Country Modern (25)

The Country Music Hall Of Fame began simply as a way to record and remember the history of country music, but has grown into one of the world’s most extensive musical collections for one of America’s oldest recorded music genres. The first country music recording was in 1922. Country music is a distinctly Southern American sound; a genre that combined blues, ranchera, Cajun, Appalachian, African-American music, folk, Celtic and many other styles into an important musical tradition. But what country music sounds like has changed throughout it’s over 100 year history. From the cowboy westerns of the 1930’s, to the rockabilly of the 1950’s, to the countrypolitan of the 1960’s into the outlaw movement of the 1970’s, even to the bro-country of the 2010’s, with various other sounds, styles and subgenres in between. It can get very difficult to pinpoint exactly what country music is (though the common expression “three chords and the truth” is what most people seem to lean on). The Hall Of Fame came along in the 1960’s to make sure every bit of that sprawling genre history is marked and preserved.

So with that large history, it can be extremely tough trying to determine who is going to be picked each year, since Country’s Hall Of Fame is notoriously one of the hardest to get inducted into. And unlike the Rock And Roll Hall Of Fame, the country genre is a lot more focused on being a part of the Nashville machine to judge achievements (like radio career length, charting hit singles, awards from the industry, etc.). For the most part they only induct 3 people per year: one in the “Modern” category, one in the “Veteran” category, and one in a rotating group (either “Musician”, “Songwriter”, or “Non-Performer”, which rotate every year). A performer is eligible for the “Modern” category 20-40 years after they achieved ‘national prominence’ and a performer is eligible for the “Veteran” category 40 years after they achieve ‘national prominence’. For this list of predictions I am putting together, I will only be focused on the “Modern” and “Veteran” categories. One additional rule: nobody can be inducted for a stretch of 12 months after they die.

On that note, let’s get started with the predictions. Here are 25 predictions for the “Modern” category:

Sincerely,

 

The Not in Hall of Fame Rock and Roll Committee.

Born in 1965, John had a leg-up on his quest to being a popular singer as he was born into a musical family. His parents, his brother and himself had a family band together that toured local clubs around Lexington, Kentucky. Once John graduated high school, he began solo touring the local honky tonk circuit. At one of popular venues…
As with a few others on these lists, Pam Tillis already had a connection to the industry before she even started singing: Pam was the daughter of country hit-maker Mel Tillis (who himself is a 2007 inductee). From the age of 8 through all of young-adulthood, she performed shows, was in various bands, joined and left a label, and released…
Since beginning to sing in his local church choir, being a part of the music industry was all Tracy wanted to do. Performing in local clubs and the honky-tonk circuit during his teenage years, he headed off to Nashville as soon as he finished college. He was signed to a record label just a few months after arriving. He had…
After being born in New Jersey and living in Japan for a couple years, her family settled in Washington D.C. and Mary had a regular suburban high school experience there. Although she enjoyed playing music, she never considered it as a career option. She would just play a couple gigs around her area and got a University degree in American…
As with a lot of other people on this list, Kathy began singing by being a part of her parents’ church choir. She joined a bluegrass band while in University, which she says helped to shape her sound and roots as an artist. After dropping out of school, she moved to Nashville. She took odd jobs while trying to make…