Menu
A+ A A-

34. Paul Silas

Paul Silas is one of the most respected players of his generation.  Never a star, Silas was a workmanlike power forward that was at his best coming off the bench and bringing the muscle to the court.  A great rebounder and defender, Silas was an integral part of three championship teams, two in Boston and one in Seattle.  A long career highlighted by being on winners and collecting over 12,000 rebounds (currently 20th on the all time list) have overshadowed a great college career. 

75. Sidney Wicks

Sidney Wicks was the UCLA big man who led the Bruins to numerous NCAA titles and was selected College Player of the Year.  He would be drafted by the Blazers and would become the centerpiece of the franchise.  Later went to Boston where he was a solid contributor.  No it’s not Bill Walton; it’s the forgotten star of the UCLA dynasty, Sidney Wicks.  Wicks is one of those great 70s players that time has seemingly forgot.  A four time All-Star and consistent 20/10 guy for the Blazers, Wicks was a dominant big man.  A three time champion at UCLA who was the star of the teams in between Alcindor and Walton, Wicks never got their publicity.  The obstacles holding him back from the Hall is a shortened career and playing for bad teams that happened to get a lot better right after he left.

78. Danny Ainge

Danny Ainge is one of those guys who depending on whom you talk to is either one of the most overrated players of all time or one of the least appreciated.  He definitely was not the most popular, but boy could he play.  He became a household name when he led BYU to an upset of Notre Dame in the NCAA tournament on a memorable full court drive in 1981; the same year he won the Wooden Award as national player of the year. 

95. Antoine Walker

With his year of eligibility pushed back from his attempts to get back in the big time through the D-League, Antoine Walker is sadly best known for his financial woes more than anything he did on the court. In his playing career, his best seasons were with Boston, where along with Paul Pierce his three pointers excited crowds (though he probably took too many) and he was a member of three All Star squads. In a reserve role, Walker had a very good season assisting the Heat in their first championship, but despite his role there, he is often the forgotten contributor on that team. Forgotten players generally don’t wind up enshrined; especially one who has become a puch line.
Subscribe to this RSS feed