34. Hal Trosky
  1. General
  2. Awards
  3. Career Stats
  • Born: November 11, 1912 in Norway, IA USA
  • Weight: 207 lbs.
  • Height: 6'2"
  • Bats: L
  • Throws: R
  • Debut: September 11, 1933
  • Final Game: September 27, 1946
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Hal Trosky is a fascinating baseball player when it comes to "rating" their overall contributions.  Very early in his career, some writers viewed him as the next Babe Ruth, which were about as lofty expectations as you can get.  It goes without saying that Trosky was not the next "Bambino," but now historians look at him as one of the best players never to be named an All-Star.

Playing at First Base, Trosky played simultaneously as Lou Gehrig, Jimmie Foxx, and Hank Greenberg, so it is easy to see why he never was an All-Star.  Trosky nevertheless was a top power hitter in his own right, having six 25 Home Run years in a seven-year period (1934-40), with the first six campaigns exceeding 100 RBI. His best year was 1936, where he blasted 42 Home Runs with an AL-leading 162 RBIs while also batting .343.

Trosky’s career fell apart in 1938 when he began suffering migraines that impacted his vision.  He retired in 1941, though he had a brief comeback with the White Sox in 1944.  

With Cleveland, Trosky smashed 216 Home Runs with a .313/.379/.551 Slash Line.  Later, in 1951, he was part of the Indians' inaugural Hall of Fame Class.

The Bullet Points

  • Position: First Base
  • Acquired: Signed before the 1933 Season.
  • Departed: Purchased by the Chicago White Sox 11/6/43.
  • Games Played: 1,125
  • Notable Statistics:

    759 Runs Scored
    1,365 Hits
    287 Doubles
    53 Triples
    216 Home Runs
    911 RBI
    21 Stolen Bases
    .313/.379/.551 Slash Line
    30.3 bWAR                     

  • Major Accolades and Awards:

    Most Total Bases (1936)
    Most Runs Batted In (1936)
    Most Putouts by a First Baseman (1934 & 1935)
    Most Assists by a First Baseman (1934)
    Most Double Plays Turned by a First Baseman (1934)
    Highest Range Factor per Game by a First Baseman (1944)

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