage.  Allen, who had previously propelled the Raiders to a Super Bowl win, was also in 1985 named the AP and PFWA MVP.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2003.

Eric Dickerson, Los Angeles Rams, Running Back(1986)

Eric Dickerson easily could have been considered a contender for this award in 1983 and/or 1984, but it would have to wait until 1986 before he won the Offensive Player of the Year.  This year would see Dickerson win his third Rushing Title with 1,821 Yards and it would be his third of five First Team All-Pro Selections. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1999.

Jerry Rice, San Francisco 49ers, Wide Receiver(1987)

We think we can agree that of this writing the greatest Wide Receiver of all-time is Jerry Rice.  Whether you agree with that or not, Rice made history in 1987 as he first Wide Receiver to win the Offensive Player of the Year and he did so with 22 Touchdown Receptions, which set a record at the time (since eclipsed by Randy Moss).  As we all know, this was only the beginning for Rice who was in the second of 11 straight Pro Bowls.  Rice also won the PFWA MVP and the Bert Bell Award.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2010.

Joe Montana, San Francisco 49ers, Quarterback (1989)

How loaded were the San Francisco 49ers in late 80s?  Montana was the third different 49er to win the Offensive Player of the Year following Jerry Rice and Roger Craig.  In this season, Montana would lead the NFL in Completion Percentage (70.2) while throwing for 3,521 Yards and 26 Touchdowns and more importantly he would win his fourth Super Bowl.  The legendary Quarterback would also win the AP MVP as well as the Bert Bell Award.   Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2000.

Warren Moon, Houston Oilers, Quarterback (1990)

At age 34, Warren Moon proved that he should have been in the NFL years before after having to prove himself as a black Quarterback in the Canadian Football League.  Moon would lead all passers with 4,689 Yards and 33 Touchdown Passes.   Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2006.

Thurman Thomas, Buffalo Bills, Running Back (1991)

Thurman Thomas would lead the NFL in Yards From Scrimmage four years in a row, and in 1991 it was the third of that streak. Thomas was a First Team All-Pro for the second and last time this season and he would also be selected as the AP and PFWA MVP.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2007.

Steve Young, San Francisco 49ers, Quarterback (1992)

Steve Young replicated what his predecessor did (Joe Montana) by winning the Offensive Player of the Year.  Young would be chosen this year for his first of seven Pro Bowls and he was the NFL leader in Completion Percentage (66.7) and Touchdown Passes (25).  He would also capture the AP MVP, PFWA MVP and the Bert Bell Award.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2005.

Jerry Rice, San Francisco 49ers, Wide Receiver (2) (1993)

This was the fourth of six seasons where Rice would lead the NFL in Receiving Yards (1,503) and the final one of six where he was at the top in Receiving Touchdowns (15).  This would be the only major individual award that Rice would win in 1993.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2010.

Barry Sanders, Detroit Lions, Running Back (1994)

Sanders would win the Rushing Title for the second time with 1,883 Yards and would also finish atop the Yards From Scrimmage leaderboard with 2,166 Yards.  This was his third First Team All-Pro Selection.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2004.

Brett Favre, Green Bay Packers, Quarterback (1995)

Surprisingly, this was the only time that Brett Favre would win this award.  In 1995, Favre would lead the NFL in Passing Yards (4,413) and Touchdown Passes (38), the former being a career high.  In this season he would win the AP MVP, PFWA MVP and Bert Bell Award and took the Packers to a Super Bowl win the following year.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2016.

Terrell Davis, Denver Broncos, Running Back (1996)

This year began Davis’ three years of dominance in the AFC running game and he would rush for 1,538 Yards and catch another 36 passes for 310 Yards.  He would be named a First Team All-Pro for the first of three straight seasons.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2017.

Barry Sanders, Detroit Lions, Running Back (2)(1997)

This was Sanders’ second Offensive Player of the Year Award, and he would shatter the accomplishments of his first win. The Lions Running Back rushed for a career high 2,058 Yards joining the exclusive “2,000 Club” and his 2,358 Yards From Scrimmage was easily the best in the NFL.  Sanders also won the AP MVP, PFWA MVP and the Bert Bell Award.  This would be his sixth and last First Team All-Pro Selection.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2004.

Terrell Davis, Denver Broncos, Running Back (2) (1998)

We will argue (and have often) that this is the season that put Terrell Davis in the Hall of Fame.  In 1998, T.D., rushed for a league leading 2,008 Yards and 21 Touchdowns and led the Broncos to their second consecutive Super Bowl win.  In ’98, Davis also won the AP and PFWA MVP Awards. After this season, injuries would decimate him but that three-year stint was so good that Canton could not ignore him. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2017.

Marshall Faulk, St. Louis Rams, Running Back (1999)

Marshall Faulk began his run of three First Team All-Pro Selections and this would be his first year in St. Louis after five seasons with the Indianapolis Colts.  Faulk was the ground attack for what would be “The Greatest Show on Turf” and in 1999, he would rush for 1,381 Yards, catch 87 passes for another 1,048 Yards and led the NFL with 2,429 Yards from Scrimmage.  Faulk would win the Super Bowl that year. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2011.

Marshall Faulk, St. Louis Rams, Running Back (2) (2000)

Faulk would again exceed 1,300 Rushing Yards, though he would not hit the 1,000 Receiving Yard mark, landing at “only” 830. Faulk would however have more Touchdowns than the previous season, as his 18 Rushing Touchdowns (league leading) and another 8 from the air, which totaled 26, again a league leading. Faulk would also win the AP and PFWA MVP.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2011.

Marshall Faulk, St. Louis Rams, Running Back (3) (2001)

Faulk became the second player since Earl Campbell to win the Offensive Player of the Year Award, and like the former Houston Oiler, he did it consecutively.  Faulk put up his fourth straight 2,000 plus Yards From Scrimmage year and again led the NFL in Touchdowns with 21.  He would also win the PFWA MVP and the Bert Bell Award.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2011.

LaDainian Tomlinson, San Diego Chargers, Running Back (2006)

By this time, LaDainian Tomlinson had already established himself as an elite NFL Running Back and he would win his first Rushing Title with 1,815 Yards and his second Rushing Touchdown title with a career high 28 Touchdowns.  He would have another three TDs for 31 total.  In 2006, he would also win the AP MVP, PFWA MVP, Walter Payton Man of the Year and the Bert Bell Award.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2017.

The following are the players who have won the AP Offensive Player of the Year in the NFL who are eligible for the Pro Football Hall of Fame and have not been selected:

Larry Brown, Washington Redskins, Running Back(1972)

This was the last great year of Larry Brown’s career and this would be his fourth straight and final Pro Bowl and we would set a career high with 1,216 Rushing Yards and his 1,689 Yards From Scrimmage would lead the NFL.  Brown also would lead the league in Approximate Value and would win the AP MVP and Bert Bell Award.  Unrankedon Notinhalloffame.com.

Bert Jones, Baltimore Colts, Quarterback (1976)

Bert Jones had only one Pro Bowl Season, and needless to say it was in 1976.  Jones led the NFL with 3,104 Passing Yards and had an 11-3 season.  He threw for 24 Touchdowns, which was a career high.  He would also win the AP MVP.  Unrankedon Notinhalloffame.com.

Ken Anderson, Cincinnati Bengals, Quarterback (1981)

Anderson would throw for career highs of 3,754 Passing Yards, 29 Touchdowns and a league leading 98.4 Quarterback Rating and he was on his third of what would be four Pro Bowls.  He would take the Bengals to their first Super Bowl, albeit in a losing effort to the San Francisco 49ers.  He would also win the AP MVP, the PFWA MVP and the Bert Bell Award.  Ranked #12 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Joe Theismann, Washington Redskins, Quarterback (1983)

The year after Theismann Quarterbacked the Redskins to the Super Bowl, Theismann had the best regular season of his career with career highs in Passing Yards (3,714) and Touchdown Passes (29).  This year, Theismann would also win the PFWA and AP MVP.  Unrankedon Notinhalloffame.com.

Roger Craig, San Francisco 49ers, Running Back(1988)

Craig was an absolute beast at Running Back in 1988 and he would lead the National Football League in Yards from Scrimmage with 2,036 Yards.  This was three years after he became the first ever player to eclipse four digits in Rushing and Receiving Yards.  He would go on to have 13,100 Yards from Scrimmage over his career.  Ranked #6 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Priest Holmes, Kansas City Chiefs, Running Back (2002)

Holmes was in the middle of a three-year run of three straight Pro Bowls and First Team All-Pro Selections and in this season he would rush for 1,615 Yards an NFL leading 21 Touchdowns.  He would also have another 687 Receiving Yards, which would tally 2,287 Yards From Scrimmage, his career high.  Unrankedon Notinhalloffame.com.

Jamal Lewis, Baltimore Ravens, Running Back (2003)

While Jamal Lewis had many good seasons in the National Football League, there was one that was unquestionably incredible. That season (2003), Lewis would join the very exclusive 2,000 Yard Rushing Club (2,066) and he would also win the PFWA MVP.  Unrankedon Notinhalloffame.com.

Shaun Alexander, Seattle Seahawks, Running Back (2005)

Shaun Alexander led the NFL in Rushing Yard (1,880) and Rushing Touchdowns (27) and this was easily the best season of his career. It was also his last decent season. Forgetting that, Alexander would in 2005 also win the AP and PFWA MVP and the Bert Bell Award.  Unrankedon Notinhalloffame.com.

Let’s update our tally, shall we?

Award in Question

Percentage of recipients who have entered the HOF

Percentage of recipients by year who have entered the HOF.

NBA MVP

100%

100%

NHL Norris

90.5%

96.4%

NBA All Star Game MVP

89.5%

91.7%

NHL Conn Smythe

74.2%

85.4%

NFL AP Offensive Player of the Year

73.1%

79.4%

NHL Lady Byng

63.8%

76.0%

NFL Super Bowl MVP

60.6%

64.9%

NBA Defensive Player of the Year

58.3%

56.5%

NBA Rookie of the Year

56.5%

56.5%

NFL Pro Bowl MVP

52.3%

54.8%

MLB Lou Gehrig Award

51.9%

51.9%

MLB Roberto Clemente Award

47.4%

47.4%

MLB/NL/AL Cy Young Award

44.4%

55.4%

MLB Babe Ruth Award

37.0%

39.3%

NHL Frank J. Selke Trophy

33.3%

36.7%

MLB Hutch Award

33.1%

33.1%

NFL Offensive Rookie of the Year

28.6%

28.6%

MLB Edgar Martinez Award

26.7%

17.2%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Designated Hitter)

25.0%

30.8%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Shortstop)

23.5%

52.6%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove

21.7%

36.8%

NFL Defensive Rookie of the Year

20.6%

20.6%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Catcher)

20.0%

22.5%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Second Base)

18.8%

39.8%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Shortstop)

18.2%

35.1%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Pitcher)

18.2%

20.1%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Second Base)

16.7%

32.7%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Outfield)

16.7%

30.1%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Outfield)

15.7%

25.2%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Third Base)

14.3%

14.3%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Third Base)

13.6%

14.3%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (First Base)

13.6%

13.3%

MLB (NL/AL) Rookie of the Year

13.3%

13.3%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Catcher)

10.3%

15.2%

NBA Most Improved Player of the Year

5.3%

3.2%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (First Base)

3.8%

3.2%

So, who is up next?

The following are the players who have won the Offensive Player of the Year Award in the National Football League who have retired but have not met the mandatory years out of the game to qualify for the Pro Football Hall of Fame:

Peyton Manning, Indianapolis Colts, Quarterback(2004)

This was the second of Peyton Manning’s seven First Team All-Pro Selections and he would do so by throwing a league-leading 49 Touchdown Passes on 4,557 Yards.  The OPOY was one of many awards that the Colts Quarterback would collect in 2004 as he was also the PFWA MVP, AP MVP and the Bert Bell Award winner.  Manning is eligible for the Hall of Fame in 2021.

Chris Johnson, Tennessee Titans, Running Back(2009)

The 2,006 Rushing Yards would bring Chris Johnson to the exclusive 2G   Rushing Club, but while he wasn’t expected to repeat it, he never came very close.  No matter.  In this season, Johnson also led the NFL in Yards From Scrimmage with 2,509 Yards.  Johnson is eligible for the Hall of Fame in 2023.

Peyton Manning, Denver Broncos, Quarterback (2)(2013)

Manning was in his second season with the Denver Broncos and he would set a career-high with 5,477 Passing Yards and 55 Touchdown Passes.  This year would be his seventh and final First Team All-Pro and he would also win the AP MVP, PFWA MVP and the Bert Bell Award.  Manning is eligible for the Hall of Fame in 2021.

DeMarco Murray, Dallas Cowboys, Running Back(2014)

Murray would lead the NFL in Rushing Yards (1,845), Rushing Touchdowns (13) and Yards From Scrimmage (2,261).  This would be his only season as a First Team All-Pro and he would retire with 9,339 Yards From Scrimmage.  Johnson is eligible for the Hall of Fame in 2023.

The following are the players who have won the Offensive Player of the Year Award who are still active.

Tom Brady, New England Patriots, Quarterback (2007)

In 2007, Tom Brady would lead the NFL in Passing Yards with a career high 4,806 and 50 Touchdown Passes.  By this time, Brady already has won three Super Bowls and in 2007, he would win the AP and PFWA MVP as well as the Bert Bell Award. 41 Years Old, Playing for the New England Patriots.

Drew Brees, New Orleans Saints, Quarterback (2008)

Brees threw for his first 5,000 Yard Season (5,069) and this was the first time that he led the NFL in Touchdown Passes (34). This was the season that cemented Brees as a bona fide elite Quarterback in the National Football League.  40 Years Old, Playing for the New Orleans Saints.

Tom Brady, New England Patriots, Quarterback (2) (2010)

Brady returns to this accolade with an NFL leading 36 Touchdown Passes.  This was also his second First Team All-Pro Selection and he would also win the AP and PFWA MVP.  41 Years Old, Playing for the New England Patriots.

Drew Brees, New Orleans Saints, Quarterback (2) (2011)

In 2011, Brees threw for a career-highs of 5,476 Yards and 46 Touchdown Passes and took the Saints to a 13-3 record.  The Quarterback was also chosen for his seventh Pro Bowl.  40 Years Old, Playing for the New Orleans Saints.

Adrian Peterson, Minnesota Vikings, Running Back (2012)

This was the season where Adrian Peterson would become one of the members of the 2,000 Rushing Yard Club with a season of 2,097 Yards.  A.P. was not surprisingly also the NFL leader in Yards From Scrimmage (2,314) and the Running Back would also win the AP and PFWA MVP and the Bert Bell Award.  This season would see him also make his third of four First Team All-Pros.  34 Years Old, Playing for the Washington Redskins.

Cam Newton, Carolina Panthers, Quarterback (2015)

Newton would take the Panthers to the Super Bowl that season and he would earn what is to date his first First Team All-Pro Selection. Newton threw for 3,837 Yards and 35 Touchdowns and also rushed for another 636 Yards and 10 TDs.  Newton would also be awarded the AP MVP, PFWA MVP and Bert Bell Award.  31 Years Old, Playing for the Carolina Panthers.

Matt Ryan, Atlanta Falcons, Quarterback (2016)

Ryan set career-highs with 4,944 Passing Yards and 38 Touchdown Passes and to date this is the only First Team All-Pro Selection. He would also win the AP MVP, PFWA MVP and the Bert Bell Award.  34 Years Old, Playing for the Atlanta Falcons.

Todd Gurley, Los Angeles Rams, Running Back (2017)

Gurley was a First Team All-Pro for the first time in his career, and he would lead the NFL in Rushing Touchdowns with 13.  He would also top the NFL with 2,093 Yards From Scrimmage, 19 Touchdowns and an Approximate Value of 19.  25 Years Old, Playing for the Los Angeles Rams.

Patrick Mahomes, Kansas City Chiefs, Quarterback (2018)

In his first season as a starting Quarterback, Mahomes shattered all lofty expectations with a league leading 50 Touchdown passes on 5,097 Passing Yards.  He would also be named the AP and PFWA Player of the Year.  24 Years Old, Playing for the Kansas City Chiefs.

It certainly appears that the Offensive Player of the Year Award is a huge springboard to Canton immortality.

How do you do the Offensive Player of the Year without going to the defensive side of the same idea?  That is what we are doing next!

As always, we thank you for that support and look for that soon!





Awards = HOF?: Part Forty-Three: The NFL AP MVP

We here at Notinhalloffame.com thought it would be fun to take a look at the major awards in North American team sports and see how it translates into Hall of Fame potential.

Needless to say, different awards in different sports yield hall of fame potential.  In basketball, the team sport with the least number of players on a roster, the dividend for greatness much higher.  In baseball, it is not as much as a great individual season does not have the same impact.

Last time, we looked at the Vezina Trophy in the NHL.  This time, we go back to the gridiron with the NFL AP MVP.

The award got off to a rocky start.  From 1957 to 1960, as it was disputed as the pre-1961 winners winning a Most Outstanding Player Award, and sources show multiple winners. In the years between 1958 to 1960.  For our purposes, we will use the single names, as shown by Pro Football Reference. In 1961, the AP MVP was clear, presenting a specific MVP Award, thus negating any confusion.

So how many MVPs have made the Pro Football Hall of Fame?

Let’s find out!

The following are the past players who have won the NFL AP MVP who are eligible for the Pro Football Hall of Fame and have been enshrined.

Jim Brown, Cleveland Browns, Running Back (1957)

Hard to start with a better player isn’t it?  This was Brown’s rookie year, and the product of Syracuse shot right out of the gate leading the NFL in Rushing Yards (942), Rushing Touchdowns (9), and Touchdowns (10), which was a precursor of the greatness to come.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1971.

Jim Brown, Cleveland Browns, Running Back (2) (1958)

The rookie season of Jim Brown was really good, but his sophomore season was groundbreaking.  The Running Back shattered the Rushing Yards mark with 1,527 (Steve Van Buren rushed for 1,146 in 1949) and his 17 Rushing Touchdowns were staggering for the era.  This would be the first of five seasons where he would lead the NFL in Yards from Scrimmage. Brown would also win the UPI MVP and NEA MVP this season.  It took only two years for us to have our first repeat winner.   Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1971.

Johnny Unitas, Baltimore Colts, Quarterback (1959)      

Johnny Unitas led the Baltimore Colts to the NFL Championship, and in his fourth season in the NFL, he would take his team to back-to-back titles.  This year, “Johnny U” led the NFL in Completions (193), Passing Yards (2,899), Touchdown Passes (32), and he was a First Team All-Pro for the second time.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1979.

Norm Van Brocklin, Philadelphia Eagles, Quarterback (1960)

Norm Van Brocklin was a grizzled veteran by this time, as he played for the Los Angeles Rams from 1949 to 1957, and he joined the Eagles in 1958.  A Champion with the Rams in 1951, the 1960 campaign would see him go 10-2, with 2,471 Yards, and 24 Touchdowns.  In what was his ninth Pro Bowl, he would go to his first and only First Team All-Pro, while also leading the Eagles to the NFL Championship.  This was his last year as a player, as he hoped to be named the team’s head coach after.  That didn’t happen, but he would take over as the HC for the Minnesota Vikings.  Van Brocklin retired with a record of 61-36-4 with 23,611 Yards and 173 Touchdowns.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1971.

Paul Hornung, Green Bay Packers, Halfback & Kicker (1961)

A former Heisman Trophy winner from Notre Dame, Paul Hornung played his entire with the Green Bay Packers, and in 1960, he rushed for 597 Yards.  The Packers would also win the NFL Championship that year, and he was also rewarded with the Bert Bell Award.  Hornung played until 1966, and won three more titles with Green Bay.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1986.

Jim Taylor, Green Bay Packers, Fullback (1962)

The MVP year of Jim Taylor made him the second straight Green Bay Packer to win the AP MVP.  The Fullback led the NFL in Rushing Yards (1,474), Rushing Touchdowns (19), and he was on the third of five straight Pro Bowls.  The Packers would win the NFL Championship and he would win four in total.  Taylor played until 1967 (his final year was in New Orleans), and he would accumulate 8,597 Rushing Yards with 81 Touchdowns.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1976.

Y.A. Tittle, New York Giants, Quarterback (1963)

In the 1950s, Y.A. Tittle was a four-time Pro Bowl selection with the San Francisco 49ers, and at the age of 34 in 1961, he was traded to the New York Giants.  There were many who thought he was washed up, but instead the next three seasons would see Tittle secure himself as a Hall of Famer.  A Pro Bowler in 1961, and 1962, Tittle would have the best year of his life in 1963, where he would lead the NFL in Completion Percentage (60.2), Touchdown Passes (36), Quarterback Rating (104.8), and threw for 3,145 Yards. He only played one more season, and after getting hurt in the second game, he was ineffective and followed his best year with his worst.  Overall, Tittle threw for 33,070 Yards and 242 Touchdowns.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1971.

Johnny Unitas, Baltimore Colts, Quarterback (2) (1964)

This season, Unitas took his team to the NFL Championship, though they would fall to the Cleveland Browns in an upset. Regardless, this was a stellar regular season for the “Golden Arm”, as Unitas was chosen for his third First Team All-Prom and he threw for 19 TDs against only 6 Interceptions.  Unitas also went 12-2 with 2,824 Yards.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1979.

Jim Brown, Cleveland Browns, Running Back (3) (1965)

After his second win, Brown remained the elite running back in football.  In 1963, he had his best season with a record setting a new record with 1,863 Rushing Yards. He didn’t win the AP MVP, but did win the UPI MVP, NEA MVP and Bert Bell Award. 1965 would be Brown’s last season in the NFL, as he would abruptly retire, and pursue a career in acting. Brown remains the only player to win the MVP in his first and final year in the NFL.  He was a Pro Bowl in all of his nine years, and a First Team All-Pro in eight of them.  This win also made him the first player to win the AP MVP three times.  Brown also won the Rushing Title in eight of those years. He left the game as the first player to rush for 10,000 Yards, was the all-time leader in Rushing Yards (12,312), Rushing Touchdowns (106), Touchdowns (126), and All-Purpose Yards (15,549). While those numbers have since been broken, he did retire at the top of his game, and many still consider him he be the greatest Running Back of all-time.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1971.

Bart Starr, Green Bay Packers, Quarterback (1966)

Joining the Green Bay Packers in 1956, Bart Starr would evolve into one of the best Quarterbacks of the game, and he would lead his star-laden team to NFL Championships in 1961, 1962 & 1965. In 1966, he would lead the NFL in Pass Completion (62.2), and had a TD-INT rate of 14-3.  He would take the Packers to another NFL Championship, and they would soundly defeat the Kansas City Chiefs in Super Bowl I.   How fitting is it that the QB of the first Super Bowl is also the first MVP in the Super Bowl Era?  Starr won his fifth NFL Championship and second Super Bowl the season after, and he retired in 1971, in a career spent entirely in the “Frozen Tundra”.  He would have 24,718 Passing Yard with 152 TDs over his career.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1977.

Johnny Unitas, Baltimore Colts, Quarterback (3) (1967)

Arguably, this is the last great season of Unitas’s career, who would play until 1973, with one forgettable year in San Diego. 1967 saw him go to his tenth Pro Bowl and fifth First Team All-Pro, both of which would be his last.  Unitas threw for 20 Touchdowns and 3,428 Yards, and for the first and only time in his career, he led the NFL in Completion Percentage (58.5).  When he retired, he had a record of 118-63-4, 40,239 Passing Yards and 290 Touchdowns. He is a member of the 1960s All-Decade Team, 75thAnniversary Team and 100thAnniversary Team. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1979.

Alan Page, Minnesota Vikings, Defensive Tackle(1971)

A member of the famed “Purple People Eaters” Defense of the Vikings in the 1970s, Alan Page was the first defensive player and the first Minnesota Viking to win the AP MVP.  This year, Page was chosen for his third straight First Team All-Pro, but was also in his third consecutive season where he would lead the NFL in Approximate Value.  He would also be named the Defensive Player of the Year.  Page would go on to be named to three more First Team All-Pros, and he would overall go to nine Pro Bowls.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1988.

O.J. Simpson, Buffalo Bills, Running Back (1973)

In 1973, O.J. Simpson would become the first Running Back to rush for the elusive 2,000 Rushing Yards mark, when he finished with 2,003.  Needless to say, that led the NFL, as did his 12 Rushing Touchdowns and 2,073 All-Purpose Yards.  He would also win the Offensive Player of the Year and the Bert Bell Award that year. Simpson was in year two of his five-year run of First Team All-Pros, where he would win the Rushing Title in four of those years.  Simpson played until 1979, and would have 11,236 Rushing Yards with 108 total Touchdowns.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1985.

Ken Stabler, Oakland Raiders, Quarterback (1974)

“The Snake”, Ken Stabler, would be in chosen for his second of four Pro Bowls this year, and he led the NFL in Touchdown Passes (26) with 2,469 Yards.  Stabler would play football until 1984, and would take the Raiders to a win in Super Bowl XI.  Overall, Stabler would throw for 27,938 Yards for 194 Touchdowns.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2016.

Fran Tarkenton, Minnesota Vikings, Quarterback(1975)

The best scrambling Quarterback of the 1970s, Fran Tarkenton would lead the NFL in Completions (273) and Touchdown Passes (25) with 2,994 Yards.   He would also win the Bert Bell Award this year.  This was his eighth of nine Pro Bowl Selections, and he would finish his career with 47,003 Yards and 342 Touchdowns, while also rushing for 3,674 Yards and another 32 TDs.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1986.

Walter Payton, Chicago Bears, Running Back (1977)

Walter Payton played his entire career with the Chicago Bears, and he would become one of the best Running Backs that the game ever saw.  1977, was his third season, and this year he would have personal highs with 1,852 Rushing Yards 1n 14 Rushing Touchdowns, both of which would lead the NFL.  Payton also led the NFL in Yards from Scrimmage with 2,121.  This would be the second of five First Team All-Pros for “Sweetness” who also was a nine-time Pro Bowl selection.  He would later win the Super Bowl with the Super Bowl Shuffle winning team, and he would retire in 1987 as the all-time leading rusher with 16,727 Yards.  He would also have another 4,538 Receiving Yards with 125 total Touchdowns.  Payton was so regarded for his philanthropy that he Man of the Year Award was renamed the Walter Payton Man of the Year.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1993.

Terry Bradshaw, Pittsburgh Steelers, Quarterback (1978)

You win a lot of games when you have as good a defense as Terry Bradshaw had with the Steel Curtain, but don’t mistake that for the Quarterback not doing his fair share.  Playing his entire career (1970-83) with Pittsburgh, Bradshaw won four Super Bowls, with 1978 being his third.  This season, he would lead the NFL in Touchdown Passes (28) with 2,915 Passing Yards.  He retired in 1983 with 27,989 Passing Yards and 212 TDs.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1989.

Earl Campbell, Houston Oilers, Running Back (1979)

Coming out of the University of Texas, Earl Campbell was the best Running Back in the first three years of his NFL career, all of which seeing him win the Rushing Title and Offensive Player of the Year.  1979 was the second of those seasons, and in addition to leading the NFL in Rushing Yards (1,697) and also first in Rushing Touchdowns (19).  He also won the Bert Bell Award.  Campbell would play until 1985 and would have 10,213 Yards from Scrimmage with 74 Touchdowns over his career.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1991.

Dan Marino, Miami Dolphins, Quarterback (1984)

Playing his entire career with the Miami Dolphins, this was the second season that Dan Marino was in the NFL.  This year, he shattered the Passing Yards record with 5,084, making him the first QB to hit the 5,000 mark.  He also threw for 48 Touchdowns, destroying Y.A. Tittle’s 36 in 1963. Marino was also first in Quarterback rating (108.9), Approximate Value (21), and Completions (362).  The Dolphin pivot would lead the NFL in Passing Yards four more times, and after he retired in 1999, he would have 61,361 Yards with 420 Touchdowns.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2005.  

Marcus Allen, Los Angeles Raiders, Running Back (1985)

Already a Super Bowl Champion two years before, Marcus Allen’s 1985 season was the best of his life.  The former USC Running Back would lead the NFL in Rushing Yards (1,759) and Yards from Scrimmage (2,314), and he had 14 Touchdowns.  Allen played for the Raiders until 1992, and he would then join the Kansas City Chiefs, where he played until he retired in 1997. Allen ended his career with 12,243 Rushing Touchdowns, 5,411 Passing Yards, 144 total Touchdowns and six Pro Bowls. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2003.

Lawrence Taylor, New York Giants, Linebacker (1986)

Arguably the greatest Linebacker of all time, Lawrence Taylor debuted in 1981, where he began a six-year streak of First Team All-Pro Selections.  This season, Taylor would lead the NFL in Quarterback Sacks (20.5) and won his third Defensive Player of the Year Award.  Taylor also won the Bert Bell Award.  He would take the Giants to a Super Bowl win this year, and again four years later.  Taylor played his entire career with the Giants, and would play in 10 Pro Bowls and recorded 132.5 Sacks over his career.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1999.

John Elway, Denver Broncos, Quarterback (1987)

John Elway was a great Quarterback, but this was a bit of a curious selection, as he lost the First Team All-Pro to Joe Montana of the San Francisco 49ers.  Elway took the Broncos to the Super Bowl (they lost to Washington) and he threw for 3,198 Passing Yards and 19 Touchdowns.  He would have better seasons than this, though he was a Pro Bowler this year, which was his second of what would be nine.  He would finally win his Super Bowls in the 1997 and 1998 season, and he retired after with 5,1475 Passing Yards, 300 Touchdown Passes and 33 Rushing Touchdowns.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2004.

Joe Montana, San Francisco 49ers, Quarterback (1989)

You would have thought that Joe Montana would have won an MVP by now considering that prior to 1989, he had already won three Super Bowls with five Pro Bowls and a First Team All-Pro.  “Joe Cool” also had already led the NFL in Touchdown passes twice and Completion Percentage four times.  This year, Montana would win his fourth Super Bowl, was again a First Team All-Pro and Pro Bowl, and he again led the league in Completion Percentage (70.2).  Montana also threw for 3,521 Passing Yards and 26 TDs.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2000.

Joe Montana, San Francisco 49ers, Quarterback (2) (1990)

While the Niners did not win the Super Bowl this year, Montana still had a great season and took San Francisco deep into the playoffs.  The Quarterback would go 14-1 with 3,944 Passing Yards and 26 TDs.  He missed the entire 1991 season due to an elbow injury, and Steve Young was anointed his successor.  He played two final seasons in the league with the Kansas City Chiefs, and retired in 1994.  He left the game with 40,551 Passing Yards and 273 Touchdown Passes.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2000.

Thurman Thomas, Buffalo Bills, Running Back (1991)

Along with Jim Kelly and Andre Reed, Thurman Thomas and the Buffalo Bills won four straight AFC Championships, with 1991 being in the middle of it.  From 1989 to 1992, Thomas would annually lead the NFL in Yards from Scrimmage, this year seeing the Running Back gain 2,038 with 12 Touchdowns.  He played with Buffalo until 1999, with one final season spent in Miami.  Thomas retired with 12,074 Rushing Yards, 4,458 Receiving Yards and 88 Touchdowns. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2007.

Steve Young, San Francisco 49ers, Quarterback (1992)

While Steve Young was the starting Quarterback for the 49ers in 1991, 1992 was the year where he proved he should be.  Young led the NFL in Completion Percentage (66.7), Touchdown Passes (25) and Quarterback Rating (107.0), and would go to his first of seven straight Pro Bowls.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2005.

Emmitt Smith, Dallas Cowboys, Running Back (1993)

Emmitt Smith and the Dallas Cowboys won the Super Bowl the year before, and in 1993 he won his third straight Rushing Title with 1,486 Yards.  Smith was also first in Yards from Scrimmage (1,900) and he also won the Bert Bell Award. Dallas would win the Super Bowl with Smith winning the Super Bowl MVP.  Smith would be named to the next two First Team All-Pros and secured a third Super Bowl ring two later, which coincided with his fourth Rushing Title.  The Running Back played for Dallas until 2002, and had two final seasons with the Arizona Cardinals before he called it a career in 2004. He retired with 18,355 Rushing Yards and 164 Rushing Touchdowns, which makes him first all-time.  Smith is also second all-time in All-Purpose Yards with 21,579.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2010.

Steve Young, San Francisco 49ers, Quarterback (2)(1994)

In 1993, Young was again a First Team All-Pro, and his third would be this season.  Young led the NFL in Completion Percentage (70.3), 35 Passing Touchdowns and QB Rating (112.8).  Young would also lead San Francisco to a Super Bowl win this year.  He would have three more seasons where he finished first in Completion Percentage, one more in Touchdown Passes, and two more in QB Rating.  Young played until 1999, and retired with 33,124 Passing Yards, 232 Touchdown Passes, 4,239 Rushing Yards and 43 Rushing TDs.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2005.

Brett Favre, Green Bay Packers, Quarterback (1995)

After four attempts (with no completions) for the Atlanta Falcons in 1992, Brett Favre joined the Green Bay Packers where he went to the Pro Bowl in both 1992 and 1993.  In 1995, “The Gunslinger” earned his third Pro Bowl, his first First Team All-Pro, and he would lead the NFL in Passing Yards (4,413), Touchdown Passes (38), and he also won the Bert Bell Award.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2016.

Brett Favre, Green Bay Packers (2), Quarterback(1996)

Favre had another phenomenal year where he went to Pro Bowl number four, First Team All-Pro number two, and again won the MVP and the Bert Bell Award.  Statistically, he led the NFL in Touchdown Passes (39) with 3,899 Passing Yards, and he would lead the Packers to a Super Bowl win.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2016.

Brett Favre, Green Bay Packers (3), Quarterback(1997)

Favre became the first player to win the AP MVP for the third straight season and he earned his fifth Pro Bowl and third First Team All-Pro.  The Quarterback again led the NFL in Touchdown Passes with 35 and had 3,867 Yards, and Green Bay would again return to the Super Bowl, though this time they would lose to the Denver Broncos.  Favre would have four more Pro Bowls with Green Bay, one with the Jets, and one with the Vikings and retired in 2010.  He would finish his career with 71,838 Passing Yards and 508 Touchdown Passes. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2016.

Barry Sanders, Detroit Lions, Running Back (1998)

Barry Sanders played his entire career with the Detroit Lions, debuting in 1989, where he won the Offensive Rookie of the Year Award and was a First Team All-Pro.  Sanders would also win the Bert Bell Award, and was the 1994 Offensive Player of the Year.  In 1997, he would again win that award, but would also capture the AP MVP and his second Bert Bell Award.  In 1997, Sanders won his fourth Rushing Title with a career-high 2,053 Rushing Yards. He also rushed for 11 Touchdowns, and was first overall in Yards from Scrimmage with 2,358.  Sanders played one more season, retiring in his prime at 30, and he was named to the Pro Bowl in all 10 of his years in the NFL.  He ended his career with 15,269 Rushing Yards, 2,921 Receiving Yards and 109 Touchdowns.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2004.

Terrell Davis, Denver Broncos, Running Back (1998)

From 1996 to 1998, Terrell Davis was a First Team All-Pro Selection, and this was his best year of them all.  T.D. anchored Denver to a Super Bowl win the year before, and would do so again this season where he won the Super Bowl MVP.  In the regular season, he won the Rushing Title with 2,008 Yards and led the NFL in Rushing Touchdowns with 21.  Davis would suffer a torn ACL and MCL the year after, and he was limited after that, retiring in 2001 with 7,607 career Rushing Yards.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2017.

Kurt Warner, St. Louis Rams, Quarterback (1999)

1999 was the improbable season ever for a Quarterback.  Kurt Warner went from Northern Iowa to bagging groceries to the Arena League and then to the NFL, where he won the back-up job to Trent Green, which in itself was a huge accomplishment.  Green would be injured in the preseason, and Warner was the starting QB, and he made the most of his opportunity.  The leader of the “Greatest Show on Turf”, Warner would throw for 4,353 Yards and lead the NFL in Completion Percentage (65.1), Touchdown Passes (41) and Quarterback Rating (109.2).  Warner would then lead the Rams to a Super Bowl Championship.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2017.

Marshall Faulk, St. Louis Rams, Running Back (2000)

Sandwiched between Kurt Warner’s MVPs was his Running Back, Marshall Faulk.  Faulk was with the Indianapolis Colts for the first five years of his career where he would go to three Pro Bowls and was the Offensive Rookie of the Year.  Faulk joined the Rams in 1999, and he helped Warner and the Rams win the Super Bowl and was the Offensive Player of the Year.  In his 2000 MVP season, Faulk led the NFL with 18 Rushing Touchdowns, 26 Total Touchdowns and had 2,189 Yards from Scrimmage. 2001 would see Faulk win the Bert Bell Award and the Offensive Player of the Year.  He played until 2005, accumulating six Pro Bowls, three First Team All-Pros, 12,279 Rushing Yards, 6,875 Passing Yards and 136 Touchdowns.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2011.

Kurt Warner, St. Louis Rams, Quarterback (2) (2001)

While Warner and the Rams did not win the Super Bowl, Warner had the best regular season of his career where he led the NFL in Completions (375), Completion Percentage (68.7), Passing Yards (4,830), Touchdown Passes (36) and Passer Rating (101.4).  He would later play one year for the Giants and five seasons for Arizona to close out his career in 2009.  He retired with 32,344 Passing Yards, 208 TDs, and the best story in sports.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2017.

LaDainian Tomlinson, San Diego Chargers, Running Back (2006)

Debuting in 2001, Tomlinson would have 1,236 Rushing Yards, which would be the least he would have until 2008.  In his MVP season, he would win his fourth of five Pro Bowls, second of three First Team All-Pro, and his first of two Rushing Titles with 1,815.  He would also lead the NFL in Rushing Touchdowns (28) and Touchdowns (31).  Tomlinson also won the PFWA MVP, NEA MVP, Bert Bell Award, Offensive Player of the Year and Walter Payton Man of the Year.  Damn, what a season!  Tomlinson played with the Chargers until 2009, and he would have two final seasons in football with the New York Jets.  His career ended with 13,684 Rushing Touchdowns, 4,772 Receiving Touchdowns and 153 Touchdowns.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2017.

The following are the players who have won the NFL AP MVP in the NFL who are eligible for the Pro Football Hall of Fame and have not been selected:

Earl Morrall, Baltimore Colts, Quarterback (1968)

Earl Morrall had one of the most inconsistent careers of any Quarterback, or for that matter any NFL player.  In 1968, he had been in the NFL for a dozen seasons and had stops in San Francisco, Pittsburgh, Detroit and New York.  Some seasons, he was a starter, some he was a backup, and he was positioned in the latter role, to play off the bench to Johnny Unitas.  Morrall would wind up taking over for Unitas, when he was injured in the last pre-season game, and Morrall responded with the best year of his career.  The Colts Quarterback would win 13 Games, and he led the NFL in Touchdown Passes with 26, and he also had 2,909 Passing Yards.  Morrall took the Colts to Super Bowl III, but he had a bad game and they lost to the Joe Namath and the New York Jets.  He would later play for the Miami Dolphins, again as a backup, but he would win two Super Bowl Rings in South Florida.  He retired in 1976, after 21 seasons, and he threw for 161 Touchdowns and 20,809 Passing Yards.  Eligible Since 1982.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Roman Gabriel, Los Angeles Rams, Quarterback (1969)

The first Filipino-American star in football, Roman Gabriel was the number one pick in the 1963 Draft, but he did not become the permanent starting Quarterback for the Rams until 1966.  He would ascend into the upper-tier of NFL pivots, and he went to the Pro Bowl each year from 1967 to 1969, and in ’69, he would lead the league in Touchdown Passes (24), and he also threw for 2,549 Yards. Gabriel would also win the Bert Bell Award this year.  Gabriel would later join the Philadelphia Eagles, winning the Comeback Player of the Year in 1973.  He played until 1977, and retired with 29,444 Passing Yards and 201 Touchdowns.  Eligible Since 1982.  Ranked #38 on Notinhalloffame.com.

John Brodie, San Francisco 49ers, Quarterback (1970)

John Brodie was one of the game’s early gunslingers, and prior to 1970, he would he would lead the NFL in Passing yards in both 1965 and 1968.  This season, he would do that for a third time with 2,941, and he was also first in Touchdown Passes with 24.  Brodie played his entire career with the San Francisco 49ers (1957-73) and he threw for 31,548 Yards and 214 Touchdowns.  Eligible Since 1982.  Ranked #25 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Larry Brown, Washington Redskins, Running Back(1972)

In the first four years of Larry Brown’s career, he was one of the better Running Backs in the NFL.  Brown, who had won the Rushing Title in 1970, would not do so in 1972, but would put up a career-high in Rushing Yards in 1972.  That season, he also had another 473 Receiving Yards, and was first in the league in Yards From Scrimmage (1,689).  Brown regressed after that, and he retired in 1975 with 8,360 Yards from Scrimmage with 55 TDs.  Eligible Since 1982.  Ranked #160 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Bert Jones, Baltimore Colts, Quarterback (1976) 

Bert Jones would have a nice career in the NFL, where he played for ten seasons, nine of which were in Baltimore.   1976 was his fourth season, and this would be his only Pro Bowl year.  Jones had an 11-3 record with 24 TDs and a league-leading 3,104 Passing Yards.  He played until 1982 and Jones would overall throw for 18,190 Yards and 124 Touchdowns.  Eligible Since 1988.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Brian Sipe, Cleveland Browns, Quarterback (1980)

Brian Sipe would play his entire 10-year career with the Browns, and it was in 1980, where he would go to his first and only Pro Bowl, which coincided with his MVP win.  He would throw for 30 Touchdowns with only 14 Interceptions, with 4,132 Passing Yards.  Sipe also led the NFL in Quarterback Rating (91.4).  He retired after 1983 with 23,713 Passing Yards and 154 Touchdown Passes. Eligible Since 1989.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Ken Anderson, Cincinnati Bengals, Quarterback (1981)

Ken Anderson is considered by most Bengals fans to be the most important player in franchise history, and the biggest Hall of Fame snub.  Anderson spent his entire career with the Bengals (1971-86) and in 1981, he would go to his third of four Pro Bowls and took Cincinnati to their first Super Bowl. In the regular season, Anderson threw for 29 Touchdowns and 3,754 Yards.  He played until1986, and retired with 32,838 Yards with 197 TDs.  Eligible Since 1982.  Ranked #12 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Mark Moseley, Washington Redskins, Place Kicker (1982)

Perhaps the unlikeliest AP MVP, Place Kicker, Mark Mosely, accomplished this feat in the strike-shortened 1982 season, making him the first Special Teams player to win this award.  This year, Moseley set a then record with a 95.2 Field Goal Percentage, and would kick two Field Goals in the Redskins Super Bowl win that year. Mosely played from 1970 to 1986, and is still the all-time leader in Points in the history of the Redskins’ franchise.  Eligible Since 1992.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Joe Theismann, Washington Redskins, Quarterback (1983)

It took a long time for Joe Theismann to become a star Quarterback, as he had to start in the CFL, was a Punt Returner as an NFL rookie, and was a backup for three years before becoming the starter in 1978 for. The Washington Redskins.  This season, Theismann threw for 3,714 Yards and 29 Touchdowns, and he would take Washington to their second straight Super Bowl, though this time they lost the big game. A gruesome leg injury at the hands of the Giants’ Lawrence Taylor would end his career, and Theismann retired with 25,206 Passing Yards and 160 Touchdowns.  Eligible Since 1991.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Boomer Esiason, Cincinnati Bengals, Quarterback (1988)

Much like Ken Anderson did before him, Boomer Esiason would take the Cincinnati Bengals to the Super Bowl, but like Anderson, his Bengals lost to Joe Montana and the San Francisco 49ers.  Regardless, this was a good season for Boomer, who was also named the PFWA MVP this season.  He threw for 3,572 Passing Yards with 28 Touchdowns, and he led the NFL in Passer Rating (97.4). Esiason was named to his second of what would be four Pro Bowls, and he played until 1997 with stops in New York with the Jets and Arizona, before playing his final season with the Bengals.  He retired with 37,920 Passing Yards with 247 Touchdowns.  Eligible Since 2003.  Ranked #86 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Rich Gannon, Oakland Raiders, Quarterback (2002)

This was year four of Rich Gannon’s four year run of Pro Bowls, and this season he would lead the NFL in Completions (418) and Passing Yards (4,689) while throwing for 26 Touchdowns.  He would get hurt the following season, and only played one more year before retiring in 2004 with 28,743 Passing Yards with 180 Touchdowns.  Eligible Since 2010.  Ranked #290 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Steve McNair, Tennessee Titans, Quarterback (2003)

McNair’s career began in 1995 when the Titans were still in Houston.  In 2003, he had his second Pro Bowl, and he led the NFL in Passer Rating (100.4).  He would throw for 24 Touchdowns and 3,215 Yards. McNair played until 2007, and would accumulate 31,304 Passing Yards with 174 TDs.  He also had 3,590 Rushing Yards and punched 37 attempts in the end zone.  Eligible Since 2013.  Ranked #111 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Shaun Alexander, Seattle Seahawks, Running Back (2005)

Alexander was a Pro Bowl for the third (and final) and he would lead the NFL in Rushing Yards (1,880), Rushing Touchdowns (27), and Touchdowns (28).  The Running Back also won the Offensive Player of the Year and the Bert Bell Award. He would play with the Seahawks until 2007, and had one final year with the Redskins before retiring.  He left the game with 9,453 Rushing Yards and 100 Rushing Touchdowns.  Eligible Since 2014.  Ranked #100 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Let’s update our tally, shall we?

Award in Question

Percentage of recipients who have entered the HOF

Percentage of recipients by year who have entered the HOF.

NBA MVP

100%

100%

NHL Norris

90.5%

96.4%

NBA All Star Game MVP

89.5%

91.7%

NHL Conn Smythe

74.2%

85.4%

NFL AP Offensive Player of the Year

73.1%

79.4%

NFL AP MVP

68.3%

74.0%

NHL Lady Byng

63.8%

76.0%

NFL Defensive Player of the Year

60.8%

71.1%

NFL Super Bowl MVP

60.6%

64.9%

NBA Defensive Player of the Year

58.3%

56.5%

NHL Vezina

57.1%

66.3%

NBA Rookie of the Year

56.5%

56.5%

MLB MVP

55.0%

60.2%

NFL Pro Bowl MVP

52.3%

54.8%

MLB Lou Gehrig Award

51.9%

51.9%

MLB Roberto Clemente Award

47.4%

47.4%

MLB/NL/AL Cy Young Award

44.4%

55.4%

MLB Babe Ruth Award

37.0%

39.3%

NHL Frank J. Selke Trophy

33.3%

36.7%

MLB Hutch Award

33.1%

33.1%

NFL Offensive Rookie of the Year

28.6%

28.6%

NHL Bill Masterton Memorial Trophy

27.9%

27.9%

MLB Edgar Martinez Award

26.7%

17.2%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Designated Hitter)

25.0%

30.8%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Shortstop)

23.5%

52.6%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove

21.7%

36.8%

NFL Defensive Rookie of the Year

20.6%

20.6%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Catcher)

20.0%

22.5%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Second Base)

18.8%

39.8%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Shortstop)

18.2%

35.1%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Pitcher)

18.2%

20.1%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Second Base)

16.7%

32.7%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Outfield)

16.7%

30.1%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Outfield)

15.7%

25.2%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Third Base)

14.3%

14.3%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Third Base)

13.6%

14.3%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (First Base)

13.6%

13.3%

MLB (NL/AL) Rookie of the Year

13.3%

13.3%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Catcher)

10.3%

15.2%

NBA Most Improved Player of the Year

5.3%

3.2%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (First Base)

3.8%

3.2%

NFL AP Comeback Player of the Year

0.0%

0.0%

So, who is up next?

The following are the players who have won the AP MVP in the NFL who have retired but have not met the mandatory years out of the game to qualify for the Pro Football Hall of Fame:

Peyton Manning, Indianapolis Colts, Quarterback (2003)

Peyton Manning was in his sixth season in the NFL, and he would have his fourth Pro Bowl year.  Manning would be named a First Team All-Pro for the first time, and he would lead the league in Completions (379), Completion Percentage (67.0), Passing Yards (4,267) and he would throw for 29 Touchdowns.  Manning also won the NEA MVP and Bert Bell Award this season.  He would co-win this award with Steve McNair  Eligible in 2021.

Peyton Manning, Indianapolis Colts, Quarterback (2) (2004)

Peyton Manning went back-to-back, also securing a First Team All-Pro and a fifth Pro Bowl.  Manning finished first in Touchdown Passes (49) and Quarterback Rating (121.1), and he threw for 4,557 Yards.  In this season, Manning would also win the PFWA MVP, NEA MVP, Offensive Player of the Year, and the Bert Bell Award. Eligible in 2021.

Peyton Manning, Indianapolis Colts, Quarterback (3) (2008)

In the years between his second and third MVP, Manning went to three Pro Bowls, another First Team All-Pro, and finally won the Super Bowl, where he was named the MVP of the game.  This season, he again was a First Team All-Pro and would lead the NFL in QBR (78.3).  The QB had 27 Touchdown Passes and 4,002 Yards.  Manning would also win the PFWA MVP this year.  Eligible in 2021.

Peyton Manning, Indianapolis Colts, Quarterback (4) (2009)

Peyton Manning became the first four-time MVP, and this was the fifth year he was a First Team All-Pro.  He threw for 4,500 Yards and 33 TDs this season.  The Quarterback also won the PFWA MVP this year. Eligible in 2021.

Peyton Manning, Denver Broncos, Quarterback (5)(2013)

It still seems strange to type Peyton Manning as a Denver Bronco, and he would have a monster regular season with a league-leading 450 Completions, 5,477 Passing Yards, 55 Touchdown Passes and a 80.9 QBR. He would also capture the PFWA MVP, Offensive Player of the Year and Bert Bell Award this season.  Manning played until 2015, and while he was not great, the Broncos defense allowed him to go on top as a Super Bowl Champion.  He retired with 71,940 Passing Yards and 539 Passing Touchdowns.  Eligible in 2021.

The following are the players who have won the AP MVP who are still active.

Tom Brady, New England Patriots, Quarterback (2007)

Tom Brady already won three Super Bowls (with two Super Bowl MVPs) before he secured his first AP MVP.  This was the year of the bittersweet season where the Pats entered the Super Bowl undefeated, only to lose to Eli Manning and the New York Giants.  Still, it was an incredible year, where the Patriots’ Quarterback led the league in Completion Percentage (68.9), Passing Yards (4,806), Touchdown Passes (50), Passer Rating (117.2) and QBR (88.5).  Brady also would win the PFWA MVP, NEA MVP, Bert Bell Award and Offensive Player of the Year this season.  42 Years Old, Playing for the New England Patriots.

Tom Brady, New England Patriots, Quarterback (2) (2010)

Brady would again lead the NFL in Touchdown Passes with 36, and was first in Passer Rating (111.0) and QBR (78.3).  He would also throw for 3,900 Yards, and only had four Interceptions.  This year Brady would also win the PFWA MVP and Offensive Player of the Year Award.  42 Years Old, Playing for the New England Patriots.

Aaron Rodgers, Green Bay Packers, Quarterback (2011)

This was Aaron Rodgers’ seventh season in the NFL but only his fourth as the Packers starter.  Rodgers won the Super Bowl the year before, and this season he would finish first in Passer Rating (122.5) and QBR (84.5), while throwing for 45 Touchdowns, and accumulating 4,643 Passing Yards.  He would also win the PFWA MVP and Bert Bell Award.  36 Years Old, Playing for the Green Bay Packers.

Adrian Peterson, Minnesota Vikings, Running Back (2012)

Adrian Peterson would be named to four First Team All-Pro selections, this being his third.  Peterson also won three Rushing Titles, with this season being the best one (and second), with him going for 2,097 Yards.  The Minnesota Viking also finished first in All-Purpose Yards with 2,314, and he secured 13 Touchdowns this year.  34 Years Old, Playing for the Washington Redskins.

Aaron Rodgers, Green Bay Packers, Quarterback (2) (2014)

Rodgers had another phenomenal year where he had a TD-INT record of 38-5, and threw for 4,381 Yards.  He would go to his fourth Pro Bowl this year, and also was named a First Team All-Pro for the second time.  Rodgers also won the PFWA MVP this year.  36 Years Old, Playing for the Green Bay Packers.

Cam Newton, Carolina Panthers, Quarterback (2015)

Cam Newton was the Offensive Rookie of the Year in 2011, and this season, in addition to his AP MVP, he also won the Bert Bell Award and was the Offensive Player of the Year.  Stat wise, Newton threw for 35 Touchdowns, 3,837 Yards, and rushed for 636 Yards and 10 TDs.  He took Carolina to the Super Bowl, but they lost to the Denver Broncos.  30 Years Old, Playing for the Carolina Panthers.

Matt Ryan, Atlanta Falcons, Quarterback (2016)

The first Atlanta Falcon to win the AP MVP, Matt Ryan would lead the NFL in Passer Rating (117.1) and QBR (79.4).  He would also throw for 4,944 Yards with 38 Touchdowns. This year, he would also win the Offensive Player of the Year and the Bert Bell Award.  Ryan would take the Falcons to the Super Bowl, but they lost to the New England Patriots.  34 Years Old, Playing for the Atlanta Falcons.

Tom Brady, New England Patriots, Quarterback (3) (2017)

In between his second and third MVP, Brady won his fourth and fifth Super Bowl.  Brady also captured the PFWA MVP this season. He would win his sixth Super Bowl the year after.   This season, he was first in Passing Yards (4,577) with 32 Touchdown Passes.  42 Years Old, Playing for the New England Patriots.

Patrick Mahomes, Kansas City Chiefs, Quarterback (2018)

After playing backup as a rookie, Patrick Mahomes took over the starting Quarterback job for the Chiefs and he instantly became one of the most exciting players in the NFL.  Mahomes would lead the NFL in Touchdown Passes (50) and QBR (80.4), and he would throw for 5,097 Yards.  This season, he would also win the Offensive Player of the Year and Bert Bell Award.  24 Years Old, Playing for the Kansas City Royals.

This yielded a high percentage as expected, which considering how difficult it is to win the NFL AP, makes complete sense.

So, what is up next?

Normally, we bounce around, but we are going to buck tradition, and stay with something very familiar, the Bert Bell Award, the MVP presented by the Maxwell Football Club.

As always, we thank you for your support, and look for that soon.

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