Awards = HOF? Part Twenty-Six: Gold Glove Shortstop

Awards = HOF?  Part Twenty-Six:  Gold Glove Shortstop
24 Sep
2017
Not in Hall of Fame
We here at Notinhalloffame.com thought it would be fun to take a look at the major awards in North American team sports and see how it translates into Hall of Fame potential.

Needless to say, different awards in different sports yield hall of fame potential. In basketball, the team sport with the least amount of players on a roster, the dividend for greatness much higher. In baseball, it is not as much as a great individual season does not have the same impact.

We are now taking a look at the Gold Glove Award, given annually to the best defensive player in MLB in each respective position.

This will take awhile, so be patient with us!

We have just tackled Catcher, First and Second Base.

As you can imagine, we are continuing with Shortstop, one of the most important defensive positions in Baseball.

The following are the past players who have won the Gold Glove at Shortstop who are eligible for the Baseball Hall of Fame and have been enshrined.

Luis Aparicio, AL Chicago White Sox (1958)

2.9 dWAR. Aparicio would make his first All Star Game this year and he would lead all players in the American League in Defensive bWAR. Aparicio would also lead in Putouts, Assists and Total Zone Runs. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1984.

Luis Aparicio, AL Chicago White Sox (2) (1959)

1.7 dWAR. Again an All Star, Aparicio finish 2nd in MVP voting. Aparicio would finish fifth in Defensive bWAR and lead the American League Shortstops in Putouts, Assists, Total Zone Runs, Range Factor per Game and Fielding Percentage. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1984.

Ernie Banks, NL Chicago Cubs (1960)

2.0 dWAR. Banks was coming off two straight MVPs and finished fourth in voting this year. While this was Banks’ lone Gold Glove, he had a strong case for it the year before with a National League leading 3.5 Defensive bWAR. 1960’s tally of 2.0 was still good enough for 3rd place. That year, “Mr. Cub” would also lead the National League Shortstops in Assists, Putouts, Double Plays Turned, and Fielding Percentage. He also finished 2nd in Range Factor per Game and Total Zone Runs. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2001.

Luis Aparicio, AL Chicago White Sox (3) (1960)

3.8 dWAR. For the second time, Luis Aparicio would lead everyone in the American League in Defensive bWAR. The Venezuelan led in Assists, Double Plays Turned, Total Zone Runs, Range Factor per Game and Fielding Percentage. He finished with 27 Total Zone Runs. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1984.

Luis Aparicio, AL Chicago White Sox (4) (1961)

1.8 dWAR. Aparicio would go to his fourth straight All Star Game and he finished 12th in MVP voting. He would finish 7th overall in Defensive bWAR in the AL while leading in his position in Assists, Range Factor per Game and Fielding Percentage. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1984.

Luis Aparicio, AL Chicago White Sox (5) (1962)

2.0 dWAR. Once again, Aparicio had a top ten finish in Defensive bWAR with a sixth place finish. He would only lead the American League Shortstops in Fielding Percentage but was second in Total Zone Runs. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1984.

Luis Aparicio, AL Baltimore Orioles (6) (1964)

2.3 dWAR. New team but a similar result. Aparicio finished fifth in Defensive bWAR in the AL but would only lead in Fielding Percentage. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1984.

Luis Aparicio, AL Baltimore Orioles (7) (1966)

2.0 dWAR. Aparicio finished fifth in Defensive bWAR in the American League, but most importantly he would become a World Series Champion with the Orioles for the first and only time in his career. He would finish first in Putouts and Fielding Percentage amongst the American League Shortstops. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1984.

Luis Aparicio, AL Chicago White Sox (8) (1968)

2.6 dWAR. Of course he finished in the top ten in Defensive bWAR, this is Luis Aparicio. This year he finished fourth. Again with the White Sox, he would lead in Assists, Double Plays Turned and Range Factor per Game. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1984.

Luis Aparicio, AL Chicago White Sox (9) (1970)

0.8 dWAR. On what would be his last of nine Gold Glove wins, Luis Aparicio finally had one where he probably should not have been in the equation. Saying that, his defensive career should be celebrated, as this is a man who is 6th overall in Defensive bWAR and 20th overall in Total Zone Runs, 4th for Shortstops. Basically, this is a rare case where we are “okay” with the wrong winner. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1984.

Ozzie Smith, NL San Diego Padres (1980)

3.5 dWAR. Here we go! When people say that Ozzie Smith was the best defensive player of all time, statistically speaking he was! He also was a human highlight reel. This was Smith’s first Gold Glove but it should have been his second as he earned the Award in 1979. Smith would lead the National League in Defensive bWAR and also the NL Shortstops in Putouts, Assists, Double Plays Turned and Total Zone Runs. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2002.

Ozzie Smith, NL San Diego Padres (2) (1981)

1.3 dWAR. In this strike shortened season, Smith finished 6th overall in Defensive bWAR and went to his first All Star Game. He would lead in Assists, Range Factor per Game and Fielding Percentage. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2002.

Robin Yount, AL Milwaukee Brewers (1982)

1.8 dWAR. This would be the best season of Yount’s career. He would be named the American League MVP where he would lead the AL in Hits, Slugging and OPS. Yount would have a good year with the glove finishing seventh overall in Defensive bWAR while finishing second in Total Zone Runs and Range Factor per Game among the Shortstops in the American League. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1999.

Ozzie Smith, NL St. Louis Cardinals (3) (1982)

3.4 dWAR. Smith would again lead the National League in Defensive bWAR and led the National League Shortstops in Assists, Total Zone Runs, Range Factor per Game and Fielding Percentage. The “Wizard” would win a World Series Ring with the Cardinals, the first and only of his career. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2002.

Ozzie Smith, NL St. Louis Cardinals (4) (1983)

2.3 dWAR. This year Smith would finish fourth in Defensive bWAR and would lead in Putouts and Range Factor per Game. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2002.

Ozzie Smith, NL St. Louis Cardinals (5) (1984)

2.4 dWAR. Smith would move up to second overall in the NL in Defensive bWAR and led his peers in Double Plays Turned, Range Factor per Game and Fielding Percentage. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2002.

Ozzie Smith, NL St. Louis Cardinals (6) (1985)

3.4 dWAR. For the third time in his career, Ozzie Smith would lead the National League in Defensive bWAR. The Cardinal would also finish first amongst the NL Shortstops in Assists, Total Zone Runs, Range Factor per Game and Fielding Percentage. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2002.

Ozzie Smith, NL St. Louis Cardinals (7) (1986)

2.7 dWAR. Smith finished second in Defensive bWAR this year and was tops in Double Plays Turned, Total Zone Runs and Fielding Percentage. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2002.

Ozzie Smith, NL St. Louis Cardinals (8) (1987)

2.4 dWAR. For the fourth time Ozzie would lead everyone in the NL in Defensive bWAR and for the first time in his career he batted over .300. He would finish second in MVP voting, the highest of his career. In terms of National League Shortstops, he would lead them in Assists, Double Plays Turned and Fielding Percentage. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2002.

Ozzie Smith, NL St. Louis Cardinals (9) (1988)

3.1 dWAR. Ho Hum. Smith AGAIN led the National League in Defensive bWAR while having the most Assists and Total Zone Runs with the Highest Range Factor per Game amongst the NL Shortstops. Seriously, how good was he? Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2002.

Ozzie Smith, NL St. Louis Cardinals (10) (1989)

4.7 dWAR. At the age of 34, Ozzie Smith put together a disgustingly high 4.7 in Defensive bWAR. Sick right? He also had 32 Total Zone Runs, the most of his career, which of course led the National League Shortstops. He also led them in Assists. This would be the sixth and final time he led the league in Defensive bWAR. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2002.

Ozzie Smith, NL St. Louis Cardinals (11) (1990)

2.5 dWAR. Imagine dropping nearly half of your Defensive bWAR and still finishing with 2.5 and third overall? He would again finish first in Total Zone Runs. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2002.

Cal Ripken, AL Baltimore Orioles (1991)

3.4 dWAR. Cal Ripken is a legend but somehow he is actually underrated in regards to his glove. Ripken finished first in the American League in Defensive bWAR in 1991, but he had already done that three times before. This year along with the American League MVP Ripken would win his first Gold Glove. How strange is that it took this long for a player with this high a profile?  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2007.

Ozzie Smith, NL St. Louis Cardinals (12) (1991)

1.3 dWAR. A decent defensive year for any other player, Ozzie won his eleventh Gold Glove, but probably should not have. Smith would still lead in Double Plays Turned and Fielding Percentage. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2002.

Cal Ripken, AL Baltimore Orioles (2) (1992)

2.4 dWAR. Ripken repeated here for the second and final time but probably should have won more than he did. Is it because he wasn’t flashy and just so great fundamentally that it wasn’t noticed? This is a bigger mystery than Palmeiro winning a Gold Glove despite being a DH. Anyway, the Iron Man of Baseball would finish second in the AL in Defensive bWAR finished first in Putouts and Double Plays Turned and finished second in Total Zone Runs. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2007.

Ozzie Smith, NL St. Louis Cardinals (13) (1992)

2.4 dWAR. This would be Ozzie’s final Gold Glove win and he did so with a third place finish in the National League Defensive bWAR and again would finish first in Total Zone Runs among the Shortstops. Overall in his career he ranks first in Defensive bWAR (43.4) and fourth all time in Total Zone Runs (239). When people say that he is the greatest defensive player of all time it is difficult to argue. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2002.

Barry Larkin, NL Cincinnati Reds (1994)

1.1 dWAR. Barry Larkin had better defensive seasons than the one that would see him win his first Gold Glove, but in the strike shortened season of 1994 this wasn’t the worst. He would lead the National League Shortstops in Putouts. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2012.

Barry Larkin, NL Cincinnati Reds (2) (1995)

0.2 dWAR. In 1995, Larkin would put forth his best offensive campaign and won the National League MVP. This year however was not his best defensively and he was nowhere close to the top of any defensive statistic. This is another case of a bat winning a Gold Glove. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2012.

Barry Larkin, NL Cincinnati Reds (3) (1996)

0.5 dWAR. Larkin would finish first amongst the National League Shortstops in Putouts but this was not a stellar defensive year. Overall he had better defensive years than the ones he won his Gold Gloves in. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2012.

The following are the players who have won the Gold Glove at Shortstop who are eligible for the Baseball Hall of Fame and have not been selected:

 

Roy McMillan, ML Cincinnati Reds (1957)

1.0 dWAR. At this point, Roy McMillan already had three seasons where he exceeded 2.0 in Defensive bWAR, all of which were enough to lead the National League in that metric. This year wasn’t nearly as good as he only led the NL in Fielding Percentage. McMillan was on the ballot for three years and finished as high as 2.3% of the vote in 1972.

Roy McMillan, NL Cincinnati Reds (2) (1958)

1.4 dWAR. McMillan would again lead the National League Shortstops in Fielding Percentage but in no other category. McMillan was on the ballot for three years and finished as high as 2.3% of the vote in 1972.

Roy McMillan, NL Cincinnati Reds (3) (1959)

0.4 dWAR. McMillan should not have won this award and it was debatable whether he should have won his other two. Still, McMillan should have won three if the award existed in the mid-50’s and probably should have won in 1961. Overall, this was a very good defensive player. McMillan was on the ballot for three years and finished as high as 2.3% of the vote in 1972.

Maury Wills, NL Los Angeles Dodgers (1961)

0.6 dWAR. Maury Wills was a star on the rise as he would go to his first All Star Game and had a ninth place finish in National League MVP voting. He was however a curious choice for the Gold Glove as he failed to lead in any defensive category at Shortstop. Wills was on the ballot for fifteen years and finished as high as 40.6% of the vote in 1981. Ranked #87 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Maury Wills, NL Los Angeles Dodgers (2) (1962)

0.9 dWAR. Wills would bat .299 with over 100 Stolen Bases and would win the MVP Award. Defensively, it was the repeat of the year before where he failed to lead in any defensive category despite him playing more games at Shortstop than any one else in the NL. Wills was on the ballot for fifteen years and finished as high as 40.6% of the vote in 1981. Ranked #87 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Zolio Versalles, AL Minnesota Twins (1963)

1.0 dWAR. In the season before, Zolio Versalles had a Defensive bWAR of 2.0. This year was not the same and he would only lead the American League Shortstops in Putouts. Despite being Hall of Fame eligible in 1977, Versalles was not on the ballot.

Bobby Wine, NL Philadelphia Phillies (1963)

2.2 dWAR. This would be the only award that Bobby Wine would win, but it was well earned. Wine finished third in the National League in Defensive bWAR and was second in Total Zone Runs amongst the Shortstops of the NL. Despite being Hall of Fame eligible in 1978, Wine was not on the ballot.

Ruben Amaro, NL Philadelphia Phillies (1964)

0.1 dWAR. This one is mind boggling. Amaro took over for Bobby Wine at Shortstop for the Phillies but despite his reputation for being a defensive gem, he wasn’t. With only a 0.1 Defensive WAR and not coming close to leading in any defensive category, Amaro also only had 323 Plate Appearances and only had 79 Hits with a .307 On Base Percentage. He actually got MVP vtes this year! Seriously, who was watching this year? Despite being Hall of Fame eligible in 1975, Amaro was not on the ballot.

Zolio Versalles, AL Minnesota Twins (2) (1965)

3.0 dWAR. Versalles would win the American League MVP and would become one of the more unlikely and dare we say most forgotten one. This was a defensive gem of a season where he led the American League in both Offensive and Defensive WAR and was also the league leader in Total Zone Runs. Despite being Hall of Fame eligible in 1977, Versalles was not on the ballot.

Leo Cardenas, NL Philadelphia Phillies (1965)

1.6 dWAR. Cardenas was coming off his second All Star appearance (and would have three more) and would have four seasons where he had a Defensive bWAR over 2.0. This wasn’t one of them but it was enough for him to finish seventh in the National League. Cardenas would lead the National League Shortstops in Putouts and Double Plays Turned. Perhaps they should do a revote in 1962 where he lost to Maury Wills! Cardenas was on the ballot for two years in 1981 and 1982 receiving 0.2% of the vote both times.

Gene Alley, NL Pittsburgh Pirates (1966)

2.2 dWAR. The year before, Gene Alley had a 3.5 Defensive bWAR finishing first in the National League. This year he was second. He would lead the NL Shortstops in Double Plays Turned. Alley was on the ballot for one year in 1979 but did not receive any votes.

Jim Fregosi, AL California Angels (1967)

1.2 dWAR. Jim Fregosi may have been a six time All Star but the Gold Glove he won likely should have occurred in a different season. Fregosi finished seventh in MVP voting this year, which was the highest he ever finished. Still, Fregosi finished in the top ten in Defensive bWAR, but this wasn’t one of those years. He would not lead in the American League Shortstops in any category defensively. Fregosi was on the ballot for one year in 1984 and received 1.0 % of the vote.

Gene Alley, NL Pittsburgh Pirates (2) (1967)

2.0 dWAR. This year Alley would finish 5th in the National League in Defensive bWAR and would lead n Putouts, Assists, Double Plays Turned and Range Factor per Game. Alley would again lead the National League in Defensive bWAR in 1968 but he would not receive the Gold Glove. Alley was on the ballot for one year in 1979 but did not receive any votes.

Dal Maxville, NL St. Louis Cardinals (1968)

1.2 dWAR. Gene Alley realistically should have won this award again, but Maxville should have probably beat Alley in 1966 and had a claim in ’67. At least one this award once, albeit in the wrong year. Alley was on the ballot for one year in 1981 but did not receive any votes.

Mark Belanger, AL Baltimore Orioles (1969)

2.2 dWAR. Belanger actually had a Defensive bWAR the year before of 4.4, but he had less than 100 Hits with a Batting Average of .208. Funny what over 150 Hits and an Average of .287 can do for a Gold Glove. With a still exceptional Defensive bWAR of 2.2, which was good enough for sixth overall in the AL. Belanger was on the ballot for one year in 1988 and received 3.7% of the vote.

Don Kessinger, NL Chicago Cubs (1969)

2.2 dWAR. Earning an All Star appearance for the second time in his career, this was the year that Don Kessinger would set career records in Hits and Defensive bWAR. The Chicago Cub would finish third in Defensive bWAR in the National League and would also lead the NL Shortstops in Putouts, Assists, Double Plays Turned and Fielding Percentage. Kessinger was on the ballot for one year in 1985 and received 0.5% of the vote.

Don Kessinger, NL Chicago Cubs (2) (1970)

1.2 dWAR. Kessinger was again named an All Star and would do so again three more times. Realistically, this was a good season for him offensively and defensively but not Gold Glove worthy. He would lead in Assists this year. Kessinger was on the ballot for one year in 1985 and received 0.5% of the vote.

Mark Belanger, AL Baltimore Orioles (2) (1971)

2.4 dWAR. The second Gold Glove of Belanger’s career also saw him have a decent offensive year. He would finish fourth in Defensive bWAR in the American League. Belanger was on the ballot for one year in 1988 and received 3.7% of the vote.

Bud Harrelson, NL New York Mets (1971)

3.0 dWAR. This would be the best defensive season of Bud Harrelson’s career by far. Harrelson was an All Star for the second and final time of his career and would actually receive a smattering of MVP votes. He would lead everyone in the National League in Defensive bWAR and led the NL Shortstops in Total Zone Runs. Harrelson was on the ballot for one year in 1986 and received 0.2% of the vote.

Ed Brinkman, AL Detroit Tigers (1972)

1.9 dWAR. Brinkman had previously led the American League in Defensive bWAR and this year he would finish sixth. Brinkman played in the era of Mark Belanger but this was still an excellent defensive player. In 1972, Brinkman would lead the AL Shortstops in Fielding Percentage. Although Brinkman was eligible for the Hall of Fame in 1981, he was not in the ballot.

Larry Bowa, NL Philadelphia Phillies (1972)

1.7 dWAR. Bowa actually had a 3.0 Defensive bWAR in 1971, but so did Bud Harrellson! In ’72 Bowa finished 7th overall in the NL in Defensive bWAR and led the National League Shortstops in Fielding Percentage. Bowa was on the ballot for one year in 1991 and received 2.5% of the vote.

Mark Belanger, AL Baltimore Orioles (3) (1973)

4.0 dWAR. Note this win! This was the first year of what has to be the best six year run of defensive skill as he would lead the American League in that metric six years in a row. Nobody had done it before, and nobody has done it since. Belanger also would thankfully win the Gold Glove each of those years showcasing the correct win by the voters. Belanger would also lead the American League Shortstops in Total Zone Runs. Belanger was on the ballot for one year in 1988 and received 3.7% of the vote.

Roger Metzger, NL Houston Astros (1973)

0.4 dWAR. While Metzger would have a decent career overall defensively the only individual award he collected in Major League Baseball should not have happened. Metzger was not great this year defensively did lead in Fielding Percentage but did not come close in any other defensive statistic. Although Metzger was eligible for the Hall of Fame in 1986, he was not in the ballot.

Mark Belanger, AL Baltimore Orioles (4) (1974)

3.5 dWAR. It is hard to add more to what was written about Belanger’s 1973 win but we have a lot more of him to talk about. The Oriole would lead the Shortstops in Assists, Total Zone Runs, Range Factor per Game and Fielding Percentage. Belanger was on the ballot for one year in 1988 and received 3.7% of the vote.

Dave Concepcion, NL Cincinnati Reds (1974)

2.6 dWAR. Dave Concepcion was already named an All Star in 1973 but it was in ’74 where he put it altogether with his bat and glove in a full season. Finishing second in Defensive bWAR in the National League, he would lead all the NL Shortstops in Assists. Concepcion was on the ballot for 15 years and finished as high as 16.9% of the vote in 1998. He is ranked #82 on Notinhalloffsme.com.

Mark Belanger, AL Baltimore Orioles (5) (1975)

4.9 dWAR. A 4.9 Defensive bWAR and 35 Total Zone Runs. Do you know how many Hall of Famers went their entire career without doing this? Let that resonate as we again profile one of the greatest defensive players of all-time, yet easily the most unheralded. Needless to day Belanger led the AL Shortstops in that category and also led in Double Plays Turned and Range Factor per Game. Seriously, the more we look at his career, the more we love Mark Belanger. Belanger was on the ballot for one year in 1988 and received 3.7% of the vote.

Dave Concepcion, NL Cincinnati Reds (2) (1975)

2.6 dWAR. This year Concepcion would finish third in Defensive bWAR in the NL but more importantly he won the World Series with the Reds. He also led in Total Zone Runs and Range Factor per Game. Concepcion was on the ballot for 15 years and finished as high as 16.9% of the vote in 1998. He is ranked #82 on Notinhalloffsme.com.

Mark Belanger, AL Baltimore Orioles (6) (1976)

3.9 dWAR. Only Mark Belanger could drop a full 1.0 in Defensive bWAR and still lead his league in that category. He would again lead in Total Zone Runs and Assists. We are running out of compliments! Belanger was on the ballot for one year in 1988 and received 3.7% of the vote.

Dave Concepcion, NL Cincinnati Reds (3) (1976)

2.1 dWAR. Again a World Series win and again a Gold Glove winner. Concepcion finished third in the NL in Defensive bWAR and led the National League Shortstops in Putouts, Total Zone Runs and Range Factor per Game. Concepcion was on the ballot for 15 years and finished as high as 16.9% of the vote in 1998. He is ranked #82 on Notinhalloffsme.com.

Mark Belanger, AL Baltimore Orioles (7) (1977)

3.4 dWAR. Again a defensive superstar, Belanger would again lead in Total Zone Runs. He would also lead the American League Shortstops in Range Factor per Game and Fielding Percentage. Belanger was on the ballot for one year in 1988 and received 3.7% of the vote.

Dave Concepcion, NL Cincinnati Reds (4) (1977)

1.6 dWAR. Concepcion did finish 7th in Defensive bWAR in the NL but was well behind Ivan DeJesus, Bill Russell and Larry Bowa. He did however lead the NL Shortstops in Fielding Percentage. Concepcion was on the ballot for 15 years and finished as high as 16.9% of the vote in 1998. He is ranked #82 on Notinhalloffsme.com.

Mark Belanger, AL Baltimore Orioles (8) (1978)

3.7 dWAR. This would be the final Gold Glove of Mark Belanger’s career, a man who is second overall all time in Defensive bWAR. He would again lead in Total Zone Runs, and is third all time in that statistic. Belanger also finished first in Fielding Percentage. This ends one of the greatest defensive players ever in terms of Gold Gloves. Belanger was on the ballot for one year in 1988 and received 3.7% of the vote.

Larry Bowa, NL Philadelphia Phillies (2) (1978)

2.8 dWAR. Bowa’s 2.8 in Defensive bWAR was enough to lead the National League in that stat. The Shortstop would lead his position in Total Zone Runs and Fielding Percentage. Overall, Bowa had an excellent Defensive bWAR of 18.7 in his Major League career. Bowa was on the ballot for one year in 1991 and received 2.5% of the vote.

Rick Burleson, AL Philadelphia Phillies (1979)

3.0 dWAR. This would be the best defensive season of Rick Burleson’s career and he finished third overall in the AL in Defensive bWAR. He would finish second in Total Zone Runs and first in Fielding Percentage Burleson was on the ballot for one year in 1993 but did not receive any votes.

Dave Concepcion, NL Cincinnati Reds (5) (1979)

1.6 dWAR. Concepcion again finished in the top ten in Defensive bWAR by finishing 8th and would overall in his career have a Defensive bWAR of 20.9. This year he led the National League Shortstops in Double Plays Turned. Concepcion was on the ballot for 15 years and finished as high as 16.9% of the vote in 1998. He is ranked #82 on Notinhalloffsme.com.

Rick Burleson, AL Philadelphia Phillies (2) (1979)

3.0 dWAR. This would be the best defensive season of Rick Burleson’s career and he finished third overall in the AL in Defensive bWAR. He would finish second in Total Zone Runs and first in Fielding Percentage   Burleson was on the ballot for one year in 1993 but did not receive any votes.

Alan Trammell, AL Detroit Tigers (1980)

1.3 dWAR. Alan Trammell would go to his first All Star Game and have his first .300 season. The Tiger was decent defensively this year but not Gold Glove worthy. He did not lead in any category. Trammell was on the ballot for 15 years and finished as high as 40.9% of the vote in 2016. He is ranked #12 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Alan Trammell, AL Detroit Tigers (2) (1981)

2.4 dWAR. This year Trammell would finish third overall in the AL in Defensive bWAR and was second amongst the American League Shortstops in Total Zone Runs. Trammell was on the ballot for 15 years and finished as high as 40.9% of the vote in 2016. He is ranked #12 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Alan Trammell, AL Detroit Tigers (3) (1983)

0.8 dWAR. This was another strange selection for Trammell as this was not a Gold Glove worthy performance. He was actually second in Defensive bWAR in 1982. Trammell was on the ballot for 15 years and finished as high as 40.9% of the vote in 2016. He is ranked #12 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Alan Trammell, AL Detroit Tigers (4) (1984)

2.2 dWAR. Trammell finished 10th overall in Defensive bWAR this season and overall in his career had an excellent 22.0. This is certainly a player deserving of four Gold Gloves though not necessarily in the four that he did so. Trammell was on the ballot for 15 years and finished as high as 40.9% of the vote in 2016. He is ranked #12 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Alfredo Griffin, AL Oakland Athletics (1985)

0.8 dWAR. Huh? Alfredo Griffin had a good career but he was not an exceptional defensive player and the only statistic he finished in the top two in defensively was Errors. Although Griffin was eligible for the Hall of Fame in 1999 he was not on the ballot.

Tony Fernandez, AL Toronto Blue Jays (1986)

1.5 dWAR. Ironically, Fernandez replaced Griffin at Shortstop in Toronto and in 1985 Tony Fernandez should have beat Griffin for the Gold Glove. Fernandez would finish first in Putouts and Fielding Percentage in the Shortstop category. Fernandez was on the ballot for one year in 2007 and finished with 0.7% of the ballot.

Tony Fernandez, AL Toronto Blue Jays (2) (1987)

1.5 dWAR. This year 1.5 was enough for Fernandez to finish 10th overall in the American League in Defensive bWAR. He would also lead the Shortstops in Putouts. Fernandez was on the ballot for one year in 2007 and finished with 0.7% of the ballot.

Tony Fernandez, AL Toronto Blue Jays (3) (1988)

1.9 dWAR. Finishing 7th in the AL in Defensive bWAR, Fernandez actually failed to win any defensive metric, though he was exceptionally efficient. Fernandez was on the ballot for one year in 2007 and finished with 0.7% of the ballot.

Tony Fernandez, AL Toronto Blue Jays (4) (1989)

2.4 dWAR. This year Tony Fernandez would win his final Gold Glove while finishing fourth in Defensive bWAR in the American League. He would also lead the Shortstops in Range Factor per Game and Fielding Percentage. Fernandez was on the ballot for one year in 2007 and finished with 0.7% of the ballot.

Ozzie Guillen, AL Chicago White Sox (1989)

2.3 dWAR. Ozzie Guillen probably should have won the Gold Glove in three or maybe four of the wins that Tony Fernandez accrued. Three of those saw Guillen exceed 3.0 in Defensive bWAR, all of which were good enough to finish first. In the year he did win the Gold Glove, he finished seventh overall. Fernandez was on the ballot for one year in 2007 and finished with 0.7% of the ballot.

Omar Vizquel, AL Seattle Mariners (1993)

2.5 dWAR. O.K. Let’s establish right now that Omar Vizquel is 10th overall all-time in Defensive bWAR and is considered one of the best defensive infielders ever. While we say that, there will be quite a few of his Gold Glove wins that should not have taken place, so be warned!  This year however saw Vizquel net a 2.5 Defensive bWAR, which would see him finish second overall in the American League. He would finish first in Double Plays Turned. As of this writing, Vizquel is entering his first year of eligibility. Ranked #76 by Notinhalloffame.com.

Jay Bell, NL Pittsburgh Pirates (1993)

2.2 dWAR. Jay Bell would also win the Silver Slugger Award and was an All Star this year. Finishing fourth overall in Defensive bWAR and would lead the National League Shortstops in Putouts and Assists and finished second in Total Zone Runs and Range Factor per Game. Bell was on the ballot for one year in 2009 and finished with 0.4% of the ballot.

Omar Vizquel, AL Cleveland Indians (2) (1994)

0.8 dWAR. This actually wasn’t a bad defensive season for Vizquel but he only played 69 Games and as such was not in the top ten in any defensive category. There had to be a better choice here. As of this writing, Vizquel is entering his first year of eligibility. Ranked #76 by Notinhalloffame.com.

Omar Vizquel, AL Cleveland Indians (3) (1995)

0.9 dWAR. Vizquel played more games this year but had a similar Defensive bWAR. He also failed to be in the hunt for any first place finish in any defensive statistic. As of this writing, Vizquel is entering his first year of eligibility. Ranked #76 by Notinhalloffame.com.

Omar Vizquel, AL Cleveland Indians (4) (1996)

1.1 dWAR. While this was not a bad season for Omar Vizquel defensively this was not a Gold Glove one either. Vizquel was not in the top ten in ANY defensive category. As of this writing, Vizquel is entering his first year of eligibility. Ranked #76 by Notinhalloffame.com.

Omar Vizquel, AL Cleveland Indians (5) (1997)

1.1 dWAR. This may have been a marginally better year defensively but again Vizquel did not finish first in any defensive category. As of this writing, Vizquel is entering his first year of eligibility. Ranked #76 by Notinhalloffame.com.

Rey Ordonez, NL New York Mets (1997)

2.6 dWAR. Finishing second overall in Defensive bWAR in the National League despite only paying 120 Games, Rey Ordonez would also lead the NL Shortstops in Total Zone Runs. He would also finish first in Fielding Percentage. Ordonez did not play enough years to be eligible for the Hall of Fame.

Omar Vizquel, AL Cleveland Indians (6) (1998)

1.7 dWAR. This would be the first of three seasons where Vizquel would become an All Star. This year he would lead the American League Shortstops in Putouts in Fielding Percentage. As of this writing, Vizquel is entering his first year of eligibility. Ranked #76 by Notinhalloffame.com.

Rey Ordonez, NL New York Mets (2) (1998)

0.3 dWAR. While Rey Ordonez will be remembered by Mets fans for his glove, it wasn’t because of much of what he did in 1998. His acrobatic plays covered up for many of his mistakes this year. He did not lead in any defensive metric and really wasn’t close. Ordonez did not play enough years to be eligible for the Hall of Fame.

Omar Vizquel, AL Cleveland Indians (7) (1999)

2.0 dWAR. This season, Vizquel would finish eighth overall in Defensive bWAR and would go to his second All Star Game. As of this writing, Vizquel is entering his first year of eligibility. Ranked #76 by Notinhalloffame.com.

Rey Ordonez, NL New York Mets (3) (1999)

4.0 dWAR. Ordonez would finish first in Defensive bWAR and had an incredible 33 Total Zone Runs, more than enough to lead all of the National League Shortstops. This would be his last season of any value as his defensive skills eroded to his batting skills, which were never much. Ordonez did not play enough years to be eligible for the Hall of Fame.

Omar Vizquel, AL Cleveland Indians (8) (2000)

0.8 dWAR. While the sabremetrics don’t show this as a great defensive season for Omar Vizquel, he did lead the AL Shortstops in Fielding Percentage. As of this writing, Vizquel is entering his first year of eligibility. Ranked #76 by Notinhalloffame.com.

Neifi Perez, NL Colorado Rockies (2000)

2.1 dWAR. In what would be the only individual award of his Pro Baseball career, Neifi Perez would finish third in the National League in Defensive bWAR. He would also lead in Putouts, Assists, Double Plays Turned, Total Zone Runs and Range Factor per Game. Although Perez was eligible for the Hall of Fame in 2013 he was not on the ballot.

Omar Vizquel, AL Cleveland Indians (9) (2001)

0.1 dWAR. Omar Vizquel would lead the American League Shortstops in Fielding Percentage but he failed to finish in the top ten in Total Zone Runs and Range Factor per Game. Again, here is another case where Vizquel should not have won the Gold Glove. As of this writing, Vizquel is entering his first year of eligibility. Ranked #76 by Notinhalloffame.com.

Orlando Cabrera, NL Montreal Expos (2001)

2.1 dWAR. Finishing fifth in the National League in Defensive bWAR, Cabrera would also finish first among the NL Shortstops in Putouts, Assists, Total Zone Runs and Fielding Percentage. Cabrera was on the ballot in 2017 but did not receive any votes.

Edgar Renteria, NL St. Louis Cardinals (2002)

1.3 dWAR. Edgar Renteria posted his first .300 season and yes we suspect that aided him in winning an award that had nothing to do with that fact. He did not finish in the top four of any Defensive category among the National League Shortstops. Renteria was on the ballot for one year in 2017 and received 0.5% of the votes.

Edgar Renteria, NL St. Louis Cardinals (2) (2003)

0.6 dWAR. This year Renteria didn’t even finish in the top ten in any defensive metric! But he did bat .330. Apparently that was enough. Renteria was on the ballot for one year in 2017 and received 0.5% of the votes.

Omar Vizquel, NL San Francisco Giants (10) (2005)

0.8 dWAR. This would be the first season where Vizquel would lead the NL Shortstops in Fielding Percentage but that would be all he would lead in. As of this writing, Vizquel is entering his first year of eligibility. Ranked #76 by Notinhalloffame.com.

Omar Vizquel, NL San Francisco Giants (11) (2006)

1.4 dWAR. We know that it this point it must seem that we are trashing Omar Vizquel but this was a player who should be a two time Gold Glove winner and not an eleven time one. Basically, he was a defensive compiler. At least in 2006, he would lead the National League Shortstops in Fielding Percentage. Incidentally, he was Gold Glove worthy in 2007, but why honor him at the right time? As of this writing, Vizquel is entering his first year of eligibility. Ranked #76 by Notinhalloffame.com.

Orlando Cabrera, AL Los Angeles Angels (2) (2007)

1.3 dWAR. While Cabrera had an ok season defensively, he might have received this as he was coming off what would be his greatest offensive campaign. 2007 saw Cabrera collect 192 Hits with a .301 Batting Average. He did finish first in Fielding Percentage. Cabrera was on the ballot in 2017 but did not receive any votes.

 

 

Let’s update our tally shall we?

Award in Question

Percentage of recipients who have entered the HOF

Percentage of recipients by year who have entered the HOF.

NBA MVP

100%

100%

NHL Norris

90.5%

96.4%

NBA All Star Game MVP

89.5%

91.7%

NHL Conn Smythe

74.2%

85.4%

NHL Lady Byng

63.8%

76.0%

NFL Super Bowl MVP

60.6%

64.9%

NBA Defensive Player of the Year

58.3%

56.5%

NBA Rookie of the Year

56.5%

56.5%

MLB/NL/AL Cy Young Award

44.4%

55.4%

NHL Frank J. Selke Trophy

33.3%

36.7%

NFL Offensive Rookie of the Year

28.6%

28.6%

MLB Edgar Martinez Award

26.7%

17.2%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Designated Hitter)

25.0%

30.8%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Shortstop)

23.5%

52.6%

NFL Defensive Rookie of the Year

20.6%

20.6%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Catcher)

20.0%

22.5%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Second Base)

18.8%

39.8%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Clove (Shortstop)

18.2%

35.1%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Pitcher)

18.2%

20.1%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Second Base)

16.7%

32.7%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Outfield)

15.7%

25.2%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Third Base)

13.6%

14.3%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (First Base)

13.6%

13.3%

MLB (NL/AL) Rookie of the Year

13.3%

13.3%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Catcher)

10.3%

15.2%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (First Base)

3.8%

3.2%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Second Base)

16.7%

32.7%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Outfield)

15.7%

25.2%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Third Base)

13.6%

14.3%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (First Base)

13.6%

13.3%

MLB (NL/AL) Rookie of the Year

13.3%

13.3%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Catcher)

10.3%

15.2%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (First Base)

3.8%

3.2%

So who is up next?

The following are the players who have won the Gold Glove at Shortstop who have retired but have not met the mandatory years out of the game to qualify for the Baseball Hall of Fame:

 

Alex Rodriguez, AL Texas Rangers (2002)

1.0 dWAR. A-Rod was one of the greatest offensive players ever regardless of position and in terms of offensive Shortstops he had little if any peers. In terms of defense, he was above average but not Gold Glove caliber. In 2002, he was good with the glove but not Gold Glove worthy. Eligible in the Hall of Fame in 2022.

Alex Rodriguez, AL Texas Rangers (2) (2003)

1.6 dWAR. 1.6 was enough to get Rodriguez 6th place in the American League in Defensive bWAR. In terms of his position, he would finish first in Fielding Percentage. Eligible in the Hall of Fame in 2022.

Derek Jeter, AL New York Yankees (2004)

-0.4 dWAR. When the Yankees signed A-Rod, they moved him to third, keeping Jeter at Shortstop but maybe they shouldn’t have. Jeter would win his first Gold Glove and lead in Putouts but advanced metrics show that he was well below average at his position. Eligible in the Hall of Fame in 2020.

Cesar Izturis, NL Los Angeles Dodgers (2004)

2.2 dWAR. This would be the best defensive season of Cesar Izturis’ career. Finishing 5th in the National League in Defensive bWAR, Izturis would also finish first in Putouts and second in Total Zone Runs. Eligible for the Hall of Fame in 2019.

Derek Jeter, AL New York Yankees (2) (2005)

-1.9 dWAR. Ouch. Not only did Jeter fail to finish first in any metric he was not able to crack the top ten in Total Zone Runs. Jeter was a popular player for sure but there were certain awards he should not have sniffed. This was one. Eligible in the Hall of Fame in 2020.

Derek Jeter, AL New York Yankees (3) (2006)

-0.8 dWAR. Once again Derek Jeter won a Gold Glove while posting a negative bWAR on the defensive side of the ledger. Jeter’s highest defensive finish was fifth place in Fielding Percentage but failed to crack the top ten in anything else. Eligible in the Hall of Fame in 2020.

Jimmy Rollins, NL Philadelphia Phillies (2007)

1.2 dWAR. Named the National League MVP this year, Jimmy Rollins likely won this year due to his bat, but he was still decent defensively though he really wasn’t close to finishing at the top of any National League statistical leaderboard among the Shortstops. Eligible for the Hall of Fame in 2022.

Michael Young, AL Texas Rangers (2008)

0.4 dWAR. Seriously? Michael Young did not win this on reputation as his last four seasons saw him net a -3.9 in Defensive bWAR, and you can’t say they gave it to him due to his bat as this was his weakest offensive season (though still good) over the last six seasons. While he finished first in Fielding Percentage he also was a Shortstop with limited range and did not save runs the way his more daring peers did. Eligible for the Hall of Fame in 2022.

Jimmy Rollins, NL Philadelphia Phillies (2) (2008)

2.4 dWAR. Rollins would finish third overall in the NL in Defensive bWAR and first in Fielding Percentage. More importantly for Rollins he led the Philadelphia Phillies to a World Series win. Eligible for the Hall of Fame in 2022.

Derek Jeter, AL New York Yankees (4) (2009)

1.0 dWAR. At lest Derek Jeter finished a positive Defensive bWAR! Jeter would finish first in Fielding Percentage, which was the first time he had ever managed to do so. Still, he would not finish in the top ten in Total Zone Runs or Range Factor per Game. Eligible in the Hall of Fame in 2020.

Jimmy Rollins, NL Philadelphia Phillies (3) (2009)

0.6 dWAR. Rollins would again finish first in Fielding Percentage but he wasn’t close to finishing first in anything else. Eligible for the Hall of Fame in 2022.

Derek Jeter, AL New York Yankees (5) (2010)

-0.1 dWAR. A repeat of the year before as Jeter would be atop the leaderboard among the American League Shortstops in Fielding Percentage and was also absent in the top ten in Range Factor per Game and Total Zone Runs. As much as we love Jeter, this is easily one of the worst multi-time Gold Glove winner in history. Eligible in the Hall of Fame in 2020.

Jimmy Rollins, NL Philadelphia Phillies (4) (2012)

0.0 dWAR. While Rollins would again finish at the top in Fielding Percentage his overall range had declined and he failed to finish in the top ten in Range Factor per Game and Total Zone Runs. Eligible for the Hall of Fame in 2022.

 

The following are the players who have won the Gold Glove at Shortstop who are still active.

Troy Tulowitzki, NL Colorado Rockies (2010)

2.6 dWAR. In 2007, Troy Tulowitzki was a rookie and put together a whopping 3.8 in Defensive bWAR. In 2010 however he would go to his first All Star Game, earn a Silver Slugger and win his first Gold Glove. This was still earned as he would finish fourth in the NL in Defensive bWAR while finishing first in Double Plays Turned, Range Factor per Game and Fielding Percentage. 32 Years Old, Playing for the Toronto Blue Jays.

Erick Aybar, AL Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim (2011)

0.7 dWAR. We are guessing that he won this, as he did not have many errors. He also didn’t have much range either, though he did finish first in Double Plays Turned. 33 Years Old, Playing for the San Diego Padres.

Troy Tulowitzki, NL Colorado Rockies (2) (2011)

2.0 dWAR. Good enough for third place in Defensive bWAR in the National League, “Tulo” finished first in Double Plays Turned, Total Zone Runs, Range Factor per Game and Fielding Percentage. 32 Years Old, Playing for the Toronto Blue Jays.

J.J. Hardy, AL Baltimore Orioles (2012)

2.7 dWAR. Also named a Wilson Defensive Player, J.J. Hardy’s first Gold Glove saw him secure second place in Defensive bWAR in the A.L. Among the American League Shortstops, Hardy was first in Putouts, Assists, Double Plays Turned, Range Factor per Game, Total Zone Runs and Fielding Percentage. 34 Years Old, Playing for the Baltimore Orioles.

J.J. Hardy, AL Baltimore Orioles (2) (2013)

1.9 dWAR. This season Hardy would only finish first in Double Plays Turned but was eight overall in Defensive bWAR in the AL. 34 Years Old, Playing for the Baltimore Orioles.

Andrelton Simmons, NL Atlanta Braves (2013)

5.4 dWAR. This could be one of the greatest defensive seasons ever. Needless to say, his 5.4 Defensive bWAR was league leading as was his 30 Total Zone Runs. He also finished first at his position in Putouts, Assists and Range Factor per Game. Simmons would also win the NL Defensive Player Award and the NL Platinum Glove Award. It is a good thing he was great with his glove as his On Base Percentage was .296. 27 Years Old, Playing for the Anaheim Angels.

J.J. Hardy, AL Baltimore Orioles (3) (2014)

2.1 dWAR. With a seventh place finish in Defensive bWAR, J.J. Hardy would also finish atop the American League Shortstops in Total Zone Runs. 34 Years Old, Playing for the Baltimore Orioles.

Andrelton Simmons, NL Atlanta Braves (2) (2014)

3.9 dWAR. For the second year in a row Andrelton Simmons would finish first in the National League in Defensive bWAR. He would also lead the National League Shortstops in Putouts and Double Plays Turned. He would also be named a Wilson Defensive Player this year, though in 2015 he was named the Wilson Overall Defensive Player of the Year but would not win a Gold Glove. 27 Years Old, Playing for the Anaheim Angels.

Alcides Escobar, AL Kansas City Royals (2015)

0.8 dWAR. Also an All Star this year, Alcides Escobar had a dream year going to the World Series and winning the ALCS MVP. Realistically, he didn’t make a lot of errors but was not among the league leaders in any defensive category. 30 Years Old, Playing for the Kansas City Royals.

Brandon Crawford, NL San Francisco Giants (2015)

2.9 dWAR. Finishing second in Defensive bWAR in the NL (to Andrelon Simmons no less) Brandon Crawford would go to his first All Star Game and win his first Silver Slugger in 2015. Amongst the Shortstops of the National League, Crawford would be first in Total Zone Runs with 20, enough to lead the entire NL. 27 Years Old, Playing for the Anaheim Angels.

Francisco Lindor, AL Cleveland Indians (2016)

2.7 dWAR. In 2016, Francisco Lindor would go to his first All Star Game and finished ninth in AL MVP voting while finishing third overall in Defensive bWAR. The recipient of the Platinum Glove, Lindor would also finish first in the league in Total Zone Runs. 27 Years Old, Playing for the Anaheim Angels.

Brandon Crawford, NL San Francisco Giants (2) (2016)

2.7 dWAR. This year he would take first place in the NL in Defensive bWAR but would only be the NL Shortstop leader in Assists. 27 Years Old, Playing for the Anaheim Angels.

Arguably, the most important defensive position in baseball is the Shortstop and this did net a higher amount of Hall of Famers than First Base, it was slightly less than at Second.

This is a considerably higher Hall of Fame yield than what happened at First Base, and realistically with the premium that defense is held for that position it should be.

We will continue around the diamond and tackle Third Base next.
Last modified on Monday, 25 September 2017 13:28
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Kirk Buchner, "The Committee Chairman", is the owner and operator of the site.  Kirk can be contacted at [email protected] .

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