Rock and Roll (567)

Music.  It has the ability to bring people together.  It can stir up hidden emotions.  It can cause you to get up and physically move.  It can help you through your work day.  It separates generations.  We could describe it for page after page in terms both specific and vague but music simply means different things to different people.  Likely, many of these things were on the mind of the builders of the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in Cleveland, Ohio, a tribute to those who built up the genre of Rock and Roll.

Their intentions certainly seemed clear enough.  Their website states that “The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame honors the legendary performers, producers, songwriters, disc jockeys and others who have made rock and roll the force that it is in our culture”.  For our purposes, we are going to focus on the performer section of the Hall.  That being said, the first rule of eligibility is very simple.  Once an artist has gone twenty five years after the release of their first record, they become eligible.  After that it becomes a little murky.  The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame states that “criteria include the influence and significance of the artists’ contributions to the development and perpetuation of rock and roll”.  Influence and significance is certainly open to interpretation.  For that matter, so is Rock and Roll.  When Bill Haley sang Rock around the Clock over sixty years ago was he describing a sound, a look or maybe just an attitude?  Did the songwriters just like the word “rock”?  The origin of Rock music is so difficult to pinpoint its subsequent evolution is just as equally hard to chart.

With these vague parameters we at Not in Hall of Fame put our own committee together and came up with the top 250 artists whom we feel deserve consideration for enshrinement in Cleveland.  Are we right?  Are we wrong?   We know two things for sure; the first is that while compiling this list we felt we could make a viable case for multiple artists to be in our number one slot, the second was that it was a blast coming up with it.  Let us know what you think and based on who gets inducted, who becomes newly eligible, your opinions and how our own perceptions change, we will see how we rank them in the following year.    

Until then, Keep on Rockin’ in the Free World!

Sincerely,

 

The Not in Hall of Fame Rock and Roll Committee.

Talking about Motown was certainly nothing new during the NIHOF Rock and Roll discussions. However, the topic generally came up when discussing forgotten and neglected 60’s artists from the legendary label, and rarely for the achievements of the decade that followed. Yet one of the Detroit label’s biggest success was a 70’s group that originated from the American Deep South…
As the New Wave genre brought a lot of androgynous looking men in to the forefront, there was one group that seemed to take the same idea only with a female lead singer who certainly had a unique androgynous appeal. Of course, that look may have gotten them their first taste of attention, but the Eurythmics proved they had the…
With the 2009 Rock and Roll Hall of Fame induction of Metallica many eyes looked to the other members of the “Big Four of Thrash Metal”. Does this pave the way for their induction? Time will tell, but the odds are that if any of the other bands in that elite group get in, Slayer is probably the group with…
When the idea for a Rock and Roll Hall of Fame was first conceived many bands likely came to mind right away. Some artists who performed in the same era probably received no consideration at all as they were dismissed as juvenile and fluff. Some of those bands may very well fit that bubblegum image but others upon time have…
Like many successful Jam bands, Phish enjoys a devoted fan base, and like any top improvisational group, the genres they draw from are quite diverse. Each Phish concert can count on Rock, Jazz, Progressive Rock, Bluegrass, Reggae, Country and Blues infusions throughout the sets, and they always seem to draw a crowd as unique as their music. As such, comparisons…
During the early 60’s many music fans were divided musically into either the Beatles camp or the Rolling Stones camp and they despised the other fans. Nowadays, that seems a little silly, but it wasn’t that long ago that a couple of us at NIHOF remembered that the Metal community had fans divided into the Metallica and Megadeth camps as…
Historically speaking, Music of all genres is full of all male bands. Sure, there was the occasional female lead singer or two, but generally, it did not get much further than that. That ceiling was forever broken in 1981, when the Go-Go’s topped the charts becoming the first all female band that wrote their own songs and played their own…
Although they may have had a limited discography, the California based band, Sublime generated a sizable impact.  They first gain attention with the Punk revival movement of the early 90’s, but with their infusion of Ska and Reggae.  Possibly, the top group flying the Third Wave Ska flag, Sublime’s Hall chances may be aided by the sympathy of the premature…
It rarely fails. As new genres emerge there seems to a need to anoint a pair of songwriters as the new Lennon and McCartney. New Wave did so with the pair of Chris Difford and Glenn Tillbrook; better known as the creative unit behind Squeeze.
We continue our list with a Doo Wop group that practically predates Rock and Roll. Because of that fact, we once again had the struggle whether this was a group that belonged in the Roots and Influences category. Considering that they are not yet in, we have to wonder if the Hall of Fame committee is confused too.
We can’t even begin to tell you how shocked we were that Jimmy Cliff recently got into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. It isn’t that we don’t think that Cliff should have been inducted; but we really saw no evidence that the Hall would ever induct a second Reggae star (after Bob Marley). The question now is will…
The term heir apparent is used far too often in Pop Culture. Lou Gehrig may have proved to be the rightful heir to Babe Ruth in the Yankees, but while Eric Lindros had a decent hockey career, his original nickname of the “Next One” (In reference to Wayne Gretzky’s moniker of the “The Great One”) was a title he couldn’t…
What should have been. This is a sentence that seems to permeate the history of Rock and Roll, especially on a list such as this. We can’t help but think that this sentence may fit Mott the Hoople better than anyone else as the Ian Hunter led band seemed to inspire so much yet accomplish so little.   Maybe stating…
There is a lot to be said if you can help define a style of song. Some will call you pioneers and others may call you innovators. REO Speedwagon did get those accolades, but we have a feeling that for every person who may agree, there is likely an individual who despises the style (Power Ballads) they helped create.
The Ska/Pop hybrid that No Doubt created in the mid 90’s found a huge following and made Gwen Stefani the Debbie Harry of her era.  No Doubt managed to gain both an Alternative and Pop following, though their future efforts were primarily danceable Pop.  Stefani is the key here, as her solo career skyrocketed and though it was not necessarily…
David Bowie is already a very deserving member of the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, and to some he is the entry representing the Glam Rock genre. Whether that is right or wrong, we can’t help think that there should be at least two, and though T-Rex is ranked much higher to us, if Slade were to get in…
The Prodigy were one of the most successful electronic bands of the 1990’s, but there were many who did not necessarily view them as electronic.
There have been many bands that were known for their experimentalism, but we are hard pressed to find a band that used more non Rock genres to create music that found its way into the Rock canon.  In a decade that celebrated independent music, Stereolab may have had the most “independent” sound of all.  Like much of the Krautrock sound…
How does one's Rock and Roll induction chances bode when you are just as well known for a rivalry with a fellow performer (James Brown) as you are for the music you created? This is the question we pose when we look at 60’s Soul superstar, Joe Tex.
The 1970’s may have been full of Singer/Songwriters but the decade that followed saw that genre dry up quickly. That made the success of Tracy Chapman that much more unlikely. She didn’t exactly have MTV good looks; she sang in a style against her racial stereotype and was not even attempting to be “cool”. Despite all of that, Chapman had…