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Our All-Time Top 50 Baltimore Orioles are now up

Yes, we know that this is taking a while!

As many of you know, we here at Notinhalloffame.com are slowly generating the 50 of each major North American sports team.  We have a new one to unveil today, that of the Baltimore Orioles. 

The Baltimore Orioles were formed as a charter member of the American League in 1901, when they were the Milwaukee Brewers.  That only lasted one year, as they relocated to St. louis as the Browns.  While in St. Louis, the Browns had limited success, having only won one Pennant (1944), but fortunes changed when they relocated to Baltimore in 1954 and became the Orioles.

With a trade that brought them Frank Robinson, the Orioles won the World Series in 1966, and with a starting rotation based around Jim Palmer, the O’s won it again in 1970.  A young Cal Ripken Jr. would lead them to their third World Series in 1983, which is to date their last title.

As for all of our top 50 players in baseball we look at the following: 

1.  Advanced Statistics.

2.  Traditional statistics and how they finished in the American League.

3.  Playoff accomplishments.

4.  Their overall impact on the team and other intangibles not reflected in a stat sheet.

Remember, this is ONLY based on what a player does on that particular team and not what he accomplished elsewhere and also note that we have placed an increased importance on the first two categories.

This list is updated up until the end of the 2019 Season.

The complete list can be found here, but as always we announce our top five in this article.  They are:

1. Cal Ripken Jr.

2. Jim Palmer

3. Brooks Robinson

4. George Sisler

5. Eddie Murray

We will continue our adjustments on our existing lists and will continue developing our new lists.  

Look for our more material coming soon!

As always we thank you for your support.

  • Published in Baseball

19. Rafael Palmeiro

At the time of the infamous steroids trial, Rafael Palmeiro seemed to come off so good.  Of course when you are sitting next to a man who suddenly suffered from amnesia (Mark McGwire), a man who suddenly forgot the English language (Sammy Sosa) and the man who broke the “bro code” (Jose Canseco) a defiant and confident sounding Rafael Palmeiro could not help but look good.  A few months later, Palmeiro was suspended by Major League Baseball for testing positive for steroids.

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