Menu
A+ A A-

Don Cherry slams the Yakushev HHOF selection

We here at Notinhalloffame.com have always been huge advocates of Don Cherry gaining induction into the Hockey Hall of Fame, though we have to give the bombastic hockey analyst credit, as he doesn’t promote himself for the Toronto based institution. That doesn’t mean that he isn’t vocal about whom he thinks should be inducted, and who shouldn’t have been.

Cherry’s wrath was directed towards former Red Army player, Alexander Yakushev who surprisingly was chosen. He had this to say:

 "I am really upset at Yakushev. Absolutely ridiculous that he's in and Henderson's not. What he did in Russia over there, it was fantastic. To think that they put in the two losers (Yakushev and Tretiak), and they keep out the Canadian winner? I guess that's a little tough but that's the way I feel."

Seemingly this is less of a shot of Yakushev’s selection than it is of championing Henderson’s cause, but with all due respect to Cherry, any shot at Vladislav Tretiak not being Hockey Hall of Fame worthy seems wrong.

For what it is worth in our last Notinhalloffame.com hockey list, we had Paul Henderson ranked #21 on our last ranking. That will be updated shortly.

We have updated our Hockey List: Alexander Mogilny now #1

As always we here at Notinhalloffame.com remain focused on our core lists of which those who are not in the Hockey Hall of Fame is one. We have now updated that list and have expanded it to 125, with an intention to grow it to 150 in the fall of the year.

Two names were removed from our list, Martin Brodeur (#1) and Martin St. Louis (#3) as both were chosen for the Hockey Hall of Fame in their first year of eligibility and as such we again have a new number one on our list. Every year we have new entries of former players who are now eligible for the Hockey Hall of Fame but for the first time none of the new entries crack our top ten.

Our entire Notinhalloffame.com Hockey List can be found here, but in the meantime here is our new Top Ten:

Alexander Mogilny goes to #1 for the first time and jumped from #4. In the 1992-93 season, “Alexander the Great” scored 76 Goals and he was a two time Second Team All Star as well a six time All Star. Mogilny would win an Olympic Gold Medal in 1988 with the Soviet Union and a Stanley Cup with the New Jersey Devils in 2000.

Don Cherry stays at #2. While the dynamic personality remains polarizing there is no doubt that he is an iconic figure in the game. The host of “Coach’s Corner” is a former Jack Adams Trophy winner himself.

Theoren Fleury moved up from #5 to #3. Fleury was a seven time All Star who led the Calgary Flames to the Stanley Cup in 1989. He is also an Olympic Gold Medalist with Team Canada in 2002.

Daniel Alfredsson went up three spots from #7 to #4. Alfredsson was a six time All Star who spent the majority of his career with the Ottawa Senators. He was an Olympic Gold Medalist for Team Sweden in 2006.

Bernie Nicholls only went up one rank to #5. Nicholls scored 150 Points for Los Angeles in the 1988-89 season and had over 1,200 overall. Nicholls was a three time All Star.

Jeremy Roenick climbed from #8 to #6. Roenick is the highest ranked American on our list and he is a nine time All Star. He is a member of the 1,200 Point Club.

Pierre Turgeon also had a significant jump as he went from #10 to #7. Turgeon has the most Points on this list with 1,327 and he is a four time All Star. He also won the Lady Byng Trophy in the 1992-93 season.

John LeClair rose from #9 to #8. LeClair does not have the accumulation that others in the top ten does but he had a five year run with the Philadelphia Flyers where he was named a post season All Star. He was also a two time Olympian for the United States.

Mike Richter remains the highest ranked netminder but hits the top ten for the first time with an increase in rank from #11 to #9. This marks the third American in a row on our list. Richter is a three time All Star, a Stanley Cup winner with the New York Rangers (1994) and a World Cup of Hockey Champion (1996) where he was the MVP.

Claude Provost also hit the top ten for the first time as he moved #13 to #10.   Provost is one of the most decorated players of all time as he is an eleven time All Star and nine time Stanley Cup Champion in a career spent entirely with the Montreal Canadiens.

While there are no new members in the top ten list, we do have two new entries to the top twenty-five.

Vincent LeCavalier debuts at #15. The four time All Star took Tampa Bay to their first and only Stanley Cup in 2004, which was the same year he helped Canada win the World Cup. Three years later he won the Maurice Richard Trophy.

Brad Richards makes his first appearance at #21. Like LeCavalier, Richards played on Tampa Bay’s Stanley Cup championship team and Team Canada’s World Cup win in 2004. Richard only went to one All Star Game but he was the Conn Smythe Trophy winner in ’04.

As we stated earlier, our list expanded to 125 and as such we have a lot of new entries who have been eligible before.

The new entries are:

Milan Hejduk #89. Hejduk helped the Colorado Avalanche win the Stanley Cup in 2001 and was a Second Team All Star and Maurice Richard Trophy winner in the 2002-03 Season. He also won the Olympic Gold Medal with the Czech Republic in 1998.

John Ross Roach #97. Roach was a First Team All Star in the 1932-33 season, nearly a decade after he backstopped the Toronto St. Pats to a Stanley Cup.

Steve Duchesne #98. Duchesne was a three time All Star Defenseman who scored 752 Points. He would win a Stanley Cup late in his career with the Detroit Red Wings in 2002.

Bill White #101. White went to six All Star Games in a career spend predominantly with the Chicago Blackhawks. White was also a Second Team All Star three years in a row from the 1971-72 season to 1973-74)

Teppo Numminen #103. Numminen was a three time NHL All Star who represented Finland multiple times including winning two Silver Medals in the Olympics.

Ziggy Palffy #104. Palffy was a three time All Star who finished in the top five in Goals twice. He represented Slovakia internationally on multiple occasions.

Jean Guy Talbot #105 . Talbot was a six time All Star and seven time Stanley Cup Champion with the Montreal Canadiens seven times. He was also a First Team All Star in the 1961-62 Season.

James Patrick #107. Patrick played 1,280 Games in the NHL and was a workhorse in the game.

Kimmo Timonen #108. Timonen was a three time NHL All Star and was a Stanley Cup Champion with the Chicago Blackhawks (2015) and a four time Olympic Medalist with Finland.

Al Rollins #111. Rollins is one of the few players to have won the Hart Trophy (1954) and to not be in the Hockey Hall of Fame. He also won the Vezina Trophy in 1951, the same season he helped the Toronto Maple Leafs win the Stanley Cup.

Pat Stapleton #114. Stapleton was a three time Second Team All Star and three time All Star who would later be the Defenceman of the Year in the WHA.

Pit Martin #116. Martin was a four time All Star during his stint with the Chicago Blackhawks and would later win the Bill Masterton Trophy in 1970.

Adam Foote #117. Foote was a two time Stanley Cup Champion with the Colorado Avalanche and he would help Canada win an Olympic Gold Medal in 2002 and a World Cup Gold Medal in 2004.

Mike Ramsey #118. Ramsey was a member of the Miracle on Ice team in 1980 and was a four time All Star in the NHL.

Glenn Resch #120. Resch was a three time All Star who would also be named a Second Team All Star twice. He was a part of the New York Islanders first Stanley Cup win in 1980.

Vic Hadfield #121. Hadfield was a famous New York Ranger who went to two All Star Games and he was also a one time Second Team All Star.

Bob Baun #123. Baun starred for the Toronto Maple Leafs where he would help the buds win four Stanley Cups.

Evgeni Nabokov #124. Nabokov won the Calder Trophy in 2001 and was named a First Team All Star in 2008. He was also a two time All Star.

Brad McCrimmon #125. McCrimmon was a Second Team All Star in 1988 in the same year he helped the Calgary Flames win the Stanley Cup.

Please note that we only rank former male players and at this time (with the exception of Don Cherry) we do not rank coaches, builders or former female players. We might create separate lists for that in the future.

Look for this list to expand to 150 in a few months.

As always we here at Notinhalloffame.com encourage all of you to take a look at our updates and give us your opinions and cast your votes.

We have added to our 2020 and 2021 Hockey Futures

We always continue to add sections here on Notinhalloffame.com, but the more we add, the more we have to maintain.  One of those that got away from us a little bit is our Future Hockey Eligibles, which we have now updated.

The following are recognizable players who are eligible for the Hockey Hall of Fame in 2020:

Brian Campbell:  Campbell was a four-time All-Star who would win the Lady Byng Trophy in 2012.  Also, a Second Team All-Star (2008), he would help the Chicago Blackhawks win the 2010 Stanley Cup.

Dennis Wideman:  Wideman was an All-Star Defenseman in 2012.

Jarome Iginla:  Iginla has the resume of a first ballot Hall of Fame induction as he is a former Art Ross winner, Ted Lindsay Winner, and a three-time First Team All-Star.  Known mostly for his time with the Calgary Flames, Iginla is a member of the 1,000 Point club, and he is also a two-time Olympic Gold Medal winner with Canada.

Jiri Hudler:  The Czech national would win the Lady Byng Trophy in 2015 and was also a Stanley Cup Champion with the Detroit Red Wings in 2008.

John-Michael Liles:  Liles was a reliable Defenseman who would also play for the United States in both the Olympics and World Cup.

Marian Hossa:  Hossa is a member of the 1,000 Point Club, and he is a five-time NHL All-Star who was named a Second Team All-Star in 2009.  The Slovakian star was also a three-time Stanley Cup Champion with the Chicago Blackhawks.

Matt Carle:  Carle was a former Hobey Baker Award winner who would have a pair of 40 Point Seasons. The Defenseman is one of the best Alaskans ever to play professional hockey.

Mike Ribeiro:  Ribeiro was an All-Star in 2008 and was regarded as one of the tougher Centres in the NHL.

Milan Michalek:  Michalek was a successful Left Winger who would be named an All-Star in 2012.  He would also win two Bronze Medals for the Czech Republic in the World Hockey Championships.

Shane Doan:  Doan is without question the greatest Arizona Coyote ever, and he was a two-time NHL All-Star. He would also win a World Cup of Hockey Gold Medal with Team Canada in 2004.

The following are recognizable players who are eligible for the Hockey Hall of Fame in 2021:

Alexandre Burrows:  Burrows had a solid NHL career that was spent primarily with the Vancouver Canucks.

Brian Gionta:  Gionta would win the Stanley Cup with the New Jersey Devils in 2003, and he was also a two-time Olympian for Team U.S.A.

Christian Ehrhoff:  From Germany, Christian Ehrhoff had a good NHL career, but would make his mark Internationally with a Silver Medal in both the 2016 World Cup of Hockey and the 2018 Olympics.

Daniel Sedin:  Sedin would win the Ted Lindsay, and Art Ross Award in 2011 and the Swedish sensation was also a three-time NHL All-Star.  He would also win an Olympic Gold Medal for the Swedish team n 2006.

Francois Beauchemin:  Beauchemin was a Second Team All-Star in 2013 and earlier in his career he would help the Anaheim Ducks won the Stanley Cup in 2007.

Henrik Sedin:  Like his brother Daniel, Henrik Sedin was a major star for both the Vancouver Canucks and the Swedish National Team.  Sedin won the Hart Trophy and Art Ross Trophy in 2010, and he was a three-time leader in Assists.

Henrik Zetterberg:  Zetterberg won it all in as he was an Olympic and World Hockey Gold Medalist with Sweden and a Stanley Cup Champion with the Detroit Red Wings.  He would be named a Second Team All-Star in the 2007/08 season.

Mark Streit:  An All-Star in 2008, Mark Streit would make history as the first Swiss-born player to be an NHL Captain.  He would play for Switzerland in four Olympics.

Mike Fisher:  Fisher was an All-Star in 2015 and over his time with the Ottawa Senators and Nashville Predators he was known as one of the great locker room leaders.

Patrick Sharp:  An All-Star in 2011, Patrick Sharp was a three-time Stanley Cup Champion with the Chicago Blackhawks and was a Gold Medalist with Canada at the 2014 Olympics.

Paul Martin:  Martin would help the University of Minnesota win two championships and aside from his NHL career he would also suit up with the United States many times.

Radim Vrbata:  Vrbata was named an All-Star in 2015 and would play internationally for the Czech Republic.

Rick Nash:  Nash was a two-time Gold Medalist for Canada and in 2003/04 he would lead the NHL in Goals.

Scott Hartnell:  Hartnell was an All-Star in 2012 and was known for his time with the Philadelphia Flyers.

Notably, we will not be adding any more names to our TBD list but will keep this up until they move into a designated year of eligibility.

As always, we here at Notinhalloffame.com would like thank all of you for support.

Frank Brown and Jim Hughson named to the Hockey Hall of Fame

The Stanley Cup Finals are underway and with it we have our first steps toward finalizing the Hockey Hall of Fame Class of 2019.

Frank Brown will be inducted by receiving the Elmer Ferguson Memorial Award for excellence in hockey journalism and Jim Hughson enters by winning the Foster Hewitt Memorial Award for his contributions as a hockey broadcaster.

At age 18, Brown would see his first hockey article published and he would be the lead hockey writer for the Associated Press for seven years. He joined the NHL as a communications executive in 1998 and retired last year.

In a 30-year career, Hughson broadcasted hockey at every level and has called the Stanley Cup, World Cup of Hockey, Olympics and World Hockey Championships.

We here at Notinhalloffame.com would like to congratulate both Frank Brown and Jim Hughson for earning this honor

Hayley Wickenheiser headlines the strangest Hockey Hall of Fame Class ever.

One of our favorite days of the year has come as the Hockey Hall of Fame has announced their Class of 2019 but we have to say that this is one of the strangest Hall of Fame classes ever. This is a six-person class consisting of the greatest female player of all-time, two former NHL players who were not considered to be the best of the group, a former Czech player that most people never heard, an executive and a U.S. College Coach.

The members of the Hockey Hall of Fame Class of 2019 are:

Hayley Wickenheiser:  Wickenheiser is this year’s headliner and without question is the greatest women’s player ever.  Entering in her first year of eligibility, the Canadian superstar represented her country five times in the Olympics where she would win four Gold Medals and one Silver. In the World Hockey Championships, she would take Canada to seven Gold Medals.  She was so good that she played semi-pro in Switzerland, making her the first woman wo play hockey on any pro level.  There is no other woman more deserving of this accolade.

Guy Carbonneau:  Carbonneau was the team captain of the Montreal Canadiens when they won the Stanley Cup in 1993.  He had previously won the Cup with the Habs in 1986 and would again win it with the Dallas Stars in 1999.  Carbonneau never had a season where he scored 60 Points but his strength was his two-way play as he was the winner of the Frank J. Selke for the best defensive forward three times.

Sergei Zubov:  A teammate of Carbonneau on their 1999 Stanley Cup winning team, Zubov was also a champion with the New York Rangers in 1994.  A four-time NHL All-Star, Zubov was named to NHL Second Team All-Star in 2006 and the Defenseman would score 771 Points over his career.  Internationally, he was part of the Unified Team (former Soviet Union) in 1992 where he won an Olympic Gold Medal.

Vaclav Nedomansky:  From Czechoslovakia, Vaclav Nedomansky made history in 1964 as the first hockey player from the Communist Bloc to defect and play in North America.  Before defecting, Nedomansky scored 534 Points over 388 Games in the Czechoslovakian league and upon arriving in North America he would play for the Toronto Toros of the WHA and later the Birmingham Bulls before joining the Detroit Rings midway through the 1977/78 Season.  He would also play for the New York Rangers and St. Louis Blues and scored 278 Points in the NHL.

Jim Rutherford: Rutherford played in net for 13 seasons but he enters as a builder.  He has won the Stanley Cup three times as a General Manager, once with the Carolina Hurricanes (2006) and twice with the Pittsburgh Penguins (2016 & 2017).

Jerry York: York is the winningest active coach in the NCAA, and he is a five time NCAA Champion taking Bowling Green to the 1984 Title and Boston College to the 2001, 2008, 2010 & 2012 Championship.

Notable snubs include Alexander Mogilny, Theoren Fleury, Daniel Alfreddson and Jeremy Roenick.

Where we are left scratching our heads (allow is to get half-conspiracy and half-editorial) is that we are openly wondering if any of the above candidates were not chosen so that there could be no doubt that Wickenheiser was the headliner.  This makes good press for the Hockey Hall of Fame and reflects them as a progressive entity.  Had any of the above names been chosen would they have leapfrogged her in public opinion’s “ranking”?  

Possibly.  

But, with due respect to Zubov and Carbonneau they aren’t former players who leap off the page and scream “headliner”.  This is the first time that anyone in our top ten list (regardless of the sport) and in this case we have to go all the way to #29 before we have our first inductee. We do need to add the caveat that at present we do not rank women or builders, but are looking to change that in the future.  

Wickenheiser could have still have been the lead attraction over anyone else this year and would people have really debated it?  They wouldn’t have, but we openly think that there are people at the Hockey Hall who worried about it and wanted this to be all about Wickenheiser.

We want to be very clear that Hayley deserves this but we have always wanted to see the best possible class every year!  

This isn’t it.

We would like to extend our congratulations to the Hockey Hall of Fame Class of 2019 and we will shortly begin work on updating our core Hockey list.  

Awards = HOF? Part Sixteen: The Frank J. Selke Trophy

We here at Notinhalloffame.com thought it would be fun to take a look at the major awards in North American team sports and see how it translates into Hall of Fame potential.

Needless to say, different awards in different sports yield hall of fame potential.  In basketball, the team sport with the least amount of players on a roster, the dividend for greatness much higher.  In baseball, it is not as much as a great individual season does not have the same impact.

Awards = HOF? Part Nineteen: The King Clancy Award

We here at Notinhalloffame.com thought it would be fun to take a look at the major awards in North American team sports and see how it translates into Hall of Fame potential.

Needless to say, different awards in different sports yield hall of fame potential.  In basketball, the team sport with the least amount of players on a roster, the dividend for greatness much higher.  In baseball, it is not as much as a great individual season does not have the same impact.

Awards = HOF? Part Twenty-Two: The Conn Smythe Trophy

We here at Notinhalloffame.com thought it would be fun to take a look at the major awards in North American team sports and see how it translates into Hall of Fame potential.

Needless to say, different awards in different sports yield hall of fame potential.  In basketball, the team sport with the least amount of players on a roster, the dividend for greatness much higher.  In baseball, it is not as much as a great individual season does not have the same impact.
Subscribe to this RSS feed