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The 2018 Hockey HOF Futures are up

Recently, we here at Notinhalloffame.com unveiled our new (2016) list for our hockey section, naming Eric Lindros as the man most worthy of consideration for the Hockey Hall of Fame.

This came with an updated list, a few new entries (Alex Kovalev, Roman Hamrlik and Miroslav Satan) and a shuffling of positions based on your votes, emails and comments.

Now once we do the repositioning on the main section, we fee it is our duty to address and upload potential entries that will come up in coming years, and allow you to vote ahead of time, BEFORE it gets on to the list without receiving your input.

With that in mind, lets take a look at part 2 of 2 of our revised hockey futures shall we?

First off, the 2015 and 2016 Futures have been removed completely.  Those players who were in the sections previously but were not able to make the Top 100 (as they are all now eligible) are no longer featured on Notinhalloffame.com, that is unless we expand to 250, which we have discussed!

The 2018 Hockey Futures are up and includes:

Evgeni Nabokov, a Russian Goalie who was a two time All Star.

Martin Brodeur, the all-time NHL leader in Wins, three time Stanley Cup winner and two time Olympic Gold Medalist.

You know what to do next!

Check out this pair of goalies and let us know whether they are Hall of Fame material!



The 2018 Hockey HOF Futures have been updated

It is time for us to continue our expansion here at Notinhalloffame.com and as such we have to focus on a specific discipline. 

We are focusing currently of the world of Hockey and for us this means a solid look at the Hockey Hall of Fame futures.

With that in mind, we are pleased to announce additions to the 2018 Hockey Futures.

The following players will be eligible for the Hockey Hall of Fame in 2018:

Daniel Briere, a two time All Star.

Evgeni Nabakov, the 2001 Calder Trophy winner and two time All Star.

Ilya Bryzgalov, who was once a Second Team All Star.

Kimmo Timonen, a four time NHL All Star from Finland.

Martin Brodeur, a four time Vezina Trophy winner and three time Stanley Cup Champion.

Martin St. Louis, a former Stanley Cup Champion and former Hart Trophy winner.

Olli Jokinen, a one time All Star.

Sergei Gonchar, a four time All Star.

All of these players are up and awaiting your votes and opinions.

Thank you as always from us at Notinhalloffame.com.

Our Hockey List has been revised, Martin Brodeur now #1

It was not that long ago that the Hockey Hall of Fame selected four former National Hockey League players to their institution, all of which were ranked in our top ten on our Notinhalloffame.com Hockey List. They are Teemu Selanne (#1), Paul Kariya (#3), Mark Recchi (#4) and Dave Andreychuk (#10). As such it is time for us to present our new list of those to consider for the Hockey Hall of Fame for 2018.

When putting together any new list we obviously remove the recently inducted but add on those who we consider worthy. We also look at the opinions that all of you have given and the votes you cast on each former player on the list.

Let’s get right to it shall we?

Debuting on our list at #1 is Goalie, Martin Brodeur. The long time New Jersey Devil did it all in the NHL, including winning the Calder, the Vezina four times and winning three Stanley Cups and an Olympic Gold Medal. He should be a first ballot lock for the Hockey Hall of Fame.

Returning to #2 is Don Cherry, the acid tongued commentator who has been a fixture on Hockey Night in Canada for decades.

Martin St. Louis, the 2004 Hart & Art Ross Trophy winner makes his first appearance at #3. That same year he would lead the Tampa Bay Lightning to their first Stanley Cup win. He is also a three time winner of the Lady Byng Trophy.

Alexander Mogilny moved up to #4 from #6. The Russian had the most Goals in the 1992-93 season and is a six time All Star.

Former Calgary Flame, Theoren Fleury moved up two spots to his highest ever rank of #5. He was a seven time All Star.

Bernie Nicholls also achieved his highest rank with a move up to #6. He is a three time All Star.

Longtime Ottawa Senator, Daniel Alfredsson moves up to #7 and is in his second year of eligibility. The Swedish star was a six time All Star.

Nine time All Star Jeremy Roenick comes in at #8.

John LeClair makes his first appearance in the top ten holding #9 on the list. The Vermont born player is a two time First Team All Star.

Pierre Turgeon rounds out the top ten. The four time All Star makes his biggest jump from #14 to #10.

Brodeur and St. Louis are not the only ones to debut on the list this year. Former blueliner, Sergei Gonchar debuts at #27.

At present, the list goes up to 106 former players, with our intent

The entire revised list can be found here.

You know what we want you to do! Take a look at our revisions and give us your opinions!

Martin Brodeur and Martin St. Louis are named to the Hockey HOF

This is one of the days that we look forward to every year at Notinhalloffame.com as the Hockey Hall of Fame has announced the Class of 2018. This year’s class includes two former NHL players (Martin Brodeur and Martin St. Louis), a former women’s player (Jayna Hefford), a former Soviet player (Alexander Yakushev) and two builders (Willie O’Ree and Gary Bettman).

Let’s take a deeper look at this year’s class.

The current NHL Commissioner, Gary Bettman was chosen. This will not be a very popular choice especially in Canada, where it is perceived that he has an anti-Canadian bias. Since he took over the league in 1993, there have been three work stoppages. Those who favor his induction will point to the fact that revenue has increased ten fold since he took over. This is not without precedent as the Pro Football Hall of Fame inducted a seated Commissioner in Pete Rozelle in 1985.

Martin Brodeur enters on his first year of eligibility and this selection was as close to being a lock as you could get. With 691 Wins in the NHL, he is the all-time leader in that statistic with his closest competition being 140 away. Brodeur has a claim as the most successful Goalie ever, as in addition to his Wins total he would backstop the New Jersey Devils to three Stanley Cups, was a four time Vezina Trophy winner and a five time William M. Jenning Award winner. Internationally, he had two Olympic Gold Medals with Team Canada. We had him ranked #1 on our most recent list.

Jayna Hefford represented Canada in International competition. She enters in her second year of eligibility. A four time Olympic Gold Medalsis and seven time World Champion, Hefford scored 91 Points Internationally, which is second overall in the history of Canadian Women’s Hockey.

As speculated by many, Willie O’Ree was chosen. O’Ree made history in 1958 when he played for the Boston Bruins in 1958 thus becoming the first black player in the history of the league. While his career only comprised of 45 Games it was a landmark moment for hockey and he was certainly a trailblazer for many of the black players today.   O’Ree’s story has become more well known in recent years and he has been very instrumental in programs that encourage diversity into the sport.

Martin St. Louis went from undrafted to the Hockey Hall of Fame. In 2004, St. Louis took the Tampa Bay Lightning to the Stanley Cup title while winning the Hart Trophy in the process. The undersized player (5’ 8”) would win the Lady Byng Trophy three times and was also the Art Ross Trophy winner in 2013. St. Louis was ranked #3 by us and like Brodeur he entered on his first year of eligibility.

Perhaps the biggest surprise is the induction of former Soviet player, Alexander Yakushev. Yakushev was the Soviet League scoring champion in 1969 and was a two time Gold Medalist for the U.S.S.R. in both 1972 and 1974. He scored 11 Points in the famous 1972 Summit Series. To the best of our knowledge, there had been no talk of Yakushev entering the Hockey Hall of Fame.

In terms of our rankings, please note that we only rank former NHL players and have not yet created a list for builders or female players.

We here at Notinhalloffame.com would like to congratulate the Class of 2018. We will begin work on our 2019 Notinhalloffame.com Hockey list shortly.

Our All-Time Top 50 New Jersey Devils are now up

Yes, we know that this is taking a while!

As many of you know, we here at Notinhalloffame.com are slowly generating the 50 of each major North American sports team.  We have a new one to unveil today, that of the New Jersey Devils. 

An expansion team in 1974, the Devils were originally the Kansas City Scouts, but they only stayed there for two years before relocating to Denver and becoming the Colorado Rockies.  That only lasted six years before they relocated to New Jersey to become the Devils. After a few more years of mediocrity, they adopted a defensive strategy and won three Stanley Cups, 1995, 2000 & 2003.

As for all of our top 50 players in hockey we look at the following: 

1.  Advanced Statistics.

2. Traditional statistics and how they finished in the NHL.

3. Playoff accomplishments.

4. Their overall impact on the team and other intangibles not reflected in a stat sheet.

Remember, this is ONLY based on what a player does on that particular team and not what he accomplished elsewhere and also note that we have placed an increased importance on the first two categories.

This list is updated up until the end of the 2019-20 Season.

The complete list can be found here, but as always, we announce our top five in this article.  They are:

1. Martin Brodeur

2. Scott Stevens

3. Scott Niedermayer

4. Patrik Elias

5. Ken Daneyko

We will continue our adjustments on our existing lists and will continue developing our new lists.  

Look for our more material coming soon!

As always we thank you for your support.

Awards = HOF?: Part Fifty-Five: The William M. Jennings Trophy

We here at Notinhalloffame.com thought it would be fun to take a look at the major awards in North American team sports and see how it translates into Hall of Fame potential.

Needless to say, different awards in different sports yield hall of fame potential.  In basketball, the team sport with the least number of players on a roster, the dividend for greatness much higher.  In baseball, it is not as much as a great individual season does not have the same impact.

Last time, we looked at the Mark Messier Leadership Award, it is designed to honor an individual who leads by positive example through on-ice performance, motivation of team members and a dedication to community activities and charitable causes.  We stay on the ice with the newest award, the William M. Jennings, which was first awarded in 1981-82.  

Specifically, the Jennings replaced the Vezina Trophy, which had been given to the goalie(s) of the team that allowed the fewest Goals. The Vezina was reworked to honor the best Goalie in the NHL, and the Jennings was created to follow along the Vezina’s previous guidelines.

It is named after Jennings, who was the longtime President of the New York Rangers.

So how many William M. Jennings winners have made the Pro Hockey Hall of Fame?

Let’s find out!

The following are the past players who have won the William M. Jennings Trophy who are eligible for the Hockey Hall of Fame and have been enshrined.

Billy Smith, New York Islanders: 18-14-7, 2.87 GAA, 9.1 PS  1983 Co-Winner

The Islanders won four consecutive Stanley Cups (1980-83), with this being the final one of the dynasty.  Smith was there for all of them, winning the Vezina the year before and Conn Smythe this year.  He continued to play in the NHL until 1989, retiring with a 305-233-105 record.

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1993.

Patrick Roy, Montreal Canadiens: 22-16-6, 2.94 GAA, 7.7 PS  1987 Co-Winner

Patrick Roy was already an established legend before he turned 21, as the year before he won the Conn Smythe when he took the Canadiens to an unexpected Stanley Cup win.  Roy won his first of three Jennings Trophies, and was tenth for the Vezina.

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2006.

Patrick Roy, Montreal Canadiens: 23-12-9, ,2.90 GAA, 8.7 PS  1988 Co-Winner (2)

Along with his co-winner, Brian Heyward, Roy became the first player to win the Jennings in consecutive years.  He was named a Second Team All-Star and was eighth for the Vezina.

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2006.

Patrick Roy, Montreal Canadiens: 33-5-6, ,2.47 GAA, 9.3 PS  1989 Co-Winner (3)

Roy made history as the first player to win the Jennings in three straight years, and he was also the first to win the Jennings and the Vezina in the same season.  The Goalie also led the NHL in Save Percentage (.908) and GAA (2.74).

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2006.

Ed Belfour, Chicago Blackhawks: 43-19-7, ,2.47 GAA, 14.0 PS  1991

Ed Belfour seemed to come out of nowhere as in his rookie year he won the Calder, the Vezina and the Jennings the first player to do so.  Belfour led the NHL in Wins (43), Save Percentage (.910) and GAA (2.47).

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2011.

Patrick Roy, Montreal Canadiens: 36-22-8, ,2.36 GAA, 13.5 PS  1992 (4)

Roy became the first player to win the fourth Jennings and his third Vezina, and in regards to the Hart, he was the runner-up. He was also the NHL leader in Save Percentage for the fourth time (.914) and GAA for the second time (2.36).  Roy would lead Montreal to another Stanley Cup win in 1993.  Notably, this would be the first time that the award was given to just one Goalie.

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2006.

Ed Belfour, Chicago Blackhawks: 41-18-11, ,2.59 GAA, 13.0 PS  1993 (2)

Belfour won his second Jennings Trophy in the same year as he won his second Vezina.  “The Eagle” led the league in Shutouts (7) and was a First Team All-Star for the second time. 

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2011.

Grant Fuhr, Buffalo Sabres: 13-12-3, ,3.69 GAA, 3.9 PS  1994 Co-Winner

A member of five Stanley Cup Championships with the Edmonton Oilers, Grant Fuhr won the Vezina in 1988, but it was with Buffalo that he would win his first and only Jennings Award.  He later played for Los Angeles, St. Louis, and Calgary and had 403 career Wins.

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2003.

Dominik Hasek, Buffalo Sabres: 30-20-6, ,1.95 GAA, 13.1 PS  1994 Co-Winner

This was Hasek’s breakout year as he not only won the Jennings, but he also won the Vezina and was the runner-up for the Hart. Hasek led the NHL in Save Percentage (.930), GAA (1.95) and Shutouts (7).

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2014.

Ed Belfour, Chicago Blackhawks: 22-15-3, ,2.28 GAA, 6.0 PS  1995 (3)

Belfour led the NHL is Shutouts for the fourth straight season, and was named a Second Team All-Star.  He finished second for the Vezina that year.

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2011. 

Martin Brodeur, New Jersey Devils: 37-14-13, ,1.88 GAA, 12.4 PS  1997 Co-Winner

Martin Brodeur is considered one of the greatest Goalies of all-time, and in terms of the William M. Jennings, he is one of the most decorated netminders ever with five wins.  Prior to his first win, Brodeur already won the Calder and won his first Stanley Cup.  This year, Brodeur was also a Second Team All-Star, was second for the Vezina, fourth for the Hart, and he led the NHL in GAA (1.88).

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2018. 

Martin Brodeur, New Jersey Devils: 43-17-8, ,1.89 GAA, 11.1 PS  1998 (2) 

Brodeur won his second straight Jennings Trophy, with similar accolades in his first win.  He was again second for the Vezina, fourth for the Hart, and a Second Team All-Star. This year began a four-year streak of leading the NHL in Wins.

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2018. 

Ed Belfour, Dallas Stars: 35-15-9, ,1.99 GAA, 9.1 PS  1999 Co-Winner (4)

Now a Dallas Star, Belfour was seventh in Vezina voting but he had his most rewarding NHL year as he helped Dallas win the Stanley Cup.  This was the only Jennings win where Belfour shared it with another Goalie.  Belfour went on to play for Toronto and Florida, retiring in 2007 with a career record of 484-320-125.Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2011.

Dominik Hasek, Buffalo Sabres: 37-24-4, ,2.11 GAA, 13.9 PS  2001 (2)

In between Hasek’s first and second Jennings win, Hasek won four Vezinas, two Harts and two Lester B. Pearson Awards. Hasek won his sixth Vezina this year, which would also be his final one as a Sabre.

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2014.

Patrick Roy, Colorado Avalanche: 32-23-8, ,1.94 GAA, 13.2 PS  2002 (5)

Patrick Roy forced a trade out of Montreal in 1996, and the team where he landed, Colorado, won a Stanley Cup with him in net that year. Roy won his fourth Cup in 2001, and this season, he won his fifth (and final) Jennings, while earning a First Team All-Star selection and was also second for the Vezina and third for the Hart. Roy played one more year before he retired as one of the most decorated players in hockey.

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2006.

Martin Brodeur, New Jersey Devils: 41-23-9, ,2.02 GAA, 11.4 PS  2003 (3) 

In between Brodeur’s second and third Jennings win, he won a Stanley Cup (2000) and never finished less than fifth for the Vezina.  This year, he not only won he Jennings, he captured a third Stanley Cup ring, and won his first Vezina.  Brodeur was also third in Hart balloting, and he began his second four-year streak of leading the NHL in Wins.  It is worth noting that this was the only year in which the Jennings was shared between two teams, as Roman Cechmanek and Robert Esche of the Philadelphia Flyers also won.

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2018. 

Martin Brodeur, New Jersey Devils: 38-26-11, ,2.03 GAA, 12.5 PS  2004 (4) 

Brodeur repeated as a dual winner of the Jennings and Vezina and like the season before he finished in third place for the Hart. He would win two more Vezina Trophies, 2007 and 2008, and was second in 2006.

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2018. 

Dominik Hasek, Detroit Red Wings: 27-10-3, ,2.14 GAA, 4.5 PS  2008 Co-Winner (3) 

Hasek forced a trade out of Buffalo and promptly won his coveted Stanley Cup that year.  He won another this year, in what was his final NHL season.  “The Dominator” won 389 Games with a career GAA of 2.20.

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2014.

Martin Brodeur, New Jersey Devils: 38-26-11, ,2.03 GAA, 12.5 PS  2010 (5) 

With his fifth Jennings win, Brodeur tied Patrick Roy for the most all-time.  Brodeur was third in Vezina voting, which would be the last time he received a vote for that award.  He played until 2013, accumulating an all-time record of 691 Wins.

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2018. 

 

The following are the players who have won the William M. Jennings Trophy who are eligible for the Hockey Hall of Fame and have not been selected:

Rick Wamsley, Montreal Canadiens, 23-7-7, 2.75 GAA, 9.2 GPS 1982 Co-Winner  

It is fitting that the first ever winner of a major award played for Montreal, and in the case of Rick Wamsley, this would be the only individual award he won.  He would later win a Stanley Cup with Calgary in 1989, and he retired with a 204-131-46 Record.

Eligible since 1996.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com 

Denis Herron, Montreal Canadiens 12-6-8, 2.64 GAA 6.6 PS 1982 Co-Winner       

Denis Herron won the Vezina the year before under the Vezina’s last year of following the format of the William M. Jennings. Herron’s .911 Save Percentage led the NHL, which was the second time he did so.  He was traded to the Pittsburgh Penguins in the off-season, and he finished his career there, retiring with 146 Wins against 203 Losses.

Eligible since 1989.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com 

Roland Melanson, New York Islanders 24-12-5, 2.66 GAA 10.2 PS 1982 Co-Winner        

Melanson was the back-up for eventual Hall of Famer, Billy Smith, but Melanson saw his share of playing time in three Stanley Cup wins, this year being the last one.  Melanson led the NHL in Save Percentage this season (.909), and did again the year after (.902).  He later played for Minnesota, Los Angeles, New Jersey and Montreal, and left the game with 125 Wins.

Eligible since 1995.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com 

Al Jensen, Washington Capitals 25-13-3, 2.92 GAA 5.8 PS 1984 Co-Winner

Jensen led the NHL in Shutouts (4) and was third in Vezina Trophy voting this year.  He would arguably have one more good year, and he only had 179 career NHL games.

Eligible since 1990.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com 

Pat Riggin, Washington Capitals 21-14-2, 2.67 GAA 6.0 PS 1984 Co-Winner         

Riggin led the NHL in Goals Against Average (2.67) this year and his four Shutouts tied his teammate, Al Jensen, for the league-lead. The Goalie was a Second Team All-Star this year and was third (again tied with Jensen) for the Vezina.  Riggin was fourth for the Vezina the year after, but this ended his run as an elite Goalie.  He had a record of 153-120-52.

Eligible since 1991.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com 

Tom Barrasso, Buffalo Sabres 25-18-10, 2.67 GAA 8.1 PS 1985 Co-Winner   

Barrasso won the Vezina and Calder the year before, and this season he was second for the Vezina, but won the Jennings and was a Second Team All-Star.  He would have an up and down career, winning two Stanley Cups with Pittsburgh and winning 369 Games in between the pipes.

Eligible since 2006.  Ranked #16 on Notinhalloffame.com

Bob Sauve, Buffalo Sabres 13-10-3, 3.23 GAA 2.3 PS 1985 Co-Winner

Sauve was previously a co-winner for the Vezina in 1980, and this was his second and last individual award in the NHL.  It was also his last year as a Sabre, as he joined Chicago the year after.  He retired in 1989, after two years with New Jersey.

Eligible since 1992.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com 

Bob Froese, Philadelphia Flyers 31-10-3, 2.55 GAA 9.9 PS 1986 Co-Winner

This was by far Froese’s best year in the National Hockey League, where he led the NHL in Wins (31), Save Percentage (.909), GAA (2.55) and Shutouts), and he was a Second Team All-Star who was second for the Vezina.  Froese never approached that year again, finishing with the New York Rangers for four years with a career record of 128-72-20

Eligible since 1993.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com 

Darren Jensen, Philadelphia Flyers 15-9-1, 3.69 GAA 9.9 PS 1986 Co-Winner       

A star at the University of North Dakota, this was Jensen’s second and final NHL season, as he was sent to the minors after. Realistically, he barely qualified for this award and won it as a second banana Goalie in a high-scoring era.  His 3.69 is toed for the worst of ant winner.

Eligible since 1989.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com 

Brian Heyward, Montreal Canadiens 19-13-4, 2.82 GAA 6.2 PS 1987 Co-Winner   

After four seasons in Winnipeg, Heyward was noa a competent backup for Patrick Roy in Montreal.  In Heyward’s 37 Games this year, he was first in the NHL in GAA (2.82) and was sixth in Vezina voting.

Eligible since 1996.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com 

Brian Heyward, Montreal Canadiens 19-13-4, 2.82 GAA 6.2 PS 1988 Co-Winner (2)       

Along with Patrick Roy, Heyward became the first back-to-back winner of the Jennings Trophy.  He might have been a back-up, but he wasn’t done making history.

Eligible since 1996.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com 

Brian Heyward, Montreal Canadiens 19-13-4, 2.82 GAA 6.2 PS 1989 Co-Winner (3)       

Patrick Roy and Brian Heyward were the first players to win the William M. Jennings Trophy three years in a row, and this is arguably the only player to win three significant awards in a row, who has zero chance for their respective Hall of Fame. 

Eligible since 1996.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com 

Reggie Lemelin, Boston Bruins 22-15-2, 2.80 GAA 6.2 PS 1990 Co-Winner 

Prior to this season, Lemelin had four top-ten finishes for the Vezina, and this year would be his last one as he was fourth. He played until 1993, accumulating 236 Wins over a 15-year career.

Eligible since 1996.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com 

Andy Moog, Boston Bruins 24-10-7, 2.89 GAA 7.3 PS 1990 Co-Winner         

Andy Moog won three Stanley Cups with the Edmonton Oilers before arriving in Boston, and in this season, he was third in Vezina voting, which was the highest of his career.  He had seven other top ten finishes for the Vezina.

Eligible since 2001.  Ranked #26 on Notinhalloffame.com

Chris Osgood, Detroit Red Wings 39-6-5, 2.17 GAA 6.6 PS 1996 Co-Winner          

Osgood had his breakout season where he also was a Second Team All-Star and was the runner-up for the Vezina behind Dominik Hasek. The Goalie also led the NHL in Wins this year with 39.  Osgood won the Stanley Cup in the next two years with Detroit.

Eligible since 2014.  Ranked #22 on Notinhalloffame.com

Mike Vernon, Detroit Red Wings 21-7-2, 2.26 GAA 4.2 PS 1996 Co-Winner 

Mike Vernon was a Second Team All-Star and Stanley Cup winner with the Calgary Flames in 1989.  Vernon joined Detroit in 1994, and won the Jennings with Chris Osgood, with whom he took the Red Wings to a Stanley Cup win in 1997.  Vernon won the Conn Smythe that year, which was also his last in Detroit.  He finished his career with San Jose, Florida, and closed his career as a Flame.

Eligible since 2005.  Ranked #13 on Notinhalloffame.com

Mike Dunham, New Jersey Devils 8-7-1, 2.55 GAA 2.6 PS 1997 Co-Winner 

This was Dunham’s rookie year, and he played in 26 Games, just enough to qualify for the Jennings Award, which was the only individual accolade he ever won.  After two years with New Jersey, Dunham was traded to Nashville, and he later played for Atlanta and both New York teams.

Eligible since 2010.  Unrankedon Notinhalloffame.com. 

Roman Turek, Dallas Stars 16-3-3, 2.29 GAA 3.7 PS 1999 Co-Winner 

Turek played just enough to qualify for the Jennings, and as Ed Belfour’s backup, he won not only the Jennings but the Stanley Cup. This was his last year in Dallas, as he was traded to St. Louis the following year.

Eligible since 2010.  Unrankedon Notinhalloffame.com. 

Roman Turek, St. Louis Blues 42-15-9, 1.95 GAA 10.2 PS 2000 (2) 

Turek went back-to-back in Jennings wins, but was the first to do it with different teams.  This time, Turek was a first string Goalie, and he had the best year of his life, finishing second in Vezina voting, sixth for the Hart and was a Second Team All-Star.  His played one more season with the Blues before moving on to Calgary for three years.

Eligible since 2010.  Unrankedon Notinhalloffame.com. 

Roman Cechmanek, Philadelphia Flyers 33-15-10, 1.83 GAA 10.9 PS 2003 Co-Winner

Roman Cechmanek had a brief NHL career, consisting of only four seasons, and he was a former Second Team All-Star.  Cechmanek was third in Vezina voting this year, which would be his penultimate NHL campaign.

Eligible since 2012.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com. 

Robert Esche, Philadelphia Flyers 12-9-3, 2.20 GAA 3.8 PS 2003 Co-Winner

Esche played eight years in the NHL, usually as a backup, and this was his lone season where he would win an award.  He had a lifetime record of 78-64-22.

Eligible since 2015.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com. 

Miikka Kiprusoff, Calgary Flames 42-20-11, 2.07 GAA 16.2 PS 2006 

This was the best season of Kiprusoff’s career where he not only won the Jennings, but was the Vezina Trophy winner and was third for the Hart.  He also led the NHL in Goals Against Average (2.07) and Shutouts (10), and played until 2013, finishing with a 305-192-68 record.

Eligible since 2016.  Ranked #189 on Notinhalloffame.com

Niklas Backstrom, Minnesota Wild 23-8-6, 1.97 GAA 9.0 PS 2007 Co-Winner

Esche played eight years in the NHL, usually as a backup, and this was his lone season where he would win an award.  He had a lifetime record of 78-64-22.

Eligible since 2015.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com. 

Manny Fernandez, Minnesota Wild 22-16-1, 2.55 GAA 7.8 PS 2007 Co-Winner

Fernandez was a late bloomer, as his best pro seasons in hockey came in the latter half of his career.  This was Fernandez’ first individual award.

Eligible since 2012.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com. 

Chris Osgood, Detroit Red Wings 27-9-4, 2.09 GAA 6.6 PS 2008 Co-Winner (2)     

Sharing the netminding duties with Dominik Hasek, Osgood won his lone GAA title this year.  Osgood won his third Stanley Cup this year, and he played until 2011, retiring with 401 Wins, 317 of which were as a Red Wing.  His 12 years between Jennings wins is the longest.

Eligible since 2014.  Ranked #22 on Notinhalloffame.com

Manny Fernandez, Boston Bruins 16-8-3, 2.59 GAA 4.9 PS 2009 Co-Winner (2)

Fernandez became the second player to win the Jennings with two different teams, and he did so in what turned out to be his last NHL season.  He had a career record of 143-123-35.

Eligible since 2012.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com. 

Tim Thomas, Boston Bruins 36-11-7, 2.10 GAA 14.7 PS 2009 Co-Winner 

If his teammate, Manny Fernandez, was a late bloomer, then what do you call Tim Thomas, who first became a bona fide presence in the NHL in his early 30s?  Thomas would also win the Vezina, and was the league leader in Save Percentage (.933) and Goals Against Average (2.10).  Two years later, Thomas led the NHL again in Save Percentage and GAA, while also winning the Vezina.  More importantly, he would backstop the Bruins to a Stanley Cup win.

Eligible since 2017.  Ranked #77 on Notinhalloffame.com

Ray Emery, Chicago Blackhawks: 17-1-0, 1.94, 3.4 PS 2013 Co-Winner

Emery lost only one game all year, and he was seventh in Vezina voting, though he did not see much action in the playoffs that year. Nevertheless, Emery won the Stanley Cup this year, giving him a ring.  Emery had played for Ottawa, Philadelphia and Anaheim before this year, and he was in the NHL for two more years afterward, back as a Flyer.

Eligible since 2018.  Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com. 

Let’s update our tally, shall we?       

Award in Question

Percentage of recipients who have entered the HOF

Percentage of recipients by year who have entered the HOF.

NBA MVP

100%

100%

NHL Art Ross

100%

100%

NHL Hart Trophy

93.6%

96.3%

NBA Finals MVP

91.3%

94.9%

NHL Norris

90.5%

96.4%

NHL Ted Lindsay Award

90.0%

 

NBA All-Star Game MVP

89.5%

91.7%

NHL Conn Smythe

74.2%

85.4%

NFL Bert Bell Award

73.7%

71.4%

NFL AP Offensive Player of the Year

73.1%

79.4%

NFL AP MVP

68.3%

74.0%

NFL Walter Payton Man of the Year

66.7%

66.7%

NHL Lady Byng

63.8%

76.0%

NFL Defensive Player of the Year

60.8%

71.1%

NFL Super Bowl MVP

60.6%

64.9%

NHL Mark Messier Leadership Award

60.0%

60.0%

NBA Defensive Player of the Year

58.3%

56.5%

NHL Vezina

57.1%

66.3%

NBA Rookie of the Year

56.5%

56.5%

MLB MVP

55.0%

60.2%

NFL Pro Bowl MVP

52.3%

54.8%

MLB Lou Gehrig Award

51.9%

51.9%

MLB Roberto Clemente Award

47.4%

47.4%

NHL Calder Trophy

46.5%

46.5%

NBA J. Walter Kennedy Citizenship Award

46.0%

46.0%

MLB/NL/AL Cy Young Award

44.4%

55.4%

MLB Babe Ruth Award

37.0%

39.3%

NHL King Clancy Award

36.8%

36.8%

NHL Frank J. Selke Trophy

33.3%

36.7%

MLB World Series MVP

33.3%

36.8%

MLB Hutch Award

33.1%

33.1%

NFL Offensive Rookie of the Year

28.6%

28.6%

NHL Bill Masterton Memorial Trophy

27.9%

27.9%

MLB Edgar Martinez Award

26.7%

17.2%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Designated Hitter)

25.0%

30.8%

MLB Comeback Player of the Year

25.0%

25.0%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Shortstop)

23.5%

52.6%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove

21.7%

36.8%

NHL William M. Jennings Trophy

20.7%

40.4%

NFL Defensive Rookie of the Year

20.6%

20.6%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Catcher)

20.0%

22.5%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Second Base)

18.8%

39.8%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Shortstop)

18.2%

35.1%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Pitcher)

18.2%

20.1%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Second Base)

16.7%

32.7%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Outfield)

16.7%

30.1%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Outfield)

15.7%

25.2%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Third Base)

14.3%

14.3%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Third Base)

13.6%

14.3%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (First Base)

13.6%

13.3%

MLB (NL/AL) Rookie of the Year

13.3%

13.3%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Catcher)

10.3%

15.2%

NBA Most Improved Player of the Year

5.3%

3.2%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (First Base)

3.8%

3.2%

NFL AP Comeback Player of the Year

0.0%

0.0%

So, who is up next?

The following are the players who have won the William M. Jennings Trophy in the NHL who have retired but have not met the mandatory years out of the game to qualify for the Hockey Hall of Fame:

Niklas Backstrom, Minnesota Wild 23-8-6, 1.97 GAA 9.0 PS 2007 Co-Winner

This was Backstrom’s rookie year, though the Swedish Goalie was already 27.  Backstrom led the NHL in Save Percentage (.929), GAA (1.97) and was sixth in Vezina voting.  He played with the Wild until 2015, and finished his NHL run with Calgary before returning to Europe and playing in the Finnish League.

Eligible in 2022.

Roberto Luongo, Vancouver Canucks 38-15-7, 2.11 GAA 13.6 PS 2011

A Second Team All-Star twice before in his career, Luongo led the NHL in Wins for the only time in his career.  He also was third in Vezina voting.    Luongo would take the Canucks to the Stanley Cup Finals, but they went down to the Boston Bruins.  Later on, Luongo returned to Florida, playing until 2019 and retiring with 489 Wins.

Eligible in 2022.

The following are the players who have won the William M. Jennings Trophy who are still active.

Cory Schneider, Vancouver Canucks 16-4-2, 2.23 GAA 5.6 PS, 2011 Co-Winner

Cory Schneider played the minimum 25 Games to qualify for what is to date, his only individual accolade in his career.  

34 Years Old,Playing for the New Jersey Devils.

Brian Elliott, St. Louis Blues: 23-10-4, 1.56, 9.0 PS 2012 Co-Winner

Brian Elliott’s 1.56 GAA is by far the lowest among William M. Jennings Award winners, which was league-leading as was his .940 Save Percentage. Elliott was fifth in Vezina voting that year.

35 Years Old,Playing for the Philadelphia Flyers.

Jaroslav Halak, St. Louis Blues: 26-12-7, 1.97, 9.0 PS 2012 Co-Winner

What an incredible tandem that Elliott and Halak made.  Both had GAAs under 2.00, and he finished sixth for the Vezina while Elliot was fifth.

35 Years Old,Playing for the Boston Bruins.

Corey Crawford, Chicago Blackhawks: 19-5-5, 1.94, 6.0 PS 2013 Co-Winner

Crawford was eighth for the Vezina this year, and in the post-season, he was the main Goalie in their Stanley Cup win.

36 Years Old,Playing for the Chicago Blackhawks.

Jonathan Quick, Los Angeles Kings: 27-17-4, 2.07, 7.4 PS 2014

Two years before, Quick was a Second Team All-Star and he led the Kings to a Stanley Cup win while winning the Conn Smythe.  This year, Quick again won the Cup, while finishing fifth in Vezina voting.

35 Years Old,Playing for the Los Angeles Kings.

Corey Crawford, Chicago Blackhawks: 32-20-5, 2.27, 11.9 PS 2015 Co-Winner (2)

In Crawford’s second Jennings win, he was again the primary Goalie for the Blackhawks in a Stanley Cup win.  Crawford was also sixth for the Vezina this year. Crawford tied with Carey Price of Montreal for this award.

36 Years Old,Playing for the Chicago Blackhawks.

Carey Price, Montreal Canadiens: 44-16-6, 1.96, 16.2 PS 2015 Co-Winner 

Carey Price had the best season of his career where he not only won the Jennings, but also captured the Vezina, Hart, and the Ted Lindsay Award. If Price gets into the Hockey Hall of Fame, this was the year that did it.

33 Years Old,Playing for the Montreal Canadiens.

Frederik Andersen, Anaheim Ducks: 22-9-7, 2.30, 7.0 PS 2016 Co-Winner 

Two years away from being named an All-Rookie, Frederik Andersen won the William M. Jennings Trophy.  This was his last year in Anaheim as he was traded to Toronto in the off season.

31 Years Old,Playing for the Toronto Maple Leafs.

John Gibson, Anaheim Ducks: 21-13-4, 2.07, 6.5 PS 2016 Co-Winner 

This was officially Gibson’s rookie year and he was seventh in both the Calder and the Vezina.

27 Years Old,Playing for the Anaheim Ducks.

Braden Holtby, Washington Capitals: 42-13-6, 2.20, 12.3 PS 2017 

Holtby won the Vezina the season before and was second for that prestigious award this year, while also earning a Second Team All-Star Selection. He would win the Stanley Cup the following year aiding the Caps in their first league title.

27 Years Old,Playing for the Washington Capitals.

Jonathan Quick, Los Angeles Kings: 33-28-3, 2.40, 12.2 PS 2018 (2)

Finishing ninth for the Vezina this year, Quick was again the lone Jennings winner in his second win. 

35 Years Old,Playing for the Los Angeles Kings.

Thomas Greiss, New York Islanders: 23-14-2, 2.28, 8.7 PS 2019 Co-Winner

As of this writing, the Jennings trophy in 2019 is the only individual trophy he has won in the NHL, and he is currently two Wins away from 250.

34 Years Old,Playing for the New York Islanders.

Robin Lehner, New York Islanders: 25-13-5, 2.13, 10.2 PS 2019 Co-Winner

Lehner had a great year where he also won the Bill Masterton Memorial Trophy and was third for the Vezina.  This would be his only year in New York as he signed with the Chicago Blackhawks as a Free Agent.

29 Years Old,Playing for the Vegas Golden Knights.

Jaroslav Halak, Boston Bruins: 18-6-6, 2.39, 6.1 PS 2020 Co-Winner (2)

In between his first and second Jennings win, Halak would have stints in Washington and the New York Islanders before joining the Bruins. Backing up Tuukaa Rask, Halak had to take over for the Bruins in the playoffs when Rask left the COVID-19 mandated bubble.  Halak became the third player to win the Jennings with two different teams.

35 Years Old,Playing for the Boston Bruins.

Tuukka Rask, Boston Bruins: 26-8-6, 2.12, 9.1 PS 2020 Co-Winner 

Rask won the Vezina in 2014, and this year he was second for the Award, and was named a Second Team All-Star.  Rask would however leave the COVID-19 bubble early in the playoffs. 

35 Years Old,Playing for the Boston Bruins.

The William M. Jennings Trophy has been awarded to legends and journeyman, and there is no reason to think that won’t continue in the future.

This concludes our hockey portion.

So, what is up next?

We go back to the diamond for the Relief Pitcher of the Year, a specialty position that has not generated a lot of success for Cooperstown.

As always, we thank you for your support, and look for that soon.

Martin Brodeur

Martin Brodeur is going to enter the Hockey Hall of Fame on his first try.

There should be no doubt about this, nor will there be any relevant debate on this subject.
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