Rock and Roll (567)

Music.  It has the ability to bring people together.  It can stir up hidden emotions.  It can cause you to get up and physically move.  It can help you through your work day.  It separates generations.  We could describe it for page after page in terms both specific and vague but music simply means different things to different people.  Likely, many of these things were on the mind of the builders of the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in Cleveland, Ohio, a tribute to those who built up the genre of Rock and Roll.

Their intentions certainly seemed clear enough.  Their website states that “The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame honors the legendary performers, producers, songwriters, disc jockeys and others who have made rock and roll the force that it is in our culture”.  For our purposes, we are going to focus on the performer section of the Hall.  That being said, the first rule of eligibility is very simple.  Once an artist has gone twenty five years after the release of their first record, they become eligible.  After that it becomes a little murky.  The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame states that “criteria include the influence and significance of the artists’ contributions to the development and perpetuation of rock and roll”.  Influence and significance is certainly open to interpretation.  For that matter, so is Rock and Roll.  When Bill Haley sang Rock around the Clock over sixty years ago was he describing a sound, a look or maybe just an attitude?  Did the songwriters just like the word “rock”?  The origin of Rock music is so difficult to pinpoint its subsequent evolution is just as equally hard to chart.

With these vague parameters we at Not in Hall of Fame put our own committee together and came up with the top 250 artists whom we feel deserve consideration for enshrinement in Cleveland.  Are we right?  Are we wrong?   We know two things for sure; the first is that while compiling this list we felt we could make a viable case for multiple artists to be in our number one slot, the second was that it was a blast coming up with it.  Let us know what you think and based on who gets inducted, who becomes newly eligible, your opinions and how our own perceptions change, we will see how we rank them in the following year.    

Until then, Keep on Rockin’ in the Free World!

Sincerely,

 

The Not in Hall of Fame Rock and Roll Committee.

The Dave Matthews Band has a devoted legion of fans and why not?  Arguably that generation’s Grateful Dead, the Virginia based group combined the ethos of a Jam band into multiple adult based genres, which has resulted into many radio friendly hits, many of which worked on Adult Contemporary or Modern Rock stations.
Somehow in the late 60’s, if you were not making a political stance or experimenting in the studio, you ran the risk of not being taken seriously. Sure, you could still be successful, but respect was hard to come by. In the case of Tommy James & the Shondells, their respect would come much later.
A lot of people have criticized the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame for its perceived bias towards Punk Rock. There may be something to that, but at the present the wave of West Coast Punk Rockers have no inductee. X would be our best guess, but if Black Flag were to be that representative, it would not be a…
How much chance does a band have to get into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame if they are best known for wearing funny hats? To many, Devo was just a one hit wonder who looked like they wore garbage bags and had flower pots on their heads. Of course, their fans knew they were much more.
Surprisingly, it is not uncommon for a musician to have their biggest hit after they passed away. We wonder if the Zombies could identify on some level, as they achieved their biggest success after they disbanded.
The early 90’s brought a lot of attention to the Pacific Northwest music scene, and there were many who thought it came out of nowhere. The reality was that Alternative music in its various forms was alive and well and if anyone was the early champion of the state of Washington it might very well be the Sonics.
You didn’t think we were done with the Germans did you? We return to the “Fatherland” where we have a band (unlike our number one choice, Kraftwerk) that had true international success and is considered one of the top acts to come out of Continental Europe. We wonder if we are going to hear from some of their fans that…
As the Rap stars begin to become eligible for the Rock and Roll of Fame, they face the same debate that stars from other genres do: that of whether popularity should supersede art. LL Cool J could be the first of the Rap stars to fall strongly on the popularity side of the equation, as though he did sell a…
It seems that every musical genre has a representative that is dubbed the “thinking man’s” band. Some have bestowed that label for the Post Punk/New Wave set to XTC. In retrospect, that may be an accurate description for this English group.
The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame case is a very intriguing one for blink-182. 
One of the most important bands of the BritPop era, Suede was a pivotal reason that the British music scene moved back towards guitar driven songs as opposed to the heavily distorted shoegazing sound that dominated British Alternative in the years previous. Suede was one of those few bands that lived up to the hype that the critics bestowed on…
If you had more hits than the Beatles and the Rolling Stones combined you would think that you may be a lock for the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. However, in the muddled case of Cliff Richard & the Shadows, this was a chart distinction held in Great Britain and not Stateside.
For a country with such a small population, the rich musical history of Ireland is an extensive one. Our first representative from the Emerald Isle is the Hard Rock band, Thin Lizzy; though it may surprise some casual fans that Thin Lizzy was even Irish.
If you are a baseball fan you might remember the sad tale of Bill Buckner whose solid career was completely overshadowed by the ground ball that dribbled through his legs that cost the Boston Red Sox the World Series in 1986. It is a very melodramatic analogy but a couple of us at NIHOF wondered aloud if Mr. Roboto may…
Although none of the members of the NIHOF committee were alive when Ben E. King achieved his greatest success, we were among the millions that rediscovered him with the re-release of his signature song, “Stand by Me”. Those that found him again, found one of the smoothest voices of and most sophisticated voices of all time.
Although the J. Geils Band appeared as an overnight success in the early 80’s, they were anything but. After delivering a series of albums throughout the 1970’s that delivered a few minor hits, the J. Geils band found a good following in the North East but could not translate the energy of their live act to studio recordings or to…
In a previous entry we mentioned that Metallica’s entry to the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame we questioned whether this could be the catalyst to induct Slayer as the second member of the “Big Four of Thrash Metal”. We still think they have the best shot of the remaining four, but if they look towards innovation than Anthrax may…
Previous entries discussed the maligned genre of “Arena Rock” which although produced many successful acts has become synonymous with soulless music devoid of any true Rock and Roll spirit. That description always seemed harsh as any band who could sell out an arena has some merit too them. Anyways, we will let some other website debate that. One of the…
As you may have noticed, this list is peppered with performers who are already in the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame for their work in other bands. Carole King is already in the Hall, but for her work as a songwriter. Ironically, the fact that she is already in may be the very factor that prevents her from getting…
This could be one of the most interesting Rap debates for the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame.