Awards & Hall of Fame? Part 28: Gold Glove Outfield

Awards & Hall of Fame? Part 28: Gold Glove Outfield
27 Oct
2018
Not in Hall of Fame

We here at Notinhalloffame.com thought it would be fun to take a look at the major awards in North American team sports and see how it translates into Hall of Fame potential.

Needless to say, different awards in different sports yield hall of fame potential. In basketball, the team sport with the least amount of players on a roster, the dividend for greatness much higher. In baseball, it is not as much as a great individual season does not have the same impact.

We are now taking a look at the Gold Glove Award, given annually to the best defensive player in MLB in each respective position.

This will take awhile, so be patient with us!

We have just tackled Catcher, First, Second Base, Shortstop and Third Base

As you can imagine, we are continuing with Outfield and this will take a long time. Dig in your cleats for this one!

The following are the past players who have won the Gold Glove at Outfield who are eligible for the Baseball Hall of Fame and have been enshrined.

Willie Mays, ML New York Giants (1957)

0.2 dWAR. “Say Hey!” The problem with running a website that discusses those who are not in the Hall of Fame is that you don’t get to discuss legends like Willie Mays often. Now we get too! By this time, Mays had already been cemented as one of the most complete baseball players in the game. Already a past MVP, this year he finished fourth. Having said that, this was just an average year defensively for a Centerfielder and sub par for Mays based on his history. In 1957, Mays did not finish first in any defensive statistic and was not in the top five in Total Zone Runs and Range Factor per Game. Having said that, is it wrong here that our first instinct is to give this a pass because it is Willie Mays? Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1979.

Al Kaline, ML Detroit Tigers (1957)

1.4 dWAR. The career Detroit Tiger finished tenth in MVP voting and was ninth in Defensive bWAR, As we look at Kaline (he won ten Gold Gloves) you will see some deserving, some not so deserving and some where the voters would have been blind and thought they were voting for either his bat, his legacy or a concoction of both. The first one we have no problem with, as not only did Kaline lead ALL Outfielders in Total Zone Runs, he was also first among the American League Rightfielders in Fielding Percentage. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1980.

Al Kaline, AL Detroit Tigers (2) (1958)

2.2 dWAR. In terms of Defensive bWAR, this would be tied for the best season that Al Kaline ever had (we will get to the other). The famed slugger would also be first amongst the American League Rightfieders in Putouts, Assists, Total Zone Runs, Range Factor per Game and Fielding Percentage. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1980.

Hank Aaron, NL Milwaukee Braves (1958)

0.2 dWAR. The season after “Hammerin” Hank Aaron won the National League MVP, he would win his first Gold Glove. He would finish second in Total Zone Runs and Fielding Percentage while also finishing third in Range Factor per Game among the National League Rightfielders. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1982.

Willie Mays, NL San Francisco Giants (2) (1958)

1.5 dWAR. Mays would finish second in MVP voting and 10th in Defensive bWAR in the 1958 season, the first for the Giants in San Francisco. Like ’57, Mays did not finish first in any defensive category at Centerfield but he was in the hunt for many of them. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1979.

Frank Robinson, NL Cincinnati Reds (1958)

-0.1 dWAR. Frank Robinson was one of the greatest hitters of all-time but he was far from the best defensively. Robinson never had an outstanding defensive year and in the year he won his lone Gold Glove was no exception. The future two time MVP did not come close to appearing in the top five in any defensive category. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1982.

Al Kaline, AL Detroit Tigers (3) (1959)

0.4 dWAR. The first two Gold Gloves for Al Kaline were worthy. This wasn’t one of them. Kaline was not in the top five in any defensive category among the AL Rightfielders in any category. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1980.

Hank Aaron, NL Milwaukee Braves (2) (1959)

-1.1 dWAR. While Hank Aaron remained the offensive juggernaut that we remember this was not a season that showed off his defensive skills. Aaron would finish first in Assists and was also third in Fielding Percentage among the National League Rightfielders but he was not able to crack the top five in Total Zone Runs or Range Factor per Game. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1982.

Willie Mays, NL San Francisco Giants (3) (1959)

0.4 dWAR. In what would be his third consecutive Gold Glove win Mays would repeat more of 1957 as this was an average defensive season for anyone but not for Willie Mays. Finishing sixth in MVP voting, Mays was not a factor in any defensive lead among any National League Centerfielders. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1979.

Hank Aaron, NL Milwaukee Braves (3) (1960)

0.8 dWAR. This would be the third and final Gold Glove for Hank Aaron and in this season he would finish first in Total Zone Runs and Range Factor per Game among the Rightfielders in the National League. He would do the same in 1961 but he would not win the Gold Glove that year or ever again. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1982.

Willie Mays, NL San Francisco Giants (4) (1960)

1.4 dWAR. Mays finished third in National League MVP voting and he was fourth in Defensive bWAR in the NL. This year he was first in Assists and Total Zone Runs at Centerfield (in the NL) and was and in Range Factor per Game. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1979.

Al Kaline, AL Detroit Tigers (4) (1961)

2.2 dWAR. Kaline made a huge defensive comeback this season as in 1960 (Kaline had a negative Defensive bWAR and did not win a Gold Glove) and finished third overall in the AL in Defensive bWAR. This would be the last time that Kaline would be a top ten finisher in that stat. Kaline was first among his American League peers in Total Zone Runs and Range Factor per Game and was also first overall among all of the AL Outfielders in Total Zone Runs. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1980.

Roberto Clemente, NL Pittsburgh Pirates (1961)

-0.6 dWAR. Roberto Clemente is the most important Latino player of all-time, there is no doubt of that and he was a good defensive player. Saying all of that this was not the season for him to receive what would be the first of twelve straight Gold Gloves. Clemente, who had already established himself as an excellent offensive player and in 1961 he won his first Batting Title. Somehow this translated into a Gold Glove though he did play the most games at Right, which aided him in finishing first in Assists and Putouts at his position. Still, he was not in the top five in Total Zone Runs though he was second in Range Factor per Game. Based on traditional metrics, this made sense. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1973.

Willie Mays, NL San Francisco Giants (5) (1961)

1.4 dWAR. In what would be his fifth straight Gold Glove win the Say Hey kid would finish tenth in Defensive bWAR in the NL. Mays did not top the National League Centerfielders in any defensive metric but was third in Total Zone Runs. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1979.

Al Kaline, AL Detroit Tigers (5) (1962)

0.3 dWAR. Kaline dropped significantly in Defensive bWAR but he was still the first place finisher among the American League Rightfielders in Total Zone Runs and Range Factor per Game. This win might be more of a reflection of the existing competition. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1980.

Mickey Mantle, AL New York Yankees (1962)

-1.8 dWAR. Mickey Mantle was one of the greatest offensive baseball players of all time but defensively this wasn’t the case at all. In 1962, Mantle would win his third American League MVP and came off a pair of runner-ups to his teammate, Roger Maris, however he was nowhere close to finishing anywhere near the top of any defensive stat for a Leftfielder. This feels like a gift. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1980.

Roberto Clemente, NL Pittsburgh Pirates (2) (1962)

1.0 dWAR. Clemente did not lead the National League Rightfielders in Assists and Putouts like he did in 1961, but he was a far more efficient defensive player in 1962. The legend from Puerto Rico was at the top in Total Zone Runs for NL Rightfielders and was third overall among all Outfielders in the league. He was again second in Range Factor per Game. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1973.

Willie Mays, NL San Francisco Giants (6) (1962)

2.1 dWAR. Mays was second overall in the National League in Defensive bWAR, which was the highest of his career. The “Say Hey Kid” was first amongst the NL Centerfielders in Putouts, Total Zone Runs and Range Factor per Game and was tops in the latter two among all of the National League Outfielders. Arguably, this was his finest defensive season. He would finish second in National League MVP voting. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1979.

Al Kaline, AL Detroit Tigers (6) (1963)

-0.4 dWAR. Kaline was the runner-up for the American League MVP this year though he had much better years in his career offensively. He also had much better years with the glove, though he did finish atop the AL Rightfielders in Fielding Percentage. Having said that, Kaline was not a top five finisher in Total Zone Runs and Range Factor per Game. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1980.

Roberto Clemente, NL Pittsburgh Pirates (3) (1963)

-0.6 dWAR. Clemente may have won his first Gold Glove with a -0.6 Defensive bWAR but his accumulation of games allowed him to lead in some traditional defensive metrics. That did not happen in 1963 where his highest finish in any defensive stat was third (Assists and Putouts) and he led the NL Rightfelders in Errors. This was a poor choice. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1973.

Willie Mays, NL San Francisco Giants (7) (1963)

1.4 dWAR. While Willie Mays did not finish first in any defensive category among the National Centerfielders, he was in contention for many of them. This was a decent season by any defensive category. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1979.

Willie Mays, NL San Francisco Giants (7) (1963)

1.4 dWAR. While Willie Mays did not finish first in any defensive category among the National Centerfielders, he was in contention for many of them. This was a decent season by any defensive category. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1979.

Carl Yastrzemski, AL Boston Red Sox (1963)

0.4 dWAR. 1963 would be the year of many first for Carl Yaztrzemski. He would win his first Batting Title, his first On Base Percentage Title, lead the league in Hits for the first time, go to his first All Star Game and win his first Gold Glove. The latter might be considered a little suspect as though he did finish first among the American League Leftfielders in Assists while finishing second in Total Zone Runs and Range Factor per Game. Realistically based on his competition Yaz was a perfectly fine choice. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1983.

Al Kaline, AL Detroit Tigers (7) (1964)

0.9 dWAR. This was certainly a better Gold Glove winning season for the Hall of Famer as Kaline finished first at his position in Total Zone Runs and Range Factor per Game. Notably, he was first in Total Zone Runs among all of the Outfielders in the American League. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1980.

Roberto Clemente, NL Pittsburgh Pirates (4) (1964)

0.2 dWAR. Clemente finished second amongst the NL Rightfieders in Total Zone Runs however again was first in Errors. This would be the fourth time he would do so. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1973.

Willie Mays, NL San Francisco Giants (8) (1964)

1.9 dWAR. Once again Willie Mays finished sixth in MVP voting and was a third place finisher in Defensive bWAR. Like the season before, Mays was not first in any defensive category amongst National League Centerfielders (though he was second in Total Zone Runs) but this was still a very good season with his glove. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1979.

Al Kaline, AL Detroit Tigers (8) (1965)

-1.3 dWAR. Horrible. Just horrible. While we love Kaline, we do not have any respect for his Gold Glove win of 1965. The Detroit Tiger was not in the top five in any defensive metric among the AL Rightfielders. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1980.

Carl Yastrzemski, AL Boston Red Sox (2) (1965)

-1.0 dWAR. While Yastrzemski would still have an overall good year and again finish first among his league peers in Assists he was not in the top five in Total Zone Runs and Range Factor per Game. His second Gold Glove should not have happened this year. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1983.

Roberto Clemente, NL Pittsburgh Pirates (5) (1965)

1.2 dWAR. While Roberto Clemente would once again suffer a National League Rightfield lead in Errors, he was also the leader in Total Zone Runs not only among NL Rightfielders but all Outfielders. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1973.

Willie Mays, NL San Francisco Giants (9) (1965)

1.6 dWAR. Willie Mays would win his second and final National League MVP award in 1965, though under modern thinking he likely would have won more. This year Mays finished eighth in Defensive bWAR and again was not the first place finisher though again was not the National League leader in any defensive statistic among the National League Centerfielders. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1979.

Al Kaline, AL Detroit Tigers (9) (1966)

-0.5 dWAR. Kaline again had another season where he was not close to the league lead in any defensive category. Perhaps, they forgot to refresh the ballot from the previous years. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1980.

Roberto Clemente, NL Pittsburgh Pirates (6) (1966)

1.3 dWAR. Clemente would repeat with the same amount of Total Zone Runs (17) that he did in ’65, though this time it was only enough for second among all National League Outfielders, though first for Rightfielders. He also would lead in Assists, though again in Errors. It also needs to be noted that this year Clemente was named the National League MVP. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1973.

Willie Mays, NL San Francisco Giants (10) (1966)

2.1 dWAR. Arguably this was the last great season for Willie Mays defensively but not the last time he would win a Gold Glove, though this is far from a pattern. Finishing third in Defensive bWAR in the National League, Mays would top the Centerfielders in the NL in Total Zone Runs and Range Factor per Game. It would actually be the final year where he would finish first defensively in any category. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1979.

Al Kaline, AL Detroit Tigers (10) (1967)

0.4 dWAR. With the tenth and final Gold Glove of Al Kaline’s career we can safely say that he probably deserved three of them or five at the most, though he bucked the trend of a legend usually saving his worst Gold Glove winning performance as his last. 1967 would see Kaline lead the AL Rightfielders in Total Zone Runs, the last time he would in his career. The next season, he would win his first and only World Series. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1980.

Carl Yastrzemski, AL Boston Red Sox (3) (1967)

1.7 dWAR. This would be the first of two times where Yastrzemski would finish in the top ten in the AL in Defensive bWAR (he was seventh) and would also finish first among the Leftfielders in Total Zone Runs and was second overall in the league. Notably Yastrzemski would win the Triple Crown and would be named the American League Most Valuable Player. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1983.

Roberto Clemente, NL Pittsburgh Pirates (7) (1967)

-0.1 dWAR. Clemente dropped to fourth in Total Zone Runs but did finish first in Assists. Still, this was not one of those seasons where he should have won a Gold Glove. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1973.

Willie Mays, NL San Francisco Giants (11) (1967)

0.3 dWAR. As you could wager by the 1966 paragraph, the 1967 defensive campaign from Mays would be sub-par…and it was. Mays was also regressing at this stage with his bat and was not in the mix for any top metric in defense. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1979.

Carl Yastrzemski, AL Boston Red Sox (4) (1968)

2.0 dWAR. 1968 would arguably be the best defensive season of Yastrzemski’s career as he had career highs in defensive bWAR and Total Zone Runs (25), the former being good enough for eighth in the latter positioning him third in those respective stats in the AL. Yaz was also first at his league position in Putouts. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1983.

Roberto Clemente, NL Pittsburgh Pirates (8) (1968)

2.5 dWAR. This was a strange year for Roberto Clemente as for the first time since 1960 he was not named an All Star. He also did not receive any votes for MVP and batted under .300, the first time since 1959 (though his .291 was still good enough for 10th in the NL). Still he was still good enough offensively and put up a career high 2.5 in Defensive bWAR, which actually made 1968 the only year that finished first and only time in bWAR in the league! Clemente would put up a career high 25 Total Zone Runs, which was the most among everyone in the NL and he also finished first among all National League Outfielders in Range Factor per Game. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1973.

Willie Mays, NL San Francisco Giants (12) (1968)

0.4 dWAR. In what was Willie Mays’ final season as a Gold Glove recipient, it was also his last year that the legend had a positive Defensive bWAR, albeit a 0.4. Like 1967, Mays probably should not have won this Gold Glove but his overall defensive metrics were strong and when Mays is spoke of as one of the best defensive players ever a case can be made. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1979

Carl Yastrzemski, AL Boston Red Sox (5) (1969)

0.4 dWAR. In terms of Defensive bWAR Yastrzemski tumbled from the previous year and also did so in Total Zone Runs. However his 11 TZR was still decent enough for a third place finish among the American League Leftfielders and he was first in Assists. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1983.

Roberto Clemente, NL Pittsburgh Pirates (9) (1969)

0.7 dWAR. Roberto Clemente could not duplicate defensively what he did the season before (though his offense returned to form) but his 11 Total Zone Runs were still enough to lead all National League Rightfielders in that stat. This would be the only defensive metric he would. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1973.

Roberto Clemente, NL Pittsburgh Pirates (10) (1970)

0.1 dWAR. This was definitely one of those incorrect selections of a Gold Glove recipient, as Clemente would become one of the many winners of this award to do so on reputation. He would not finish in the top three in any defensive statistic. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1973.

Carl Yastrzemski, AL Boston Red Sox (6) (1971)

0.8 dWAR. Yaz was first at his league position in Assists with a second place finish in Total Zone Runs. It was not a spectacular year defensively but he did play the most games at this position and it was not a terrible win. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1983.

Roberto Clemente, NL Pittsburgh Pirates (11) (1971)

1.8 dWAR. Clemente rebounded with his glove as he finished eighth in the National League in Defensive bWAR. The future Hall of Famer would also again lead the National League Outfielders in Total Zone Runs (20) while also finishing first in Range Factor per Game among the NL Rightfielders. Far more important to Clemente, he would lead his Pittsburgh Pirates to a World Series (his second) and was named the World Series MVP. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1973.

Roberto Clemente, NL Pittsburgh Pirates (12) (1972)

1.1 dWAR. In what would be his final year in baseball, Roberto Clemente would have a good year defensively as he finished first amongst the National League Rightfielders in Total Zone Runs and Range Factor per Game. As baseball fans know, Clemente’s career ended after the 1972 season as he died in a plane crash while on his way to bring relief and aid to the victims of an earthquake in Nicaragua. Clemente probably should not have won a dozen Gold Gloves but overall the Hall of Famer was well above average in terms of defensive acumen. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1973.

Carl Yastrzemski, AL Boston Red Sox (7) (1977)

0.5 dWAR. In between what would be his final Gold Glove and the one he won in 1971 Yastrzemski would play both Leftfield and in First Base. 1977 would see a full time return to Left and would again lead in Assists. He would also finish first amongst his AL contemporaries in Total Zone Runs and for the first and only time he would be a top Leftfield leaderboard in Fielding Percentage, where had a perfect 1.000. Overall Carl Yastrzemski had a decent defensive career though seven Gold Gloves was a little excessive. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1983.

Dave Winfield, NL San Diego Padres (1979)

0.6 dWAR. To be clear, we are fans of Dave Winfield as an entrant to the Baseball Hall of Fame, though it may not seem that way after we talk about his seven Gold Glove wins, none of which we think he should have won. For what it is worth his first Gold Glove win would at least see him do so with a positive Defensive bWAR, something he did not do in the next six. In 1979 the then San Diego Padre Winfield did finish first in Putouts and was second among the National League Rightfielders in Total Zone Runs. Overall, this is not bad, but not Gold Glove worthy and sadly the best of his seven. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2001.

Andre Dawson, NL Montreal Expos (1980)

0.9 dWAR. This would be the first of eight Gold Gloves for the “Hawk” and this was not a terrible way to start. Dawson was second in Assists and Putouts while finishing fourth at his league position in Total Zone Runs. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2010.

Dave Winfield, NL San Diego Padres (2) (1980)

-1.4 dWAR. Winfield played more games than anyone else in the National League at Rightfield and he would lead all in his position at Assists. Saying that he was not in the top five in Total Zone Runs and Range Factor per Game, which will be a pattern as we continue to look at Winfield’s defense. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2001.

Rickey Henderson, AL Oakland Athletics (1981)

2.0 dWAR. When you think of Rickey Henderson, you think of his speed, his unequaled eccentricity and his longevity. You generally don’t think of his defensive skills and with a career Defensive bWAR in the negative that makes sense. However, we have a case here of a Hall of Famer who had a great (and rare) defensive gem of a campaign and was rewarded for that season and that season only. In 1981, Henderson’s 2.0 Defensive bWAR was good enough for fourth overall in the AL and he would also finish second overall in the League in Total Zone Runs. In terms of his position (Leftfield) Henderson was first in Putouts, Total Zone Runs and Range Factor per Game. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2009.

Andre Dawson, NL Montreal Expos (2) (1981)

2.2 dWAR. While it was a strike-shortened season, Andre Dawson still netted a Defensive WAR over 2.0! In what could be argued as the Hawk’s best defensive year, he would finish first in the NL in Total Zone Runs while also leading his position in Putouts, Assists and Range Factor per Game. Notably this was his first All Star game and he would finish second in MVP voting. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2010.

Dave Winfield, AL New York Yankees (3) (1982)

-1.3 dWAR. This was Dave Winfield’s first Gold Glove in the American League and he failed to finish in the top five in any significant defensive stat among the Rightfielders. Why is this happening other than rewarding a great offensive player? Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2001.

Andre Dawson, NL Montreal Expos (3) (1982)

2.1 dWAR. Dawson would rank sixth in Defensive WAR in the National League while finishing second in Total Zone Runs in the NL and first at his position. Dawson was also first at his position in Range Factor per Game. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2010.

Dave Winfield, AL New York Yankees (4) (1983)

-2.2 dWAR. Not only did Dave Winfield not finish in the top five in any defensive category, he played multiple positions in the Outfield that year and was mediocre everywhere. His -2.2 is one of the worst Defensive bWARs to win a Gold Glove. This is horrible. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2001.

Andre Dawson, NL Montreal Expos (4) (1983)

1.2 dWAR. Andre Dawson finished second in the National League MVP race and with his glove he had a respectable third and fourth place at his position in Total Zone Runs and Range Factor per Game. Perhaps this was not a Gold Glove worthy season but it is in terms of what was typical! Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2010.

Dave Winfield, AL New York Yankees (5) (1984)

-1.1 dWAR. Winfield at least finished first among the American League Rightfielders in Fielding Percentage but was not in the top five in anything else. For a Winfield Gold Glove win, this is actually good, not that we expected much. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2001.

Andre Dawson, NL Montreal Expos (5) (1984)

0.7 dWAR. Dawson had moved to Rightfield this season and was second in Total Zone Runs and overall among all Outfielders was fifth. Perhaps this wasn’t the net win that should occur, but intangibles might allow this to be not be a mess of a win like we will see later. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2010.

Dave Winfield, AL New York Yankees (6) (1985)

-0.7 dWAR. Dave Winfield played more games in the American League at Rightfield but he was not first at his position in any defensive stat. He finished second in Assists and Fielding Percentage, was fifth in Range Factor per Game but as expected (especially if you have been following here) was not in the mix in Total Zone Runs. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2001.

Andre Dawson, NL Montreal Expos (6) (1985)

-0.1 dWAR. We now have our first Andre Dawson Gold Glove as a Montreal Expo that is impossible to defend. Dawson not only had a negative Defensive WAR but also was not in the top five in any defensive category. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2010.

Kirby Puckett, AL Minnesota Twins (1986)

-0.5 dWAR. This one is going start a little strange. Kirby Puckett’s rookie year did not set anyone on fire, although he did finish third in American League Rookie of the Year voting and while he did not display the offense he would late in his career he had an exemplary 3.3 Defensive bWAR. He would never come close to that again. While his offense exploded in 1986 with a 30 Home Run and .300 season, his defense was not great but the fact that he was now an All Star and Silver Slugger did not hurt. Again we have offense rewarding defense in the Gold Glove awards. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2001.

Tony Gwynn, NL San Diego Padres (1986)

0.7 dWAR. Tony Gwynn proved to be one of the greatest spray hitters in Baseball and in 1986 after already establishing himself as a multi-time All Star he would lead the NL on Putouts among the National League Outfielders and was also first in Fielding Percentage at his outfield position at Right. He was however first among those in the National League in regards to Outfielders in Total Zone Runs. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2007.

Kirby Puckett, AL Minnesota Twins (2) (1987)

-0.7 dWAR. Puckett’s defense did not improve in his second Gold Glove win as among all of the American League Centerfielders he was not in the top five in Total Zone Runs, Range Factor per Game or Fielding Percentage. Still, this was a star, which was cemented by taking Minnesota to their first World Series win. Ask anyone in Minnesota if they care that Puckett was not a legit Gold Glover in 1987. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2001.

Dave Winfield, AL New York Yankees (7) (1987)

-1.5 dWAR. This would be the seventh and final Gold Glove for Winfield and the last of these abominations. Sorry, but it was. Winfield’s overall Defensive bWAR was a disgusting -22.7 and he is a seven time Gold Glove winner? Appalling! The only top five finish was third in Fielding Percentage for American League Rightfielders and nowhere in any other top five in a defensive stat. Again, et us state that Winfield BELONGS in the Baseball Hall of Fame, but his trophy case should have never obtained one Gold Glove Award. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2001.

Andre Dawson, NL Chicago Cubs (7) (1987)

-0.6 dWAR. The 1987 MVP Award for Andre Dawson was honestly a bit fraudulent. This was the year of collusion where Dawson took a substantially lower pay as a Free Agent that he should have receiver and put forth an exceptional offensive season…though it was not great with the glove. Dawson had great offensive metrics but was not a top five finisher in any defensive one other than a second place one in Fielding Percentage. This felt like an apology on behalf of the colluding owners. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2010.

Tony Gwynn, NL San Diego Padres (2) (1987)

0.1 dWAR. This was the second Gold Glove for Tony Gwynn and while he proved himself to be an offensive juggernaut his defensive statistics at this stage was not Gold Glove worthy. He finished fourth in Range Factor per Game and Total Zone Runs among the National League Rightfielders, so at least there is that. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2007.

Kirby Puckett, AL Minnesota Twins (3) (1988)

1.0 dWAR. This was the third of six Gold Gloves that Puckett would win and sadly his 1.0, which while decent should not be the best Defensive bWAR season when you win six. Still, this is what it is and Puckett finished second among the American League Centerfielders in Range Factor per Game and Fielding Percentage and was fourth in Total Zone Runs. At least a case can be made this season. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2001.

Andre Dawson, NL Chicago Cubs (8) (1988)

-0.4 dWAR. Again we state how much we love Andre Dawson for the Baseball Hall of Fame, but he should not have been an eight time Gold Glove winner, and maybe four at tops. In what would be his last award he was not in the mix for any Defensive title but he did have some good will that carried over. Make no mistake as this helped him here! Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2010

Kirby Puckett, AL Minnesota Twins (4) (1989)

-0.1 dWAR. While Puckett had a negative bWAR in terms of his defense he actually was his league’s position leader in Range Factor per Game. This would also be the third and final time he would finish first in Putouts. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2001.

Tony Gwynn, NL San Diego Padres (3) (1989)

-2.8 dWAR. What a mess. Let us first state how much we love Tony Gwynn as a hitter but this Gold Glove win marks one of the worst Defensive bWARs ever to win a Gold Glove with a sad -2.8. While Gwynn was coming off his third straight Batting Title, his highest defensive finish was fourth in Assists and he was not close to the top five among his league peers in anything else. This was an atrocious choice. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2007.

Ken Griffey Jr., AL Seattle Mariners (1990)

0.5 dWAR. Ken Griffey Jr. began his decade of domination where not only would he be named an All Star throughout the 1990’s he would also named a Gold Glove winner each year. Some were more deserving then others, in the future first ballot Hall of Famer did not get off to the best start as in 1990 he did not finish in the top five in Range Factor per Game, Total Zone Runs and Fielding Percentage. Watch this as this will be a pattern for the first few Ken Griffey Jr. Gold Glove wins. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2016.

Tony Gwynn, NL San Diego Padres (4) (1990)

0.3 dWAR. This was certainly a lot better than his last Gold Glove win, but again we don’t have a Gold Glove worthy season from Gwynn, although he was the leader among the National League Rightfielders in Range Factor per Game. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2007.

Ken Griffey Jr., AL Seattle Mariners (2) (1991)

1.0 dWAR. Griffey Jr.’s second season would also see him not finish in the top five among his league position in Range Factor per Game, Total Zone Runs and Fielding Percentage but he showcased his powerful arm with 15 Assists. That netted him the American League lead among the Centerfielders. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2016.

Kirby Puckett, AL Minnesota Twins (5) (1991)

0.1 dWAR. In 1991, Kirby Puckett was not able to crack the top five in Range Factor Per Game, Fielding Percentage, Total Zone Runs or even Putouts. This was not a spectacular season for Puckett with his glove but again his bat was string and more importantly he led the Twins to their second World Series where he was the ALCS MVP. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2001.

Tony Gwynn, NL San Diego Padres (5) (1991)

2.6 dWAR. Based on the first four Gold Gloves that Tony Gwynn won, did you think that he had this defensive season in him? In 1991, Gwynn led everyone in the National League with 28 Total Zone Runs and his 2.6 Defensive bWAR placed him second overall in the National League. Interestingly enough Tony Gwynn had another good defensive campaign in 1992 with 19 Total Zone Runs (third overall) and a Defensive bWAR of 1.7 (seventh overall). That season warranted a Gold Glove, so of course he did not get one. This was the last of five Gold Gloves he would win. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2007.

Ken Griffey Jr., AL Seattle Mariners (3) (1992)

-0.1 dWAR. While Ken Griffey Jr. continued to provide great offense his defense was not impeccable. He did for the first and only time finish first at his position in Fielding Percentage but again he was absent in the top five in Range Factor per Game and Total Zone Runs. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2016.

Kirby Puckett, AL Minnesota Twins (6) (1992)

0.6 dWAR. This would be the final Gold Glove win of Kirby Puckett’s career and again we state that he was only worthy of one, which was in the rookie season that he didn’t win the award. Puckett was the runner-up for the American League MVP award this year (his highest) was fourth among the AL Centerfielders in Fielding Percentage did not finish in the top five in any other category. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2001.

Ken Griffey Jr., AL Seattle Mariners (4) (1993)

0.9 dWAR. This was the first season that Griffey Jr. would finish in the top five at his position in Total Zone Runs and it was also his first of seven 40 Home Run seasons. The Seattle Mariner was about to hit is stride defensively but arguably he went four for four in curious Gold Glove selections up until tis point. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2016.

Ken Griffey Jr., AL Seattle Mariners (5) (1994)

1.2 dWAR. In the strike-shortened 1994 season Ken Griffey Jr. finished ninth overall in Defensive bWAR, which as he first time he finished in the top ten in that sabremetric category. Griffey Jr. He would finish in second among the AL Centerfielders in Total Zone Runs. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2016.

Ken Griffey Jr., AL Seattle Mariners (6) (1995)

1.5 dWAR. This one is fascinating. In regards to Defensive bWAR he recorded what was then a career high 1.5 and his 15 Total Zone Runs led the American League Centerfielders. Amazingly, he did this in only 72 Games played yet this was to date the easiest Gold Glove win to defend. Only a freak athlete like Ken Griffey Jr. can accomplish this. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2016.

Ken Griffey Jr., AL Seattle Mariners (7) (1996)

3.4 dWAR. Without question there is no doubt that this was the best defensive season of the career of Ken Griffey Jr. He would be the American League leader in Total Zone Runs with 32, which would be by far the highest of his career. Griffey Jr. was also first among all of the AL Outfielders in Range Factor per Game. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2016.

Ken Griffey Jr., AL Seattle Mariners (8) (1997)

1.9 dWAR. Ken Griffey Jr. was named the American League MVP where he set career highs in Home Runs (56), Runs Batted In (147) and Slugging Percentage .646). Defensively he was strong with a second place at his league position in Total Zone Runs and third in Range Factor per Game. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2016.

Ken Griffey Jr., AL Seattle Mariners (9) (1998)

0.1 dWAR. While Griffey’s offense remained on an elite level (he equaled the 56 Home Runs from the year before) his defense took a tumble as he fell out of the top five in Total Zone Runs though he was second in Range Factor per Game. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2016.

Ken Griffey Jr., AL Seattle Mariners (10) (1999)

-0.9 dWAR. Griffey slid defensively again with a -.0.9 and a failure to reach the top ten among the AL Centerfielders in Range Factor per Game, Total Zone Runs and Fielding Percentage. While we feel that Griffey Jr. should be a three time Gold Glove winner as opposed to a ten time recipient he did have an overall Defensive bWAR as a Mariner of 9.2, so he was certainly more than adequate with his glove. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2016.

The following are the players who have won the Gold Glove at Outfield who are eligible for the Baseball Hall of Fame and have not been selected:

Minnie Minoso, ML Chicago White Sox (1957)

-0.2 dWAR. Finishing 8th in MVP voting, Minoso was an All Star for the fifth time in 1957. Minoso did not exactly put up good defensive metrics but in terms of his peers at Leftfield he was second in Total Zone Runs, third in Range Factor per Game and second in Assists. He did play the most games at Left, which at least showed he finished first at something. Minoso was on the ballot for fifteen years and finished as high as 21.1% of the ballot.  Ranked #23 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Jim Piersall, AL Boston Red Sox (1958)

1.5 dWAR. Piersall was the American League leader in Defensive bWAR in both 1955 and 1956 and was the fifth place finisher in 1958. Piersall was first among the AL Centerfielders in Total Zone Runs and was second in Range Factor per Game. Despite being eligible for the Hall of Fame in 1973 he was not on the ballot.  

Norm Siebern, AL New York Yankees (1958)

0.6 dWAR. In terms of Defensive bWAR, this was the best season of Norm Siebern’s career, however it was the only one where he had a positive number and it was only 0.6. Siebern would finish first among the AL Leftfielders in Total Zone Runs but this was hardly a great defensive year. It likely didn’t hurt that he was a popular rookie on what would be a World Series Championship team. Despite being eligible for the Hall of Fame in 1974 he was not on the ballot.  

Jackie Jensen, AL Boston Red Sox (1959)

0.3 dWAR. Jackie Jensen (historically speaking anyway) was a surprise MVP winner the year before and Jensen would win his only Gold Glove the year after. While the 0.3 Defensive bWAR isn’t great, it was actually the highest of his career and he would finish first in Range Factor per Game and second in Total Zone Runs among the AL Rightfielders. Jensen would retire the year after, though would make a comeback for one season in 1961. Jensen was on the ballot for six years and finished as high as 1.1% in 1968.  

Minnie Minoso, AL (2) Cleveland Indians (1959)

0.7 dWAR. Minoso would finish first amongst American League Leftfielders in Assists and Total Zone Runs while being second in Range Factor per Game and Fielding Percentage. Minoso was on the ballot for fifteen years and finished as high as 21.1% of the ballot.  Ranked #23 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Jackie Brandt, NL San Francisco Giants (1959)

-0.6 dWAR. This was a very strange Gold Glove win as Jackie Brandt was not exactly a superstar and only led the National League Leftfielders in Fielding percentage. This was not a special defensive year and realistically Brandt never had one with the possible exception of 1964 as a Baltimore Oriole. Despite being eligible for the Hall of Fame in 1973 he was not on the ballot.  

Jim Landis, AL Chicago White Sox (1960)

0.4 dWAR. Jim Landis had a case for the Gold Glove in 1959 where he finished 7th in MVP voting and led the AL in Total Zone Runs while finishing second in Defensive bWAR. This would not be the case for any of Landis’ five Gold Glove wins. In his first win Landis was not in the top two in any defensive stat for an American League Centerfielder. Despite being eligible for the Hall of Fame in 1973 he was not on the ballot.  

Roger Maris, AL New York Yankees (1960)

1.4 dWAR. Roger Maris was known for a lot of things but his defensive skills were not often talked about. Maris’ best year with the glove was in fact this year, which was also his first of two straight MVPs. He would finish first among the AL Leftfielders in Total Zone Runs and Fielding Percentage and if he was ever going to be a Gold Glove winner, this was the year.  Maris was on the ballot for fifteen years and finished as high as 43.1% of the ballot in 1988.  Ranked #25 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Minnie Minoso, AL (3) Chicago White Sox (1960)

-1.5 dWAR. This definitely was not a Gold Glove worthy season and overall his career Defensive bWAR was -5.7, a number that does not scream defensive excellence. The only metric that Minoso finished first in 1960 was Assists and he was not a top five finisher in Total Zone Runs. A better choice could have been made here. Minoso was on the ballot for fifteen years and finished as high as 21.1% of the ballot.  Ranked #23 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Wally Moon, NL Los Angeles Dodgers (1960)

0.4 dWAR. Wally Moon won the World Series was named an All Star and finished 4th in National League MVP voting and that might have bled into a strange Gold Glove win for him in 1960. This wasn’t the best year that a Leftfielder had but Moon led the National League Leftfielders in Total Zone Runs and Fielding Percentage. Moon was on the ballot for one year in 1971 and received 0.6% of the ballot.  

Jim Landis, AL Chicago White Sox (2) (1961)

0.0 dWAR. Although Landis had a lower Defensive bWAR (0.0 from 0.4, he did finish first at his position in Range Factor per Game. Despite being eligible for the Hall of Fame in 1973 he was not on the ballot.  

Jim Piersall, AL Cleveland Indians (2) (1961)

1.6 dWAR. Piersall finished ninth in the AL in Defensive bWAR and was also 13th overall in MVP voting. In terms of his position, he was first in Total Zone Runs, Range Factor per Game and Fielding Percentage. Despite being eligible for the Hall of Fame in 1973 he was not on the ballot.  

Vada Pinson, NL Cincinnati Reds (1961)

1.8 dWAR. In terms of Defensive bWAR this was by far the best season defensively that Vada Pinson would have in his career. He finished first amongst the National League Centerfielders in Range Factor per Game and Total Zone Runs. He would never come close to doing that again. While Pinson will never be known for his defense this was the season he should have been. Pinson was on the ballot for fifteen years and finished as high as 15.7% in 1988. Pinson is ranked #85 on Notinhalloffame.com.  

Jim Landis, AL Chicago White Sox (3) (1962)

0.0 dWAR. Landis did not finish at the top among the American League Centerfielders but he was second in Range Factor per Game and Fielding Percentage. Notably, this was the only year where he was named an All Star. Despite being eligible for the Hall of Fame in 1973 he was not on the ballot.  

Bill Virdon, NL Pittsburgh Pirates (1962)

0.3 dWAR. Bill Virdon was the National League Rookie of the Year for the Cardinals in 1955 and this would be his second and final individual accolade as a player. Virdon was a decent player over his long career but if he was meant to be a Gold Glove winner, this wasn’t the year. He was not in the mix to lead any Rightfielders in any defensive metric. Virdon was on the ballot for two years and finished as high as 0.8% in 1974.  

Jim Landis, AL Chicago White Sox (4) (1963)

0.5 dWAR. For the first and only time in his career, Jim Landis would lead the American League Centerfielders in Fielding Percentage. Despite being eligible for the Hall of Fame in 1973 he was not on the ballot.  

Curt Flood, NL St. Louis Cardinals (1963)

1.8 dWAR. While this was the first Gold Glove for Curt Flood, this was the fourth time he finished in the top ten in Defensive bWAR; this year he was eighth. Flood finished first amongst the National League Centerfielders in Putouts, Total Zone Runs and Range Factor per Game. Flood was on the ballot for fifteen years and finished as high as 15.1% in 1996.  

Vic Davalillo, AL Cleveland Indians (1964)

-0.7 dWAR. There might have been some seasons where Vic Davalillo was Gold Glove material but 1964 was not one of them. While he did finish first among the American League Centerfielders in Fielding Percentage he would also finish first in Errors. He was also not in the top four in Range Factor Per Game or Total Zone Runs. Ideally, the bookend years (1963 or 1965) he might have had a case for the trophy. Davalillo was on the ballot in 1986 but did not receive any votes.  

Jim Landis, AL Chicago White Sox (5) (1964)

0.2 dWAR. In what would be the last Gold Glove of Jim Landis’ career, the Centerfielder failed to finish in the top five in any significant defensive statistic, which has been a trend in Gold Glove recipients. We will see this again soon. Despite being eligible for the Hall of Fame in 1973 he was not on the ballot.  

Curt Flood, NL St. Louis Cardinals (2) (1964)

1.4 dWAR. 1964 was a special year for Curt Flood as he went to his first All Star Game, won his first World Series and finished eleventh in MVP voting, Defensively Flood finished eighth overall in the NL in Defensive bWAR but did not finish first in any defensive category. He did however finish second amongst his peers in Total Zone Runs, Range Factor per Game and Fielding Percentage. Flood was on the ballot for fifteen years and finished as high as 15.1% in 1996.  

Tom Tresh, AL New York Yankees (1965)

-1.4 dWAR. A former Rookie of the Year (1962) Tresh would have a few good defensive seasons in baseball but 1965 was not one and he was nowhere close to finishing in the top three in any major defensive metric. This was a horrible choice and you have to wonder if there was a Yankee bias in play. Tresh did not play the mandatory ten seasons to qualify for Hall of Fame consideration.  

Curt Flood, NL St. Louis Cardinals (3) (1965)

-0.2 dWAR. While Curt Flood was a deserving winner for his two Gold Gloves, Flood did not really earn this one. The St. Louis Cardinal was nowhere near the top in any defensive statistic. Flood was on the ballot for fifteen years and finished as high as 15.1% in 1996.  

Tony Oliva, AL Minnesota Twins (1966)

0.8 dWAR. Tony Oliva is accurately applauded for his offensive skills but there were a few seasons where his defensive metrics were pretty good. The Minnesota Twin would win his only Gold Glove in 1966 where he was tops among the American League Rightfielders in Putouts, Total Zone Runs and Range Factor per Game. Oliva was on the ballot for fifteen years and finished as high as 47.3% in 1988.  Ranked #31 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Tommie Agee, AL Chicago White Sox (1966)

1.7 dWAR. Named the American League Rookie of the Year Agee finished ninth overall in Defensive bWAR in the league. Agee finished first in Putouts and Total Zone Runs. Agee was on the ballot for one year in 1979 but did not receive any votes.  

Curt Flood, NL St. Louis Cardinals (4) (1966)

1.2 dWAR. Flood would go to his second All Star Game and he would rebound defensively. He would lead the Centerfielders in the NL in Putouts and Fielding Percentage. Flood was on the ballot for fifteen years and finished as high as 15.1% in 1996.  

Paul Blair, AL Baltimore Orioles (1967)

2.4 dWAR. Paul Blair had already assisted the Baltimore Orioles in winning the World Series the year before but it was in ’67 where he cemented himself as an everyday player. Blair would finish third overall in the AL in Defensive bWAR and in Total Zone Runs. At his league position he was first in Putouts, Total Zone Runs and Range Factor per Game. Blair was on the ballot for one year and finished in 1986 and received 1.9% of the vote.  

Curt Flood, NL St. Louis Cardinals (5) (1967)

0.6 dWAR. This year would see Flood finish first in Range Factor per Game among not only the National League Centerfielders but all NL Outfielders. Flood was on the ballot for fifteen years and finished as high as 15.1% in 1996.  

Reggie Smith, AL Boston Red Sox (1968)

0.7 dWAR. Reggie Smith would become a feared power hitter but he wasn’t considered a defensive superstar. He did however in 1968 lead all of the American League Outfielders in Putouts and had a respectable second place finish in Total Zone Runs among those at his position in the AL. Smith was on the ballot for one year in 1988 and finished with 0.7% of the vote.

Mickey Stanley, AL Detroit Tigers (1968)

1.0 dWAR. Everything was coming up Detroit in 1968 and Mickey Stanley would ride that to his first Gold Glove and a World Series ring. Stanley had a perfect Fielding Percentage and finished third in Total Zone Runs. Stanley was on the ballot for one year in 1984 and finished with 0.5% of the vote.  

Curt Flood, NL St. Louis Cardinals (6) (1968)

-0.4 dWAR. Arguably, this would be the best season of Curt Flood’s career as in 1968 he was named to his third (and final) All Star Game, would help the Cardinals win the World Series and was fourth in MVP voting. Although Flood had a negative Defensive bWAR he was still first among all of the National League Centerfielders in Putouts and Range Factor per Game. Flood was on the ballot for fifteen years and finished as high as 15.1% in 1996.  

Paul Blair, AL Baltimore Orioles (2) (1969)

2.8 dWAR. Arguably this was the best season of Paul Blair’s career. He would set career highs in bWAR, Hits and Home Runs and would go to jhis first of two All Star Games. He would also finish eleventh in MVP voting (another career high). Specifically in regards to his defensive statistics Blair was fourth overall in Defensive bWAR and was first overall in the American League in Total Zone Runs. In terms of American League Centerfielders he was the leader in Putouts, Total Zone Runs and Range Factor per Game. Blair was on the ballot for one year and finished in 1986 and received 1.9% of the ballot.  

Mickey Stanley, AL Detroit Tigers (2) (1969)

0.2 dWAR. While it would be possible to defend the Mickey Stanley’s first Gold Glove, his second one is difficult to justify. He did not finish in the top five in any defensive category. Stanley was on the ballot for one year in 1984 and finished with 0.5% of the vote.  

Curt Flood, NL St. Louis Cardinals (7) (1969)

0.7 dWAR. This would be the seventh and final Gold Glove for Flood and overall he was a decent defensive player he was not worth a touchdown worth of defensive hardware. In this year he would finish first in Putouts and Fielding Percentage. Now we have to look at doing a piece on players who were more influential than you think! Free agency is because of Curt Flood! But that is another story… Flood was on the ballot for fifteen years and finished as high as 15.1% in 1996.  

Pete Rose, NL Cincinnati Reds (1969)

-1.1 dWAR. Anyone who has visited this site on even a semi-regular basis knows that we are huge advocates of Pete Rose entering the Baseball Hall of Fame. At no point have we ever said it was because of his defense. Rose played multiple positions in the field and bluntly he was not a great player with the glove during the bulk of his career. In what would be his first of two Gold Gloves. Rose would finish second among the National League Rightfielders in Range Factor per Game, but he was not in the mix anywhere else. Pete Rose is currently banned from the Baseball Hall of Fame. Rose is ranked #1A on Notinhalloffame.com.  

Ken Berry, AL Chicago White Sox (1970)

0.2 dWAR. This was a very strange selection as Ken Berry was not in the top five in any defensive statistic, nor was he basking in the glow of a championship team or the overflow of an All Star year. We will need a lot of help to understand what went wrong here. Berry was on the ballot for one year in 1981 but did not receive any votes.  

Paul Blair, AL Baltimore Orioles (3) (1970)

2.7 dWAR. Paul Blair has another incredible year with his glove and would finish third overall in Defensive WAR and was second in Total Zone Runs. Amongst the AL Centerfielders Blair would be atop the leaderboard in Total Zone Runs and Range Factor per Game. More importantly to Blair and the Baltimore Orioles, he would win the World Series for the second time. Blair was on the ballot for one year and finished in 1986 and received 1.9% of the ballot.  

Mickey Stanley, AL Detroit Tigers (3) (1970)

-0.4 dWAR. Despite the negative Defensive bWAR Stanley had a perfect Fielding Percentage, the second of his career. This was however a player who could not save runs by doing anything extraordinary in the field. This does, and should matter. Stanley was on the ballot for one year in 1984 and finished with 0.5% of the vote.  

Tommie Agee, NL New York Mets (1970)

1.3 dWAR. Winning his second and final Gold Glove the year after he was part of the Miracle Mets, Tommie Agee would actually lead the National League Centerfielders in Errors but was also the top finisher in Putouts and Total Zone Runs. Agee was on the ballot for one year in 1979 but did not receive any votes.  

Pete Rose, NL Cincinnati Reds (2) (1970)

-0.3 dWAR. Rose would win his second straight (and final) Gold Glove where he was not exactly a worthy recipient, though this was light years better than the first. He would actually finish first among all National League Outfielders in Fielding Percentage and was a respectable third amongst the NL Rightfielders in Total Zone Runs. It is certainly worth noting that when he switched to Leftfield, he would drastically improve with a first place finish in Total Zone Runs in 1973, which was bookended by third place finishes. All of these years also had a positive Defensive bWAR. Essentially what we are saying is that if you are to give Pete Rose two Gold Gloves you picked the wrong two years. Pete Rose is currently banned from the Baseball Hall of Fame. Rose is ranked #1A on Notinhalloffame.com.  

Paul Blair, AL Baltimore Orioles (4) (1971)

0.8 dWAR. While this was statistically a down year for Paul Blair defensively, he would be named an All Star for the second and final time. While he had much fewer Total Zone Runs (8 from 26 from the previous year), it was still enough to lead all the Centerfielders of the American League. He would also finish first for the second time in Fielding Percentage (the first being 1965). Blair was on the ballot for one year and finished in 1986 and received 1.9% of the ballot.  

Amos Otis, AL Kansas City Royals (1971)

0.7 dWAR. In the early 1970’s Amos Otis became a popular player despite being on an awful Kansas City team, and offensively he was very good…however his speed masked a defensive career that was average at best. 1971 would mark Otis’ first Gold Glove and it wasn’t a bad year for the Kansas City Royal with the glove. He would lead all American League Outfielders in Putouts, while also finishing second in Range Factor per Game among Centerfielders. This was not a Gold Glove worthy year, bit we have seen worse…and will from Otis himself. Otis was on the ballot for one year in 1990

Willie Davis, NL Los Angeles Dodgers (1971)

0.7 dWAR. Before we talk about Willie Davis’s 1971 defensive season, there are two things that stand out. The first is that in 1964 he was first overall in the National League in Defensive WAR and Total Zone Runs and he did not win the Gold Glove. Ok…those were not stats yet, but even more notable is that Willie Davis who has over 2,500 career Hits and a bWAR over 60 never even made the Hall of Fame ballot! This makes Davis the best player ever not to make a Baseball Hall of Fame ballot. In regards to 1971 Davis would go to his first All Star Game and was first among the National League Centerfielders in Putouts and was second in Total Zone Runs. This was not a bad year, but not the campaign where he broke his Gold Glove cherry! Although Davis was eligible for the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1985, he was not on the ballot.

Ken Berry, AL California Angels (2) (1972)

0.8 dWAR. The second and final Gold Glove win of Ken Berry’s career at least had something you could argue for. Berry had a perfect 1.000 Fielding Percentage and he had a league leading 13 Assists among all American League Outfielders. He should not have won this one either, but at least a statistical argument could be made from some point of view. Berry was on the ballot for one year in 1981 but did not receive any votes.  

Paul Blair, AL Baltimore Orioles (5) (1972)

2.1 dWAR. Once again, Paul Blair finished in the top five in the American League in Defensive bWAR (fourth) and Total Zone Runs (third) though this would be the last time he would accomplish either. For the sixth season in a row he was number one amongst the AL Centerfielders in Total Zone Runs. Blair was on the ballot for one year and finished in 1986 and received 1.9% of the ballot.  

Bobby Murcer, AL New York Yankees (1972)

0.1 dWAR. Huh? Bobby Murcer had a career Defensive bWAR of -15.8 and all of the pertinent statistics show that at his best he could only be considered average. This was one of those “average” seasons actually as Murcer would have the most Putouts among all American League Outfielders and he was fourth amongst the Centerfielders in Range Factor per Game but he was also not in the top five in Total Zone Runs. In fact, he never was. Notably, 1972 was one of his best offensive seasons where he finished second in Home Runs (33) and fourth in OPS (.898) and finished fifth in MVP voting. Apparently this made him a better fielder too. Murcer was on the ballot for one year in 1989 and received 0.7% of the vote.  

Cesar Cedeno, NL Houston Astros (1972)

0.3 dWAR. Cesar Cedeno was certainly the spark plug of the Astros’ offense in the 1970’s and in 1972 he had one of his best seasons posting career highs in Hits (179), Batting Average (.320), Slugging Percentage (.537) and OPS (.921) en route to a sixth place finish in National League MVP voting (also a career high). He was however just average in the outfield and the excitement of his offense brought him an award on defense. His highest defensive stat was a third place finish in Putouts for National League Centerfielders. Cedeno was on the ballot for one year in 1992 and finished with 0.5% of the vote.

Willie Davis, NL Los Angeles Dodgers (2) (1972)

1.5 dWAR. David finished tenth overall in Defensive bWAR and second in Total Zone Runs in the National League. At his position, he would finish first in Total Zone Runs. Although Davis was eligible for the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1985, he was not on the ballot.

Paul Blair, AL Baltimore Orioles (6) (1973)

2.2 dWAR. While we said previously that he would never again crack the top five in American League Defensive bWAR he was still good enough for seventh overall. Amongst his league peers at his position Blair was second in Total Zone Runs and Range Factor per Game. Blair was on the ballot for one year and finished in 1986 and received 1.9% of the ballot.  

Amos Otis, AL Kansas City Royals (2) (1973)

-1.3 dWAR. While Amos Otis would go to his fourth All Star Game and post some of his best offensive numbers, his defense was not anywhere close to what a Gold Glove recipient should be. Otis did not even sniff the top of any defensive metric for AL Centerfielders and again might have won this based on his overall athleticism and not actual defensive performance. Otis was on the ballot for one year in 1990 but did not receive any votes.  

Mickey Stanley, AL Detroit Tigers (4) (1973)

-0.3 dWAR. Stanley’s highest finish was second among his position in Fielding Percentage but again this was not a dynamic defensive player by any means. While he did win four Gold Gloves it was four too many. Stanley was on the ballot for one year in 1984 and finished with 0.5% of the vote.  

Cesar Cedeno, NL Houston Astros (2) (1973)

0.9 dWAR. Cedeno would go to his second of four All Star Games but this is the first and only time he would be voted in. Cedeno posted a very similar offense to the year before. Defensively Cedeno was third amongst the National League Centerfielders in Fielding Percentage and Total Zone Runs and second in Range Factor per Game. Cedeno was on the ballot for one year in 1992 and finished with 0.5% of the vote.

Willie Davis, NL Los Angeles Dodgers (3) (1973)

1.0 dWAR. For what would be his third and final Gold Glove, Willie Davis would finish second among all of the NL Centerfielders in Total Zone Runs, which would be his highest finish. Three Gold Gloves for Davis seems accurate, though like so many here we have to dispute the years in which we won them. Although Davis was eligible for the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1985, he was not on the ballot.

Paul Blair, AL Baltimore Orioles (7) (1974)

1.7 dWAR. For the seventh and final time Paul Blair would be first among all of the AL Centerfielders in Total Zone Runs. He would also finish second in Range Factor per Game. Blair was on the ballot for one year and finished in 1986 and received 1.9% of the ballot.  

Amos Otis, AL Kansas City Royals (3) (1974)

0.6 dWAR. In what was the third and final Gold Glove win for Amos Otis, we again see a player who was nowhere close to being at the top of his peers in a defensive category. This was a case of looking good, but not necessarily performing good. Incidentally, had he won this in 1978 where he was the league leaser in Total Zone Runs he would at least have a Gold Glove in his trophy case that was warranted. Otis was on the ballot for one year in 1990 but did not receive any votes.  

Joe Rudi, AL Oakland Athletics (1974)

-0.5 dWAR. The Oakland A’s in 1974 won their third straight World Series and Joe Rudi might have benefited from this success by winning a trio of Gold Gloves. Rudi may have been the American League MVP runner-up but defensively he wasn’t up to snuff. He was second overall in Fielding Percentage among the Leftfielders of the AL but he was not in the top five in any other category. Rudi was on the ballot for one year in 1988 but did not receive any votes.  

Cesar Cedeno, NL Houston Astros (3) (1974)

0.9 dWAR. Cedeno would lead all National League Outfielders in Putouts while finish second in Range Factor per Game and third in Total Zone Runs among those playing Center. This was not a terrible year but not exactly screaming Gold Glove either. Cedeno was on the ballot for one year in 1992 and finished with 0.5% of the vote.

Cesar Geronimo, NL Cincinnati Reds (1974)

2.4 dWAR. A member of Cincinnati’s famed “Big Red Machine”, Cesar Geronimo won his first of four Gold Gloves in convincing fashion. He would place fifth and first in Defensive bWAR and Total Zone Runs respectively while also finishing first among all National League Outfielders in Range Factor per Game. Geronimo was on the ballot for one year in 1989 but did not receive any votes.

Paul Blair, AL Baltimore Orioles (8) (1975)

1.4 dWAR. It can certainly be argued that Paul Blair should not have won all eight of his Gold Gloves, there was still no bad win like others who have won as many Gold Gloves as he did. In regards to 1975, Blair finished first among the Centerfielders of the AL in Fielding Percentage with a second place rank in Total Zone Runs. Overall, Paul Blair is tenth all-time in Total Zone Runs, sixtieth in Defensive bWAR and has a claim as being one of the elite defensive outfielders in the game’s history. Blair was on the ballot for one year and finished in 1986 and received 1.9% of the ballot.  

Fred Lynn, AL Boston Red Sox (1975)

0.9 dWAR. This was Fred Lynn’s famed rookie season where he won not only the Rookie of the Year but was named the American League Most Valuable Player. Lynn’s hype may have led him to a Gold Glove that he wasn’t quite ready for as he finished fifth in Total Zone Runs among the American League Centerfielders and was third in Range Factor per Game. This isn’t bad, but not exactly Gold Glove worthy. Lynn was on the ballot for two years finishing as high as 5.5% in 1996.  

Joe Rudi, AL Oakland Athletics (2) (1975)

-0.5 dWAR. Rudi’s second Gold Glove win was just as inexplicable as his first as he did not finish in the top five in any defensive statistic. Rudi was on the ballot for one year in 1988 but did not receive any votes.  

Cesar Cedeno, NL Houston Astros (4) (1975)

-0.5 dWAR. This was a terrible choice. Cedeno finished fifth in Range Factor per Game among his NL peers but was in no other top five defensive list. This is another example of winning a Gold Glove on reputation though Cedeno probably never should have such a reputation in the first place. Cedeno was on the ballot for one year in 1992 and finished with 0.5% of the vote.

Cesar Geronimo, NL Cincinnati Reds (2) (1975)

2.7 dWAR. Geronimo had an even better defensive season with Cincinnati than in his first win in ’74. Geronimo increased his Defensive bWAR from 2.4 to 2.7 while also increasing his Total Zone Runs from 22 to 25. This put him second and first respectively in those statistics in the National League. In addition he was second among his league position (Centerfield) in Range Factor per Game and Fielding Percentage. However, most important for Geronimo, the Reds would win the World Series this year. Geronimo was on the ballot for one year in 1989 but did not receive any votes.

Garry Maddox, NL San Francisco Giants/Philadelphia Phillies (1975)

1.3 dWAR. Garry Maddox would be traded early in the season from the Giants to Philadelphia and thus would begin eight straight Gold Gloves. In what would be his first Gold Glove, Maddox would finish first among the National Centerfielders in Assists while finishing second in Range Factor per Game and Total Zone Runs. Maddox was on the ballot for one year in 1992 but did not receive any votes.

Dwight Evans, AL Boston Red Sox (1976)

1.1 dWAR. Buckle up buckaroo...We love Dwight Evans but not his eight Gold Gloves. Evans would have a plus 2 Defensive bWAR in both 1974 and 1975 so of course he did not win a Gold Glove in those seasons. 1976, which was his first Gold Glove win was still decent defensively. Splitting time between Rightfield and Centerfield, he was fourth overall among all Outfielders in Total Zone Runs and had the highest Fielding Percentage at Right. Evans was on the ballot for three years and finished as high as 10.4% in 1998. He is ranked #21 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Rick Manning, AL Cleveland Indians (1976)

-0.2 dWAR. Rick Manning’s best season in baseball was in 1976 but to say that this was a great defensive year would be a fallacy. Actually Rick Manning was never a very good defensive player. In what would be his only Gold Glove, Manning would finish in the top five in only one stat, Fielding Percentage where he was fourth among American League Centerfielders. Although Manning was eligible for the Hall of Fame in 1993 he was not on the ballot.

Joe Rudi, AL Oakland Athletics (3) (1976)

-0.6 dWAR. At least in 1976 Joe Rudi is the American League Leftfielder leader in Fielding Percentage. That is the good news, but you probably see where we are going here. Rudi failed to crack the top five in Total Zone Runs and Range Factor per Game. For what it is worth, Rudi DID lead the AL Leftfielders in Total Zone Runs (1971 & 1973), years in which he had a positive Defensive bWAR and you could have made a stronger case. Such is life for the Gold Glove. Rudi was on the ballot for one year in 1988 but did not receive any votes.  

Cesar Cedeno, NL Houston Astros (5) (1976)

-0.1 dWAR. 1976 would see Ceasr Cedeno go to his last All Star Game and win his fifth and final Gold Glove, though this would be another suspect win. He played the most games defensively at Center and also made the most Errors. He also failed to land in the top five at his position in Range Factor per Game and Total Zone Runs. With a career Defensive bWAR of -4.3 and -0.5 as an Astro it is difficult to justify Cedeno as a five time Gold Glove recipient. Cedeno was on the ballot for one year in 1992 and finished with 0.5% of the vote.

Cesar Geronimo, NL Cincinnati Reds (3) (1976)

-0.7 dWAR. This was actually a good year overall for Cesar Geronimo. He batted over .300 for the first and only time and also had career highs in OBP (.382), Slugging Percentage (.414), Hits (149) and Stolen Bases (22). He actually received a vote for the MVP Award and the Reds repeated as World Series Champions. This did however cloud the fact that his 1976 season was not great defensively and apart from a third place finish in Fielding Percentage among the National League Centerfielders there was nothing remotely good here. Geronimo was on the ballot for one year in 1989 but did not receive any votes.

Garry Maddox, NL Philadelphia Phillies (2) (1976)

2.3 dWAR. 1976 was Garry Maddox’ first full season and it was arguably his best. This would see Maddox set career highs in all Slash Line components (.330/.377/.456) Hits (175) and Doubles (37) while solidifying himself as one of the elite defensive Outfielders in the game. Maddox become known in Philadelphia as the “Secretary of Defense” and a famed line emerged that “two thirds of the planet are covered by water and the rest by Garry Maddox”. Finishing fifth in MVP voting and first in Defensive WAR, Maddox also was the National League leader in Total Zone Runs. At his position he also was tops in Putouts, Assists and Range Factor per Game. Maddox was on the ballot for one year in 1992 but did not receive any votes.

Juan Beniquez, AL Texas Rangers (1977)

1.0 dWAR. In 1976, Juan Beniquez had the best defensive season of his career. He finished fifth in the AL in Defensive bWAR and would lead all of the American League Centerfielders in Total Zone Runs. So of course, he would win the Gold Glove in the SEASON AFTER, where he did not accomplish those feats. Instead in 1977 he was decent defensively with a fourth place finish among Centerfielders in Total Zone Runs. This win was clearly one year too late! Although Beniquez was Hall of Fame eligible in 1993 he was not on the ballot.

Al Cowens, AL Kansas City Royals (1977)

0.2 dWAR. 1977 was by far the greatest offensive season that Al Cowens would have as he would be the American League MVP runner-up and set career highs in Hits (189), Home Runs (23) Runs Batted In (112) and every aspect of the Slash Line (.312/.361/525). Apparently this meant that he was better with his glove that season though he was essentially average at playing Rightfield. That was however good enough to lead the AL in that position in Total Zone Runs, which can somewhat justify this award. Although Cowens was Hall of Fame eligible in 1992 he was not on the ballot.

Cesar Geronimo, NL Cincinnati Reds (4) (1977)

0.3 dWAR. The goodwill of the Reds success continued as Geronimo obtained a fourth Gold Glove, the second straight one that was unwarranted. Like his last win, the defensive highlight here was a third place finish among his league peers in Fielding Percentage. This would be the final Gold Glove of Cesar Geronimo’s career. Geronimo was on the ballot for one year in 1989 but did not receive any votes.

Garry Maddox, NL Philadelphia Phillies (3) (1977)

1.4 dWAR. While this wasn’t that close to what Garry Maddox accomplished in the previous season this was still a good defensive campaign. Maddox still was second in Total Zone Runs and Range Factor per Game among all of the Centerfielders of the National League. Maddox was on the ballot for one year in 1992 but did not receive any votes.

Dave Parker, NL Pittsburgh Pirates (1977)

2.0 dWAR. When you think of Dave Parker you think of the Pittsburgh Pirates, offense and cocaine, though probably not in that order. Defense is not something Parker was known for and with a career Defensive WAR of -14.3 he shouldn’t be, though this did not stop him from winning three Gold Gloves, though the first of which was completely earned. In 1977 “The Cobra” had a Defensive bWAR of 2.0, which was only one of three positive seasons in that metric he had. He was first in the National League in Total Zone Runs, sixth in Defensive WAR and was first among the RIghtfielders in the NL in Range Factor per Game. To ice the cake he was also first at his league position in Putouts and Assists. These however are all things we won’t be able to say again. Parker was on the ballot for fifteen years and finished as high as 24.5% in 1998. He is ranked #24 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Dwight Evans, AL Boston Red Sox (2) (1978)

-0.1 dWAR. 1978 would see Dwight Evans go to his first All Star Game and defensively he would finish first among all of the AL Rightfielders in Putouts but was only fifth in Range Factor per Game and did not place in the top five in Total Zone Runs. This is a hard one to justify. Evans was on the ballot for three years and finished as high as 10.4% in 1998. He is ranked #21 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Fred Lynn, AL Boston Red Sox (2) (1978)

-0.3 dWAR. While Fred Lynn’s bat remained strong in the 70’s, his defense was still average on a good day. Lynn’s highest defensive stat was second among AL Centerfielders in Assists. There was not anything else close. This isn’t exactly a Gold Glove season is it? Lynn was on the ballot for two years finishing as high as 5.5% in 1996.  

Rick Miller, AL California Angels (1978)

0.1 dWAR. There are some players who win a Gold Glove because they are offensive superstars and it floats over to Gold Glove voting. This isn’t the case for Rick Miller who did not display anything in any season to warrant a Gold Glove. In this season, Miller was third amongst the American League Rightfielders but that was about it. This is one of the stranger Gold Glove wins in an award that excels at finding strange homes. Although Miller was Hall of Fame eligible in 1991 he was not on the ballot.

Garry Maddox, NL Philadelphia Phillies (4) (1978)

2.2 dWAR. For the third and final time Maddox would receive MVP votes (21st overall) and he was fourth in the NL in Defensive bWAR and second in Total Zone Runs. Amongst the National League Centerfielders Maddox was the leader in Putouts, Total Zone Runs and Range Factor per Game. Maddox was on the ballot for one year in 1992 but did not receive any votes.

Dave Parker, NL Pittsburgh Pirates (2) (1978)

-0.6 dWAR. This would be the season where Dave Parker won the National League MVP Award and some of that shine extended to an unwarranted second Gold Glove. Parker was second at Range Factor per Game but was not a top five finisher in Total Zone Runs. Parker was on the ballot for fifteen years and finished as high as 24.5% in 1998. He is ranked #24 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Ellis Valentine, NL Montreal Expos (1978)

1.4 dWAR. An All Star in 1977, Ellis Valentine had an even better 1978 as he recorded career highs in both Offensive (3.5) and Defensive bWAR (1.4). The Montreal Expos Rightfielder led all NL Outfielders with 25 Assists and was position leader in Total Zone Runs. Valentine would never have a season like this again. Valentine was on the ballot for one year in 1991 and received 0.2% of the vote.

Dwight Evans, AL Boston Red Sox (3) (1979)

1.5 dWAR. Evans rebounded defensively leading all of the AL Rightfielders in Putouts, Assists, Fielding Percentage and Total Zone Runs. Evans would actually finish fourth overall in the American League in Total Zone Runs. Evans was on the ballot for three years and finished as high as 10.4% in 1998. He is ranked #21 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Sixto Lezcano, AL Milwaukee Brewers (1979)

-1.1 dWAR. 1979 would see Sixto Lezcano post career highs offensively in Hits (152), Home Runs (28) and the triumvirate of the Slash Line (.321/.414/.573) and he finished fifteenth in American League MVP voting. You already know where we are going here don’t you? Lezcano also set a career low in Defensive bWAR and he failed to finish in the top five in Total Zone Runs and Range Factor per Game. This award almost feels like it was a consolation prize. Although Lezcano was Hall of Fame eligible in 1991 he was not on the ballot.

Fred Lynn, AL Boston Red Sox (3) (1979)

1.0 dWAR. Fred Lynn’s 1975 rookie season might be the most ballyhooed but his best year was actually 1979 where he set career highs in Home Runs (39), Runs Batted In (122), Batting Average (.333), On Base Percentage (.423), Slugging Percentage (.637), WAR (8.9) and even Defensive WAR (1.0). Lynn probably should not have won this Gold Glove either but he was second overall among the AL Centerfielders in Total Zone Runs and with the success of his overall year you could see how he won this award. Lynn was on the ballot for two years finishing as high as 5.5% in 1996.  

Garry Maddox, NL Philadelphia Phillies (5) (1979)

2.8 dWAR. In terms of his overall defensive play, 1979 was the best ever for Garry Maddox. For the second time he was the National League leader in Defensive WAR and Total Zone Runs, but he had approximately 25 percent higher numbers than he did when he first accomplished that in 1976. Topping it off for the sixth (and final) time he was first among all of the NL Outfielders in Range Factor per Game. Sadly, when you say this was the “best season of a career” you know it can only go down from there. Maddox was on the ballot for one year in 1992 but did not receive any votes.

Dave Parker, NL Pittsburgh Pirates (3) (1979)

-0.5 dWAR. 1979 wasn’t much different than the year before as Parker had good offense, the Pirates were good and Parker did not do much defensively. His highlight was a third place finish in Range Factor per Game among the National League Rightfielders but this was the year of Pirates, as the team would win the World Series. Parker would decline until a two year rejuvenation with Cincinnati took place in the mid-80’s but he would never win another Gold Glove again. Parker was on the ballot for fifteen years and finished as high as 24.5% in 1998. He is ranked #24 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Fred Lynn, AL Boston Red Sox (4) (1980)

0.9 dWAR. In what was Fred Lynn’s fourth and final Gold Glove he would finish first in Fielding Percentage amongst the American League Centerfielders and was also second in Assists and Total Zone Runs. Arguably this is his best Gold Glove win and possibly the only one that can be justified. Lynn was on the ballot for two years finishing as high as 5.5% in 1996.  

Dwayne Murphy, AL Oakland Athletics (1980)

2.5 dWAR. Dwayne Murphy would have what has to be regarded as his finest defensive campaign of his career and he was second overall in the AL in Defensive bWAR with his career high of 2.5. In this season he would also have a career high 22 Total Zone Runs (good enough for second overall in the AL) and he would also lead the American League Centerfielders in Range Factor per Game. This was his first of six Gold Gloves and as we will see by far the most deserving. Although Murphy was Hall of Fame eligible in 1995 he was not on the ballot.

Willie Wilson, AL Kansas City Royals (1980)

2.2 dWAR. Willie Wilson finished fourth in American League MVP voting and he earned it as he led the AL in Hits (230), Runs Scored (130), Triples (15) and he batted .326. Defensively, he was also excellent with a career high Defensive bWAR of 2.2, which was good enough for third overall and he led the AL in Total Zone Runs with a career high of 24. Wilson was on the ballot for one year in 2000 and finished with 2.0% of the vote.

Garry Maddox, NL Philadelphia Phillies (6) (1980)

1.3 dWAR. While he did drop off defensively his defensive campaign was nothing to sneeze at. While he dropped from 26 to 12 Total Zone Runs, that still led all of the National League Centerfielders. In addition Maddox was a more than respectable second at his league position in Range Factor per Game. However the most important factor of all was that the Philadelphia Phillies finally put it altogether and won the World Series. Fittingly it was Garry Maddox who recorded the final out. Maddox was on the ballot for one year in 1992 but did not receive any votes.

Dwight Evans, AL Boston Red Sox (4) (1981)

1.1 dWAR. Even though this was a strike-shortened season, 1981 might have been the best of “Dewey’s” career. Evans won the Home Run and OPS Title while going to his second All Star Game and finishing a career high third in American League MVP voting. In terms of his glove, Evans would finish second in Total Zone Runs and Range Factor per Game at his league position. Evans was on the ballot for three years and finished as high as 10.4% in 1998. He is ranked #21 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Dwayne Murphy, AL Oakland Athletics (2) (1981)

1.1 dWAR. In the strike-shortened season of 1981, Dwayne Murphy would have his only season where he received MVP votes (he finished eleventh). He would again lead the AL Centerfielders in Total Zone Runs and Range Factor per Game. Although Murphy was Hall of Fame eligible in 1995 he was not on the ballot.

Dusty Baker, NL Los Angeles Dodgers (1981)

-0.7 dWAR. Dusty Baker would have a solid career in Major League Baseball but there is no reason to think that he was ever a Gold Glove worthy Outfielder. Baker went to the All Star Game and helped the Dodgers win the World Series but he did not do anything that should have helped him win Gold Glove hardware. Sometimes, the good guys win! Davis was on the ballot for one year in 1992 and finished with 0.9% of the ballot.

Garry Maddox, NL Philadelphia Phillies (7) (1981)

0.7 dWAR. This was the season where Maddox’s skills were in obvious decline but he still had the name value to get a seventh (and as will be mentioned an eighth) Gold Glove. His Total Zone Runs dropped in half (12 to 6) from the previous year yet this was still good enough for second at his league position. He was also third at Range Factor per Game. Maddox was on the ballot for one year in 1992 but did not receive any votes.

Dwight Evans, AL Boston Red Sox (5) (1982)

-0.5 dWAR. This would begin a four year run of negative bWAR Gold Glove wins by Evans. While he finished 7th in MVP voting and did play the most games in the AL at Rightfield he would lead his peers in only two categories: Putouts and Errors. Evans was on the ballot for three years and finished as high as 10.4% in 1998. He is ranked #21 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Dwayne Murphy, AL Oakland Athletics (3) (1982)

1.3 dWAR. For the third season in a row, Dwayne Murphy would lead the American League Centerfielders in Putouts, Total Zone Runs and Range Factor per Game. He would also for the first and only time finish first among his league peers in Assists. Although Murphy was Hall of Fame eligible in 1995 he was not on the ballot.

Garry Maddox, NL Philadelphia Phillies (8) (1982)

0.3 dWAR. In 1982 Garry Maddox would for the first and only time in his career lead his position in Fielding Percentage, but this was a far more careful Garry Maddox who took far less chances. He was no longer in the top five in Total Zone Runs or Range Factor per Game and never would be again. This would be his last Gold Glove and while he didn’t win this award at the top of his defensive game, he earned a lot of these awards, which is more than be can said about many other eight or more time Gold Glove winners. Maddox was on the ballot for one year in 1992 but did not receive any votes.

Dale Murphy, NL Atlanta Braves (1982)

0.0 dWAR. Oh boy. Buckle up, as this one is about to get messy, especially considering he won five Gold Gloves and should not have won any of them!   Don’t get us wrong as we love Murphy but it was his offense that stirred his drink and he was not an exceptional defensive player. Murphy was named the National League Most Valuable Player but defensively he was not in the top five in any category. Get used to that as we continue. Murphy was on the ballot for fifteen years and finished as high as 23.2% in 2000. He is ranked #33 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Dwight Evans, AL Boston Red Sox (6) (1983)

-1.0 dWAR. Dwight Evans would finish second in Range Factor per Game but that was it as he was not in the top five in any other category among the American League Rightfielders. Evans was on the ballot for three years and finished as high as 10.4% in 1998. He is ranked #21 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Dwayne Murphy, AL Oakland Athletics (4) (1983)

0.7 dWAR. Murphy regressed defensively in 1983 and he did not finish first in any major defensive category. That being said, Murphy was still second among the American League Centerfielders in Range Factor per Game and he was fourth in Total Zone Runs. Although Murphy was Hall of Fame eligible in 1995 he was not on the ballot.

Willie McGee, NL St. Louis Cardinals (1983)

0.3 dWAR. Willie McGee of the St. Louis Cardinals went to his first All Star Game in 1983 and would also earn his first Gold Glove this year. McGee was not exactly worthy this year as his best defensive statistic was finishing fifth in Range Factor per Game amongst the National League Centerfielders. McGee was on the ballot for two years and finished as high as 5.0% in 2005.

Dale Murphy, NL Atlanta Braves (2) (1983)

0.1 dWAR. Murphy repeated as the National League MVP in 1983 but he also repeated with mediocre defensive play. This season he would at least finish fifth among the National League Centerfielders in Total Zone Runs (with a whopping 3) and was also fifth in Fielding Percentage. Let’s just say that it this point Murphy was two for two in unwarranted Gold Gloves. Murphy was on the ballot for fifteen years and finished as high as 23.2% in 2000. He is ranked #33 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Dwight Evans, AL Boston Red Sox (7) (1984)

-1.6 dWAR. Evans played the most game at Rightfield and expectedly led everyone in the AL at that position in Putouts and was second in Fielding Percentage. While he did finish fourth in Total Zone Runs (remember he played the most games) he failed to crack the top five in Range Factor per Game. Evans was on the ballot for three years and finished as high as 10.4% in 1998. He is ranked #21 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Dwayne Murphy, AL Oakland Athletics (5) (1984)

-0.1 dWAR. Murphy regressed again and with a negative Defensive bWAR if you assumed that he did not finish first in any Defensive metric you would be right. He also did not finish in the top five in among the AL Centerfielders in Total Zone Runs and Range Factor per Game and of the six Gold Gloves he would win, this is one he should return. Although Murphy was Hall of Fame eligible in 1995 he was not on the ballot.

Bob Dernier, NL Chicago Cubs (1984)

0.2 dWAR. Relatively speaking this would be the only season of note for Bob Dernier as he accumulated 149 Hits and won a Gold Glove, which was by far the best season he had in the Majors. How he won the Gold Glove in 1984 (or really any season) is a mystery as he did not do anything defensively worthy. While Bernier was eligible for the Hall of Fame in 1995 he was not on the ballot.

Dale Murphy, NL Atlanta Braves (3) (1984)

-0.7 dWAR. While Dale Murphy played the most games in the National League at Centerfield, beyond a first place finish in Assists he was not in the top five in anything else. Offensively, he was still excellent and he was good enough to finish ninth in MVP voting. Murphy was on the ballot for fifteen years and finished as high as 23.2% in 2000. He is ranked #33 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Dwight Evans, AL Boston Red Sox (8) (1985)

-0.9 dWAR. Wrapping up Dwight Evans’ final Gold Glove we see him finish third in Fielding Percentage but again fail to make the top five in Range Factor per Game and Total Zone Runes. Evans overall eight Gold Gloves probably should have been three at best and that might be generous. Dwight, we love you for Cooperstown but not a mantle full of Gold Gloves. Evans was on the ballot for three years and finished as high as 10.4% in 1998. He is ranked #21 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Dwayne Murphy, AL Oakland Athletics (6) (1985)

0.4 dWAR. While Dwayne Murphy had a better season (marginally) defensively than he did the year before, this was also not a Gold Glove worthy season and we will argue that his last two Gold Gloves should not have found his way to his trophy case. The best defensive stat he had was a second place finish in Putouts among his American League peers. For what it is worth, his next season was in fact Gold Glove worthy as he had 17 Total Zone Runs with a 1.9 Defensive bWAR. Although Murphy was Hall of Fame eligible in 1995 he was not on the ballot.

Gary Pettis, AL California Angels (1985)

1.4 dWAR. This would be the first of many Gold Glove wins by the fleet footed Gary Pettis. In this season, Pettis was second in Stolen Bases and he finished second in Total Zone Runs amongst the American League Centerfielders. He was also first in Range Factor per Game. Although Pettis was Hall of Fame Eligible in 1998 he was not on the ballot.

Willie McGee, NL St. Louis Cardinals (2) (1985)

0.7 dWAR. In 1985, Willie McGee was named the National League MVP and took the Cards to the World Series. Defensively, McGee was OK, though a Gold Glove win might seem a little peculiar here. He would finish this season third among the NL Centerfielders in Total Zone Runs. McGee was on the ballot for two years and finished as high as 5.0% in 2005.

Dale Murphy, NL Atlanta Braves (4) (1985)

-2.2 dWAR. With a -2.2 Defensive bWAR, Dale Murphy sabremetrically posted one of the worst defensive seasons that ever won a Gold Glove. The Atlanta Brave still finished seventh in MVP voting based on his offensive strength but his defense was horrific and despite playing the most games in the Outfield in all of the National League he was not able to finish in the top ten in any defensive metric. This is one of the worst choices of all time! Murphy was on the ballot for fifteen years and finished as high as 23.2% in 2000. He is ranked #33 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Jesse Barfield, AL Toronto Blue Jays (1986)

1.7 dWAR. Jesse Barfield would become the first Toronto Blue Jay to sack 40 Home Runs and he would also lead the AL in that category while going to his first All Star Game. He would finish fifth in MVP voting. Defensively, Barfield was also good and he finished second overall in the American League in Total Zone and along with leading his position in that metric he was also the top finisher in Putouts, Assists and Range Factor per Game. Although he was eligible for the Hall of Fame in 1998 he was not on the ballot.

Gary Pettis, AL California Angels (2) (1986)

2.4 dWAR. In terms of Defensive bWAR Gary Pettis would have his best defensive season with his 2.4 and fourth place finish in that metric. The California Angel was the American League leader in Total Zone Runs (22) and was also the AL Leader among all of the Outfielders in Range Factor per Game. Although Pettis was Hall of Fame Eligible in 1998 he was not on the ballot.

Willie McGee, NL St. Louis Cardinals (3) (1986)

1.0 dWAR. This would be the third and final Gold Glove win for Willie McGee and in this season McGee would lead the National League Centerfielders in Putouts, Range Factor per Game and Fielding Percentage. Arguably, this was the best defensive season that Willie McGee would have. McGee was on the ballot for two years and finished as high as 5.0% in 2005.

Dale Murphy, NL Atlanta Braves (5) (1986)

-1.8 dWAR. This was the fifth and final Gold Glove win for Dale Murphy and we can firmly state that he went five for five in unwarranted Gold Glove wins. Murphy was again terrible this season and he failed to finish in the top five in any defensive statistic. In his overall five Gold Glove seasons Dale Murphy posted a -4.0 Defensive bWAR, one of the worst in that period yet apparently Gold Glove worthy. Again, we love you Dale, but not for these awards. Murphy was on the ballot for fifteen years and finished as high as 23.2% in 2000. He is ranked #33 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Jesse Barfield, AL Toronto Blue Jays (2) (1987)

1.9 dWAR. While this was till a decent offensive season for Barfield (28 Home Runs with 84 RBI) his defensive season was still good and his 1.9 Defensive bWAR equaled the mark he set in 1985 (when he didn’t win) and was good enough for fourth overall in the AL. Barfield had a career high Total Zone Runs of 25 (which was third overall) and like 1986 he was second among his league position in Fielding Position. Although he was eligible for the Hall of Fame in 1998 he was not on the ballot.

Eric Davis, NL Cincinnati Reds (1987)

0.9 dWAR. Eric Davis went to his first All Star Game in 1987, which would be largely based on his offensive production. Davis blasted 37 Home Runs and defensively he was adequate this year as he led the National League Centerfielders in Putouts, Assists and Range Factor per Game. Davis was on the ballot for one year in 2007 and received 0.6% of the vote.

Gary Pettis, AL Detroit Tigers (3) (1988)

1.3 dWAR. In 1987, Gary Pettis finished eighth in Defensive bWAR (1.7) and fifth in Total Zone Runs but was not named a Gold Glove recipient. Those were the last two season in which Pettis would be in the top ten in either category. Now a Detroit Tiger, he would still have a decent season with a second place finish among his league peers in Total Zone Runs, but it wasn’t what he accomplished the year before. Although Pettis was Hall of Fame Eligible in 1998 he was not on the ballot.

Devon White, AL California Angels (1988)

1.4 dWAR. Devon White probably should have won his first Gold Glove in his rookie season (he had a 2.3 Defensive bWAR) but this is not bad especially considering many of the other first time Gold Glove winners on this list. White was first among all of the American League Centerfielders in Total Zone Runs and Range Factor per Game. White was on the ballot for one year in 2007 but did not receive any votes.

Eric Davis, NL Cincinnati Reds (2) (1988)

-0.6 dWAR. While Davis remained a potent force with his bat, his defensive season was not great in 1988. Davis was at least fifth in Fielding Percentage but he was not in the top five in Range Factor per Game and Total Zone Runs. This was a bad choice but it will get worse. Davis was on the ballot for one year in 2007 and received 0.6% of the vote.

Andy Van Slyke, NL Pittsburgh Pirates (1988)

0.9 dWAR. Andy Van Slyke went to his first All Star Game and he finished fourth in National League MVP voting. This wasn’t a bad season defensively for Van Slyke as he led the National League Centerfielders in Putouts, Assists and Range Factor per Game with a second place finish in Total Zone Runs. Van Slyke was on the ballot for one year in 2001 but did not receive any votes.

Gary Pettis, AL Detroit Tigers (4) (1989)

0.3 dWAR. While the 0.3 in Defensive bWAR is not the greatest, he did at least finish third among the AL Centerfielders in Range Factor per Game. This would be the best finish defensively for Gary Pettis and of his five Gold Gloves the least deserved one. Although Pettis was Hall of Fame Eligible in 1998 he was not on the ballot.

Devon White, AL California Angels (2) (1989)

2.8 dWAR. White put forth another good defensive season and his speed and skill helped him finish second overall in the AL in Defensive bWAR. He finished second overall in Total Zone Runs with 22 and also led his league position (and of course in TZR) in Range Factor per Game. White was on the ballot for one year in 2007 but did not receive any votes.

Eric Davis, NL Cincinnati Reds (3) (1989)

-2.2 dWAR. As we said in the last Eric Davis entry, it got worse. Davis returned to the All Star Game in 1989 and that year he would return to the 30 Home Run and 100 RBI club. Defensively however he was atrocious and was not in the top five in any defensive category. He wasn’t even close. Having said that, he was an integral part of Cincinnati’s surprise 1989 World Series win, an accolade he did deserve. Davis was on the ballot for one year in 2007 and received 0.6% of the vote.

Andy Van Slyke, NL Pittsburgh Pirates (2) (1989)

1.6 dWAR. Andy Van Slyke would post career highs in Defensive bWAR (1.6) and Total Zone Runs (13), though the latter was not good enough for first among his league position, rather it netted him third. He was also second in Range Factor per Game. Van Slyke was on the ballot for one year in 2001 but did not receive any votes.

Ellis Burks, AL Boston Red Sox (1990)

-0.6 dWAR. Ellis Burks was a good baseball player over his career but should he have won a Gold Glove? Probably not, but even more strange was the season in which he did win it where he had a negative Defensive bWAR and he was not in the top five in Range Factor per Game or Total Zone Runs. He was first among all of the American League Centerfielders in Fielding Percentage, which might have been enough for some to have voted for him in the first place. Burks was on the ballot for one year in 2010 and received 0.4% of the ballot.

Gary Pettis, AL Detroit Tigers (5) (1990)

0.6 dWAR. This would be the fifth and final Gold Glove win for Gary Pettis and while he was the American League leader among the Centerfielders with 10 Assists and second in Fielding Percentage, he was not in the top five in Total Zone Runs or Range Factor per Game. While he is a five time Gold Glove recipient realistically he should have been a three time winner at best. Although Pettis was Hall of Fame Eligible in 1998 he was not on the ballot.

Barry Bonds, NL Pittsburgh Pirates (1990)

2.5 dWAR. This is actually refreshing for us to talk about his glove rather than his bat and well…other things. At this point, Bonds already had two seasons where he finished in the top ten in Defensive bWAR (1987 & 1989) the latter of which saw him accrue a career high of 3.6. In 1990, he finished at 2.5, which was good enough for second overall in the National League and he exploded offensively where he would win his first MVP Award. Bonds would for the third (and final) time lead the National League in Total Zone Runs and at his league position (Leftfield) in Putouts, Assists and Range Factor per Game. Frankly his first Gold Glove should have been his third, but as you will see it will even out at the end. Bonds has been on the ballot for six years and finished as high as 56.4% in 2018. He is ranked #2 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Andy Van Slyke, NL Pittsburgh Pirates (3) (1990)

0.0 dWAR. Andy Van Slyke did not have a great season with his glove as the only thing he could point to was a third place finish in Putouts and fifth place finish in Fielding Percentage among National League Centerfielders. Van Slyke was on the ballot for one year in 2001 but did not receive any votes.

Devon White, AL Toronto Blue Jays (3) (1991)

2.8 dWAR. White put forth another good defensive season and his speed and skill helped him finish second overall in the AL in Defensive bWAR. He finished second overall in Total Zone Runs with 22 and also led his league position (and of course in TZR) in Range Factor per Game. Not bad for his first season with the Toronto Blue Jays. White was on the ballot for one year in 2007 but did not receive any votes.

Barry Bonds, NL Pittsburgh Pirates (2) (1991)

1.5 dWAR. The 1.5 Defensive bWAR of Barry Bonds was good enough for ninth overall in the NL, though this would be the last time that he would finish in the top ten. Bonds would also for the final time that he would finish in the top ten in Total Zone Runs with his fourth place finish with 19. At his position, Bonds again led the National League Leftfielder in Putouts and Assists and he was second in Range Factor per Game and Fielding Percentage. He would finish second in MVP voting this year. Bonds has been on the ballot for six years and finished as high as 56.4% in 2018. He is ranked #2 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Andy Van Slyke, NL Pittsburgh Pirates (4) (1991)

-0.3 dWAR. Andy Van Slyke finished second in Fielding Percentage among the Centerfielders in the National League but that was about it. He was not able to finish in the top five in any other defensive category. Van Slyke was on the ballot for one year in 2001 but did not receive any votes.

Devon White, AL Toronto Blue Jays (4) (1992)

3.9 dWAR. With an incredible 3.9 in Defensive bWAR, Devon White was the American League leader in that metric. What else did he do? His 33 Total Zone Runs led the AL and most importantly he helped Toronto win their first World Series. White was on the ballot for one year in 2007 but did not receive any votes.

Barry Bonds, NL Pittsburgh Pirates (3) (1992)

0.0 dWAR. This would be the beginning of Bonds’ run of questionable Gold Glove wins and while his hitting was reaching the stratosphere, his defense was clearly in decline. He would fail to reach the top five among National League Leftfielders in Total Zone Runs and was only fourth in Range Factor per Game. He would however finish first in Putouts. Bonds would win his second MVP this season. Bonds has been on the ballot for six years and finished as high as 56.4% in 2018. He is ranked #2 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Andy Van Slyke, NL Pittsburgh Pirates (5) (1992)

-0.1 dWAR. This would be the final of five Gold Gloves that Andy Van Slyke would win and it can be easily argued that the last three were certainly not up to the par of what should be a Gold Glove winning season. Van Slyke finished fifth among National League Centerfielders in both Range Factor per Game and Fielding Percentage but again did not have a top finish in Total Zone Runs. Van Slyke was on the ballot for one year in 2001 but did not receive any votes.

Kenny Lofton, AL Cleveland Indians (1993)

2.2 dWAR. In 1992, Kenny Lofton was the runner-up for the American League Rookie of the Year and he was the league leader in Stolen Bases. He also should have won a Gold Glove as he had a 2.3 Defensive bWAR and finished third overall in the AL. In 1993, Lofton was an All Star, again led the AL in swipes and had a Defensive bWAR over 2 (2.2, which was good enough for fifth in the American League). The Centerfielder would also lead his position in Total Zone Runs (18) and was third in Range Factor per Game. Lofton was on the ballot for one year in 2013 and received 3.2% of the ballot. He is ranked #51 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Devon White, AL Toronto Blue Jays (5) (1993)

2.1 dWAR. This was the second time (and final) that Devon White would be named an All Star. He would also help the Jays win their second World Series. Defensively speaking, Devon White was still strong with an eighth place finish in Defensive bWAR in the AL and he was third in his position in Total Zone Runs. White was on the ballot for one year in 2007 but did not receive any votes.

Barry Bonds, NL San Francisco Giants (4) (1993)

0.4 dWAR. Now a San Francisco Giant, Bonds would win the National League MVP award for the third time in a four year period though perhaps the Gold Glove for this season should not have joined the MVP award in the trophy case. Bonds was fourth among all of the National League Leftfielders in Total Zone Runs, Range Factor per Game and Fielding Percentage which isn’t bad but it doesn’t scream defensive excellence. Bonds has been on the ballot for six years and finished as high as 56.4% in 2018. He is ranked #2 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Marquis Grissom, NL Montreal Expos (1993)

1.8 dWAR. In the two seasons prior to his first Gold Glove win Marquis Grissom was the National League Stolen Base leader. While he would never lead the league in that category again he used his speed in Centerfield and in this season he would finish eighth in Defensive bWAR in the NL while finishing first in Total Zone Runs. Grissom was on the ballot for one year in 2011 and received 0.7% of the vote.

Kenny Lofton, AL Cleveland Indians (2) (1994)

1.5 dWAR. Lofton’s 1.5 was enough for fourth overall in the AL during the strike-shortened season of ’94. Lofton, who again repeated as the American League Stolen Base leader and also was first among all of the Centerfielders in his league in Total Zone Runs. He was also first in Assists. Lofton was on the ballot for one year in 2013 and received 3.2% of the ballot. He is ranked #51 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Devon White, AL Toronto Blue Jays (6) (1994)

1.0 dWAR. White regressed somewhat this year with his defense and he was ok with a fifth place and third place finish among AL Centerfielders in Total Zone Runs and Range Factor per Game respectively. Basically this was decent but there were better choices this year for a Gold Glove. White was on the ballot for one year in 2007 but did not receive any votes.

Barry Bonds, NL San Francisco Giants (5) (1994)

0.1 dWAR. Bonds won his fifth Gold Glove in a row and while this still wasn’t stellar with his defense, his 5 Total Zone Runs was still good enough to finish second overall among National League Leftfielders in that stat. He did however finish first in Assists this year and he was also third at his league position in Range Factor per Game. Bonds has been on the ballot for six years and finished as high as 56.4% in 2018. He is ranked #2 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Marquis Grissom, NL Montreal Expos (2) (1994)

2.2 dWAR. 1994 would be by far the best defensive season of his career and considering it was reduced due to the strike it makes it far more impressive. Grissom had a career high of 2.2 Defensive bWAR (2nd overall in the NL) and his 19 Total Zone Runs was league leading. He would also finish first in Putouts and Range Factor per Game among the Centerfielders of the National League. Grissom was on the ballot for one year in 2011 and received 0.7% of the vote.

Darren Lewis, NL San Francisco Giants (1994)

0.0 dWAR. Darren Lewis only won one major award, but that was more than he should have…or at least not in the year he did win it. Lewis would have some good defensive numbers in 1995 and 1999. Lewis was the leader among all of the NL Centerfielders in Fielding Percentage he was not in the top five in Total Zone Runs and Range Factor per Game. Had this been 1995, it would have made more sense. Although Lewis was Hall of Fame eligible in 2008, he was not on the ballot.

Kenny Lofton, AL Cleveland Indians (3) (1995)

1.1 dWAR. In 1995, Lofton again was the Stolen Base leader and an All Star but while he did win his third Gold Glove, perhaps he should not have. Lofton would lead all of the Centerfielders in Assists but was not a top five finisher in Total Zone Runs and Range Factor per Game. Despite this, Lofton still had a decent season with his glove but there were more successful players at his position this year. Lofton was on the ballot for one year in 2013 and received 3.2% of the ballot. He is ranked #51 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Devon White, AL Toronto Blue Jays (7) (1995)

-0.2 dWAR. This would be Devon White’s final Gold Glove, but it should not have been as he should not have been awarded this year. With a sub zero Defensive bWAR and only 101 Games Played, White was not in the top five in any defensive category and this was clearly an oversight. Still he earned five of those seven, which for a Gold Glove is more than decent. White was on the ballot for one year in 2007 but did not receive any votes.

Steve Finley, NL San Diego Padres (1995)

-1.8 dWAR. Wow. Just Wow. For a first time Gold Glove winner, Steve Finley’s -1.8 Defensive bWAR is pretty bad. Finley’s defensive career was all over the place but this beginning is about as bad is gets for a multiple Gold Glove winner. Prior to this season, Steve Finley had respectable defensive seasons in MLB but this was not one of them. Considering this debut on the Gold Glove scene, it is surprising that we will see him again more than once. Finley was on the ballot for one year in 2013 and received 0.7% of the votes.

Marquis Grissom, NL Atlanta Braves (3) (1995)

0.7 dWAR. Marquis Grissom was now an Atlanta Brave but he regressed from his previous two All Star seasons both offensively and defensively. Grissom dropped to fourth in Total Zone Runs at his Centerfield position and was not in the top five in Range Factor per Game. That being said, Grissom also celebrated his third Gold Glove with a World Series ring. Grissom was on the ballot for one year in 2011 and received 0.7% of the vote.

Raul Mondesi, NL Los Angeles Dodgers (1995)

0.5 dWAR. Raul Mondesi was the National League Rookie of the Year in 1994 and in 1995 he would go to his first and only All Star Game while also earning what would be his first of two Gold Gloves. Mondesi did not always possess the full compliment of defensive skills but he did have a cannon for an arm. In 1995, he would lead all National League Outfielders in Assists and was third in Range Factor per Game at his Rightfield position. Mondesi was on the ballot for one year in 2011 but did not receive any votes.

Jay Buhner, AL Seattle Mariners (1996)

-0.7 dWAR   Jay Buhner was a star at this stage (especially if you ask George Costanza’s dad) but realistically he was not a Gold Glove winner despite what occurred this season. An All Star for the first and only time this year, Buhner’s popularity allowed him to win an award that he should not have based on his defensive metrics.. Buhner was on the ballot for one year in 2007 and received 0.2% of the votes.

Kenny Lofton, AL Cleveland Indians (4) (1996)

0.6 dWAR. 1996 was a lot like 1995 in that Lofton again used his speed to lead the AL in Stolen Bases but again his defense was ok but he did not land in the top five in Range Factor per Game or Total Zone Runs among the Centerfielders. Lofton would again exceed the 2.0 mark in Defensive bWAR in 1997 and 1998 but as his offence slid a bit, this apparently affected his defense, at least in the eyes of some of those who voted for the Gold Glove. This was the final Gold Glove for Kenny Lofton retired with an overall Defensive bWAR of 15.5. Lofton was on the ballot for one year in 2013 and received 3.2% of the ballot. He is ranked #51 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Barry Bonds, NL San Francisco Giants (6) (1996)

0.3 dWAR. While this was again was not spectacular he was second among all of the National League Leftfielders in Total Zone Runs (12) and had a third place finish in Range Factor per Game. Bonds has been on the ballot for six years and finished as high as 56.4% in 2018. He is ranked #2 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Steve Finley, NL San Diego Padres (2) (1996)

-0.1 dWAR. Steve Finley’s second Gold Glove win was light years better than his first but if you look at his 1995 win it doesn’t say that much. The second Gold Glove win of Steve Finley’s career was not spectacular but like the year previous it was not worthy of a Gold Glove. We will come back to Finley again. Finley was on the ballot for one year in 2013 and received 0.7% of the votes.

Marquis Grissom, NL Atlanta Braves (4) (1996)

0.9 dWAR. This would be the fourth and final Gold Glove for Grissom but like the last one it was a little suspect. He was second in Fielding Percentage but was not a top five finisher in Total Zone Runs or Range Factor per Game. Still his “two out of four” are not bad based on what we have seen here. Grissom was on the ballot for one year in 2011 and received 0.7% of the vote.

Jim Edmonds, AL Anaheim Angels (1997)

0.5 dWAR. This one will be interesting overall. Jim Edmonds had a decent career in terms of his offense and defense, but as we will see his defensive Gold Glove acumen might be a little suspect. In what was first Gold Glove, Edmonds he would finish second in Range Factor per Game but was not a top five finisher in any other category. Edmonds was on the ballot for one year in 2016 and received 2.5% of the ballot. He is ranked #50 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Bernie Williams, AL New York Yankees (1997)

-0.3 dWAR. For the record, we have always been a fan of the bat of Bernie Williams and his work during the Yankees dynasty of the late 90’s. Having said that, there was nothing special about his defense and in all four Gold Glove wins, he was rewarded for his offense and overall skill of the team. In his first Gold Glove (and also first All Star season) Williams was second in Fielding Percentage among American League Centerfielders but was not a top five finisher in Range Factor per Game or Total Zone Runs. Williams was on the ballot for two years and finished as high as 9.6% in 2012. He is ranked #38 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Barry Bonds, NL San Francisco Giants (7) (1997)

0.7 dWAR. Bonds would finish first in Total Zone Runs among the National League Leftfielders and was first in Putouts. He would also finish third in Range Factor per Game. Bonds has been on the ballot for six years and finished as high as 56.4% in 2018. He is ranked #2 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Raul Mondesi, NL Los Angeles Dodgers (2) (1997)

0.4 dWAR. Raul Mondesi’s second and final Gold Glove probably should not have occurred. While he still had that stellar arm he did not finish first in any defensive statistic among the National League Rightfielders, and was not in the top five in Total Zone Runs. He did however finish second in Range Factor per Game. Mondesi was on the ballot for one year in 2011 but did not receive any votes.

Larry Walker, NL Colorado Rockies (3) (1997)

0.3 dWAR. 1997 would be a magical year for the Canadian as he would not only win his first Gold Glove with Colorado but would also win the National League Most Valuable Player of the Year. While he won the Gold Glove in 1997 he did not exactly light up the league with his defensive skills. He was fifth among the NL Rightfielders in Total Zone Runs but was not top five in Range Factor per Game. He did however for the first and only time he finished first at his league position in Fielding Percentage. Walker has been on the ballot eight years and finished as high as 34.1% in 2018. He is ranked #13 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Jim Edmonds, AL Anaheim Angels (2) (1998)

0.0 dWAR. Look for a pattern here as this what will see. Edmonds hat a flat Defensive bWAR in 1998 where he was neither spectacular nor crap in regards to his defensive acumen. We have a lot more to go with Jim Edmonds so buckle up buttercup! Edmonds was on the ballot for one year in 2016 and received 2.5% of the ballot. He is ranked #50 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Bernie Williams, AL New York Yankees (2) (1998)

-1.1 dWAR. Bernie Williams did not finish in the top five in any defensive metric among the Centerfielders of the AL but in 1998 he would win the Batting Title and finished with a career high 7th place finish in MVP voting. More importantly, he helped the Bronx Bombers win the World Series, which was his second. Williams earned many accolades in ’98 but this wasn’t one of them. Williams was on the ballot for two years and finished as high as 9.6% in 2012. He is ranked #38 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Barry Bonds, NL San Francisco Giants (8) (1998)

0.3 dWAR. This would be the last Gold Glove of Barry Bonds career, and there were some other lasts of Bonds’ defensive career. This was the final time that he would lead the National League Leftfielders in Total Zone Runs, Range Factor per Game and Putouts. Arguably, he would never have any season with his glove that could even be described as decent. However following this season, Bonds’s offense would reach Playstation numbers, while his defensive skills became lumbering “Cansecolike”. Bonds would not win another Gold Glove and realistically he should not have won that many but for those who remember the last five years of his career and can’t imagine how he would have won so many, this was a player who deserved to me a multi-time winner when he was a Pittsburgh Pirate. Eight however doesn’t compute but he is a lot closer to it than many others who won five or more. Bonds has been on the ballot for six years and finished as high as 56.4% in 2018. He is ranked #2 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Andruw Jones, NL Atlanta Braves (1998)

3.9 dWAR. This will be a joy. Andruw Jones won ten Gold Gloves and he is a player who deserved to win that amount though perhaps the years could have been different but no matter…as this is a player who was far more deserving than almost everyone else we spoke about in terms of Gold Glove winning Outfielders. Jones had a strong case in his rookie of year (1997) as he had a 2.5 Defensive bWAR but in 1998 his 3.9 was league leading and was the best of his career. The Atlanta Brave would also have a career high (and league leading among NL Outfielders) 20 Assists and was also the National League Leader in Total Zone Runs with 35. This is a great start for a decade of defensive excellence. Jones has been on the ballot for one year and received 7.3% of the vote. He is ranked #46 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Larry Walker, NL Colorado Rockies (4) (1998)

-0.5 dWAR. Walker would repeat as the National League Batting Champion and also the Gold Glove winner. The former he earned, the latter he didn’t. While you could find some case to be made for the first three, you can’t for this one. Walker was not in the top five in Range Factor per Game, Total Zone Runs or Putouts. The best he had was a fourth place finish in Fielding Percentage. This is still better than his next Gold Glove win. Walker has been on the ballot eight years and finished as high as 34.1% in 2018. He is ranked #13 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Shawn Green, AL Toronto Blue Jays (1999)

0.1 dWAR. In 1999, Shaun Green was in his last year as a Toronto Blue Jay and he had his first of three 40 Home Run seasons with a career high .309 Batting Average and would be chosen for his first of two All Star Games. He would also have a career high 0.1 Defensive bWAR, which as you are reading isn’t that great. Green likely won based on his American League Rightfield leading Fielding Percentage. He was also fifth in Total Zone Runs. While this wasn’t great, this was his best defensive season in the American League.  Green was on the ballot for one year in 2013 and he received 0.4% of the vote.

Bernie Williams, AL New York Yankees (3) (1999)

-1.1 dWAR. Williams would win his third World Series ring in 1999 and he would post a career high .342 Batting Average. Williams was again great offensively but his skills with the glove were nothing special as once again he was not in the top five in Total Zone Runs or Range Factor per Game. The best he could say that among his league position he was third in Putouts and fifth in Fielding Percentage. Williams was on the ballot for two years and finished as high as 9.6% in 2012. He is ranked #38 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Steve Finley, NL Arizona Diamondbacks (3) (1999)

1.9 dWAR. Steve Finley had no business winning his first two Gold Gloves but his third win was certainly reasonable. Finley, who was now an Arizona Diamondback would have a career high 1.9 Defensive bWAR and 17 Total Zone Runs though based on his league position he still may not have been the most worth recipient of the Gold Glove. Finley was on the ballot for one year in 2013 and received 0.7% of the votes.

Andruw Jones, NL Atlanta Braves (2) (1999)

3.8 dWAR. Jones retuned with another monster defensive season with a 3.8 Defensive bWAR that had him finish second overall in the National League. Jones would also have a career high of 36 Total Zone Runs, which unsurprisingly was National League Leading. Jones would again the lead all of the National League Centerfielders in Assists and for the third season in a row he was the league leader at his position in Putouts and was also first among all of the NL Outfielders in Range Factor per Game. Jones has been on the ballot for one year and received 7.3% of the vote. He is ranked #46 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Larry Walker, NL Colorado Rockies (5) (1999)

-1.2 dWAR. Walker’s third straight Gold Glove with the Rockies showed his continued defensive decline but unlike his fourth place finish in Fielding Percentage in 1998, he didn’t accomplish that in 1999. He again failed to reach the top five in Total Zone Runs and Range Factor per Game. Walker has been on the ballot eight years and finished as high as 34.1% in 2018. He is ranked #13 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Jermaine Dye, AL Kansas City Royals (2000)

-0.6 dWAR. Jermaine Dye went to his first All Star Game and had a career high Batting Average of .321 with his first 30 Home Run season. Dye’s offense was good, but again this is a case where he was rewarded with a Gold Glove because of offensive accomplishments.   The Kansas City Royal actually had the most errors of any American League Rightfielder and was nowhere near close to get to the top five in Range Factor per Game and Total Zone Runs. He also was not in the top five in Fielding Percentage. Dye was on the ballot for one year in 2015 but did not receive any votes.

Darin Erstad, AL Anaheim Angels (2000)

2.3 dWAR   2000 was arguably the best season of his career as he had career highs in Hits (240), Home Runs (25), Runs Batted In (100) and all parts of the Slash Line (.355/.409/.541). He also went to All Star Game for the second time, but more importantly this was not the case of increased offensive numbers leading to an unwarranted Gold Glove win. Erstad finished third in the American League in Defensive bWAR and was the league leader in Total Zone Runs. He would also lead everyone in his league position in Range Factor per Game.  Erstad was on the ballot for one year in 2015 and received 0.2% of the ballot.

Bernie Williams, AL New York Yankees (4) (2000)

0.0 dWAR. Again an All Star (this would be his fourth of five straight appearances), Bernie Williams again won the World Series and had a Batting Average over .300. He also failed to be in the top five at his position in Range Factor per Game and Total Zone Runs. He would however finish first in Fielding Percentage with a perfect 1.000. Perhaps that can justify to some this win, which is more than can be said in the previous three. This was the fourth and final Gold Glove for Bernie. Williams was on the ballot for two years and finished as high as 9.6% in 2012. He is ranked #38 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Jim Edmonds, NL St. Louis Cardinals (3) (2000)

0.4 dWAR   Hmmm. Jim Edmonds had already proved himself to be a star player but was he a third time Gold Glove recipient at this stage? Probably not but either way, he was at that place and had more to prove. Edmonds was on the ballot for one year in 2016 and received 2.5% of the ballot. He is ranked #50 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Steve Finley, NL Arizona Diamondbacks (4) (2000)

0.0 dWAR. Finley won his fourth Gold Glove, though this one probably should not have given to him just like the first two. The then Arizona Diamondback would go this year to his second (and final All Star Game) but defensively he was not worthy. In 2000, he was not in the top five in Total Zone Runs nor Range Factor per Game. Finley was on the ballot for one year in 2013 and received 0.7% of the votes.

Andruw Jones, NL Atlanta Braves (3) (2000)

2.7 dWAR. For the second time, Andruw Jones finished atop the National League in Defensive bWAR and for the first time he was named an All Star. For the fourth consecutive season he finished first in Total Zone Runs (25) and he would lead all of the National League Centerfielders in Putouts and Range Factor per Game. Jones has been on the ballot for one year and received 7.3% of the vote. He is ranked #46 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Jim Edmonds, NL St. Louis Cardinals (4) (2001)

0.7 dWAR   While this was relatively a decent defensive campaign for Jim Edmonds like every other Gold Glove winning season for Edmonds there were certainly defensive metrics that would reflect why he should not have won it.   Again, this was not terrible, but not Gold Glove worthy. This will be a pattern as we continue with Edmonds.   Edmonds was on the ballot for one year in 2016 and received 2.5% of the ballot. He is ranked #50 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Andruw Jones, NL Atlanta Braves (4) (2001)

3.0 dWAR. Jones does it again! For the third time in four years the Atlanta Brave would lead the National League in Defensive bWAR and for the fifth consecutive season he was first amongst everyone in the NL in Total Zone Runs. He also continued his streak with his fourth straight year leading the NL Centerfielders in Putouts. He was also first among his position and all Outfielders in Range Factor per Game. Jones has been on the ballot for one year and received 7.3% of the vote. He is ranked #46 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Larry Walker, NL Colorado Rockies (6) (2001)

0.8 dWAR. Larry Walker returned to the Gold Glove circle with a decent positive Defensive bWAR. The Colorado Rockie went to his fifth and final All Star Game and he would also win his third and final Batting Title. This was somewhat of a rebound defensively as Walker finished second among all of the National League Rightfielder in Total Zone Runs. Walker has been on the ballot eight years and finished as high as 34.1% in 2018. He is ranked #13 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Mike Cameron, AL Seattle Mariners (2001)

1.5 dWAR   Mike Cameron went to one All Star Game, and this was the year.   Cameron was third among the American League Centerfielders in Total Zone Runs and second in Range Factor per Game. He was also 16th in American League MVP voting. Cameron was on the ballot for one year in 2017 but did not receive any votes.

Jim Edmonds, NL St. Louis Cardinals (5) (2002)

1.2 dWAR   Edmonds would secure a Defensive bWAR over 1.0 and while that is decent the St. Louis Cardinal was not in the top three at his position in Range Factor per Game or Total Zone Runs. Edmonds was on the ballot for one year in 2016 and received 2.5% of the ballot. He is ranked #50 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Darin Erstad, AL Anaheim Angels (2) (2002)

2.3 dWAR   This would be by far the greatest defensive season of Darin Erstad’s career and one of the best one by an Angel period. Erstad had a career high 4.2 Defensive bWAR and 39 Total Zone Runs, all of which were enough to lead the American League. Erstad played Centerfield this season and he would also finish first at his league position in Fielding Percentage and Range Factor per Game. Erstad would win a third Gold Glove in 2004 at First Base. Erstad was on the ballot for one year in 2015 and received 0.2% of the ballot.

Andruw Jones, NL Atlanta Braves (5) (2002)

2.3 dWAR. For the fourth and final time, Andruw Jones would lead the National League in Defensive bWAR. While he would never finish first again, there is a lot of good defense from Jones to come! This season would see Jones continue his streaks, but they would all come to an end after this year. For the sixth and final year he would lead the league in Total Zone Runs and for the fifth and final year he would finish first in Putouts among the Outfielders. He was also second in Range Factor per Game among the NL Centerfielders in Range Factor per Game. Jones has been on the ballot for one year and received 7.3% of the vote. He is ranked #46 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Larry Walker, NL Colorado Rockies (7) (2002)

0.3 dWAR. This would be the seventh and final Gold Glove of Larry Walker’s career and frankly this is not the defensive resume of a seven time Gold Glove winner, thought as you have read there have been worse at the Outfield position and realistically the Canadian should have won maybe three at best. No matter. In this last win he would finish fourth in Total Zone Runs and Range Factor per Game among the National League Rightfielders and was first in Assists. Walker has been on the ballot eight years and finished as high as 34.1% in 2018. He is ranked #13 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Mike Cameron, AL Seattle Mariners (2) (2003)

1.5 dWAR   While Mike Cameron had the exact same Defensive bWAR that he had in his first 2001 Gold Glove win, he increased his other sabremetric numbers with a first place finish among American League Centerfielders in both Range Factor per Game and Total Zone Runs. He was also the leader among AL Outfielders in Putouts. Cameron was on the ballot for one year in 2017 but did not receive any votes.

Jose Cruz, NL San Francisco Giants (2003)

0.9 dWAR   In the lone season he was a Giant, this would be without question the best defensive season of Jose Cruz’s career. While he was not a top ten performer in terms of Defensive bWAR, he had an incredible National League leading 38 Total Zone Runs. He would also finish first in Double Plays among all of the National League Outfielders and was his position leader in Putouts and Range Factor per Game. We have to say this, if they were only going to give Cruz one Gold Glove (which was the correct amount he deserved) they picked the correct year to do it. Although Cruz was eligible for the Hall of Fame in 2014 he was not on the ballot

Jim Edmonds, NL St. Louis Cardinals (6) (2003)

1.0 dWAR   This would be the first time that Jim Edmonds would finish first among all of the National League Centerfielders in Total Zone Runs. This was also the first and only season where Edmonds would land first among his position in Range Factor per Game. Edmonds was on the ballot for one year in 2016 and received 2.5% of the ballot. He is ranked #50 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Andruw Jones, NL Atlanta Braves (6) (2003)

1.7 dWAR. While we mentioned in Jones’ 2002 Gold Glove win that some impressive defensive streaks ended, the “regression” of Andruw Jones was still better than most of the Majors. Jones still finished seventh in the NL in Defensive bWAR (1.7) and was second in Total Zone Runs among the National League Centerfielders (19). He was also fourth in Range Factor per Game at his position. Jones has been on the ballot for one year and received 7.3% of the vote. He is ranked #46 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Jim Edmonds, NL St. Louis Cardinals (7) (2004)

0.4 dWAR   Edmonds would finish first among Assists and fifth in Total Zone Runs among all of the National League Centerfielders. Edmonds was on the ballot for one year in 2016 and received 2.5% of the ballot. He is ranked #50 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Steve Finley, NL Arizona Diamondbacks/Los Angeles Dodgers (5) (2004)

0.8 dWAR. This was the fifth and final Gold Glove of Steve Finley’s career which probably should not have had won one. Finley did not finish first in any significant defensive statistic. Finley was on the ballot for one year in 2013 and received 0.7% of the votes.

Andruw Jones, NL Atlanta Braves (7) (2004)

1.1 dWAR. For the first time in his Gold Glove wins, Andruw Jones was not in the top ten in Defensive bWAR and based on other statistics, if Jones was omitted from winning a Gold Glove it would not have been a crime. It wasn’t a crime that he won it either. In 2004 his 17 Total Zone Runs were good enough for fourth in the National League and second amongst the Centerfielders. Jones was fourth at his position in Range Factor per Game. Jones has been on the ballot for one year and received 7.3% of the vote. He is ranked #46 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Jim Edmonds, NL St. Louis Cardinals (8) (2005)

0.5 dWAR   This was the eighth and final time that Jim Edmonds won the Gold Glove and realistically it could be argued that he never should have won any of them. Edmonds was slightly above average defensively in his seasons but in all eight? He probably wasn’t but there likely have been worse eight time Gold Glove winners. The main difference is that they probably at least warranted one of them. Edmonds was on the ballot for one year in 2016 and received 2.5% of the ballot. He is ranked #50 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Andruw Jones, NL Atlanta Braves (8) (2005)

2.0 dWAR. Before we get to the defensive accomplishments this was the best offensive year for Andruw Jones as he led the NL in Home Runs (51) and Runs Batted In (128). As a result he was the runner-up for the MVP Award and he would also win his first and only Silver Slugger. Defensively he was tenth overall in Defensive bWAR with a third place finish at Centerfield in Total Zone Runs (19). He was also fourth in Range Factor per Game and for the final time he led his position in Assists. Jones has been on the ballot for one year and received 7.3% of the vote. He is ranked #46 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Mike Cameron, NL San Diego Padres (3) (2006)

1.5 dWAR   This would be the third and final Gold Glove for Mike Cameron and the only one in the National League. Realistically there should not have been any in the NL. Cameron was second among National League Centerfielders in Range Factor per Fame but was not a top five finisher in Total Zone Runs or Fielding Percentage. Cameron was on the ballot for one year in 2017 but did not receive any votes.

Andruw Jones, NL Atlanta Braves (9) (2006)

1.5 dWAR. While Jones was not league leading in any defensive statistic he still had a decent year with the glove. He would finish second among the NL Centerfielders in Total Zone Runs (19) and was third in Range Factor per Game. Jones has been on the ballot for one year and received 7.3% of the vote. He is ranked #46 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Andruw Jones, NL Atlanta Braves (10) (2007)

2.2 dWAR. This was the last Gold Glove win of Andruw Jones’ career and unlike other double digit Gold Glove winners his last win was decent. Jones finished sixth overall in Defensive bWAR in the National League and he would again finish first in Putouts among the NL Centerfielders and was third in Total Zone Runs and Range Factor per Game. Jones has been on the ballot for one year and received 7.3% of the vote. He is ranked #46 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Aaron Rowand, NL Philadelphia Phillies (2007)

0.7 dWAR. Aaron Rowand was also named an All Star this season and had he would have his best offensive season of his career with a .309 Batting Average with 27 Home Runs. Defensively however, he was just average. He was first amongst the Centerfielders in the National League in Fielding Percentage and was fifth in Range Factor per Game. Rowand was eligible for the Hall of Fame in 2017 but was not on the ballot.

 

Let’s update our tally shall we?

Award in Question

Percentage of recipients who have entered the HOF

Percentage of recipients by year who have entered the HOF.

NBA MVP

100%

100%

NHL Norris

90.5%

96.4%

NBA All Star Game MVP

89.5%

91.7%

NHL Conn Smythe

74.2%

85.4%

NHL Lady Byng

63.8%

76.0%

NFL Super Bowl MVP

60.6%

64.9%

NBA Defensive Player of the Year

58.3%

56.5%

NBA Rookie of the Year

56.5%

56.5%

MLB/NL/AL Cy Young Award

44.4%

55.4%

NHL Frank J. Selke Trophy

33.3%

36.7%

NFL Offensive Rookie of the Year

28.6%

28.6%

MLB Edgar Martinez Award

26.7%

17.2%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Designated Hitter)

25.0%

30.8%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Shortstop)

23.5%

52.6%

NFL Defensive Rookie of the Year

20.6%

20.6%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Catcher)

20.0%

22.5%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Second Base)

18.8%

39.8%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Shortstop)

18.2%

35.1%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Pitcher)

18.2%

20.1%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Second Base)

16.7%

32.7%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Outfield)

16.7%

30.1%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Outfield)

15.7%

25.2%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Third Base)

14.3%

14.3%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Third Base)

13.6%

14.3%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (First Base)

13.6%

13.3%

MLB (NL/AL) Rookie of the Year

13.3%

13.3%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Catcher)

10.3%

15.2%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (First Base)

3.8%

3.2%

So who is up next?

The following are the players who have won the Gold Glove at Third Base who have retired but have not met the mandatory years out of the game to qualify for the Baseball Hall of Fame:

Torii Hunter, AL Minnesota Twins (2001)

2.4 dWAR   This would be the first of nine straight Gold Gloves for Torii Hunter and he started it off with a bang. Hunter’s Defensive bWAR of 2.4 would be a career high and food enough for second overall in the American League. Hunter had 14 Assists, which led the American League Centerfielders and he would also finish first in Total Zone Runs and Range Factor per Game.   Hunter will be eligible for the Hall of Fame in 2021.

Ichiro Suzuki, AL Seattle Mariners (2001)

1.0 dWAR   It is not erroneous to suggest that Ichiro Suzuki took the North American baseball world by storm the second he arrived. In his “rookie” year, he would not only win the American League Rookie of the Year, he would lead his league in Hits, Batting Average and Stolen Bases while also capturing the Silver Slugger and MVP. Should he have won the Gold Glove?   This year (and there will be many we will talk about) we will say yes as he led the American League Rightfielders in Total Zone Runs, Range Factor per Game, Putouts and Fielding Percentage, so by those accounts it is a good start for what will be a ten year streak.  Suzuki will be eligible for the Hall of Fame in 2024.

Torii Hunter, AL Minnesota Twins (2) (2002)

-0.2 dWAR   Torii Hunter duplicated (actually improved on what was already good) his offensive performance but his defense tumbled quite a bit and his second Gold Glove was certainly suspect. The Centerfielder was fifth in Range Factor per Game and Fielding Percentage but that was about it. Hunter would however finish sixth in MVP voting, which would be his highest ever.   Hunter will be eligible for the Hall of Fame in 2021.

Ichiro Suzuki, AL Seattle Mariners (2) (2002)

-0.7 dWAR  Perhaps the mania surrounding Ichiro Suzuki was still strong as his defense was not the same as it was in his rookie year. While he was the American League Rightfield leader in Putouts he was not in the top five in Total Zone Runs though he was first in Fielding Percentage and Range Factor per Game. The latter two notes likely won Suzuki this award. Suzuki will be eligible for the Hall of Fame in 2024.

Torii Hunter, AL Minnesota Twins (3) (2003)

2.0 dWAR   In terms of defensive statistics, this was a little strange as his 2.0 Defensive bWAR was strong and was good enough for fourth overall in his league. Having said that he was not in the top five in Total Zone Runs at his position and he was only fifth in Range Factor per Game. Hunter will be eligible for the Hall of Fame in 2021.

Ichiro Suzuki, AL Seattle Mariners (3) (2003)

1.0 dWAR   Ichiro returned as a Gold Glove winner and at his American League position he was first in Total Zone Runs and in Fielding Percentage. He was also second in Range Factor per Game and notably his 23 TZR was second overall in the AL. Suzuki will be eligible for the Hall of Fame in 2024.

Torii Hunter, AL Minnesota Twins (4) (2004)

2.1 dWAR   In what would be Torii Hunter’s fourth Gold Glove win, this would be his last top ten finish in Defensive bWAR with a third place finish. Again, like the year before despite the solid number in Defensive bWAR he was not a top five finisher at his position in Total Zone Runs, though he was fifth in Range Factor per Game. Hunter will be eligible for the Hall of Fame in 2021.

Ichiro Suzuki, AL Seattle Mariners (4) (2004)

2.5 dWAR   In terms of Defensive bWAR, this was by far the greatest defensive season of Ichiro’s career with a 2.5 that landed him second overall. This was also the first and only season where the superstar from Japan finished first in Total Zone Runs with 27 and he was also first among AL Rightfielders in Range Factor per Game. Suzuki will be eligible for the Hall of Fame in 2024.

Vernon Wells, AL Toronto Blue Jays (2004)

1.7 dWAR   While Vernon Wells was not in the top five in Total Zone Runs (likely because he did not play 135 Games) his 1.7 Defensive bWAR was a career high. Wells was first among American League Centerfielders in Fielding Percentage and fourth in Range Factor per Game. He was notably eighth in Defensive bWAR in the AL. Wells will be eligible for the Hall of Fame in 2019.

Torii Hunter, AL Minnesota Twins (5) (2005)

1.1 dWAR   While this was not a bad season defensively for Hunter he only played 98 Games and was not in the top five in any defensive category making this a difficult one to justify. Hunter will be eligible for the Hall of Fame in 2021.

Ichiro Suzuki, AL Seattle Mariners (5) (2005)

2.5 dWAR   In terms of Defensive bWAR, this was by far the greatest defensive season of Ichiro’s career with a 2.5 that landed him second overall. This was also the first and only season where the superstar from Japan finished first in Total Zone Runs with 27 and he was also first among AL Rightfielders in Range Factor per Game. Suzuki will be eligible for the Hall of Fame in 2024.

Vernon Wells, AL Toronto Blue Jays (2) (2005)

0.9 dWAR   Wells had a perfect Fielding Percentage in this season but in terms of any other stat, he was nowhere close to the top. Having said that, the Toronto Blue Jay had a respectable defensive season though it may not have been Gold Glove worthy. Wells will be eligible for the Hall of Fame in 2019.

Bobby Abreu, NL Philadelphia Phillies (2005)

-1.5 dWAR   Hmmmm. While Bobby Abreu was known for his plate patience his defense was not spectacular especially in the season where he win a Gold Glove. Abreu, who was at this time a second time All Star was not in the midst of any glove related season that made sense. With all due respect to Bobby Abreu, his career was solid bit not in respect to his defensive skill. Abreu will be eligible for the Hall of Fame in 2020.

Torii Hunter, AL Minnesota Twins (6) (2006)

0.1 dWAR   Torii Hunter again won the Gold Glove, but this is was another win where the defensive metrics don’t justify the trophy. Again, Hunter failed to finish in the top five in any defensive statistic, although he would finish first in Assists among American League Centerfielders with 8. Hunter will be eligible for the Hall of Fame in 2021.

Ichiro Suzuki, AL Seattle Mariners (6) (2006)

1.0 dWAR   While Suzuki’s Defensive bWAR went up, for the first time as a Gold Glove winner he was not in the top five in Total Zone Runs among the American League Rightfielders, although he was second in Range Factor per Game. Suzuki will be eligible for the Hall of Fame in 2024.

Vernon Wells, AL Toronto Blue Jays (3) (2006)

1.5 dWAR   This would be the third and final Gold Glove for Vernon Wells and he would finish tenth in Defensive bWAR in the American League. Wells would finish first among all of the AL Centerfielders in Total Zone Runs. Wells will be eligible for the Hall of Fame in 2019.

Carlos Beltran, NL New York Mets (2006)

1.6 dWAR   Often when a player significantly increases their offensive output they can get rewarded with an unwarranted Gold Glove. In the case of Carlos Beltran’s first Gold Glove it took place in a season where he achieved many offensive highs, but his defense really stepped this year as well. Beltran was the National League Centerfielder leader in Range Factor per Game and he had a respectable 15 Total Zone Runs, which was good enough for fourth at his position. He would finish a career high fourth in MVP voting. Beltran will be eligible for the Hall of Fame in 2023.

Torii Hunter, AL Minnesota Twins (7) (2007)

0.3 dWAR   Hunter’s final season as a Twin and second All Star nod likely should not have saw him win this Gold Glove…much like some of the others before. Again, Hunter was not in the top five in Range Factor per Game or Total Zone Runs at his position, though he was fourth in Fielding Percentage. Hunter will be eligible for the Hall of Fame in 2021.

Grady Sizemore, AL Cleveland Indians (2007)

0.1 dWAR   With all due respect to Grady Sizemore, we have another situation where there a player who had an All Star season based on his offense who was rewarded for his defense. Having said that, this is not exactly a horrible choice as he played the most defensive games in the Outfield in ’07, and he was second among the American League Centerfielders in Total Zone Runs.   Sizemore will be eligible for the Hall of Fame in 2022.

Ichiro Suzuki, AL Seattle Mariners (7) (2007)

0.8 dWAR   This would be the only season where Ichiro would win the Gold Glove after predominantly playing Centerfield as opposed to Rightfield and it was not a bad defensive season as he was the league leader in Fielding Percentage and was second in Range Factor per Game. Suzuki will be eligible for the Hall of Fame in 2024.

Carlos Beltran, NL New York Mets (2) (2007)

1.3 dWAR   Beltran would go to his fourth straight All Star Game this year and would also win his second straight Silver Slugger. Defensively speaking he repeated leading the National League Centerfielders in Range Factor per Game and was again fourth in Total Zone Runs. Beltran will be eligible for the Hall of Fame in 2023.

Jeff Francouer, NL Atlanta Braves (2007)

1.3 dWAR   With what was arguably his best offensive season of his career, Jeff Franceour had a good defensive one in 2007 too. This was the third season in a row that he would finish first amongst the National League Rightfielders in Total Zone Runs and he was also the leader among all of the National League Outfielders in Assists. Francouer will be eligible for the Hall of Fame in 2022.

Torii Hunter, AL Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim (8) (2008)

0.0 dWAR   Hunter’s first season as an Angel saw him continue his Gold Glove streak, but it also continued his run of undeserving hardware. While he was again not a top five finisher at his position in Total Zone Runs and was fifth in Range Factor per Game, those who defend this can point to a perfect Fielding Percentage, and his first and only positional win for this stat. Hunter will be eligible for the Hall of Fame in 2021.

Grady Sizemore, AL Cleveland Indians (2008)

0.2 dWAR   The second and final Gold Glove of Grady Sizemore’s career saw a repeat of the year before, where he had a low Defensive bWAR but played a lot to accumulate a lot of statistics. An All Star for the third time, Sizemore was not a top five finisher in Total Zone Runs but he was second in Fielding Percentage at his position. Sizemore deserved all three of his trips to the All Star Game, but realistically he probably should not have been a two time Gold Glove recipient.   Sizemore will be eligible for the Hall of Fame in 2022.

Ichiro Suzuki, AL Seattle Mariners (8) (2008)

0.9 dWAR   Ichiro returned to Right and would have an average season, though this was not Gold Glove worthy. He was not in the top five in Total Zone Runs at his league position but was fifth in Range Factor per Game. Suzuki will be eligible for the Hall of Fame in 2024.

Carlos Beltran, NL New York Mets (3) (2008)

2.0 dWAR   This would be Carlos Beltran’s third and final Gold Glove win and he finished well with a fifth place finish overall in the National League. He would finish first among the NL Centerfielders in Putouts and Total Zone Runs and was second in Range Factor per Game. Beltran will be eligible for the Hall of Fame in 2023.

Carlos Beltran, NL New York Mets (3) (2008)

2.0 dWAR   This would be Carlos Beltran’s third and final Gold Glove win and he finished well with a fifth place finish overall in the National League. He would finish first among the NL Centerfielders in Putouts and Total Zone Runs and was second in Range Factor per Game. Beltran will be eligible for the Hall of Fame in 2023.

Nate McLouth, NL Pittsburgh Pirates (2008)

-2.1 dWAR   This is very interesting. In terms of offense, this was by far the best season of Nate McLouth’s career where he was an All Star, the National League leader in Doubles and had a career high 26 Home Runs, 94 RBI and .276 Batting Average. Somehow despite a horrific -2.1 Defensive bWAR and a complete failure to come close to the top five in Total Zone Runs or Range Factor per Game he won the Gold Glove. Again, offense trumped defensive for a Gold Glove. Beltran will be eligible for the Hall of Fame in 2022.

Shane Victorino, NL Philadelphia Phillies (2008)

1.2 dWAR   Shane Victorino had a high profile season as his Philadelphia Phillies won the World Series. Victorino probably should not have won the Gold Glove but it was still a decent year where his Defensive bWAR was OK and he finished fifth in Total Zone Runs among National League Centerfielders. It was good, but not great. Victorino will be eligible for the Hall of Fame in 2021.

Torii Hunter, AL Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim (9) (2009)

1.5 dWAR   Torii Hunter would win his ninth and final Gold Glove and while we have ragged on many of the wins, he finished reasonably well. With a decent Defensive bWAR of 1.5, he also returned to the top five in Total Zone Runs among American League Centerfielders with a third place finish and he was fourth in Range Factor per Game. He was also second in Fielding Percentage. Overall, Hunter was a good defensive player but he should never have won nine Gold Gloves. Hunter will be eligible for the Hall of Fame in 2021.

Ichiro Suzuki, AL Seattle Mariners (9) (2009)

-0.2 dWAR   Ichiro Suzuki may have had a negative Defensive bWAR but in terns of other advanced defensive metrics he had some positive attributes. Ichiro was second in Total Zone Runs and was third in Range Factor per Game and in the regular stats he was first in Putouts and fourth in Fielding Percentage. Suzuki will be eligible for the Hall of Fame in 2024.

Michael Bourn, NL Houston Astros (2009

1.5 dWAR This would be the first of three straight seasons where Michael Bourn would lead the National League in Stolen Bases. This was actually a decent season defensively for Bourn but he was not in the top five in Total Zone Runs and was only fifth in Range Factor per Game. Bourn will be eligible for the Hall of Fame in 2022.

Shane Victorino, NL Philadelphia Phillies (2) (2009)

0.2 dWAR   Victorino would be named an All Star for the first time in his career and he would also finish first in Fielding Percentage among National League Centerfielders though again he was not in the top five in Range Factor per Game and Total Zone Runs. Victorino will be eligible for the Hall of Fame in 2021.

Carl Crawford, AL Tampa Bay Rays (2010)

0.3 dWAR Carl Crawford had a solid career in Baseball, but was it Gold Glove worthy? It might not be as the four time All Star never had a Defensive bWAR over 1.2 and this season he had only a 0.3 although he was third in Total Zone Runs and second in Range Factor per Game among American League Leftfielders, however he had much better seasons in those metrics and was not awarded with a Gold Glove, however you know what is coming. This was his best offensive season and he finished seventh place in MVP voting and won the Silver Slugger, which magically made him a better fielder. Crawford will be eligible for the Hall of Fame in 2022.

Franklin Gutierrez, AL Seattle Mariners (2010)

0.4 dWAR Franklin Gutierrez would have his best overall season in MLB in terms of his offense, but in regards to hos defense he lands here as a one off. This won’t be the only time where this occurs. Gutierrez will be eligible for the Hall of Fame in 2023.

Ichiro Suzuki, AL Seattle Mariners (10) (2010)

-0.7 dWAR   2010 was truly the end of an era for the Japanese superstar as not only was this his last Gold Glove, but his last trip to the All Star Game. 10 in a row was pretty impressive right?   In terms of his last Gold Glove win, he probably should not have won it as he was the American League Rightfielder leader in Putouts he was only third in Total Zone Runs, was second in Range Factor per Game, though despite the negative Defensive bWAR, it was not the worst win of his career. Having said all of this, Ichiro was a solid defensive player but he never should have came close to the ten Gold Gloves he won. We guess when you know you have a future Hall of Famer, you tend to be generous with the Gold Gloves. Suzuki will be eligible for the Hall of Fame in 2024.

Michael Bourn, NL Houston Astros (2) (2010)

3.5 dWAR Bourn’s second and final Gold Glove would see him post a career high Defensive bWAR of 3.5, which would also land him the National League lead. Bourn would also lead everyone in the National League in Total Zone Runs with 22 and he would also be named an All Star. Pretty good, right? It is however definitely worth noting that in 2012 he had a 2.9 Defensive bWAR, a league leading 32 Total Zone Runs and was the first recipient of the Wilson Defensive Player of the Year Award (shared with Mike Trout). Bourn would of course NOT win the Gold Glove that year. Can we say again that this is a flawed award? Bourn will be eligible for the Hall of Fame in 2022.

Shane Victorino, NL Philadelphia Phillies (3) (2010)

0.4 dWAR   This would be the third National League Gold Glove for Shane Victorino though arguably he would go “0 for 3” in regards to deserving it. In this season Victorino would lead the National League Outfielders in Assists (11) and was second in Fielding Percentage among the NL Centerfielders. Victorino will be eligible for the Hall of Fame in 2021.

Andre Ethier, NL Los Angeles Dodgers (2011)

-0.5 dWAR   Andre Ethier never really had a stellar defensive season in his career and while he went to his second straight All Star Game, this was not a case where he had a great offensive season and it bled into Gold Glove votes. Ethier, who was not in the top five in Assists, Putouts, Total Zone Runs and Range Factor per Game did have a perfect Fielding Percentage. That is likely how he managed to win this Gold Glove. Ethier will be eligible for the Hall of Fame in 2023.

Shane Victorino, AL Boston Red Sox (4) (2013)

2.2 dWAR   Shane Victorino would win four Gold Gloves over his career, but it was his last where he had an arguable claim for the trophy. That year, he was an integral part of the Red Sox World Series win he was first by a mile in Total Zone Runs and Range Factor per Game among all of the AL Rightfielders, which were both stats he would never come close to again. Victorino will be eligible for the Hall of Fame in 2021.

 

 

 

The following are the players who have won the Gold Glove at Outfield who are still active.

Adam Jones, AL Baltimore Orioles (2009)

0.5 dWAR. 2009 saw Adam Jones go to his first All Star Game and also win his first Gold Glove. This season, Jones would finish first among all of the American League Centerfielders in Range Factor per Game and was second in Assists, however he was not a top five finisher in Total Zone Runs at his position. 33 Years Old, Playing for the Baltimore Orioles.

Matt Kemp, NL Los Angeles Dodgers (2009)

0.0 dWAR Matt Kemp was hardly a defensive star in 2009, and frankly he wasn’t in any season. Kemp also won the Silver Slugger (a case can be made for that) but this Gold Glove was not warranted. He would however play the most games in the National League at Centerfield and was first in Assists and Double Plays Turned though was not in the top five in Total Zone Runs and Range Factor per Game. 33 Years Old, Playing for the Los Angeles Dodgers.

Matt Kemp, NL Los Angeles Dodgers (2009)

0.0 dWAR Matt Kemp was hardly a defensive star in 2009, and frankly he wasn’t in any season. Kemp also won the Silver Slugger (a case can be made for that) but this Gold Glove was not warranted. He would however play the most games in the National League at Centerfield and was first in Assists and Double Plays Turned though was not in the top five in Total Zone Runs and Range Factor per Game. 33 Years Old, Playing for the Los Angeles Dodgers.

Carlos Gonzalez, NL Colorado Rockies (2010)

-0.1 dWAR This would be by far the best offensive season of Carlos Gonzalez’ career where he would win the Batting Title (.336) lead the NL in Hist (197) and would have 34 Home Runs with 117 RBI. The Outfielder would also finish third in MVP voting. This however did not mean he had a great defensive seasons as he split the season in three ways almost evenly at all three Outfield positions although he was second overall in Fielding Percentage among all National League Outfielders. 32 Years Old, Playing for the Colorado Rockies.

Jacoby Ellsbury, AL Boston Red Sox (2011)

1.4 dWAR. By far and away, this was the best offensive season of Jacoby Ellsbury’s career as the Centerfielder had career highs in Hits (212), Home Runs (32), RBI (105) and Batting Average (.321) and he was named an All Star, a Silver Slugger and was the runner-up for the MVP Award. He was also the league leader in WAR and was the American League Comeback Player of the Year. He had a good season defensively as he finished first among American League Centerfielders in Putouts and Fielding Percentage though he was not in the top five in Total Zone Runs. This would be his only Gold Glove win. 33 Years Old, Playing for the New York Yankees.

Alex Gordon, AL Kansas City Royals (2011)

1.4 dWAR. In what would be his first Gold Glove win Gordon would lead his league position (Leftfield) in Putouts, Assists, Range Factor per Game and Fielding Percentage while finishing second in Total Zone Runs. Not a bad start! 34 Years Old, Playing for the Kansas City Royals.

Nick Markakis, AL Baltimore Orioles (2011)

-0.1 dWAR. This was a strange choice but arguably safe as Nick Markakis did not make a lot of mistakes though he never took a lot of chances either. Markakis played the most defensive games among all of the American League Outfielders and he had a perfect Fielding Percentage, however he was not a top five finisher in Total Zone Runs and was only fourth in Range Factor per Game. Notably, Markakis would also have a 1.000 Fielding Percentage in 2013.  34 Years Old, Playing for the Atlanta Braves.

Matt Kemp, NL Los Angeles Dodgers (2) (2011)

-3.5 dWAR Before we get into Kemp’s 2011 defensive season, it is worth noting that this was by far his best offensive one. Kemp would lead the National League in Home Runs (39), Runs Batted In (126), Runs Scored (115) and he had a Slash Line of .324/.399/.586. He would win the Silver Slugger and he was second overall in MVP voting. That being said, a -3.5 Defensive bWAR can only be classified as abysmal. He somehow managed a fourth place finish in Total Zone Runs among National League Rightfielders but while he had a good throwing arm it wasn’t always accurate and he had horrible range. 33 Years Old, Playing for the Los Angeles Dodgers.

Gerardo Parra, NL Arizona Diamondbacks (2011)

0.9 dWAR   Gerardo Parra had a special season in terms of having moments in that his 12 Assists and 5 Double Plays were tops in the National League among the Leftfielders. He would finish first in Range Factor per Game and second in Total Zone Runs. 31 Years Old, Playing for the Colorado Rockies.

Alex Gordon, AL Kansas City Royals (2) (2012)

1.9 dWAR. Gordon repeated as the American League Leftfield leader in Assists, Putouts and Range Factor per Game though he was not in the top five in Total Zone Runs. 34 Years Old, Playing for the Kansas City Royals.

Adam Jones, AL Baltimore Orioles (2) (2012)

-1.0 dWAR. Despite having a negative Defensive bWAR, there were some positives to Adam Jones’s defensive campaign. The Baltimore Oriole would finish second in Range Factor per Game and was third in Total Zone Runs at his league position. The now second time All Star also led the AL Outfielders in Putouts. 33 Years Old, Playing for the Baltimore Orioles.

Josh Reddick, AL Oakland Athletics (2012)

0.9 dWAR. Josh Reddick received a sprinkling of MVP votes this year and in addition to his Gold Glove he would also win the Wilson Defensive Player Award. In terms of his American League position (Rightfield) he was second in Range Factor per Game. 31 Years Old, Playing for the Houston Astros.

Carlos Gonzalez, NL Colorado Rockies (2) (2012)

-1.9 dWAR Unlike in 2010 where Gonzalez played all over the Outfield, 2012 would see him stay in Leftfield but it was not a season where he did have a fifth place finish in Fielding Percentage, he did not accomplish anything else with his glove. 32 Years Old, Playing for the Colorado Rockies.

Jason Heyward, NL Atlanta Braves (2012)

1.3 dWAR. Jason Heyward was an All Star in 2010 and the runner-up for the Rookie of the Year was first in 2012 among National League Rightfielders in Putouts, Assists and Total Zone Runs, the latter of which saw him finish second in the National League. He was also second at his position in Range Factor per Game and third in Fielding Position. 28 Years Old, Playing for the Chicago Cubs.

Andrew McCutcheon, NL Pittsburgh Pirates (2012)

-0.2 dWAR. Hmmm. Andrew McCutcheon had proven himself to be a major star on the rise at this point but realistically his defensive skills were never more than average, although he did also win the Wilson Defensive Award this year. While he did have a negative Defensive bWAR he was third among the National League Centerfielders in Total Zone Runs. He would be named the National League MVP the next year. 31 Years Old, Playing for the New York Yankees.

Alex Gordon, AL Kansas City Royals (3) (2013)

1.4 dWAR. For the first time in his career Alex Gordon was an All Star and he repeated with another good defensive season. Gordon repeated as the AL Leftfield leader in Assists, Putouts and Range Factor per Game but for the first time he would finish first in Total Zone Runs. 34 Years Old, Playing for the Kansas City Royals.

Adam Jones, AL Baltimore Orioles (3) (2013)

0.5 dWAR. This was a little strange in comparison to the season previously as Jones had a positive Defensive bWAR but was not in the top five in either Range Factor per Game or Total Zone Runs although he was first in Putouts and Assists. 33 Years Old, Playing for the Baltimore Orioles.

Carlos Gomez, NL Milwaukee Brewers (2013)

3.9 dWAR This was the first of two All Star campaigns for Carlos Gomez although it was the only Gold Glove win for him, although the second Wilson Defensive Award. Having said that, this was an incredible defensive season for the Milwaukee Brewer and he would finish second in Defensive bWAR, while finishing first in Putouts and Range Factor per Game among all of the National League Outfielders. 32 Years Old, Playing for the Tampa Bay Rays.

Carlos Gonzalez, NL Colorado Rockies (3) (2013)

0.7 dWAR In terms of Defensive bWAR, this was the best defensive campaign that Carlos Gonzalez would ever have, although this was not spectacular by any means. Gonzalez would lead the National League Leftfielders in Assists and was third in Range Factor per Game but he was not in the top five in Total Zone Runs or Fielding Percentage. 32 Years Old, Playing for the Colorado Rockies.

Gerardo Parra, NL Arizona Diamondbacks (2) (2013)

3.6 dWAR   This was far and away the best season of Gerardo Parra’s career where he would not only win the Gold Glove but would win both the Wilson Defensive Player and Wilson Overall Defensive Player Award. The Venezuelan was third overall in the National League in Defensive bWAR and was first overall among all National League Outfielders in Assists (17). 31 Years Old, Playing for the Colorado Rockies.

Alex Gordon, AL Kansas City Royals (4) (2014)

2.4 dWAR. This was the best season for Gordon as he not only finished 12th in MVP voting he was also a repeat All Star. Defensively, he was never better as his 2.4 Defensive bWAR was good enough for fifth overall in the AL. He would again finish first in Total Zone Runs (24) at his position and he was second overall in the league. Gordon also finished first in Putouts, Range Factor per Game and Fielding Percentage and he also won the Wilson Defensive Player and Platinum Glove Award. 34 Years Old, Playing for the Kansas City Royals.

Adam Jones, AL Baltimore Orioles (4) (2014)

0.9 dWAR. Jones would again be named an All Star (his fourth) and in what was also his fourth Gold Glove season, he did not do anything remarkable, or terrible for that matter. He wasn’t in the top five in anything other than Putouts (fifth) at his position, but his errors were way down and he was efficient, although not extraordinary. 33 Years Old, Playing for the Baltimore Orioles.

Nick Markakis, AL Baltimore Orioles (2) (2014)

-0.5 dWAR. The second Gold Glove win of Nick Markakis’ career was a lot like his first in that he again had a negative Defensive bWAR but had a perfect Fielding Percentage and was not a top five finisher in Total Zone Runs. He would finish third among American League Rightfielders in Range Factor per Game. 34 Years Old, Playing for the Atlanta Braves

Jason Heyward, NL Atlanta Braves (2) (2014)

2.2 dWAR. Heyward finished seventh in the National League in Defensive bWAR and was also named a Wilson Defensive Player and a Wilson Overall Defensive Player of the Year. Heyward’s 27 Total Zone Runs would also top the National League and at his position he was first in Putouts, Assists, Range Factor per Game and Fielding Percentage. 28 Years Old, Playing for the Chicago Cubs.

Juan Lagares, NL New York Mets (2014)

3.2 dWAR. Juan Lagares had an incredible rookie year in terms of his glove with a 3.3 Defensive bWAR and a Wilson Defensive Player Award, but that was in 2013, the year he did not win a Gold Glove. The year he did he would have a similar Defensive bWAR (3.2) and was second overall in the National League (although he was not a Wilson Defensive Player winner). At his National League Position (Centerfield) he finished second in Total Zone Runs and first in Range Factor per Game. 29 Years Old, Playing for the New York Mets.

Christian Yelich, NL Miami Marlins (2014)

0.5 dWAR. Christian Yelich had proved to be a baseball star on the rise but in terms of him being a Gold Glove winner the jury was certainly out on that one. In 2014 he was not on the top five in any defensive metric of note. 26 Years Old, Playing for the Milwaukee Brewers.

Kole Calhoun, AL Los Angeles Angels (2015)

0.1 dWAR. As of this writing this is the only individual award that Kole Calhoun would win. Calhoun did play the most games defensively in the American League at Rightfield and he would lead his league at his position in Putouts, Total Zone Runs and Range Factor per Game. He was not actually the best Outfielder, but he was good enough and played the most. Sometimes that is all you need. 30 Years Old, Playing for the Los Angeles Angels.

Yoenis Cespedes, AL Detroit Tigers (2015)

0.8 dWAR. This was very unique, but what else is new in regards to the Gold Glove! The Cuban born Outfielder was traded midway through the season to the New York Mets, but he would still win the Gold Glove in the American League based on the 102 Games he played there. In that timeframe, he had a case as he was first in Range Factor per Game among the AL Leftfielders and was also third in Total Zone Runs, but based on only 102 Games, does this make sense? 32 Years Old, Playing for the New York Mets.

Kevin Kiermaier, AL Tampa Bay Rays (2015)

5.0 dWAR. Wow. In 2015, Kevin Kiermaier had an out of this world 5.0 Defensive bWAR, which made him only the fourth player in Major League Baseball to do that. The Tampa Bay Ray would also win the American League Platinum Glove. He would finish first among all American League Centerfielders in Assists, Total Zone Runs and Range Factor per Game. If only he was a good hitter! 28 Years Old, Playing for the Tampa Bay Rays.

Jason Heyward, NL St. Louis Cardinals (3) (2015)

2.0 dWAR. In his lone season with the St. Louis Cardinals, Jason Heyward finished eighth overall in Defensive bWAR while also being a Wilson Defensive Player. Heyward may not have had an impressive total in Total Zone Runs but he was second at his position in Range Factor per Game. 28 Years Old, Playing for the Chicago Cubs.

Starling Marte, NL Pittsburgh Pirates (2015)

2.0 dWAR. Also a Wilson Defensive Player in 2015, Starling Marte was only fourth at Leftfield among those in National League in Total Zone Runs, but he was first in Fielding Percentage and he led all National League Outfielders in Assists with 16. He was seventh overall in the NL in Defensive bWAR. 29 Years Old, Playing for the Pittsburgh Pirates.

A.J. Pollock, NL Arizona Diamondbacks (2015)

1.9 dWAR. This was definitely the best season of A.J. Pollock’s career as he was an All Star, a 20 Home Run hitter, a .300 Batter and also a Gold Glove winner who finished ninth overall in the NL in Defensive bWAR. At his Centerfield position, he would finish first in Putouts and Total Zone Runs. 30 Years Old, Playing for the Arizona Diamondbacks.

Mookie Betts, AL Boston Red Sox (2016)

2.9 dWAR. Mookie Betts had arrived in 2016 where he would win not only the Gold Glove but the Silver Slugger en route to finishing second in MVP voting. Betts would also win the Wilson Defensive Player Award but also the Wilson Defensive Player of the Year Award in a season where he was second in the AL in Defensive bWAR. Betts would also finish first in Putouts, Total Zone Runs   and Fielding Percentage with a second place finish in Range Factor per Game among all of the American League Rightfielders. 25 Years Old, Playing for the Boston Red Sox.

Brett Gardner, AL New York Yankees (2016)

0.8 dWAR. Brett Gardner might have won this based on his tenure and respect and he was decent enough to also win the Wilson Defensive Award. Gardner played the most games in the American League at Left and he would finish second in Fielding Percentage. Gardner should have one at least one Gold Glove in his career, but the year in question (2016) can certainly be debated.   34 Years Old, Playing for the New York Yankees.

Kevin Kiermaier, AL Tampa Bay Rays (2) (2016)

3.0 dWAR. In only 105 Games Played, Kevin Kiermaier had an incredible 3.0 Defensive bWAR, which was good enough again for first overall in the American League. He would also win the Wilson Defensive Player Award. The Tampa Bay Ray would also finish first at his league position in Total Zone Runs. Game for Game, was there a better defensive player in the American League than Kevin Kiermaier? 28 Years Old, Playing for the Tampa Bay Rays.

Jason Heyward, NL Chicago Cubs (4) (2016)

1.4 dWAR. This was the first season for Jason Heyward with the Chicago Cubs and it would be easy to argue that it was the best of his career. In 2016 Heyward would help the Chicago Cubs end the near century old jinx and win the World Series and in terms of his Gold Glove win, it was solid. At his position he had 22 Total Zone Runs, which was enough for second among National League Rightfielders. 28 Years Old, Playing for the Chicago Cubs.

Ender Inciarte, NL Atlanta Braves (2016)

1.8 dWAR. While this was the first Gold Glove for Inciarte, he arguably had a case in the previous two seasons, which were also his first two in the Majors. The Venezuelan would finish sixth in Defensive bWAR in 2016 while also leading all Centerfielders in the NL in Assists and Range Factor per Game. He was also second in Total Zone Runs. 27 Years Old, Playing for the Atlanta Braves.

Starling Marte, NL Pittsburgh Pirates (2) (2016)

1.3 dWAR. While Starling Marte did not win a Wilson Defensive Award like he did in his first Gold Glove, he did however go to his first All Star Game in 2016. In terms of his glove he would again finish first in Assists among those in the National League Outfield he was not in the top five in Total Zone Runs or Range Factor per Game. 29 Years Old, Playing for the Pittsburgh Pirates.

Mookie Betts, AL Boston Red Sox (2) (2017)

2.6 dWAR. Mookie Betts finished third overall in the AL in Defensive bWAR this year while again leading the American League Rightfielders in Putouts, Total Zone Runs and Range Factor per Game. He would finish sixth in American League MVP voting. 25 Years Old, Playing for the Boston Red Sox.

Byron Buxton, AL Minnesota Twins (2017)

2.8 dWAR. 2017 was an excellent season for Byron Buxton as not only did he win the Gold Glove but his trophy case also acquired a Wilson Defensive Player Award, the Wilson Overall Defensive Player Award and the Platinum Glove. Buxton’s 2.8 Defensive bWAR was second overall in the American League and he was first overall in Total Zone Runs with 31. He would also lead all American League Centerfielders in Range Factor per Game. 24 Years Old, Playing for the Minnesota Twins.

Alex Gordon, AL Kansas City Royals (5) (2017)

0.7 dWAR. While his 0.7 was his lowest Defensive bWAR for a Gold Glove win, he was again the leader amongst the American League Leftfielders in Total Zone Runs and was fourth overall in the AL. He would also win the Wilson Defensive Player Award. 34 Years Old, Playing for the Kansas City Royals.

Jason Heyward, NL Chicago Cubs (5) (2017)

1.4 dWAR. Heyward had another solid season defensively for the Chicago Cubs and at Rightfield in general. In this season he would finish first at his position in Total Zone Runs with a respective 21, which was enough for first among National League Outfielders. 28 Years Old, Playing for the Chicago Cubs.

Ender Inciarte, NL Atlanta Braves (2) (2017)

0.8 dWAR. We did say that Ender Inciarte had a case for a Gold Glove in his first two seasons but this second win is not exactly a strong one. While he did finish first among all of the National League Centerfielders in Putouts and Range Factor per Game, he was not in the top five in Total Zone Runs. 27 Years Old, Playing for the Atlanta Braves.

Marcell Ozuna, NL Atlanta Braves (2017)

0.4 dWAR. Honestly, we would think that by this time that the advanced metrics would prevent an increased offensive production from winning a Gold Glove, but here we are! Ozuna had 37 Home Runs with a .312 Batting Average and was a surefire Silver Slugger, but defensively he was just OK. Still, the case that could be made was that he finished first among the National League Leftfielders in Putouts, Range Factor per Game and Fielding Percentage but he was not a top five finisher in Total Zone Runs per Game nr was his 0.4 Defensive bWAR special. 27 Years Old, Playing for the St. Louis Cardinals.

Frankly, we thought it would be a higher percentage of Hall of Famers, but that is how it goes!

The next one frankly won’t be that interesting as we are going to complete the Gold Glove Pitchers, which won’t be as easy to dissect, or frankly even remotely as interesting.

Still, that is what we do here at Notinhalloffame.com!

Look for that soon!

Committee Chairman

Kirk Buchner, "The Committee Chairman", is the owner and operator of the site.  Kirk can be contacted at [email protected] .

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