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Wayne Campbell & Garth Algar

We are going to count these as a duo.Wayne Campbell and Garth Algar were not musicians, but they certainly loved their rock and roll, and we would like to think that the musical genre loved them too. They hosted their own show, Wayne's World, which would often talk about rock Wayne did date the lovely Cassandra, the lead singer of Crucial Taunt. If you are still debating whether they belong here, they did promote the successful (at the very last minute) Waynestock, which was almost a disaster of Fyrefest proportions. Concert promotors definitely count here!The Bullet Points:T.V. Show and Movie…
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Dr. Johnny Fever

In the 1960s, or so the backstory goes, John Caravella was a top Disc Jockey in Los Angeles where he went by the name of "Johnny Sunshine." Apparently, you can't say the word "booger" on the air in L.A. because after he did, he was sacked, and poor Johnny went on a downward spiral where he went from "town to town up and down the dial." As he did so, he used the aliases of "Johnny Duke," "Johnny Style," "Johnny Cool" and "Johnny Midnight" where he hit rock bottom working at W.K.R.P. in Cincinnati, a classical music station where he…
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Wyld Stallyns

Bill S. Preston EsquireTed “Theodore” LoganIf we are to believe what we saw in Bill & Ted’s Excellent Adventure (and why wouldn’t we?) it was the music of Wyld Stallyns that brought peace to all of Earth and excellence.Musically speaking it might be hard to digest that as in the last scene of the first film we saw them actually play and the results were not very good.  Rufus (George Carlin) assured us that they would get better, and in the sequel (Bill & Ted’s Bogus Journey) they did get better thanks to time travel and intense lessons, which allowed…
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The Wonders

One of the strongest entries on the ballot has to come from the Tom Hanks 1996 film, That Thing You Do. The movie is the story of an early 1960’s one hit wonder, (called the Wonders appropriately) and their rise and fall. It was a very good film that was fun and gave us a catchy song that sounds perfect for the era it represented. We would be surprised if this did not enter the Fictitious Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in a quick fashion. The Bullet Points: Movie Appeared: That Thing You Do (1996) Actors: Tom Everett Scott…
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Tenacious D

Here is another one that we are befuddled if they really qualify. Jack Black and Kyle Gass basically are fictionalized versions of themselves and have essentially created “Mock Rock” where their over the top guitar solos and theatrical singing is a parody and tribute to Rock and Roll. What started as a comedic rock goof led to a television show, a movie, three albums and tours, though when they perform as JB and KG, how fictitious is this really?   Although when we watched their 2006 film, “Tenacious D in the Pick of Destiny”, we can argue that it is pretty…
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Stillwater

From Cameron Crowe’s semi-autobiographical film, Almost Famous, we are introduced to Stillwater, an up and coming Rock band in the 1973. The music in the film is perfectly framed (way to many period music pieces don’t fit at all) and we aren’t just treated to a good band, but a great behind the scenes look at their struggles, both personal and professional. The songs were co-written by Crowe’s real life wife, Nancy Wilson from Heart, and the film was told from the point of view of the Crowe based character who was covering the band for Rolling Stone Magazine. Incidentally,…
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Spinal Tap

This is Spinal Tap (1984)Although it is not a prerequisite, to be a great fictional rock band you need an elaborate past, which is what we learn from what is considered to be (and lets face it is) the greatest mockumentaries of all time. Documented by longtime Spinal Tap fan by longtime fan and fake director, Mary DiBergi (Rob Reiner), we follow the band after they released their latest album and corresponding American Tour. We get flashbacks of the band’s history when David St. Hubbins (formerly of the Creatures) and Nigel Tufnel (formerly of the Lovely Lads) joined to create…
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Schroeder

Another that we had to really think about of he qualifies, Schroeder was a Beethoven loving piano player who we saw mostly face deep tickling the ivories (that sounded bad). He was never a central figure of the Peanuts comic strip or the TV specials, and he always seemed to play the same song.   Still, every Christmas and Halloween you can count on that song playing on television.           The Bullet Points: TV Specials Appeared: Multiple Actors: Multiple Voices Songs you might remember: That same song that they always play. Why you should vote for him: He debuted in 1951…
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The Rutles

With all due respect to all of the other nominees, we don’t think there is any other act on the ballot that has created a more detailed backstory than the Rutles. This near perfect pastiche of the Beatles began on Eric Idle’s BBC Television Show, Rutland Weekend Television, which presented a brief documentary of the band. Idle paired with Neil Innes, formerly of the Bonzo Dog Doo Dah Band who provided the music and the combination proved so popular that a full documentary “All You Need is Cash” was filmed was the first musical mockumentary of its kind. George Harrison…
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Otis Day and the Knights

Just how popular was National Lampoon’s Animal House? It created a demand for the fictitious band that performed “Shout” at the Delta’s toga party. That band was called Otis Day and the Knights and the man who played Otis, (DeWayne Jessie) who was actually lip syncing someone else, formed a touring band and adopted the Otis Day moniker. As much as we loved them at the frat house, we loved them more when they played the Dexters Lake Club, which was only frequented by black patrons; until the Deltas got there. The Bullet Points: Movie Appeared: Animal House (1978) Actors:…
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