Rock and Roll (591)

Music.  It has the ability to bring people together.  It can stir up hidden emotions.  It can cause you to get up and physically move.  It can help you through your work day.  It separates generations.  We could describe it for page after page in terms both specific and vague but music simply means different things to different people.  Likely, many of these things were on the mind of the builders of the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in Cleveland, Ohio, a tribute to those who built up the genre of Rock and Roll.

Their intentions certainly seemed clear enough.  Their website states that “The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame honors the legendary performers, producers, songwriters, disc jockeys and others who have made rock and roll the force that it is in our culture”.  For our purposes, we are going to focus on the performer section of the Hall.  That being said, the first rule of eligibility is very simple.  Once an artist has gone twenty five years after the release of their first record, they become eligible.  After that it becomes a little murky.  The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame states that “criteria include the influence and significance of the artists’ contributions to the development and perpetuation of rock and roll”.  Influence and significance is certainly open to interpretation.  For that matter, so is Rock and Roll.  When Bill Haley sang Rock around the Clock over sixty years ago was he describing a sound, a look or maybe just an attitude?  Did the songwriters just like the word “rock”?  The origin of Rock music is so difficult to pinpoint its subsequent evolution is just as equally hard to chart.

With these vague parameters we at Not in Hall of Fame put our own committee together and came up with the top 250 artists whom we feel deserve consideration for enshrinement in Cleveland.  Are we right?  Are we wrong?   We know two things for sure; the first is that while compiling this list we felt we could make a viable case for multiple artists to be in our number one slot, the second was that it was a blast coming up with it.  Let us know what you think and based on who gets inducted, who becomes newly eligible, your opinions and how our own perceptions change, we will see how we rank them in the following year.    

Until then, Keep on Rockin’ in the Free World!

Sincerely,

 

The Not in Hall of Fame Rock and Roll Committee.

How many artists on this list have melded multiple styles that resulted in unique music and critical acclaim? Quite a few of course, though if we had to subject one on this list that may have combined the most styles, Little Feat could be that candidate.
When many people first heard Stone Temple Pilots, they were quick to label them as knock-offs of Nirvana and Pearl Jam.  This was an unfair tag, as there were many Grunge bands who came out around the same time, and this was a band who stuck around for an extended period of time and left behind a long lasting series…
They say that in some cases the sum is greater than its parts. In terms of rock bands this is often true. But what if the parts still did other things after it left the sum? Okay, that was convoluted, but with The Guess Who, we think that this statement holds some water.
There has been a lot of debate as to whether Hip Hop belongs in the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. To us at NIHOF, we believe it does belong and with the past inductions of Grandmaster Flash and Run D.M.C. it is clear that the Rap question has been answered. Had we launched this site two years ago, Run D.M.C.…
Although Sleater-Kinney was not the first Riot Grrl band (or to some even a Riot Grrl band at all), they emerged as one of the highest regarded feminist based Indie Rock bands ever.  The band was poignant and powerful and could generate attention for their causes (regardless of what they were) with equal parts melody and articulation.   This was a group loaded…
In the first decade of the new millennium, the medium of television became overrun with reality television. Other portions of this website may discuss the merits of reality T.V., but never have we had felt the need to incorporate that discussion in terms of the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. With Ozzy Osbourne, we may have to reevaluate that…
We remember a bit from Wayne’s World where Wayne Campbell discussed how in the 70’s the Fleetwood Mac album, Rumors (in another bit he inputted Frampton Comes Alive) was shipped to every house. He very well could have inputted Boston’s debut album which likely was found in most turntables in suburbia. No joke, that album really was that big.
Considering how much Western Pop Culture is inundated with Australians, we would have thought we would have had an Australian act by now. Instead, our first selection from “Down Under” was on the brink of flirting with being the biggest band in the world at one point. It didn’t happen, but it is hard pressed to find anyone who can’t…
There is no rule in music that says that you have to be a commercial success to make a difference. Hüsker Dü fits that category as they were considered influential by countless bands though they themselves never really broke past cult status.
One of the most critically respected female artists of the last thirty years, P.J. Harvey could be classified in so many ways.  Singer/Songwriter.  Lo-Fi Superstar.  Alternative Goddess.  Frankly, we could come up with so many more.  
We hate using an American Idol reference but how many times does Simon and company tell the contestants after they nailed a performance that “they made the song their own”. Somehow, this just seemed like the right quote for Joe Cocker.
From the Dirty South, OutKast took Southern Hip Hop into a more melodic and dare we say more fun direction than many of their peers.  Influenced by the funk of the 1970’s while looking towards the future, the duo of Andre 3000 and Big Boi bring unique visions to the group making them not just one of the more texture…
Again we find ourselves with a band that achieved great success on the charts yet were not darlings of the critics. Yet as successful as Three Dog Night were in the early 70’s, they are barely known by today’s generation. Funny, they were not always so anonymous.
Our introduction to our Rock and Roll list depicted the ever changing face of what Rock and Roll is or was. There are artists on this list with whom we expect to hear a roaring cry that they are not “Rock and Roll”. We doubt we will hear that with Steppenwolf.
The next choice generated more debate from us in terms of their genre and not so much in terms of the band itself. Mötley Crüe was one of the many Metal bands to come out of L.A., but they were likely the band most closely associated with Hair Metal, and the debate we had is just how worthy that genre…
Sometimes, you can’t associate music to a region. Coming from the American South, The B-52’s redefined what music was supposed to be from there. Then again, nothing was ever typical with the B-52’s.
An earlier entry discusses the importance of the Go-Go’s who were able to make history by being the first all female band who performed all their own instruments and wrote their own songs who went to number one. As important as that feat was, there have been many who have pointed to the Runaways as being the more important all…
The Dave Matthews Band has a devoted legion of fans and why not?  Arguably that generation’s Grateful Dead, the Virginia based group combined the ethos of a Jam band into multiple adult based genres, which has resulted into many radio friendly hits, many of which worked on Adult Contemporary or Modern Rock stations.
You would think that a band that numerous hits and constant radio airplay in the mid and late 60’s and early 70’s would be in the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. However, as we go through this list we find that this is not necessary the rule. In the case of Paul Revere & the Raiders, one has to…
The United States of America has often touted itself as the “Melting Pot” of the world. We will let some other website debate the validity of that statement. For now, we will simply slot the ironically named band, War as the band on our list that we think best serves the Melting Pot analogy.