Menu
A+ A A-

Joe Buck named to the Pro Football Hall of Fame

During last night’s halftime of the Thursday Night Cincinnati VS Cleveland game, Pro Football Hall of Fame President, David Baker was in a pre-recorded segment announcing that Joe Buck, who was broadcasting that game with Troy Aikman won the Pete Rozelle Award.  The annual winner receives automatic entry to the Pro Football Hall of Fame.

The Pete Rozelle Award was first given in 1989, with one of the past inductees being Jack Buck, the father of Joe.  Buck is a previous Emmy winner, and he has called six Super Bowls.

We here at Notinhalloffame.com would like to congratulate Joe Buck for earning this honor. 

Read more...

Review: The Mule (2018)

Cast:

Clint Eastwood                          Earl Stone

Alison Eastwood                       Iris

Dianne Wiest                            Mary

Taissa Farmiga                          Ginny

Laurence Fishburne                   Special Agent in Charge

Bradley Cooper                         Agent Colin Bates

Michael Pena                            Agent Trevino

It has been a few weeks since my last blog and review of television and film. This was primarily due to a visit to “La Belle Province” to visit my wife’s family. For those readers who are not Canadian, and don’t know what place I mean, I am referring to the province of Quebec. So with that in mind, I wanted to select a movie for this weekend’s entertainment that I was sure that I was going to enjoy. So I made a trip to the shelf that holds all the unwatched Blu-Ray’s and selected “The Mule” with Clint Eastwood. This film has a few things going for it right out of the gate, first, it stars Clint Eastwood! He is one of my absolute favourite actors! Second, it is based on a true story, this always appeals to me, as for those few that actually read all my reviews, I am very sick of Hollywood’s penchant for remaking films, rebooting or copying ideas. So anything that is “real” will always get my attention. Finally, it is also directed by Clint Eastwood, not only is he a fantastic actor, I rarely see a film directed by Clint that I do not like. So with this holy trinity of ideals in place, we put in the film so that we could be entertained.

So what is this film about? “The Mule” is about Earl Stone (Eastwood), an elderly man who loved his flowers and horticulture business above all else, and that included his family. This was demonstrated by him forgetting his daughter’s wedding and other important family events. However, his love of flowers, and the old way of running a floral business could not compete with technology. This resulted him losing everything within a few years, his home, his business, his daughter and wife. Once the bank took over his home and business, with nowhere else to go, he arrives at his granddaughter’s engagement party with all of his possessions in his old beat-up pickup. This is much to his ex-wife’s (Wiest) and daughter’s chagrin (Allison Eastwood), as they really don’t want anything to do with him. Making impossible promises to his granddaughter on how he will pay for the booze for the wedding (well he doesn’t have a job or home now), he is at his wits end. Another party guest, offers him a job due to Stone’s (Eastwood) love of driving and clean record. With no other option, Stone (Eastwood) takes up the offer and begins transporting duffel bags around the country. He finds these trips to be very profitable, and shortly discovers that he is now a Mule, transporting drugs for the cartel. Not looking a gift-horse in the mouth, Stone (Eastwood) takes advantage of his new found wealth, by not only helping his loved ones and recovering his home, but also making a few purchases to make his life a bit easier. Meanwhile, some intrepid federal agents who are looking to make a name for themselves, agents Bates and Trevino (Cooper and Pena respectively) under the leadership of the Special Agent in Charge (SAC) (Fishburne) decide that they need to apprehend this new Mule who is transporting all the drugs for the Cartel. The film culminates with Stone’s (Eastwood) apprehension by the law and some resolution between Stone and his family.  Again, I am in a situation where I don’t want to give out any more spoilers for this film, as it is definitely worth the watch. 

Before getting into the good/bad of the film. Let’s look at the main characters:

Clint Eastwood  as Earl Stone; As mentioned previously, Clint is one of my all-time favourite actors. He was the ultimate action hero before all the special effects and steroids came to be so prevalent in the films of today. When I was a kid growing up, westerns were the craze, and in our household we watched them religiously. My father’s opinion was if it had a horse and a gunfight, then it was worth the watch. I remember many a day watching these films, and our favorite was Clint. He was iconic in Hang’em High, Fistful of Dollars, The Good, The Bad and The Ugly, and the Outlaw Jose Wales. No one could stare, spit, and then shoot with the accuracy of Clint Eastwood. He was Hollywood! Of course he moved onto other films that were equally great, Dirty Harry Franchise, Space Cowboys, Kelly’s Heroes, Unforgiven to name but a few. (However, I still can’t forgive him for “The Bridges of Madison County”, c’mon Clint doesn’t cry!) There might also be a few other weak films. But, overall it was a great career as both a star and director. In “The Mule” he does not disappoint. He continues to entertain with his direction and acting style. One thing we did like about his character was the fact that he played his age. He was not hanging on to the illusion that he could still swing a punch or shoot the wing off of a fly at a 100 metres. He was dramatic, he moved with the shuffle of a senior and his dialogue was also comparative. He is a 90-year-old man and played it as such. No special effects to make him look younger, or a stunt double to make him more spry or agile.  He is what he is. The chemistry between Iris (Allison Eastwood), Mary (Wiest) and Ginny (Farmiga) was believable. Hell, his own daughter played his daughter, it just doesn’t get any more real than that. Stone’s (Eastwood) caring for his wife and granddaughter came through the screen and it added to the effect of the film. One of his final scenes with his ex-wife, Mary (Wiest) was especially poignant and it showed that Clint can actually demonstrate caring and love, not just anger, fists and intense glares.

As a director, he also was spot on. The film was a slow burn, the story slowly unfolded and the tension increased as the film progressed. We witnessed Stone’s (Eastwood) transformation from a man at his peak, to the man being crushed, and then the complete circle again. The dialogue flowed and was presented in such a way that you could almost even picture your own grandfather in the scene. While it might not be considered one of his best works, it was still extremely noteworthy. If this film is his last as a director, it was still an admirable way to finish his career. 

Alison Eastwood as Iris: Well as she is one of Clint’s daughters in real life, there is already a bond in place. Also, as his real daughter, I am sure she could project actual events within their relationship to portray the appropriate feelings and chemistry between the two. While she does not have the screen presence of her father, she is still a fair actress and we enjoyed her part within the film. I had to look at IMDB to see what else she had done, and I have only previously seen her in Tightrope and Absolute Power, both films with her father. Obviously, she did not leave that much of an impact at that time if I had to look it up, but in this case, she did a fair job in the Mule and added to the general enjoyment of the film.

Dianne Wiest as Mary: Wiest is a very accomplished actress and always delivers in our opinion. We have enjoyed her in films for many years and she has mastered the mousy persona like few others can. As the Ex wife of Stone, Wiest imparts all the anger and frustration with a man that only an Ex can have, while combining it with feelings left over from the past. Her scenes with Clint were strong and left an impact. As mentioned previously, especially in their final scene together near the end of the film. Another strong performance from Wiest!

Taissa Farmiga as Ginny: Farmiga looked very familiar to us, when checking out her resume on IMDB, I saw that she was in “American Horror Story” an anthology series that we really enjoyed. Now taking that into account, I can see how her acting has progressed since that series. She did an admirable job as the granddaughter, ensuring she presented enough admiration for her grandfather while still trying to placate her mother and grandmother. The scenes with Clint were well done, and I believe that she has plenty of room to grow and expand her career and film resume. She is definitely an actress with potential and I hope to see her in future films. 

Laurence Fishburne as Special Agent in Charge: We are fan’s of Fishburne, and have been for many years. However, in this role, his character is not really developed. Yes, he is the supervisor of Agents Bates and Trevino (Cooper and Pena respectively) but besides telling them to make a bust, he has no other impact to the film. Too bad, as we really like him in most of his films and it would have been nice to see him give a greater contribution to the film.

Bradley Cooperas Agent Colin Bates and Michael Pena as Agent Trevino: At this point I will put these two together. Much like Fishburne, they did not have as great a role as I would have liked to see. They were in pursuit of the fabled “Tata” as the cartel henchmen were calling Stone (Eastwood). There were a few good scenes with both Cooper and Eastwood, specifically in a diner and at a hotel, which did set up the ending. The chemistry between the two is pretty good, which is no doubt due to the fact that they have worked together in American Sniper. As previously mentioned, they could have played their parts in the movie up a bit to flesh out the characters, as they were pretty one dimensional through the film. But again, this film was about Earl Stone (Eastwood) not the cops who were after him.

There were several other supporting actors from the Cartel who gave some good performances as well, specifically, Robert Lasardo as Emilio, Paul Alayo as Sal and Daniel Moncada as Eduardo. As members of the Cartel their contribution to the film help enhance many scenes and provide Eastwood the proper characters/personalities to work off of. 

So, were we entertained? Yes, we were. This was a solid film directed and acted by Eastwood. It further illustrated his talents both in front of, and behind the lens. The story was presented in a slow burn that managed to boil at the end, just as many of his films do. Was it a Gran Torino or Unforgiven, no it was not, but it was still an enjoyable film with a good supporting cast. In some instances, it would have been nice to see some of the other stars get more film time or development, but the film was good nonetheless. If you are an Eastwood fan, I would highly recommend this picture as it may just be his swan song in the industry. If you like a good drama, then this film is for you as well, not to mention people who like to watch films based on an event or person. If you are expecting an Academy award performance, then you may be disappointed. This is a good film to pass a few hours and catch one of the last Icons from Hollywood tell a tale and perform his art. 

Our rating: 7/10

If you are interested in other films from the principal cast, please consider the following recommendations:

Clint Eastwood              (I pretty much love all his films, but will mention what I feel are some of his best)

                                    Hang’em High, The Outlaw Josey Wales, Kelly’s Heroes, Escape From Alcatraz, Unforgiven, Gran Torino, Dirty Harry, Space Cowboys, Million Dollar Baby, Trouble with the Curve, Heartbreak Ridge, Pale Rider

Diane Wiest                  Life in Pieces, Dan in Real Life, Parenthood, Footloose (original)  

Laurence Fishburne       Last Flag Flying, John Wick Chapter 2, Contagion, The Matrix, Boyz in the Hood, Apocalypse Now

Bradley Cooper             American Sniper, Silver Linings Playbook, The Hangover, Limitless, American Hustle

Michael Pena                Ant-Man and the Wasp, 12 Strong, Chips, The Martian, Ant-Man, Fury, American Hustle  

Read more...

The Pro Football HOF announces 2021 Preliminary List of Modern Era Candidates

For us at Notinhalloffame.com, this is our march toward our Christmas.  The Pro Football Hall of Fame has announced the Modern-Era Preliminary Nominees for the Class of 2021, a total of 122 former players.  

To qualify, a player must have retired less than 25 years ago and at least 5 years ago:

The nominees are:

Quarterbacks:

Drew Bledsoe: 1993-2006, NE, BUF, DAL. Bledsoe was a four-time Pro Bowler and he twice led the NFL in Completions.  He threw for 44,611 Yards and 251 Touchdowns.  Ranked #99 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Randall Cunningham: 1985-2001, PHI, MIN, DAL, BAL. Cunningham is a three-time Bert Bell Award winner a four-time Pro Bowl Selection.  Ranked #31 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Jake Delhomme: 1999-11, NOR, CAR, HOU. Delhomme went to the Pro Bowl in 2005 and he would throw for over 20,000 Yards.

Jeff Garcia:  1999-09, SFO, CLE, DET, PHI, TAM.  Garcia was a four-time Pro Bowler and would throw for over 25,000 Passing Yards.

Dave Krieg:  1980-98, SEA, KAN, DET, ARI, CHI, TEN.  Krieg went to three Pro Bowls with the Seahawks and threw for 38,147 Yards and 261 Touchdowns over a 19-year career.  Ranked #120 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Peyton Manning:  1998-2015, IND, DEN.  Manning was a five-time MVP, two-time Offensive Player of the Year, three-time Bert Bell Award winner and two-time Super Bowl Champion.  The 14-time Pro Bowl Selection threw for 71,940 Yards and 539 Touchdowns and is a first ballot nominee.  Ranked #1 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Donovan McNabb:  1999-01, PHI, WAS, MIN.  McNabb took the Eagles to the Super Bowl and was a six-time Pro Bowler.  He threw for 37,276 Yards with 234 Touchdowns and ran for another 3,459 Yards and 29 TDs.  Ranked #70 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Steve McNair:  1995-2007, HOU, TEN, BAL.  McNair was a three-time Pro Bowl and former MVP.  He threw for 31,204 Yards and 174 Touchdowns.  Ranked #108 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Running Backs:

Shaun Alexander:  2000-08, SEA, PHI.  Alexander went to three straight Pro Bowls and in the last one he won the Rushing Title and was named the AP MVP.  Alexander retired with 10,973 Yards From Scrimmage and 112 Touchdowns.  Ranked #90 on Notinhalloffame.com

Mike Alstott:  1996-06, TAM.  Alstott won a Super Bowl with the Bucs and was a six-time Pro Bowl and three-time First Team All-Pro.  He would total 7,373 Yards From Scrimmage with 71 Touchdowns.  Ranked #184 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Tiki Barber:  1997-06, NYG.  Barber rushed for over 10,000 Yards and was a three-time Pro Bowler.  He also caught another 5,000 Yards and was a two-time leader in Yards From Scrimmage.  Ranked #139 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Earnest Byner:  1984-97, CLE, WAS, BAL.  Byner won a Super Bowl with the Washington Redskins and he was a two-time Pro Bowler. He would accumulate 12,866 Yards From Scrimmage with 71 Touchdowns over his career.

Larry Centers:  1990-03, PHO, ARI, WAS, BUF, NWE.  Centers was a three-time Pro Bowl Selection and totalled 8,985 Yards From Scrimmage

Corey Dillon:  1997-06, CIN, NWE.  Dillon won the Super Bowl with the Patriots and was a four-time Pro Bowl Selection.  Dillon accumulated 13,335 All-Purpose Yards over his career.

Warrick Dunn:  1997-08, TAM, ATL.  Dunn was the 1997 Offensive Rookie of the Year and was a three-time Pro Bowler who rushed for 10,957 Yards and 49 Touchdowns.

Eddie George:  1996-04, HOU, TEN, DAL.  George went to four straight Pro Bowls and was a First Team All-Pro in 2000.  He would rush for 10,441 Yards.  Ranked #173 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Priest Holmes:  1997-07, BAL, KC.  Winning the Super Bowl with the Baltimore Ravens, Holmes had greater individual success with the Chiefs where he was a three-time First Team All-Pro.  He would tabulate 11,134 Yards From Scrimmage.  Ranked #111 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Steven Jackson:  2004-15, STL, ATL, NWE.  Jackson is nominated in his first year of eligibility and he accrued 15,121 Yards From Scrimmage and 78 Touchdowns.  He is the Rams’ all-time leading rusher.  Ranked #225 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Jamal Lewis:  2000-09, BAL, CLE.  In 2003, Lewis entered rarified air as he entered the 2,000-Yard club when he went for 2,006.  He would rush for 10,607 Yards.  Ranked #204 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Eric Metcalf:  1989-02, CLE, ATL, SDG, ARI, CAR, WAS, GNB.  Incredibly versatile, Metcalf was also used as a Wide Receiver and Returner and the three-time Pro Bowler would total 17,230 All-Purpose Yards.

Glyn Milburn:  1993-01, DEN, DET, CHI, SDG.  Milburn was a two-time Pro Bowl Selection who had 14,911 All-Purpose Yards.  He led the NFL in Kick Return Yards in 1998.

Lorenzo Neal:  1993-08, NOR, NYJ, TAM, TEN, CIN, SDG, BAL.  Playing at Fullback, Neal would go to four Pro Bowls and was named to two First Team All-Pros.

Fred Taylor:  1998-10, JAX, NWE.  Taylor was a Pro Bowl Selection in 2007 and would accumulate 14,079 Yards From Scrimmage, 11,695 on the ground.  Ranked #171 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Herschel Walker:  1986-97, DAL, MIN, PHI, NYG.  Walker was a two-time Pro Bowl Selection who had 13,084 Yards From Scrimmage with 82 Touchdowns.  He is also the best player in USFL history, though we aren’t sure how much (if at all) the Pro Football Hall of Fame cares about that.  Ranked #30 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Ricky Watters:  1992-01, SFO, PHI, SEA.  Watters was a Super Bowl Champion with the 49ers and he would go to the Pro Bowl in his first five years in the NFL.  He would lead the NFL in Yards From Scrimmage in 1996 and would have 14,891 in total.  Ranked #43 on Notinhalloffame.com.

 

Wide Receivers:

Donald Driver:  1999-12, GNB.  Driver was a Super Bowl Champion with the Packers where he would also go to three Pro Bowls.  He would accumulate 10,137 Receiving Yards.

Henry Ellard:  1983-98, LAR, WAS, NWE.  Ellard led the NFL in Receiving Yards in 1988 and was a three-time Pro Bowl as well as a two-time First Team All-Pro.  He would have 13,777 Receiving Yards with 81 Touchdowns over his career.  Ranked #129 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Torry Holt:1999-09, STL, JAX.  A Super Bowl Champion with the St. Louis Rams, Holt went to seven Pro Bowls and led the NFL in Receiving Yards twice.  He finished his career with 13,382 Yards and 74 TDs.  Holt has previously been a Semi-Finalist.  Ranked #9 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Calvin Johnson:  2007-15, DET.  Johnson played his entire career with the Lions where he had 11,619 Receiving Yards with 83 Touchdowns.  “Megatron” is in his first year of eligibility.  Ranked #27 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Chad Johnson:  2001-11, CIN, NWE.  Johnson went to six Pro Bowls as a Bengal and he would accumulate 11,059 Receiving Yards, punching 67 of them into the end zone.  “Ocho Cinco” was also a First Team All-Pro twice.  Ranked #87 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Derrick Mason:  1997-11, TEN, BAL.  Mason would record 12,061 Receiving Yards and was chosen for the Pro Bowl twice.  Ranked #181 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Muhsin Muhammad:  1996-09, CAR, CHI.  Muhammad led all NFL Wide Receivers in Yards in 2004, which was the season he was chosen as a First Team All-Pro.  He would net 11,438 Receiving Yards in total.

Jimmy Smith:  1992-05, DAL, JAX.  Smith was chosen for five consecutive Pro Bowls (1997-01) and in 1999 he led the NFL in Receptions.  He would retire with 12,287 Receiving Yards and 67 Touchdowns.  Ranked #151 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Rod Smith:  1995-06, DEN.  Smith would win two Super Bowls with the Broncos and was a three-time Pro Bowl Selection.  He recorded 11,389 Yards with 68 TDs.  Ranked #53 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Hines Ward:  1998-11, PIT.  Ward won two Super Bowls with the Steelers and was the MVP in one of them.  A previous Semi-Finalist, he has four Pro Bowls, 85 Touchdowns and 12,083 Yards on his resume.  Ranked #33 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Reggie Wayne:  2001-14, IND.  Wayne won a Super Bowl with the Indianapolis Colts and was the Receiving Yards leader in 2007.  A six-time Pro Bowler, Wayne’s 14,345 Yards ranks him 10thall-time.  Ranked #8 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Wes Welker:  2004-15, MIA, SDG, NEW, DEN, STL.  Welker led the NFL three times in Receptions and the five-time Pro Bowl Selection had 9,924 career Receiving Yards.  This is Welker’s first year of eligibility.  Ranked #161 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Roddy White:  2005-15, ATL.  White is in his first year of eligibility and the career-Falcon led the league in Receptions in 2010.  He was a four-time Pro Bowler and accrued 10,863 Yards with 63 Touchdowns.  Ranked #291 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Tight Ends: 

Dallas Clark:  2003-13, IND, TAM, BAL.  Clark would win the Super Bowl with the Colts and was a First Team All-Pro and Pro Bowl Selection in 2009.  He would record 5,665 Yards with 53 Touchdowns.

Ben Coates:  1991-00, NWE, BAL.  Coates was a Pro Bowler in five straight years from 1994 to 1998 and was a two-time First Team All-Pro.  He would accumulate 5,555 Yards with 50 Touchdowns.  Ranked #88 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Keith Jackson:  1988-96, PHI, MIA, GNB.  Jackson was a five-time Pro Bowl Selection and in his first three seasons in the NFL was a First Team All-Pro.  He would have 5,283 Receiving Yards with 49 TDs.  Ranked #59 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Brent Jones:  1987-97, SFO.  Jones went to four Pro Bowls in a row (1992-95) and he was a three-time Super Champion with San Francisco.  He accrued 5,195 Yards with 33 TDs over his career.

Heath Miller:  2005-15, PIT.  Playing his entire career with the Pittsburgh Steelers, Miller went to two Pro Bowls and helped his team win two Super Bowls.  In his first year of eligibility, Miller had 6,569 Yards and 45 Touchdowns.

Jeremy Shockey:  2002-11, NYG, NO, CAR.  Shockey would go to four Pro Bowls and was a First Team All-Pro as a rookie.  He would later win a Super Bowl with the New Orleans Saints.

Wesley Walls:  1989-03, SFO, NOR, CAR, GNB.  Walls was named to the Pro Bowl five times when he was with the Carolina Panthers.  He would have 5,291 Yards with 54 TDs in his career.  Ranked #265 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Offensive Lineman:

Willie Anderson:  1996-08, CIN, BAL.  Anderson was chosen for four Pro Bowls in a row (2003-06), with his last three being First Team All-Pro worthy.  Ranked #283 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Matt Birk:  1998-12, MIN, BAL.  Birk is a Super Bowl Champion with the Baltimore Ravens and would prior have six Pro Bowls as a Minnesota Viking.  Ranked #74 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Tony Boselli:  1995-01, JAX.  Boselli was a Finalist for the last three years and he was a five-time Pro Bowl and three-time First Team All-Pro Selection.  Ranked #45 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Lomas Brown:  1985-02, DET, ARI, CLE, NYG, TAM.  Brown had seven straight Pro Bowls (1990-96) and in his last season in the NFL, he would win a Super Bowl with Tampa Bay.  Ranked #175 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Ruben Brown:  1995-07, BUF, CHI.  Brown was a nine-time Pro Bowl Selection who started all of his 181 Games.  Ranked #112 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Alan Faneca:  1998-10, PIT, NYJ, ARI.  Faneca has been a Finalist for the last three years and he is a Super Bowl Champion with the Pittsburgh Steelers.  He is also a nine-time Pro Bowl and a six-time First Team All-Pro.  Ranked #4 on Notinhalloffame.com.

D’Brickashaw Ferguson:  2006-15, NYJ.  Playing his entire career with the Jets, Ferguson went to three Pro Bowls and started all of his 160 Games at Left Tackle.  This is his first year of eligibility.

Kevin Glover:  1985-99, DET, SEA.  Glover was a three-time Pro Bowl Selection at Center with the Lions.

Jordan Gross:  2003-13, CAR.  A career Carolina Panther, Jordan Gross went to three Pro Bowls and was a First Team All-Pro in 2008.

Kent Hull:  1986-96, BUF.  Hull was a three-time Pro Bowl and two-time First Team All-Pro.

Olin Kreutz:  1998-11, CHI, NOR.  Kreutz went to six Pro Bowls and was also a one-time First Team All-Pro.  Ranked #60 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Logan Mankins:  2005-15, NWE, TAM.  A seven-time Pro Bowler, Mankins started all of his 161 Games at. Left Guard.  This is his first year of eligibility.  Ranked #126 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Tom Nalen:  1994-07, DEN.  Nalen was a five-time Pro Bowl, two-time First Team All-Pro who played his entire career with Denver.  He also won two Super Bowls.  Ranked #211 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Chris Samuels:  2000-09, WAS.  Samuels went to six Pro Bowls in a career spent only as a Redskin. Ranked #281 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Jeff Saturday:  1999-02, IND, GNB.  Saturday won a Super Bowl with the Colts and he was a six-time Pro Bowl and two-time First Team All-Pro.  Ranked #102 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Chris Snee:  2004-13, NYG.  Snee was a two-time Super Bowl Champion who played all 141 of his Games starting at Right Guard.  He was also a four-time Pro Bowl and one-time First Team All-Pro.  

Brian Waters:  2000-13, KAN, NWE, DAL.  Waters would go to six Pro Bowls and was named to two First Team All-Pros.  Ranked #156 on Notinhalloffame.com

Richmond Webb:  1990-02, MIA, CIN.  Webb was a Pro Bowl Selection in his first seven seasons with two of them earning First Team All-Pro nods.  Ranked #65 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Erik Williams:  1991-01, DAL, BAL.  Williams won three Super Bowls with Dallas and he went to four Pro Bowls.

Steve Wisniewski:  1989-01, RAI, OAK.  A previous Semi-Finalist, Wisniewski played his entire career with the Raiders and he was an eight-time Pro Bowl and two-time First Team All-Pro.  Ranked #18 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Defensive Linemen:

John Abraham:  2000-14, NYJ, ATL, ARI.  Recording 133.5 Sacks, Abraham was a five-time Pro Bowl and two-time First Team All-Pro.  Ranked #51 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Jared Allen:  2004-15, KAN, MIN, CHI, CAR.  Allen twice led the NFL in Sacks and would have 136.0 in total.  In his first year of eligibility, Allen was a five-time Pro Bowler, and was a First Team All-Pro in four of those years.  Ranked #19 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Ray Childress:  1985-96, HOU, DAL.  This is the last year that Childress is eligible as a Modern Era Candidate.  He was a five-time Pro Bowl and one-time First Team All-Pro with 76.5 career Sacks.  Ranked #10 on Notinhalloffame.com.

La’Roi Glover:  1996-08, OAK, NOR, DAL, STL.  Glover was a six-time Pro Bowl Selection and in 2000 he would lead the NFL in Sacks and was also a First Team All-Pro that year. He would have 83.5 career Sacks.  Ranked #154 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Casey Hampton:  2001-12, PIT.  Hampton played his entire career with the Steelers where he won two Super Bowls and was chosen for five Pro Bowls.  Ranked #286 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Leslie O’Neal:  1986-99, SDG, STL, KAN.  O’Neal was a six-time Pro Bowler during his tenure with the Chargers and was the 1986 Defensive Rookie of the Year.  O’Neal had 132.5 career Sacks.  Ranked #113 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Simeon Rice:  1996-07, ARI, TAM, IND, DEN.  Rice won a Super Bowl with the Buccaneers and was a three-time Pro Bowler.  He would have 122.0 Sacks over his career.  Ranked #147 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Richard Seymour:  2001-12, NWE, OAK.  Seymour won three Super Bowls with the Patriots and was a seven-time Pro Bowl and three-time First Team All-Pro Selection.  Seymour was a Finalist last year.  Ranked #39 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Justin Smith:  2001-14, CIN, SFO.  Smith went on a five-year streak in the second half of his career of Pro Bowls (2009-14) and was a one-time First Team All-Pro in the middle of it.  He had 87.0 career Sacks.  Ranked #157 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Neil Smith:  1988-00, KAN, DEN, SDG.  Smith would go to six Pro Bowls and was also a First Team All-Pro in 1993.  He would also win two Super Bowls with the Denver Broncos and had 104.5 career Sacks.  Ranked #40 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Greg Townsend:  1983-97, RAI, PHI, OAK.  Townsend is a Super Bowl Champion with the Raiders and would be named to two Pro Bowls.  He would have 109.5 career Sacks.

Justin Tuck:  2005-15, NYG, OAK.  Tuck was a two-time Pro Bowler and two-time Super Bowl Champion as a Giant.  This is his first year of Hall of Fame eligibility.

Kevin Williams:  2003-15, MIN, SEA, NOR.  Williams had six Pro Bowls and five First Team All-Pros in a career spent mostly in Minnesota.  He is entering his first year of eligibility.  Ranked #109 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Bryant Young:  1994-07, SFO.  Young won a Super Bowl with the 49ers and he would be chosen for four Pro Bowls and one First Team All-Pro.  He had 89.5 career Sacks.  Ranked #164 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Linebackers:

Cornelius Bennett:  1987-00, BUF, ATL, IND.  Bennett would go to five Pro Bowls and he was a First Team All-Pro in 1988.  He had 71.5 Sacks and 1,190 Combined Tackles.  Ranked #124 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Lance Briggs:  2003-14, CHI.  Briggs went to seven straight Pro Bowls (2005-11) and he was a First Team All-Pro in the first year of that streak.  He had 1,181 career Combined Tackles, 16 Interceptions and 15.0 Sacks.  Ranked #95 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Tedy Bruschi:  1996-08, NWE.   Bruschi won three Super Bowls with the Patriots and was a Pro Bowler in 2004.

London Fletcher:  1998-13, STL, BUF, WAS.  Fletcher would win a Super Bowl early in his career with the Rams and late on his career, he would make the Pro Bowl four years in a row as a Redskin. He would accumulate over 2,000 Combined Tackles over his career.  Ranked #63 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Seth Joyner:  1986-98, PHI, ARI, GNB, DEN.  Joyner was a three-time Pro Bowler and would win a Super Bowl late in his career with the Packers.  He would have 1,123 career Combined Tackles and 52.0 Sacks.

Wilber Marshall:  1984-95, CHI, WAS, HOU, ARI, NYJ.  Marshall was a Super Bowl Champion with both the Chicago Bears and Washington Redskins and he would go to three Pro Bowls.

Clay Matthews Jr.:  1978-96, CLE, ATL.  Matthews played 278 Games and would go to four Pro Bowls while playing for the Cleveland Browns.  With 1,598 career Combined Tackles, 69.5 Quarterback Sacks and 14 Interceptions, this is his last year as a Modern Era Finalist.  He is ranked #75 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Jerod Mayo:  2008-15, NWE.  Mayo was the 2008 Defensive Rookie of the Year and two years later he was the league-leader in Tackles.  A two-time Pro Bowl Selection, Mayo also has a Super Bowl Ring and he is in his first year of Hall eligibility.

Willie McGinest:  1994-08, NWE, CLE.  McGinest would win three Super Bowls with the New England Patriots and was named to two Pro Bowls.  He has 86.0 career Sacks and 804 Combined Tackles.

Sam Mills:  1986-97, NOR, CAR.  Mills was chosen for five Pro Bowls and one First Team All-Pro. He had 1,265 Combined Tackles and 20.5 career Sacks.  Ranked #48 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Joey Porter:  1999-11, PIT, MIA, ARI.  Porter helped the Steelers win a Super Bowl and was a four-time Pro Bowl and one-time First Team All-Pro.  He recorded 98.0 Sacks over his career.  Ranked #152 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Chris Spielman:  1988-97, DET, BUF.  Spielman would lead the NFL in Tackles in 1994 and was a four-time Pro Bowl and one-time First Team All-Pro.  He led the NFL in Tackles in 1994 and had 1,363 career Combined Tackles. 

Takeo Spikes:  1998-12, CIN, BUF, PHI, SFO, SDG.  Spikes was chosen for two Pro Bowls and was a First Team All-Pro in 2004.  He was also one Interception shy of the 20-20 club and he accumulated 1,431 career Combined Tackles.

Pat Swilling:  1986-98, NOR, DET, OAK.  Swilling was the 1991 Defensive Player of the Year, and he was a five-time Pro and two-time First Team All-Pro.  Over his career, Swilling had 107.5 Sacks.  Ranked #91 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Darryl Talley:  1983-86, BUF, ATL, MIN.  Talley was a Pro Bowl Selection twice and had 38.5 Sacks and 1,252 Combined Tackles.  This is his last year of eligibility as a Modern Era candidate.

Zach Thomas:  1996-08, MIA.  Thomas is an eight-time Pro Bowl and five-time First Team All-Pro who has twice led the NFL in Tackles.  He was a Finalist last year.  Ranked #23 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Patrick Willis:  2007-14, SFO.  Willis retired before the age of 30 and is now in his first year of eligibility. The career 49er led the league in Tackles twice and is a seven-time Pro Bowl and five-time First Team All-Pro.  Ranked #15 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Defensive Backs:

Eric Allen:  1988-01, PHI, NOR, OAK.  Allen secured 54 Interceptions and would have six Pro Bowl Seasons, with one of them earning a First Team All-Pro Selection.  Ranked #42 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Ronde Barber:  1997-12, TAM.  Barber helped the Tampa Bay Buccaneers win their only Super Bowl and he would record 47 Interceptions and 1,231 Tackles.  A five-time Pro Bowl and three-time First Team All-Pro, Barber has been a Semi-Finalist. Ranked #13 on Notinhalloffame.com.

LeRoy Butler:  1990-01, GNB.  Butler won a Super Bowl with the Packers and in all four of his Pro Bowl Selections, he would also be named a First Team All-Pro.  Butler had 38 career Interceptions and 889 Combined Tackles and he was been a Finalist last year.  Ranked #73 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Nick Collins:  2005-11, GNB.  Collins won a Super Bowl with the Green Bay Packers and was a Pro Bowler three times. He would lead the NFL in Interception Return Yards in 2008 and had 21 career Interceptions.

Merton Hanks:  1991-98, SFO, SEA.  Hanks won a Super Bowl with the Niners and was also a Pro Bowl Selection four times.  He recorded 33 career Interceptions.

Rodney Harrison:  1994-08, SDG, NWE.  Harrison won two Super Bowls with the New England Patriots and he was a Pro Bowl and First Team All-Pro twice.  He would have 34 career Interceptions and 1,206 Combined Tackles.

James Hasty:  1998-01, NYJ, KAN, OAK.  Hasty was a two-time Pro Bowler who had 45 Interceptions and 910 Combined Tackles over his career.

Albert Lewis:  1983-98, KAN, RAI, OAK.  Lewis would record 42 Interceptions and he was a four-time Pro Bowler.  He also had two First Team All-Pro Selections and grabbed 42 Interceptions, 12.5 Sacks and 832 Combined Tackles.  Ranked #278 on Notinhalloffame.com.

John Lynch:  1993-07, TAM, DEN.  A Finalist for the last six years, Lynch won a Super Bowl with the Buccaneers and was a Pro Bowl Selection nine times.  He also was a First Team All-Pro twice.  Ranked #25 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Tim McDonald:  1987-99, STL, PHO, SFO.  McDonald recorded 40 Interceptions and was a six-time Pro Bowler.  He would win a Super Bowl with the 49ers and had 40 Interceptions and 1,139 Combined Tackles.  Ranked #236 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Allen Rossum:  1998-09, PHI, GNB, ATL, PIT, SFO. DAL.  Rossum is listed as a Cornerback, but he was more of a Returner.  He was a Pro Bowler in 2004 and had 15,046 All-Purpose Yards.

Asante Samuel:  2003-13, NEW, PHI, ATL.  Samuel was a four-time Pro Bowl and one-time First Team All-Pro.  Twice a Super Bowl Champion with New England, Samuel had 51 career Interceptions.  Ranked #155 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Bob Sanders:  2004-11, IND, SDG.  Sanders only played 50 Games but was the 2009 Defensive Player of the Year and is the owner of a Super Bowl Ring with the Colts.

Charles Tillman:  2004-11, CHI, CAR.  Tillman is in his first year of eligibility and he was a two-time Pro Bowl Selection.  He would have 38 career Interceptions with 930 Combined Tackles.

Troy Vincent:  1992-06, MIA, PHI, BUF, WAS.   Vincent’s five Pro Bowls would all come consecutively when he was with the Eagles. He would earn First Team All-Pro honors in 2002 and had 47 Interceptions and 893 Combined Tackles.  Ranked #275 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Adrian Wilson:  2001-12, ARI.  Wilson was a five-time Pro Bowl and one-time First Team All-Pro who had 27 career Interceptions and 903 Combined Tackles.

Charles Woodson:  1998-16, OAK, GNB.  Woodosn was a nine-time Pro Bowler who had two separate four-year streaks that were six years apart.  Also, a three-time First Team All-Pro, Woodson was the 1998 Defensive Rookie of the Year, 2009 Defensive Player of the Year and was a Super Bowl Champion with the Packers.  With 65 career Interceptions and 1,220 Combined Tackles, Woodson is in his first year of eligibility.

Darren Woodson:  1992-03, DAL.  A part of the Cowboys three Super Bowl Titles in the early 90s, Woodson was a five-time Pro Bowl and three-time First Team All-Pro.  He has been a Semi-Finalist before and has 23 career Interceptions with 11 Sacks and 967 Combined Tackles.  Ranked #94 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Place Kickers:

David Akers:  1998-13, PHI, SFO, DET.  Akers was a six-time Pro Bowl and two-time First Team All-Pro Selection.  Ranked #251 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Gary Anderson:  1982-04, PIT, PHI, SFO, MIN, TEN.  Anderson went to four Pro Bowls and at the time of his retirement, he was the all-time leader in Points Scored and Field Goals Made.  Ranked #246 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Jason Elam:  1993-09, DEN, ATL.  Elam won two Super Bowls with Denver and is a three-time Pro Bowl Selection.

Jason Hanson:  1992-12, DET.  Hanson played his entire career with the Detroit Lions and was chosen for two Pro Bowls. He is fourth all-time in Points Scored and Field Goals Made.

Ryan Longwell:  1997-12, GNB, MIN, SEA.  Longwell is 17thall-time in Field Goals Made.

Nick Lowery:  1978-96, KC, NYJ.  Lowery is a three-time Pro Bowl and two-time First Team All-Pro.  He is 13thall-time in Field Goals Made.

Punters:

Jeff Feagles:  1988-09, NEW, PHI, ARI, SEA, NYG.  Feagles was a two-time Pro Bowler and won a Super Bowl with the Giants.

Sean Landeta:  1985-05, NYG, LAR, STL, TAM, GNB, PHI.  Landeta won two Super Bowls with the Giants and was chosen for three First Team All-Pros.  He is currently third all-time in Punting Yards.

Reggie Roby:  1983-98, MIA, WAS, TAM, HOU, TEN, SFO.  Roby went to three Pro Bowls and two First Team All-Pros.

Rohn Stark:  1982-97, BAL, IND, PIT, CAR, SEA.  Stark was a four-time Pro Bowl and one-time First Team All-Pro.

Matt Turk:  1995-11, WAS, MIA, NYJ, STL, HOU, JAX.  Turk’s three Pro Bowls were consecutive from 1996 to 1998.  He was a First Team All-Pro in ’95.

Special Teams:

Josh Cribbs (PR/KR/WR): 2005-14, CLE, NYJ, IND.  Cribbs was a three-time Pro Bowl and one-time First Team All-Pro and collected 15,453 All-Purpose Yards.  

Mel Gray (PR/KR/WR): 1986-97, NOR, DET, HOU, TEN, PHI.  Gray was chosen for four Pro Bowls and three First Team All-Pros.  He would accrue 13,279 All-Purpose Yards.  Ranked #267 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Brian Mitchell (KR/PR/RB): 1990-03, WAS, PHI, NYG.  Mitchell was a one-time Pro Bowl recipient and a four-time leader in All-Purpose Yards. He totaled 23,330 in APY, and is second all-time in that statistic.  Ranked #162 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Steve Tasker (ST/WR): 1985-97, HOU, BUF. Tasker is a seven-time Pro Bowl Selection at Special Teams.  Ranked #106 on Notinhalloffame.com.

There are fourteen first-year nominees in this group consisting of Manning, Jackson, Johnson, Welker, White, Miller, Ferguson, Mankins, Allen, Tuck, K. Williams, Mayo, Tillman and C. Woodson.

With all due respect to many of these candidates, there are several of these Preliminary Nominees that have no realistic chance for the Pro Football Hall of Fame, but it is a much better list than last year, where there were some obvious omissions.  

This group will be pared down to 25 in November and reduced to 15 in January.

Whomever those 15 Modern Era Finalists are, they will be joined by Senior Finalist, Drew Pearson, Contributor Finalist, Bill Nunn and Coach Finalist, Tom Flores.

We here at Notinhalloffame.com would like to congratulate the 130 former players who made it to this stage.

Read more...

Awards = HOF?: Part Fifty-One: The Calder Trophy

We here at Notinhalloffame.com thought it would be fun to take a look at the major awards in North American team sports and see how it translates into Hall of Fame potential.

Needless to say, different awards in different sports yield hall of fame potential.  In basketball, the team sport with the least number of players on a roster, the dividend for greatness much higher.  In baseball, it is not as much as a great individual season does not have the same impact.

Last time, we looked at the Walter Payton Man of the Year Award in the NFL.  This time we went back to hockey, with the Calder Trophy, given annually to the NHL Rookie of the Year.

So how many Calder Trophy winners have made the Pro Hockey Hall of Fame?

Let’s find out!

The following are the past players who have won the Calder Trophy who are eligible for the Hockey Hall of Fame and have been enshrined.

Carl Voss, New York Rangers & Detroit Red Wings, Center: 8 G, 16 A, 24 P, 2.8 PS 1933       

You could argue that we are starting this one with an asterisk, as Voss was not inducted into the Hall of Fame as a player, but as a builder for his work as an Administrator in various minor leagues of hockey.  Having said that, don’t sleep on his career as the American born-Canadian raised player was a great athlete, who prior to his NHL career won the Grey Cup in 1924 with Queen’s College and in the minors was a leading scorer (IHL in 1932).  Voss had played for the Toronto Maple Leafs for 14 Games in the late 20s, but he finally became a regular on the roster of the New York Rangers for in 1932.  Ten Games into the season, he was sold to the Detroit Red Wings, where he proved his worth in the NHL, and was the first ever rookie of the year.  Voss later played for the Ottawa Senators, St. Louis Eagles, New York Americans, Montreal Maroons and Chicago Blackhawks, where in his final NHL game, he scored the Stanley Cup winning goal to seal the deal for the 1938 Title.  Forced to retire afterward due to a knee injury, Voss would begin his career as an administrator.

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1974.

Sweeney Schriner, New York Americans, Left Wing: 18 G, 22 A, 40 P, 4.5 PS 1935        

Sweeney Schriner goes down in history as the only Calder Trophy winner in the history of the New York Americans.  The Left Wing would lead the NHL in scoring the next two seasons, where he was a First Team All-Star and Second Team All-Star respectively. Later in his career, he was traded to the Toronto Maple Leafs where he won two Stanley Cups and was again a First Team All-Star.  Schriner played until 1946, retiring with 407 Points in 484 Games.

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1962.

Syl Apps, Toronto Maple Leafs, Centre: 16 G, 29 A, 45 P, 6.1 PS 1937         

Apps played all of his career with the Leafs and in his rookie year, he led the NHL in Assists.  He did that again as a sophomore, where he was a Second Team All-Star, an accolade he repeated twice more.  Apps was also a First Team All-Star twice, a Lady Byng winner, and he was second in Hart Trophy voting three times.  The Centre helped to lead Toronto to the Stanley Cup three times and he scored 432 Points in 423 Games.

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1961.

Frank Brimsek, Boston Bruins, Goalie: 33-9-1 Record, 1.56 GAA, 11.3 GPS 1939

Frank Brimsek became the second American Goalie to win the Calder, but he shattered the overall success of his predecessor. The Minnesotan was the first player to win the Calder and the Vezina in the same year, and also the first to win the Calder and Stanley Cup in the same season.  He led all Goalies in Wins (33), GAA (1.56), Shutouts (10), and Point Shares (11.3), and he was named a First Team All-Star.  Brimsek would later win a second Vezina, was a First Team All-Star one more time, a Second Team, All-Star six times and won another Cup in 1941.  Brimsek would also play for the Blackhawks, and he retired with 252 Wins and a career 2.70 GAA.

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1961.

Edgar Laprade, New York Rangers, Center: 15 G, 19 A, 34 P, 2.9 PS 1946   

Laprade played the entirety of his NHL career with the New York Rangers, which would span ten seasons.  A clean player, Laprade would win the Lady Byng in 1949/50, and he was seventh in Hart Trophy voting that year.  He scored 280 Points, which may not seem like a lot but he was also a skilled defensive forward.

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1993.

Terry Sawchuk, Detroit Red Wings, Goalie: 44-12-13 Record, 1.97 GAA, 17.0 PS 1951  

The 1950/51 season began one of the most phenomenal half-decades that a Goalie ever had in the NHL.  Terry Sawchuk would not only win the Calder in his rookie year, he would also lead the NHL in Wins (44), Goalie Point Shares (17.0), and was a First Team All-Star.  Over the next four seasons, the Red Wings Goalie won three Stanley Cups, three Vezinas, two First Team All-Star Selections, two GAA Titles, and four more league-lead in Wins.  Following that incredible run, Sawchuk was still a very good Goalie, winning a Vezina in 1964/65, another Stanley Cup in 1967 with Toronto and two Second Team All-Star nods.  Over his career, Sawchuk also played for Boston, Los Angeles and New York, and he retired with 350 career Wins.

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1971.

Bernie Geoffrion, Montreal Canadiens, Right Wing: 30 G, 24 A, 54 P, 7.4 PS  1952       

Geoffrion led the NHL in Power Play Goals as a rookie (10), and he went on to have a long and prosperous career with the Canadiens. The French-Canadian went on to win six Stanley Cups, two Goal Scoring Titles, two Art Ross Trophies and the Hart Trophy in 1961.  Geoffrion scored 822 Points over a 883-Game career.

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1972.

Gump Worsley, New York Rangers, Goalie: 44-12-13 Record, 1.97 GAA, 17.0 PS 1953   

Worsley did the best he could on a poor Rangers team, but the hockey world recognized that the “Gump” was a talented Goalie. Worsley played until the mid-70s, and he would win four Stanley Cups with Montreal where he was also a two-time Vezina Trophy winner.  Worlsey played into his mid-40s, where he the charismatic Goalie played for the Minnesota North Stars for his last four years.

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1980.

Glenn Hall, Detroit Red Wings, Goalie: 30-24-16 Record, 2.10 GAA, 14.5 PS 1956         

How do you replace a legend like Terry Sawchuk? With a legend like Glenn Hall.  As a rookie, Hall was a Second Team All-Star, and he led the NHL in Shutouts (12).  Hall was a First Team All-Star in his second season, but despite this he was traded to the Chicago Blackhawks after the season.  Hall played for Chicago for a decade where he won two Vezinas, was a First Team All-Star five times, and backstopped the Blackhawks to a Stanley Cup win in 1961.  Hall joined the expansion St. Louis Blues in 1967 and immediately made them relevant, bringing them to three Stanley Cup appearances, and while they lost them all, Hall was the Conn Smythe winner in 1968.  He also won a third Vezina playing in St. Louis.  The Goalie played until 1971, and retired with a record of 279-229-107.

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1975.

Frank Mahovolich, Toronto Maple Leafs, Left Wing: 20 G, 16 A, 36 P, 4.9 PS 1958        

Nicknamed the “Big M”, Mahovolich had a decent rookie year, but would morph into one of the leaders of a powerful Toronto squad that won four Stanley Cups in the 1960s.  In this period, Mahovolich was a two-time First Team All-Star and four-time Second Team All-Star, and had two top-five finishes for the Hart. Following Toronto’s last Cup win in 1967, Mahovolich was traded to Detroit during the 1967/68 season, and he added a pair of Second Team All-Stars in Motown.  He later played for Montreal, where he won the Stanley Cup twice more with another First Team All-Star etched on his resume.  Mahovolich had 1,103 Points in the NHL, and he also had four pro seasons in the WHA where he scored 232 Points.

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1981.

Bill Hay, Chicago Blackhawks, Centre: 18 G, 37 A, 55 P, 4.9 PS: 1960         

Hay did well as a rookie, and played a significant role on the Chicago team that won the Stanley Cup the year after.  Hay eclipsed his 55 Point Rookie year three times and led the NHL in Assists per Game in 1961/62.  Hay played his entire NHL career with the Blackhawks, collecting 386 career Points.  We will count this as while Hay did not have a Hall of Fame career as a player, he was inducted as a builder for his work as the past President and CEO of the Calgary Flames and as the Hockey Hall of Fame Chairman.

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2015 as a Builder.

Dave Keon, Chicago Blackhawks, Centre: 20 G, 25 A, 45 P, 4.2 PS: 1961     

After Keon’s Calder winning season, he became a core part of the Maple Leafs squad that won four Stanley Cups, so much so that he won the Conn Smythe Trophy in 1967 as the playoff MVP.  Keon would be a two-time Second Team All-Star, and he won the Lady Byng in consecutive seasons in 1962 and 1963.  Keon bolted for the WHA in 1975, playing for Minnesota, Indiana and New England, rejoining the NHL, when the Whalers were one of the four teams that merged with the senior hockey circuit.  Keon retired in 1982 with 986 NHL Points and 291 WHA Points..

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1986.

Jacques Laperriere, Montreal Canadiens, Defenseman:  2 G, 28 A, 30 P, 6.7 PS: 1964

Laperriere had a great rookie campaign as he not only won the Calder but was named a Second Team All-Star.  Playing all 12 years of his NHL career with the Habs, the Defenseman was a First Team All-Star the two years after his rookie season, and was the Norris Trophy winner in 1965/66.  Laperriere helped Montreal win five Stanley Cups, and was a one-time leader in Plus/Minus.

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1987.

Bobby Orr, Boston Bruins, Defenseman:  13 G, 28 A, 30 P, 6.7 PS: 1964

Orr was a Second Team All-Star in his rookie season and was third in Norris Trophy voting.  It was a good year, but it did not accurately foreshadow what Orr would accomplish.  Over the next eight seasons, Orr was an annual First Team All-Star and Norris Trophy winner.  He won three straight Hart Trophies (1970-72), two Stanley Cups, and was the first Defenseman to lead the NHL in scoring; which he did twice!  Orr transformed what Defenseman could do, and some will argue that he is not just the greatest blueliner of all-time, but the best hockey player ever!  

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1979.

Tony Esposito, Chicago Blackhawks, Goalie:  38-17-8 Record, 2.17 GAA, 14.7 GPS: 1970

Esposito played 13 Games the previous year with the Montreal Canadiens and the Blackhawks claimed him in the Intraleague Draft (basically, waivers).  Esposito had a monster rookie year where he led the NHL in Wins (38), Save Percentage (.932) and Shutouts (15) and he was a First Team All-Star and a Vezina Trophy win. Esposito played his entire career with Chicago and he went on to win two more Vezina, two First Team All-Stars and two Second Team All-Stars.  The Goalie would have 302 career Wins.

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1988.

Gilbert Perreault, Buffalo Sabres, Centre:  38 G, 34 A, 72 P, 6.5 GPS: 1971

Perreault was the first Buffalo Sabre to win the Calder, and two years later he won the Lady Byng.  The French-Canadian played his entire career with Buffalo where he was a two-time Second Team All-Star and exceed the 100 Point mark twice. Perreault scored 1,326 Points over 1,191 Games.

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1990.

Ken Dryden, Montreal Canadiens, Goalie:  39-8-15 Record, 2.24 GAA, 15.0 GPS: 1972

Dryden did this backwards, as he was already a legend BEFORE he completed his rookie year.  Late in the 1970/71 season, he replaced the injured Rogie Vachon, and he was astounding.  Dryden backstopped the Habs to a Stanley Cup win where he won the Conn Smythe, thus becoming the first player to win the Conn Smythe before the Calder.  In that Calder Trophy winning season, he was a Second Team All-Star, the runner-up for the Hart and the league-leader in Wins (39). Dryden played until 1979 where he led the NHL three more times in Wins, five First Team All-Stars, five Vezinas, and five more Stanley Cups.  Dryden was the top Goalie of the 1970s and he had a career record 258-57-74 with a 2.24 GAA.

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1983.

Denis Potvin, New York Islanders, Defenseman:  17 G, 37 A, 54 P, 8.7 PS: 1974

Easily the best Defenseman in Islanders history, Potvin was the first player in Long Island to win the Calder and he was the first building block that would become the Islanders dynasty in the early 1980s. Potvin played all 15 years of his career with New York, was a First Team All-Star five times, two Second Team All-Stars and won three Norris Trophies.  He scored 1,052 career Points.

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1991.

Bryan Trottier, New York Islanders, Centre:  32 G, 63 A, 95 P, 8.6 PS: 1976

Above was the first piece of the Islanders dynasty, Denis Potvin.  Here is the second one, Bryan Trottier.  The Centre set a then record for rookies with 95 Points, and he would become one of the top scorers in the NHL.  Trottier would win the Hart and Art Ross in 1978/79, and the year after he won the Conn Smythe in New York’s first of four straight Stanley Cups.  A two-time First Team and two-time Second Team All-Star, Trottier played the late stages of his career with the Pittsburgh Penguins, where he won two Stanley Cups as an elder statesman.  Trottier scored 524 Goals and 1,425 Points.

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1997.

Mike Bossy, New York Islanders, Right Wing:  32 G, 63 A, 95 P, 8.6 PS: 1976

This of this for a second.  With the Calder win of Bossy, there were three Islander Calder winners in a five-year period, all of whom would enter the Hockey Hall of Fame.  Is it any wonder that this trio led the Islanders a four-Cup dynasty?  Bossy was the first Calder winner to net over 50 Goals, and was a Second Team All-Star.  Bossy went on to win two Goal-scoring titles, five First Team All-Stars, three Lady Byngs and a Conn Smyth.  Injuries forced him out at the age of 30, but he still retired with 573 Goals and 1,126 Points.

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1990.

Ray Bourque, Boston Bruins, Defenseman:  32 G, 63 A, 95 P, 8.6 PS: 1980

Bourque was a First Team All-Star as a rookie, and he earned that honor 12 more times in his career.  Also, a three-time Second Team All-Star, Bourque won the Norris Trophy five times, and he NEVER had a year where he did not finish at least seventh in voting.  Bourque was Boston hockey for nearly two decades, but he never won the Stanley Cup as a Bruin.  In what would be his penultimate NHL season, Bourque was traded to Colorado to chase the Holy Grail of Hockey.  The season after that trade, Bourque and the Avalanche won the Cup, and as happy as Denver was, Boston fans were just as happy for their beloved former star.  In a 21-year career, the Montreal native scored 1,579 Points, the most ever by a Defenseman.

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2004.

Peter Stastny, Quebec Nordiques, Centre:  39 G, 70 A, 109 P, 8.6 PS: 1981

This was a groundbreaking Calder Trophy win. Peter Stastny was the first Quebec Nordique/Colorado Avalanche to win, the first from a former WHA team to win, the first to score over 100 Points, but most importantly, he was the first European to win the Calder.  Stastny was a superstar for the Czechoslovakian National Team and he defected to Canada to play for the Nordiques.  Stastny had six more 100 Point years (all with Quebec) and had 1,239 over his 15 NHL seasons.  

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1998.

Dale Hawerchuk, Winnipeg Jets, Centre:  45 G, 58 A, 103 P, 8.6 PS: 1981

From one former WHA team to another we go from Quebec City to Winnipeg, with Dale Hawerchuk, the first superstar for the team in their NHL era.  Hawerchuk had 103 Points as a rookie, and hit the three-digit Point mark five more times, all as a Jet.  Hawerchuk was a Second Team All-Star in 1984/85 and he was second behind Wayne Gretzky for the Hart.  Also playing for Buffalo, St. Louis and Philadelphia, Hawerchuk scored 1,409 Points in 1,188 Games.  

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2001.

Mario Lemieux, Pittsburgh Penguins, Centre:  43 G, 57 A, 100 P, 7.5 PS: 1985

Mario Lemieux is a player who saved an NHL franchise twice.  The first was in his Calder season where he instantly lived up to the hype, and became at one time the best player in the league.  Remember, this was no small task, as it was Wayne Gretzky who he had to dethrone.  Lemieux captured the Hart Trophy three times, the Art Ross six times, and was a First Team All-Star five times.  Lemieux took the Pens to two Stanley Cup wins, he overcame cancer, and then he saves the team again.  With the Penguins in financial despair, he worked out the remaining money owed to him and worked out a deal to buy the team.  He played again, becoming the first owner/player in the modern era, and as an owner he won three more Cups.  Lemieux scored 1,723 Points in 915 Games.

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1997.

Luc Robitaille, Los Angeles Kings, Left Wing:  45 G, 39 A, 84 P, 6.8 PS: 1985

Robitaille was a Second Team All-Star as a rookie, and he would be a First Team All-Star five of the next six seasons.  The Left Wing exceeded the 100 Point plateau four times and while he played most of his career with Los Angeles, he won a Stanley Cup with the Detroit Red Wings in 2002.  Robitaille also played for the Penguins and the Rangers, and he scored 1,394 career Points, 1,154 of which as a King.

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2009.

Joe Niewendyk, Calgary Flames, Centre:  51 G, 41 A, 92 P, 8.7 PS: 1988

It is possible to claim that Nieuwendyk’s Calder winning season was his best regular season in hockey.  He scored 51 Goals, his career-best and he tied that mark as a sophomore.  Nieuwendyk also was first in Power Play Goals as a rookie.  If it is in fact the case that Nieuwendyk never matched his skill level in his first two years like other Calder winners, the Centre did however remain at a high tier for years and he amassed a long career where he scored 1,126 Points.  Niewendyk helped take Calgary to a Stanley Cup win in 1989 and later in a renaissance performance in 1999, he won the cup again as a Dallas Star where he won the Conn Smythe.  He also played for New Jersey, Toronto and Florida.

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2011.

Brian Leetch, New York Rangers, Defense:  23 G, 48 A, 71 P, 9.0 PS: 1989

One of the best American Defenseman in hockey history, Leetch was also the best blueliner in the team history of the New York Rangers.  With New York, Leetch was a two-time Norris Trophy winner, was a two-time First Team All-Star and a three-time Second Team All-Star.  These were great things to put in a trophy case, but it was the Conn Smythe Trophy he won when he anchored that Rangers to the 1994 Stanley Cup. Leetch would play until 2006 and scored 1,028 Points, 981 of which were as a Ranger.

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2009.

Sergei Makarov, Calgary Flames, Right Wing:  24 G, 62 A, 86 P, 6.8 PS: 1990

It was not that Sergei Makarov did not deserve the Calder.  Statistically speaking, he did.  The backlash was that he as 31 Years Old, and a top flight player from the Soviet Red Army, so his experience level was through the roof.  Makarov is the only player to win the Calder Trophy, who did so AFTER his peak.  He played in the NHL until 1997 with 384 career Points.  Makarov entered the Hockey Hall but it was mostly for his work in the former Soviet Union.

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2016.

Ed Belfour, Chicago Blackhawks, Goalie:  43-19-7 Record, 2.47 GAA, 14.0 GPS: 1991

Belfour’s rookie season would not just see him win the Calder, as he was also the Vezina Trophy winner, William M. Jennings winner, and a First Team All-Star.  Belfour led all the Goalies in Wins (43), Saves (1,713), Save Percentage (.910) and Goals Against Average (2.47).  Belfour went on to win another Vezina, three more Jennings, a First Team All-Star, a Second Team All-Star and a Stanley Cup with the Dallas Stars.  The Goalie also played for San Jose, Toronto and Florida.  Belfour had a career record of 484-320-126.

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2011.

Pavel Bure, Vancouver Canucks, Right Wing:  34 G, 26 A, 60 P, 5.7 PS: 1992

After a good rookie year, Bure but up back-to-back 60 Goal years, the second one being good enough to lead the NHL, and land him a First Team All-Star nod.  Bure later played for Florida, where he had two more league-leading seasons in Goals, both of which were Second Team All-Star worthy.  Bure finished his NHL career in 2003, and he had 779 Points in only 702 Games.

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2012.

Teemu Selanne, Winnipeg Jets, Right Wing:  76 G, 56 A, 132 P, 13.4 PS: 1993

A case can be made that Teemu Selanne’s debut season was the best ever by a non-Gaolie.  Selanne set a rookie record with 76 Goals, and he was a First Team All-Star.  Selanne never matched that total, but he had a long and fruitful career, where he led the NHL twice more in Goals, was a First Team All-Star a second time, was a two-time Second Team All-Star, and a Stanley Cup Champion with the Ducks. Selanne also played for San Jose and Colorado, and would score 1,457 Points over his 21-year career.

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2017.

Martin Brodeur, New Jersey Devils, Goalie:  27-11-8 Record, 8.9 GPS: 1994

The career of Martin Brodeur is nothing short of outstanding.  Following his Calder win, he captured three Stanley Cups, four Vezina Trophies, five William M. Jennings Trophies, and was a three-time First Team and Second Team All-Star.  Brodeur led the NHL in Wins nine times, and was the league-leader in GAA once.  When Brodeur retired, he had the “W” 691 times, more than anyone Goalie. And he is also the all-time leader in Saves (28,928), Shutouts (125) and Minutes Played (74,439).

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2018.

Peter Forsberg, Quebec Nordiques, Centre:  15 G, 35 A, 50 P, 5.0 GPS: 1995

Eric Lindros refused to play for the Quebec Nordiques when they drafted him and after sitting out a year, Quebec traded him to Philadelphia for a glut of picks, players and the rights to a Swedish Center named Peter Forsberg.  We can argue that Forsberg was the best player in the transaction.  Forsberg went on to help Colorado (Quebec relocated) win two Stanley Cups and individually he won the Hart and Art Ross Trophy in 2002/03. He was also a three-time First Team All-Star and he retired with 885 Points in only 708 Games.  Forsberg also played for Philadelphia and Nashville.

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2014.

 

The following are the players who have won the Calder Trophy who are eligible for the Hockey Hall of Fame and have not been selected:

Russ Blinco, Montreal Maroons, Center: 14 G, 9 A, 23 P, 4.1 PS 1934

Unless the Montreal Maroons are suddenly resurrected, Russ Blinco will be the only member of this long defunct franchise to win the Calder.  Blinco would help the Maroons win the Stanley Cup the following year, where he was also the runner-up for the Lady Byng.  He played for Montreal three more years, and had one more season with the Chicago Blackhawks before he retired.  Blinco had 125 Points over his six-year career.

Eligible since 1942.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Mike Karakas, Chicago Blackhawks, Goalie: 21-19-8 Record, 1.85 GAA, 9.5 GPS 1936  

Karakas made history as the first American born and raised to win the Calder, and he was also the first Goalie to win the award. For that matter, he was also the first American born and raised Goalie in the NHL.  Karakas would play until 1946, with all but five of his games played in a Chicago uniform.  He won a Stanley Cup in 1938.

Eligible since 1949.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Cully Dahlstrom, Chicago Blackhawks, Centre: 10 G, 9 A, 19 P, 1.3 PS 1938        

Dahlstrom made it back-to-back for American born Calder winners, and the Centre would play his entire eight-year career with the Blackhawks.  The Calder would be the only individual honor that Dahlstrom would win on the professional level, but his name was etched on the Stanley Cup when Chicago won it all in 1938.  Dahlstrom scored 206 Points in 345 career Games.

Eligible since 1948.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Kilby MacDonald, New York Rangers, Centre: 15 G, 13 A, 28 P, 3.8 PS 1938        

The sky might have seemed to be the limit for Kilby MacDonald, as he not only won the Calder Trophy, he also hoisted the Stanley Cup over his head in his rookie season.  That would not be the case for MacDonald, who never matched his rookie year, and was sent down to the minors shortly after before joining the Canadian Army. He made it back to the Rangers in 1943, playing two more years before going back to the minors.  MacDonald only had 79 career Points.

Eligible since 1948.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

John Quilty, Montreal Canadiens, Centre: 18 G, 16 A, 34 P, 3.9 PS 1941    

Quilty’s rookie year was by far his best, as he never came close to these numbers again.  World War II would see Quilty leave the NHL for the Canadian Army, and he missed several years, returning for three Games in 1946-47.  He played only one more year in the NHL, splitting time between Montreal and Boston, but he was not playing at an NHL worthy level. A compound fracture of his leg resulted in his retirement, and Quilty would only have 70 career Points.

Eligible since 1951.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Grant Warwick, New York Rangers, Right Wing: 16 G, 17 A, 33 P, 3.0 PS 1942     

Like the previous two Calder winners, Grant Warwick likely won’t get into the Hockey Hall of Fame, however unlike those two individuals, Warwick did not peak as a rookie.  The Saskatchewan native would not miss time due to World War II, and he exceeded his rookie Point total six times.  Warwick would also play for Boston and Montreal in his career, and in 1955, he was the player/coach on the Canadian Team that won the World Hockey Championship.  The Right Wing scored 289 career Points.

Eligible since 1953.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Gaye Stewart, Toronto Maple Leafs, Left Wing: 24 G, 23 A, 47 P, 4.0 PS 1943      

After Gaye Stewart won the Calder (and the Stanley Cup), he went into the Canadian Military to serve in World War II.  The Left Winger came back for the 1945/46 Season and promptly built on his rookie year as if he never left, leading the NHL in Goals (37) was a First Team All-Star, and was the runner-up for the Hart. Stewart’s production dipped the following year, but he helped Toronto win another Stanley Cup.  After a poor start in 1947/48 he was traded to Chicago and rebounded with a Second Team-All-Star nod, which was the last one he had.  He would later play for Detroit, New York and Montreal, and had 344 Points in his nine-year career.

Eligible since 1956.  Ranked #145 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Gus Bodnar, Toronto Maple Leafs, Centre: 22 G, 40 A, 62 P, 4.5 PS 1944    

Bodnar likely got an early opportunity to earn an NHL spot due to the World War II depletion of talent.  That might be why he never eclipsed his rookie totals, but he had a long 12-year career and won two Stanley Cup Rings (1945 & 1947) with the Toronto Maple Leafs.  Bodnar also played for Chicago and Boston, and he would accumulate 397 Points.

Eligible since 1958.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Frank McCool, Toronto Maple Leafs, Goalie: 24-22-4, 3.22 GAA, 10.1 GPS 1945   

There may never be another player who won the Calder Trophy who had a career as brief as Frank McCool.  Playing at Goalie, McCool was the third straight Maple Leaf to win the Calder, and this year he backstopped Toronto to a Stanley Cup win. He played only 22 Games the following year, only to retire abruptly due to severe ulcers.  We can’t imagine another Calder winner with only 72 Games Played in his career.

Eligible since 1949.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Howie Meeker, Toronto Maple Leafs, Right Wing: 27 G, 18 A, 45 P, 5.3 GPS: 1947        

Meeker was the fourth Maple Leaf in five years to win the Calder, and his 45 Point year turned out to be the best of his career. Meeker would win the Stanley Cup as a rookie, and twice again in 1948 and 1951.  Meeker would go onto greater fame as a broadcaster in Hockey night in Canada as an analyst for over twenty-five years.  He would score 185 Points over 346 Games.

Eligible since 1958.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Jim McFadden, Detroit Red Wings, Centre: 24 G, 24 A, 48 P, 5.7 GPS: 1948        

McFadden became the first Detroit Red Wing to win the Calder, and like so many before him, the Centre set personal bests in scoring (48) as a rookie.  McFadden won the Stanley Cup with Detroit in 1950, and he would also play for the Blackhawks.  His NHL career ended in 1954, and he would score 226 Points over seven seasons.

Eligible since 1957.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Pentti Lund, New York Rangers, Right Wing: 14 G, 16 A, 30 P, 2.6 PS: 1949         

Here is something you wouldn’t think was true. The first Scandinavian born player to win a major individual award took place before 1950.  Granted, that player was Finnish-born Pentti Lund, who immigrated to Canada as a six-year-old, so it doesn’t count for the most part, but he was the first nevertheless.  Lund never won another accolade in the NHL, and he lasted a total of five seasons, three with New York and two with Boston.  He would score 77 Points in his career.

Eligible since 1956.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Jack Gelineau, Boston Bruins, Goalie: 22-30-15, 3.28 GAA, 7.3 GPS: 1950  

Gelineau played four games for the Bruins in 1948/49 and took over as the top netminder for the Boston Bruins the following year, where despite the losing record, he had a good rookie year keeping the Bruins competitive.  Gelineau had an even better sophomore year, but when he sought a raise from Bruins ownership he was rebuffed.  Rather than stay in Boston, he returned to his native province of Quebec, where he played a few years in the provincial league for a few seasons, save for two games in 1954 with Chicago.

Eligible since 1956.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Camille Henry, New York Rangers, Centre: 24 G, 15 A, 39 P, 5.4 PS: 1954  

20 of Henry’s 24 Goals were on the power play, and it was enough to lead the NHL.  Henry struggled the next two seasons, and was demoted to the minors.  He returned to again lead the NHL in Power Play Goals twice, and in 1957/58 he was a Second Team All-Star and Lady Bing winner. Henry played most of his career with New York, finishing his professional run with Chicago and St. Louis. He would have 478 Points.

Eligible since 1973.  Ranked #201 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Ed Litzenberger, Montreal Canadiens and Chicago Blackhawks, Centre: 23 G, 28 A, 51 P, 5.8 PS: 1955   

It was a unique rookie year for Litzenberger, who began the year as a Montreal Canadian, but was donated early in the season to the Chicago Blackhawks in an effort to help save the team from folding. Litzenberger played 29 Games that year in Montreal, scoring 11 Points, but he went on to have 40 Points in 44 Games to conclude the season in Chicago.  Litzenberger went on to have three 60-plus years with the Blackhawks, and would win four Stanley Cups; one with Chicago and three with the Toronto Maple Leafs.  He retired with 416 career Points.

Eligible since 1967.  Ranked #190 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Ralph Backstrom, Montreal Canadiens, Centre: 18 G, 22 A, 40 P, 3.8 PS: 1959    

In Backstrom’s Calder Trophy winning year with the Montreal Canadiens, he was a member of the Stanley Cup Championship Team. Providing good two-way hockey for years, Backstrom won five more Cup with the Habs.  He would later play for Los Angeles and Chicago, before moving to the WHA with stints with Chicago, Denver, Ottawa and New England. Backstrom had 639 NHL Points and 253 WHA Points. 

Eligible since 1980.  Ranked #33 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Bobby Rousseau, Montreal Canadiens, Right Wing: 21 G, 24 A, 45 P, 4.5 PS: 1962        

In his rookie year, Bobby Rousseau had four Short-Handed Goals, which was enough to lead the NHL.  Rousseau did not do that again, but he found a niche in the powerful Montreal Canadiens team that won four Stanley Cups in the 1960s. During his stint in Montreal, Rousseau was a Second Team All-Star and league-leader in Assists in 1965/66. When the decade ended, Rousseau was a Minnesota North Star for one season and a New York Ranger for four before retiring in 1975.  Bobby Rousseau Rousseau scored 703 Points over a 942-Game career.

Eligible since 1978.  Ranked #158 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Kent Douglas, Toronto Maple Leafs, Defenseman: 7 G, 15 A, 22 P, 6.6 PS: 1963   

It took 30 years for the Calder Trophy to be awarded to a Defenseman, and again it went to a Toronto Maple Leaf.  A relatively late arrival to the NHL (he was 26), Douglas led the NHL in Defensive Point Shares as a rookie (5.1), but it would be the only time he would do so.  Douglas won the Stanley Cup as a rookie, and technically did two more times, but he was not on those post-season rosters, which reflects that his best season was as a rookie.  He would also play for Oakland, Detroit and the New York Raiders of the WHA.  

Eligible since 1976.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com

Roger Crozier, Detroit Red Wings, Goalie: 40-22-7 Record, 2.42 GAA, 14.4 PS: 1965     

Roger Crozier did not just win the Calder, as he was a First Team All-Star, and the NHL leader in Wins (40), Shutouts (6) and Goalie Point Shares (14.4).  The Red Wings Goalie would take the Red Wings to the Stanley Cup Finals the next season against the heavily favored Montreal Canadiens.  Montreal won, but Crozier was spectacular and he became the first Conn Smythe winner on a losing team.  Crozier’s career went downhill after, but he played until 1977 with stints in Buffalo and Washington.  He had a career record of 206-194-72.

Eligible since 1980.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com

Brit Selby, Toronto Maple Leafs, Left Wing: 14 G, 13 A, 27 P, 2.0 PS: 1966

While there were many Calder winners who had much shorter careers than Brit Selby, it is hard to argue that he was the worst player to win the award.  With only 2.0 Point Shares in his Calder year (nearly half of his career 4.3), Selby was sent back to the minors and was not a member of the Leafs 1967 Stanley Cup win. The next year, he was a member of the expansion Philadelphia Flyers, and he would later play again for Toronto, St. Louis and the WHA’s Quebec Nordiques, New England Whalers and Toronto Toros.  He would have 117 career NHL Points and 74 Points in the WHA.

Eligible since 1978.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com

Derek Sanderson, Boston Bruins, Centre: 24 G, 25 A, 49 P, 4.8 PS: 1968     

After his good Calder year, Sanderson would have a long career (mostly with the Boston Bruins), and while he was a good player, the tough guy’s good looks and fame were much higher than his on-ice skill. He would help Boston win two Stanley Cups.  His hard-partying lifestyle held his career back, but he did score 452 Points in a career that also saw Sanderson play for the New York Rangers, St. Louis, Vancouver and Pittsburgh.  

Eligible since 1981.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Danny Grant, Minnesota North Stars, Left Wing: 34 G, 31 A, 65 P, 5.6 PS: 1969   

Grant played 22 Games the year before with Montreal, where he was a member of the Canadiens’ Stanley Cup Championship Team. He did not exceed rookie limits, thus was able for the Calder in 1969, though he was now a Minnesota North Star, as the Hans had traded him.  With this Calder win, Grant was the first Calder winner from an Expansion Team. Grant would go on to play in three All-Star Games, scoring 536 Points in a career that also extended to Detroit and Los Angeles.  

Eligible since 1982.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Steve Vickers, New York Rangers, Left Wing: 30 G, 23 A, 53 P, 5.9 PS: 1973        

Vickers played his entire NHL career with the New York Rangers, and had at least 30 Goals in his first four seasons.  Two seasons after his Calder Trophy win, Vickers was a Second Team All-Star, and would score 586 career Points over a ten-year career.  

Eligible since 1985.  Ranked #247 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Eric Vail, Atlanta Flames, Left Wing: 39 G, 21 A, 60 P, 6.1 PS: 1975   

In between the Calder wins of Hall of Famers, Denis Potvin and Bryan Trottier was Eric Vail, the first of two Calder winners when the Flames were located in Atlanta.  Vail had a decent career with three 60-plus Point years in his career that generated 476 Points.    

Eligible since 1985.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Willi Plett, Atlanta Flames, Right Wing: 33 G, 23 A, 66 P, 4.8 PS: 1977       

Plett became the second Atlanta Flame, and also the second Flame to earn the Calder in between future Islanders Hall of Famers (Trottier and Mike Bossy).  While Plett went on to score a respectable 437 Points in the NHL, he would be known more for his pugilistic skills, amassing 2,570 Penalty Minutes.    

Eligible since 1991.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Bobby Smith, Minnesota North Stars, Centre: 30 G, 44 A, 74 P, 5.0 PS: 1979       

A four-time All-Star, Smith had a good career, peaking with a 114-Point year in 1981-82.  The Centre had nine 70-plus years and would have a Stanley Cup win with the Montreal Canadiens in 1996.  Smith had 1,036 career Points in 1,077 Games.    

Eligible since 1985.  Ranked #31 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Steve Larmer, Chicago Blackhawks, Right Wing: 43 G, 47 A, 90 P, 8.4 PS: 1983   

Larmer was with Chicago for all but his last two seasons, and the Right Wing would tie or exceed his 90 Point rookie year total tice more and from 1982/83 to 1992/93 he would also have at least 70 Points. Larmer accumulated 1,012 Points.

Eligible since 1998.  Ranked #32 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Tom Barrasso, Buffalo Sabres, Goalie: 26-12-3 Record, 7.5 PS: 1984   

Barrasso had a phenomenal rookie campaign where he not only won the Calder, he was a Vezina winner and First Team All-Star. The American Goalie was a Second Team All-Star and a William M. Jennings winner in his second season, and he was only 20!   Barrasso had a long career afterward, though he was never again won a Vezina. Barrasso would win two Stanley Cups with Pittsburgh, and he was also a Second Team All-Star there.  The Goalie also played for Ottawa, Carolina, Toronto and St. Louis and he had a career record of 369-277-86.   

Eligible since 2006.  Ranked #18 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Gary Suter, Calgary Flames, Defense: 18 G, 50 A, 68 P, 8.0 PS: 1986  

Gary Suter was the first of two Calgary Flames to win the Calder in the 1980s (the other being Joe Nieuwendyk) and he was the first American blueliner to win the trophy.  Suter helped Calgary win the Stanley Cup in 1989, and the year before he was a Second Team All-Star.  Suter also played with Chicago and San Jose, and he would have 844 Points over his 17 NHL seasons.

Eligible since 2005.  Ranked #35 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Daniel Alfredsson, Ottawa Senators, Right Wing: 26 G, 35 A, 61 P, 5.3 PS: 1996  

Daniel Alfredsson was the first Calder winner for the Ottawa Senators, and is safe to say that he was the best player in the team’s resurrection.  Alfredsson was a Second Team All-Star in 2005/06, and he would also win the King Clancy and Mark Messier Leadership Award.  With the exception of his final season in Detroit, Alfredsson was a career Senator and he scored 1,157 Points in his career.

Eligible since 2017.  Ranked #5 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Bryan Berard, New York Islanders, Defense: 8 G, 40 A, 48 P, 7.6 PS: 1997   

Berard played ten years in the NHL, which was incredible considering he almost lost an eye early in his career.  That injury occurred early in his career, and impeded what could have been a great career.  Still, the Defenseman had 323 career Points and won the Bill Masterton Award in 2004.

Eligible since 2011.   Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.

Sergei Samsonov, Boston Bruins, Left Wing: 22 G, 25 A, 47 P, 5.5 PS: 1998         

From Moscow, Samsonov never ascended to superstar status, but this was a really good player for a long time.  The Left Wing played for Boston, Edmonton, Montreal. Chicago, Carolina and Florida and scored a respectable 571 career Points.

Eligible since 2014.  Ranked #282 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Chris Drury, Colorado Avalanche, Centre: 20 G, 24 A, 44 P, 5.0 PS: 1999    

Two years after he won the Calder, Drury helped the Avalanche win their second NBA Title.  Drury was a good two-way player, and he also played for Buffalo and the New York Rangers over a 615-Point career.

Eligible since 2014.  Ranked #296 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Scott Gomez, New Jersey Devils, Centre: 19 G, 51 A, 70 P, 7.3 PS: 2000     

Gomez would win the Stanley Cup as a rookie, and again in 2003, both of which with the New Jersey Devils.  The Alaskan would also play for the Rangers, Montreal, San Jose, Florida, St. Louis and Ottawa with 655 career Points.

Eligible since 2019.  Ranked #249 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Evegeni Nabokov, San Jose Sharks, Goalie: 32-21-7 Record, 11.7 PS: 2001

Nabokov became the first San Jose Shark and the first Russian Goalie to win the Calder.  Nabokov was a First Team All-Star in 2008, and would have a career record of 353-227-86 in a career mostly with San Jose.

Eligible since 2018.  Ranked #122 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Dany Heatley, Atlanta Thrashers, Right Wing: 26 G, 41 A, 67 P, 6.8 PS: 2002      

Heatley will go down in history as the only Atlanta Thrasher to win the Calder.  He was the driver in an accident that killed his teammate, and needing a change of scenery, he was traded to the Ottawa Senators where he a one-time First Team and Second Team All-Star.  Heatley also played for San Jose, Minnesota and Anaheim and had 791 Points.

Eligible since 2018.  Ranked #108 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Barrett Jackman, St. Louis Blues, Defense: 3 G, 16 A, 19 P, 5.4 PS: 2003    

The Calder Trophy would be the only award that Jackman would win, or even receive a vote for, but this was stay-at-home defenseman who knew his role and did it well.  The Defenseman played 13 years with the Blues, and one final one with Nashville.

Eligible since 2019.  Unrankedon Notinhalloffame.com.

Andrew Raycroft, Boston Bruins, Goalie: 29-18-9 Record, 2.05 GAA, 12.6 PS: 2004      

This was the best season of Raycroft’s career, and he only ever had one good year again, which was when he was with Toronto. Raycroft also played for Colorado, Vancouver and Dallas, and had a record of 113-114-27 upon retirement.

Eligible since 2015.  Unrankedon Notinhalloffame.com.

Let’s update our tally, shall we?        

Award in Question

Percentage of recipients who have entered the HOF

Percentage of recipients by year who have entered the HOF.

NBA MVP

100%

100%

NHL Art Ross

100%

100%

NBA Finals MVP

91.3%

94.9%

NHL Norris

90.5%

96.4%

NBA All-Star Game MVP

89.5%

91.7%

NHL Conn Smythe

74.2%

85.4%

NFL Bert Bell Award

73.7%

71.4%

NFL AP Offensive Player of the Year

73.1%

79.4%

NFL AP MVP

68.3%

74.0%

NFL Walter Payton Man of the Year

66.7%

66.7%

NHL Lady Byng

63.8%

76.0%

NFL Defensive Player of the Year

60.8%

71.1%

NFL Super Bowl MVP

60.6%

64.9%

NBA Defensive Player of the Year

58.3%

56.5%

NHL Vezina

57.1%

66.3%

NBA Rookie of the Year

56.5%

56.5%

MLB MVP

55.0%

60.2%

NFL Pro Bowl MVP

52.3%

54.8%

MLB Lou Gehrig Award

51.9%

51.9%

MLB Roberto Clemente Award

47.4%

47.4%

NHL Calder Trophy

46.5%

46.5%

NBA J. Walter Kennedy Citizenship Award

46.0%

46.0%

MLB/NL/AL Cy Young Award

44.4%

55.4%

MLB Babe Ruth Award

37.0%

39.3%

NHL King Clancy Award

36.8%

36.8%

NHL Frank J. Selke Trophy

33.3%

36.7%

MLB World Series MVP

33.3%

36.8%

MLB Hutch Award

33.1%

33.1%

NFL Offensive Rookie of the Year

28.6%

28.6%

NHL Bill Masterton Memorial Trophy

27.9%

27.9%

MLB Edgar Martinez Award

26.7%

17.2%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Designated Hitter)

25.0%

30.8%

MLB Comeback Player of the Year

25.0%

25.0%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Shortstop)

23.5%

52.6%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove

21.7%

36.8%

NFL Defensive Rookie of the Year

20.6%

20.6%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Catcher)

20.0%

22.5%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Second Base)

18.8%

39.8%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Shortstop)

18.2%

35.1%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Pitcher)

18.2%

20.1%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Second Base)

16.7%

32.7%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Outfield)

16.7%

30.1%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Outfield)

15.7%

25.2%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Third Base)

14.3%

14.3%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Third Base)

13.6%

14.3%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (First Base)

13.6%

13.3%

MLB (NL/AL) Rookie of the Year

13.3%

13.3%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Catcher)

10.3%

15.2%

NBA Most Improved Player of the Year

5.3%

3.2%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (First Base)

3.8%

3.2%

NFL AP Comeback Player of the Year

0.0%

0.0%

So, who is up next?

The following are the players who have won the Calder Trophy in the NHL who have retired but have not met the mandatory years out of the game to qualify for the Hockey Hall of Fame:

Steve Mason, Columbus Blue Jackets, 33-20-7 Record, 2.29 GAA, 11.2 GPS, 2009

In his rookie season, Mason was a Second Team All-Star, was the runner-up for the Vezina and was fourth in Hart voting. Mason never replicated that year, but did have a ten-year run where he also played for Philadelphia and Winnipeg. He retired with a career record of 205-183-64.

Eligible in 2021.

The following are the players who have won the Calder Trophy who are still active.

Alex Ovechkin, Washington Capitals, Centre: 52 G, 54 A, 106 P, 12.7 PS 2006

The Russian is easily the best European star of his generation and he was a First Team All-Star as a rookie.  Since that time, he has been a First Team All-Star five times and won the Hart three times.  The future Hall of Famer took the Capitals to their first Stanley Cup in 2018.

34 Years Old,Playing for the Washington Capitals.

Evgeni Malkin, Pittsburgh Penguins, Centre: 52 G, 54 A, 106 P, 12.7 PS 2007

Malkin was the second Russian Centre to win the Calder in a row, and how fitting is that Malkin played for Pittsburgh, a rival of Alex Ovechkin’s Washington Capitals.  Since his Calder win, Malkin has won three Stanley Cups, a Hart and two Art Ross Trophies.  He is already a member of the 1,000 Point club.

33 Years Old,Playing for the Pittsburgh Penguins.

Patrick Kane, Chicago Blackhawks, Right Wing: 21 G, 51 A, 72 P, 7.2 PS, 2008

Since his Calder win, Kane won the Hart Trophy and led Chicago to three Stanley Cups.  Kane is already a member of the 1,000 Point Club, has three First Team All-Stars, and an Art Ross Trophy on his mantle.

32 Years Old,Playing for the Chicago Blackhawks.

Tyler Myers, Buffalo Sabres, Defense: 11 G, 37 A, 48 P, 9.8 PS, 2010

After that good rookie year, Myers has yet to replicate that success and his 48 Points and 9.8 Point Shares remain career-highs.

30 Years Old,Playing for the Vancouver Canucks.

Jeff Skinner, Carolina Hurricanes, Left Wing: 31 G, 32 A, 63 P, 8.1 PS, 2011

Jeff Skinner has matched his rookie output of 63 Points twice but has yet to exceed it.

28 Years Old,Playing for the Buffalo Sabres.

Gabriel Landeskog, Colorado Avalanche, Left Wing: 22 G, 30 A, 52 P, 6.8 PS, 2012

Gabriel Landeskog has had a good career thus far that has been spent entirely with the Avalanche.  He has had six 50-plus Point years, but nothing higher than 75 Points.

28 Years Old,Playing for the Colorado Avalanche.

Jonathan Huberdeau, Florida Panthers, Center: 14 G, 17 A, 31 P, 3.3 PS, 2013

Jonathan Huberdeau is the first Panther to win the Calder and he was an All-Star in 2020.

27 Years Old,Playing for the Florida Panthers.

Nathan MacKinnon, Colorado Avalanche, Center: 24 G, 39 A, 63 P, 7.7 PS, 2014

Since his Calder season, MacKinnon went on a current three-year 90-Point streak.  He was an All-Star in 2002, and was the runner-up for the Hart in 2018.

25 Years Old,Playing for the Colorado Avalanche.

Aaron Ekblad, Florida Panthers, Defense: 12 G, 27 A, 39 P, 8.5 PS, 2015

Aaron Ekblad became the second Florida Panther in three seasons to win the Calder.  He has participated in two All-Star Games since.

24 Years Old,Playing for the Florida Panthers.

Artemi Panerin, Chicago Blackhawks, Left Wing: 30 G, 47 A, 77 P, 9.8 PS, 2016

Following his rookie year, Panerin was a Second Team All-Star and is coming off of a 95 Point season in his first year in New York.

29 Years Old,Playing for the New York Rangers.

Auston Matthews, Toronto Maple Leafs, Center: 40 G, 29 A, 69 P, 9.7 PS, 2017

In Matthews’ rookie year, his 32 Even-Strength Goals led the NHL. He would do so again with 35 in 2019-20.

22 Years Old,Playing for the Toronto Maple Leafs.

Matthew Barzal, New York Islanders, Center: 22 G, 63 A, 85 P, 8.2 PS, 2018

Barzal’s Calder Trophy winning season is to date his best in his young NHL career.

23 Years Old,Playing for the New York Islanders.

Elias Pettersson, Vancouver Canucks, Center: 28 G, 38 A, 66 P, 7.8 PS, 2019

Pettersson has been with the Canucks for two seasons and played in the All-Star Game in both years.

22 Years Old,Playing for the Vancouver Canucks.

Doesn’t it feel like the Calder means more than other league Rookies of the Year?

For the most part, winning the Calder reflects a great player, especially in the second half of this awards existence.

So, what is up next?

We stay with the NHL and look at the most important individual award in the NHL. The Hart Trophy.

As always, we thank you for your support, and look for that soon.

Read more...
Subscribe to this RSS feed