Awards = HOF? Part Twenty-Five: Gold Glove Second Base

Awards = HOF?  Part Twenty-Five:  Gold Glove Second Base
08 Jul
2017
Not in Hall of Fame
We here at Notinhalloffame.com thought it would be fun to take a look at the major awards in North American team sports and see how it translates into Hall of Fame potential.

Needless to say, different awards in different sports yield hall of fame potential.  In basketball, the team sport with the least amount of players on a roster, the dividend for greatness much higher.  In baseball, it is not as much as a great individual season does not have the same impact.

We are now taking a look at the Gold Glove Award, given annually to the best defensive player in MLB in each respective position.

This will take awhile, so be patient with us!

We have just tackled the Catcher and First Base spot.

As you can imagine, we are continuing with Second Base, a position where stellar defense is certainly more required than at First.

The following are the past players who have won the Gold Glove at Second Base who are eligible for the Baseball Hall of Fame and have been enshrined.

 

Nellie Fox, ML Chicago White Sox (1957)

2.2 dWAR.  The first winner of the Gold Glove at Second Base, Nellie Fox was coming off his third season leading the AL in Hits and his seventh straight All Star Game.  Fox was a worthy debut winner, finishing second in Defensive bWAR and leading all AL Second Basemen in Assists, Putouts, Double Plays Turned, Total Zone Runs and Range Factor per Game.  We are off to a great start!  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1997.

Bill Mazeroski, NL Pittsburgh Pirates (1958)

2.9 dWAR.  While some can debate whether or not Bill Mazeroski is Hall of Fame worthy, there is no question that he deserved this Gold Glove.  “Maz” would lead the NL in Defensive WAR and would lead the NL second Basemen in Assists, Total Zone Runs and Range Factor per Game.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2001.

Nellie Fox, AL Chicago White Sox (2) (1959)

2.6 dWAR.  This would be Nellie Fox’s best year, where he would win the MVP (his only), go to the World Series (though Chicago would lose) and lead the American League in Defensive WAR.  Fox would again lead in Assists, Putouts and Total Zone Runs, this time with a whopping 21.  He would also lead in Fielding Percentage.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1997.

Nellie Fox, AL Chicago White Sox (3) (1960)

2.1 dWAR.  This time finishing fourth in Defensive WAR, Nellie Fox was still in All Star home both with his bat and glove.  Fox would again lead the AL Second Basemen in Assists, Putouts, Double Plays Turned and Range Factor per Game.  He may not have led in Total Zone Runs, but with 16 he did finish second.  Fox earned all three of these awards.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1997.

Bill Mazeroski, NL Pittsburgh Pirates (2) (1960)

1.1 dWAR.  While defensively he was not where he was in ’58, he was still good and this was the best overall year of his career.  Not only did Mazeroski finish 8th in MVP voting (the only time he would finish in the top ten), he had the game winning Home Run that would win the World Series for the Pirates.  Defensively speaking, Mazeroski led the National League Second Basemen is Assists, Putouts, Double Plays Turned, Range Factor per Game and Fielding Percentage.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2001.

Bill Mazeroski, NL Pittsburgh Pirates (3) (1961)

1.2 dWAR.  Well, how could he top last year?  He couldn’t, but this was still a very good player.  Maz still led the NL Second Baseman in Assists, Putouts, Double Plays Turned and Range Factor per Game.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2001.

Bill Mazeroski, NL Pittsburgh Pirates (4) (1963)

3.3 dWAR.  For the second and final time in his career, Bill Mazeroski would lead the National League in Defensive WAR.  Again an All Star, he would lead in Assists, Double Plays Turned, Total Zone Runs (with 23!) and Range Factor per Game.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2001.

Bill Mazeroski, NL Pittsburgh Pirates (5) (1964)

2.1 dWAR.  Now we said Mazeroski would never lead the NL in Defensive WAR again, but he did finish second this year.  Mazeroski would again make the All Star Game and he would lead all National League Second Basemen in Assists, Double Plays Turned, Total Zone Runs and Range Factor per Game.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2001.

Bill Mazeroski, NL Pittsburgh Pirates (6) (1965)

1.6 dWAR.  This year, Mazeroski would finish fifth overall in Defensive WAR in the NL.  He would not finish in the top ten in Assists and Putouts this year, as he only played 127 Games in Double Plays Turned, Total Zone Runs, Range Factor per Game and Fielding Percentage.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2001.

Bill Mazeroski, NL Pittsburgh Pirates (7) (1966)

1.6 dWAR.  Mazeroski did not finish in the top ten in Defensive WAR, but did finish with the same number he did the year before.  This was Mazeroski’s last All Star appearance, and he would again lead in Assists, Putouts, Double Plays Turned, Range Factor per Game and Fielding Percentage.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2001.

Bill Mazeroski, NL Pittsburgh Pirates (8) (1967)

2.6 dWAR.  This would be Mazeroski’s final Gold Glove and he deserved all eight of them.  Finishing second in Defensive WAR in ’67, Mazeroski is as of this writing twenty-second overall in that category.  To cap it off, Maz would finish first amongst the NL First Basemen in Assists, Putouts, and Range Factor per Game.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2001.

Joe Morgan, NL Cincinnati Reds (1973)

1.7 dWAR.  By this time, Joe Morgan had established himself as the premier offensive Second Baseman in history, and this year his defense was catching up.   The Cincinnati Red led in Double Plays Turned and finished 7th overall in Defensive bWAR.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1990.

Joe Morgan, NL Cincinnati Reds (2) (1974)

0.9 dWAR.  This wasn’t a bad season with the glove for Morgan, but he didn’t really deserve this one and was nowhere to be found in the top ten in Range Factor per Game or Total Zone Runs.  Morgan won this one with his bat and reputation and it wouldn’t be the last time.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1990.

Joe Morgan, NL Cincinnati Reds (3) (1975)

2.0 dWAR.  This was the best defensive season of Joe Morgan’s career as he finished 5th overall in Defensive bWAR and 2nd amongst NL Second Basemen in Total Zone Runs.  To top it off, Morgan had an incredible season offensively (leading in Offensive bWAR) and he justifiably won the National League MVP Award.  Oh, and he also won the World Series!  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1990.

Joe Morgan, NL Cincinnati Reds (4) (1976)

0.3 dWAR.  Morgan actually put up an even better offensive season, repeated with the MVP and the World Series.  Defensively however, Morgan was just average Second Basemen and was not Gold Glove worthy by any stretch.    Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1990.

Joe Morgan, NL Cincinnati Reds (5) (1977)

-0.5 dWAR.  While Joe Morgan was still a very good player, he took a step back defensively and had no business winning this award.  While he did lead in Putouts, he was not in the top ten in Total Zone Runs, Range Factor Per Game and finished with a negative Defensive bWAR.  This is one of those many Gold Gloves awarded on reputation alone.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1990.

Ryne Sandberg, NL Chicago Cubs (1983)

1.9 dWAR.  Ryne Sandeberg was considered the best Second Baseman in the National League of the 1980’s and rightfully became a Hall of Fame inductee.  In his sophomore season and first of many Gold Glove wins, Sandberg would finish fifth overall in Defensive bWAR while leading his NL peers in Assists, Double Plays Turned, Range Factor per Game and Fielding Percentage.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2005.

Ryne Sandberg, NL Chicago Cubs (2) (1984)

1.9 dWAR.  This would be arguably the best season of Sandberg’s career.  1984 would see Sandberg go to his first of multiple All Star Games, win his first Silver Slugger and win the National League MVP Award.  He would also again finish fifth in Defensive bWAR while leading in Assists, Total Zone Runs, Range Factor per Game and Fielding Percentage.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2005.

Ryne Sandberg, NL Chicago Cubs (3) (1985)

0.1 dWAR.  Ryne Sandberg kept his bat up but his glove game took a serious step back.  He did not lead in any defensive metric this season and won this award on reputation.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2005.

Ryne Sandberg, NL Chicago Cubs (4) (1986)

0.8 dWAR.  “Ryno” would have a better year defensively and would lead the National League Second Basemen in Assists and Fielding Percentage.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2005.

Ryne Sandberg, NL Chicago Cubs (5) (1987)

-0.9 dWAR.  With all due respect to this worthy Hall of Fame inductee this is one of the worst season ever offered to a Gold Glove winner.  It goes without saying that he did not come close to leading in any defensive metric.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2005.

Ryne Sandberg, NL Chicago Cubs (6) (1988)

1.4 dWAR.  Sandberg would rebound defensively and would lead the National League Second Basemen in Assists.  He would finish 8th overall in the National League in Defensive bWAR.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2005.

Ryne Sandberg, NL Chicago Cubs (7) (1989)

0.2 dWAR.  Sandberg would not lead in any defensive metric and this award makes you wonder if they just repeated what they had leftover on the ballot from the season before.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2005.

Ryne Sandberg, NL Chicago Cubs (8) (1990)

0.6 dWAR.  While Ryne Sandberg would lead the NL Second Basemen in Assists, we have another misappropriated Gold Glove win by the Chicago Cub.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2005.

Roberto Alomar, AL Toronto Blue Jays (1991)

-0.1 dWAR.  Do you know Sandy Alomar would go the All Star Game year after year despite having poor stats?  His brother won a plethora of Gold Gloves and shouldn’t have.  His first Gold Glove came in his first year in the American League and while his bat made him one of the best offensively at his position he did not lead in any defensive category.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2011.

Ryne Sandberg, NL Chicago Cubs (9) (1991)

1.0 dWAR.  Sandberg probably wasn’t the best choice this year either, though again would lead in Assists.  Ironically, he would have three more seasons where he would lead the Second Basemen in the NL in Total Zone Runs with two more appearances in the top ten in Defensive bWAR.  By then the writers “moved on” from Sandberg.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2005.

Roberto Alomar, AL Toronto Blue Jays (2) (1992)

0.5 dWAR.  This year, Alomar would at least lead the AL Second Basemen in Fielding Percentage but while Alomar would win another unearned Gold Glove he was stellar with the bat and propelled the Blue Jays to their first World Series win.  He would be named the MVP of the ALCS.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2011

Roberto Alomar, AL Toronto Blue Jays (3) (1993)

-0.4 dWAR.  Alomar helped Toronto win their second straight World Series but this wasn’t because of his defensive contributions.  Alomar was not only not the leader in any defensive stat, he would not appear in the top ten in Range Factor per Game, Fielding Percentage and Total Zone Runs.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2011

Roberto Alomar, AL Toronto Blue Jays (4) (1994)

-0.4 dWAR.  Wow.  Alomar had the same Defensive bWAR that he had in the year before and did so in a strike shortened season.  We don’t have to tell you that he wasn’t close to winning any defensive category.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2011.

Craig Biggio, NL Houston Astros (1994)

-0.4 dWAR.  Craig Biggio deserved to enter the Baseball Hall of Fame early but his first three Gold Gloves should not be on his mantle.  While he did lead in Assists and Putouts he was not in the race for Total Zone Runs and had a negative Defensive bWAR.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2015

Roberto Alomar, AL Toronto Blue Jays (5) (1995)

-0.4 dWAR.  Alomar had his third straight year with the same negative bWAR but at least this year he leaded in Fielding Percentage.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2011.

Craig Biggio, NL Houston Astros (2) (1995)

0.1 dWAR.  Biggio again was not a true star defensively this season but he did lead the National League Second Basemen in Assists.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2015

Roberto Alomar, AL Baltimore Orioles (6) (1996)

-0.1 dWAR.  In his sixth consecutive Gold Glove, Alomar also was consistent in not earning a single one of them.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2011.

Craig Biggio, NL Houston Astros (3) (1996)

0.4 dWAR.  Just from sheer volume, Biggio would lead in Putouts and Assists for the Second Basemen but he again failed to make the top ten in Total Zone Runs.  Let’s say “three for three”.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2015.

Craig Biggio, NL Houston Astros (4) (1997)

2.2 dWAR.  Biggio did not go four for four as this was an excellent defensive campaign for Craig Biggio.  It was arguably the only one he ever had.  Biggio finished 5th overall in the National League in Defensive bWAR and while he did lead in Assists and Putouts he also led in Total Zone Runs an Range Factor per Game.  Biggio might be a four time Gold Glove winner but should be a one time recipient.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2015

Roberto Alomar, AL Baltimore Orioles (7) (1998)

0.4 dWAR.  In regards to Defensive bWAR, this was the best season that Alomar had defensively.  He would lead the American League Second Baseman in Assists, finished third in Total Zone Runs and was second in Range Factor per Game and Fielding Percentage.  He still probably should not have won this award, but at least a case could be made.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2011.

Roberto Alomar, AL Cleveland Indians (8) (1999)

1.1 dWAR.  Alomar would for the third time lead the American League Second Basemen in Fielding Percentage and finished second in Total Zone Runs.  This is the second year in a row that a case could at least be made for Alomar winning the Gold Glove.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2011

Roberto Alomar, AL Cleveland Indians (9) (2000)

1.0 dWAR.  In regards to Defensive bWAR, this was the best season that Alomar had defensively.  He would lead the American League Second Baseman in Assists, finished third in Total Zone Runs and was second in Range Factor per Game and Fielding Percentage.  He still probably should not have won this award, but at least a case could be made.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2011

Roberto Alomar, AL Cleveland Indians (10) (2001)

0.0 dWAR.  How fitting that Roberto Alomar’s last Gold Glove was as “worthy” as his first.  Alomar would lead for the fourth and final time in Fielding Percentage but in nothing else.  Seriously, if Alomar won no Gold Gloves it might be more fitting.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2011

The following are the players who have won the Gold Glove at Second Base who are eligible for the Baseball Hall of Fame and have not been selected:

 

Frank Bolling, AL Detroit Tigers (1958)

1.9 dWAR.  An All Star twice in his career when he would play later with the Milwaukee Braves, Frank Bolling had a productive season where he would lead AL Second Basemen in Assists, Total Zone Runs and Fielding Percentage.  He might have been jobbed out of the 1961 NL version, which went to Bill Mazeroski.  Although Bolling was Hall of Fame eligible in 1972, he was never put on the ballot.

Charlie Neal, NL Los Angeles Dodgers (1959)

1.0 dWAR.  By far, this was the best season of Charlie Neal’s career.  He would go to the All Star Game, put up career numbers in Hits, Batting Average and Stolen Bases and led the NL in Triples and Sacrifice Hits, not to mention winning the World Series!  Defensively, he led the NL Second Basemen in Putouts, Souble Plays Turned, Total Zone Runs and Fielding Percentage.  Neal did not play the minimum amount of years to be Hall of Fame Eligible.

Bobby Richardson, AL New York Yankees (1961)

-0.4 dWAR.  Were the voters swept up with everything Yankees?  They must have, as Richardson had no business winning his first Gold Glove here.  While he did lead in Assists and Double Plays Turned, he did not finish in the top ten in Total Zone Runs or Range Factor per Game.  Richardson was on the ballot for three years and finished as high as 2.0% in 1972.

Bobby Richardson, AL New York Yankees (2) (1962)

0.6 dWAR.  Offensively speaking, this was the best season of Bobby Richardson’s career.  He finished second in MVP voting, led the AL in Hits and had his lone season batting over .300.  Defensively however, this was his second consecutive Gold Glove, which he should not have won.  He did lead in Double Plays turned by Second Basemen but again was nowhere to be found in the top ten for Total Zone Runs.  Richardson was on the ballot for three years and finished as high as 2.0% in 1972.

Ken Hubbs, NL Chicago Cubs (1962)

0.1 dWAR.  Named the Rookie of the Year, Ken Hubbs was set up as the next big star for the Chicago Cubs though advanced metrics showed that would have been hard and he also had no business winning the Gold Glove that year as he never came close to leading in any defensive category, although he did have a much better year with the glove the following season where the was a case that he should have beaten Bill Mazeroski for it.  Hubbs would never have a chance to win another award as he was killed in a plane crash prior to the 1964 season.  Hubbs only played three seasons and was not eligible for the Hall of Fame.

Bobby Richardson, AL New York Yankees (3) (1963)

2.0 dWAR.  While Richardson had no business winning the previous two Gold Gloves, he was definitely the right choice here.  With a 2.0 Defensive bWAR that was good enough to finish third overall, he also led the AL Second Basemen in Total Zone Runs and was fourth overall.  In terms of traditional defensive metrics, he would lead in Double Plays.  Richardson was on the ballot for three years and finished as high as 2.0% in 1972.

Bobby Richardson, AL New York Yankees (4) (1964)

0.4 dWAR.  Here we go again.  Richardson slumped back with his glove and earned another Gold Glove that he probably shouldn’t have.  He would lead in Putouts, but once again did finish in the top ten in Total Zone Runs amongst the Second Basemen of the American League.  Richardson was on the ballot for three years and finished as high as 2.0% in 1972.

Bobby Richardson, AL New York Yankees (5) (1965)

-0.5 dWAR.  Ouch.  Traditionally speaking, Richardson did lead in Double Plays turned, but again he was nowhere to be found in the top ten in Total Zone Runs.  Basically, we are saying that only earned one of his five Gold Gloves and the four he shouldn’t have won, he shouldn’t have even been considered for.  For what it is worth, he has three World Series rigs over this timeframe to console him with our words.  Richardson was on the ballot for three years and finished as high as 2.0% in 1972.

Bobby Knoop, AL California Angels (1966)

2.1 dWAR.  This was Knoop’s lone season going to the All Star Game and he would offensively lead the American League in Triples.  Knoop would lead all AL Second Basemen in Putouts, Assists, Double Plays Turned, Total Zone Runs, Range Factor per Game and Fielding Percentage.  Incidentally, in his rookie year (1964) he posted a 3.1 Defensive bWAR, but lost to Bobby Richardson and his negative bWAR.   Knoop only played nine seasons and did not qualify for the Hall of Fame.

Bobby Knoop, AL California Angels (2) (1967)

0.5 dWAR.  Knoop took a step back and while he led in Double Plays Turned, his overall defensive season was far from Gold Glove worthy.  Perhaps this makes up for his snub in his rookie year?   Knoop only played nine seasons and did not qualify for the Hall of Fame.

Bobby Knoop, AL California Angels (3) (1968)

2.0 dWAR.  This was a rebound year defensively for Bobby Knoop and he would finish 7th overall in Defensive bWAR.  Knoop would lead the American League Second Basemen in Double Plays Turned and Total Zone Runs.  Knoop only played nine seasons and did not qualify for the Hall of Fame.

Glenn Beckert, NL Chicago Cubs (1968)

1.3 dWAR.  This would be Glenn Beckert’s best season in Major League Baseball and he would finish 9th in MVP voting while also leading the NL in Runs Scored.  Defensively, he would have a good season, though he would not lead in any category.  Beckert was on the ballot for one year in 1981 and finished with 0.2% of the vote.

Davey Johnson, AL Baltimore Orioles (1969)

1.2 dWAR.  Johnson was named to his second All Star Team this year and this was his first of three seasons where he batted over .280 with an OBP of .350.  Johnson would have a good season with the glove but did not lead in any category.  Johnson was on the ballot for one year in 1984 and finished with 0.7% of the vote.

Felix Millan, NL Atlanta Braves (1969)

1.5 dWAR.  This would be the first of three appearances in the All Star Game for Felix Millan and arguably his best defensively.  Millan would lead the National League Second Basemen in Putouts, Assists, Total Zone Runs and Fielding Percentage.  Millan was on the ballot for one year in 1983 and finished with 0.3% of the vote.

Davey Johnson, AL Baltimore Orioles (2) (1970)

1.0 dWAR.  Johnson would lead in Putouts but probably didn’t have a season worthy of the Gold Glove.  Johnson likely didn’t care as he was with the World Series Championship team this year.  Johnson was on the ballot for one year in 1984 and finished with 0.7% of the vote.

Tommy Helms, NL Cincinnati Reds (1970)

0.8 dWAR.  Helms was a former Rookie of the Year and two time All Star before he won his first Gold Glove.  He would lead the NL Second Basemen in Firlding Percentage.  Helms was on the ballot for one year in 1983 and finished with 0.3% of the vote.

Davey Johnson, AL Baltimore Orioles (3) (1971)

0.7 dWAR.  The pattern continues as Davey Johnson would have an ok defensively, though would lead in Double Plays Turned.  Incidentally, Johnson would have his best season defensively in 1972 where he would lead in Total Zone Runs and finish 9th in Defensive WAR.  Johnson would later become a two time Manager of the Year  Johnson was on the ballot for one year in 1984 and finished with 0.7% of the vote.

Tommy Helms, NL Cincinnati Reds (2) (1971)

2.4 dWAR.  This was easily the best defensive season of Helms’ career.  Amongst the National League Second Basemen, Helms would lead in Assists, Double Plays Turned, Total Zone Runs, Range Factor per Game and Fielding Percentage.  He would also finish third overall in Defensive WAR and Total Zone Runs.  Helms was on the ballot for one year in 1983 and finished with 0.3% of the vote.

Doug Griffin, AL Boston Red Sox (1972)

-0.6 dWAR.  How the hell did this happen?  While sometimes Gold Glove voters are dazzled by good offensive numbers, and while this was the best offensive year that Griffin had, it was only 122 Hits with a Slash Line of .260/325/.302.  He didn’t finish in the top four in ANY defensive category.  Again, we ask how this happened!  Griffin did not play the minimum years to qualify for the Hall of Fame.

Felix Millan, NL Atlanta Braves (2) (1972)

-0.1 dWAR.  Millan earned his first Gold Glove, but not this one.  He was not even close to leading in any defensive metric and was not in the top ten in Range Factor per Game or Total Zone Runs.  Millan was on the ballot for one year in 1983 and finished with 0.3% of the vote.

Bobby Grich, AL Baltimore Orioles (1973)

3.9 dWAR.  OK, Sabremetricians…we know we don’t have to tell you who Bobby Grich is!  The darling of advanced stats led the American League in bWAR for Position Players in ’73 and was second overall in Defensive bWAR.  It is needless to say that Grich led all of the Second Basemen in the American League in Putouts, Assists, Double Plays Turned, Total Zone Runs, Range Factor per Game and Fielding Percentage.  In regards to Total Zone Runs, Grich had a sick 29 of them, first overall in the AL!  Grich was on the ballot for one year in 1992 and finished with 2.6% of the voteCurrently ranked #37 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Bobby Grich, AL Baltimore Orioles (2) (1974)

1.5 dWAR.  Grich would make his second All Star Game appearance and he finished 9th in MVP voting.  He would again lead in Putouts, Assists, Double Plays Turned and Range Factor per Game  Grich was on the ballot for one year in 1992 and finished with 2.6% of the voteCurrently ranked #37 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Bobby Grich, AL Baltimore Orioles (3) (1975)

2.5 dWAR.  Grich returned to the top ten in Defensive bWAR by finishing fifth.  He would once again finish first in many defensive categories, this time in Putouts, Assists, Double Plays Turned Total Zone Runs and Range Factor per Game.  Grich was on the ballot for one year in 1992 and finished with 2.6% of the voteCurrently ranked #37 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Bobby Grich, AL Baltimore Orioles (4) (1976)

0.7 dWAR.  We love Bobby Grich but this was not a year he should have won this accolade.  He only led in Putouts, though he did finish second in Range Factor per Game and Fielding Percentage.  Grich was on the ballot for one year in 1992 and finished with 2.6% of the voteCurrently ranked #37 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Frank White, AL Kansas City Royals (1977)

1.8 dWAR.  Realistically, Frank White should have won his first Gold Glove the year before, but this was still an appropriate win.  White would lead in Fielding Percentage and finish third in Total Zone Runs.  He would also finish 10th overall in Defensive bWAR.  White was on the ballot for one year in 1996 and finished with 3.8% of the vote.

Frank White, AL Kansas City Royals (2) (1978)

1.9 dWAR.  Overall Frank White would finish 5th in Defensive bWAR.  This year he would lead all of the American League Second Basemen in Total Zone Runs.  White was on the ballot for one year in 1996 and finished with 3.8% of the vote.

Davey Lopes, NL Los Angeles Dodgers (1978)

0.3 dWAR.  This would be Lopes first of four consecutive All Star Game appearances, which he may have earned.  Basically we are saying he should not have won this one!  Lopes led the Second Basemen in Errors and was not in the top ten in Range Factor per Game, Total Zone Runs or Fielding Percentage.  Lopes was on the ballot for one year in 1993 and finished with 0.5% of the vote.

Frank White, AL Kansas City Royals (3) (1979)

0.4 dWAR.  Here we go again on reputation!  White was not in the mix for any defensive statistic lead and should not have won this award.  He was not in the top ten in Total Zone Runs either.  White was on the ballot for one year in 1996 and finished with 3.8% of the vote.

Manny Trillo, NL Philadelphia Phillies (1979)

1.6 dWAR.  By far, this was the best defensive season of Manny Trillo’s career.  Trillo would finish seventh overall in Defensive bWAR and finished second amongst the National League Second Basemen in Total Zone Runs.  Trillo was on the ballot for one year in 1995 but did not receive any votes.

Frank White, AL Kansas City Royals (4) (1980)

1.2 dWAR.  While Frank White had a better year with the glove, he probably still was not the best choice here.  He did however win the ALCS MVP this year.  White was on the ballot for one year in 1996 and finished with 3.8% of the vote.

Doug Flynn, NL New York Mets (1980)

1.4 dWAR.  This would be the only award Flynn would win in MLB and did so in a season where he would lead the National Second Basemen in Fielding Percentage and was second in Total Zone Runs.  Although Flynn was eligible for the Hall of Fame in 1990 he was not on the ballot.

Frank White, AL Kansas City Royals (5) (1981)

0.3 dWAR.  Another win on reputation.  White did not finish in the top ten in ANY defensive category.  At least this wasn’t a case of Gold Glove winner with a negative Defensive bWAR winning!  White was on the ballot for one year in 1996 and finished with 3.8% of the vote.

Manny Trillo, NL Philadelphia Phillies (2) (1981)

-0.2 dWAR.  This was a very bizarre statistical defensive line for Trillo.  He had a negative bWAR on the defensive side of the ledger and did lead in Putouts and finish second in Range Factor per Game but was not in the top ten in Total Zone Runs.  Trillo was on the ballot for one year in 1995 but did not receive any votes.

Frank White, AL Kansas City Royals (6) (1982)

0.9 dWAR.  This year, Frank White at least led in one defensive stat, Putouts.  He also led in Errors.  White was on the ballot for one year in 1996 and finished with 3.8% of the vote.

Manny Trillo, NL Philadelphia Phillies (3) (1982)

0.5 dWAR.  In what would be his third and final Gold Glove season (though he should have only won one) Trillo would lead in Fielding Percentage but again did not appear in the top ten in Total Zone Runs.  Trillo was on the ballot for one year in 1995 but did not receive any votes.

Lou Whitaker, AL Detroit Tigers (1983)

1.0 dWAR.  In 1981 and 1982, Lou Whitaker finished 4th in the American League in Defensive bWAR and led the Second Basemen in Total Zone Runs.  Of course, he wins the Gold Glove in 1983, when he did none of those things.  While this was still a decent defensive season for Whitaker, he was unable to lead in any defensive category.  Whitaker was on the ballot for one year in 2001 and finished with 2.9% of the vote.  Ranked #10 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Lou Whitaker, AL Detroit Tigers (2) (1984)

0.7 dWAR.  Again, this was an ok season for Lou with the glove, but he also didn’t lead in any defensive stat again.  Not that he cared, as this was the year of the dominant Detroit Tigers World Series Championship squad of ‘84.  Whitaker was on the ballot for one year in 2001 and finished with 2.9% of the vote.  Ranked #10 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Lou Whitaker, AL Detroit Tigers (3) (1985)

0.2 dWAR.  What a mess.  This was Whitaker’s third and last Gold Glove and while he probably deserved three Gold Gloves over his career, he didn’t in the season he won them.  He would have seven better seasons in terms of Defensive bWAR than the best he finished in a Gold Glove winning season.  Whitaker was on the ballot for one year in 2001 and finished with 2.9% of the vote.  Ranked #10 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Frank White, AL Kansas City Royals (7) (1986)

1.7 dWAR.  This was a renaissance of sorts for White as he was again an All Star and had his best Home Run Total and posted a good defensive season.  White did not lead amongst the AL Second Basemen in any defensive category but finished second in Total Zone Runs.  White was on the ballot for one year in 1996 and finished with 3.8% of the vote.

Frank White, AL Kansas City Royals (8) (1987)

1.9 dWAR.  White would finish fourth in Defensive bWAR and would lead for his second and final time in Total Zone Runs.  Overall Frank White lost out on Gold Gloves he should have won and was awarded quite a few he shouldn’t have come close too.  White was on the ballot for one year in 1996 and finished with 3.8% of the vote.

Harold Reynolds, AL Seattle Mariners (1988)

0.2 dWAR.  Reynolds was a flashy and popular player but in the season that was his second and last All Star appearance, he had no business earning a Gold Glove.  Reynolds would lead in Assists and Double Plays Turned but he also led in Errors and was not a factor in the race for the most Total Zone Runs by an American League Second Baseman.  Reynolds was eligible for the Hall of Fame in 2000 but was not on the ballot.

Harold Reynolds, AL Seattle Mariners (2) (1989)

1.7 dWAR.  Harold Reynolds may not have been named an All Star, but at least this was a Gold Glove worthy season.  Reynolds may have again led the American League Second Basemen in Errors, but he also led in Total Zone Runs as well as Range Factor per Game.  Reynolds was eligible for the Hall of Fame in 2000 but was not on the ballot.

Harold Reynolds, AL Seattle Mariners (3) (1990)

2.5 dWAR.  Finishing 5th in the AL in Defensive bWAR, this was the best defensive campaign of Harold Reynolds’ career.  He would also lead the AL Second Basemen in Assists and Total Zone Runs, the latter stat of which saw him finish fourth overall in the League.  Reynolds was eligible for the Hall of Fame in 2000 but was not on the ballot.

Jose Lind, NL Pittsburgh Pirates (1992)

0.2 dWAR.  This was the only award that Lind would win professionally, but he should have been skunked.  Lind would lead the NL Second Basemen in Fielding Percentage but was nowhere to be found in Total Zone Runs.  Lind was eligible for the Hall of Fame in 2001 but was not on the ballot.

Robby Thompson, NL Pittsburgh Pirates (1993)

1.6 dWAR.  Robby Thompson saw 1993 as the best season of his career. He would go to his second (and final) All Star Game and receive votes for the MVP Award, the only time that would happen.  Thompson did not lead in any category but his 1.6 Defensive bWAR was the second best of his career.  Thompson was on the ballot for one year in 2002 but did not receive ant votes.

Chuck Knoblauch, AL Minnesota Twins (1997)

2.0 dWAR.  Before Chuck Knoblauch became a Yankee, he was an excellent infielder as a Minnesota Twin and this was his best year defensively.  Knoblauch would finish fifth in the American League in Defensive bWAR and would lead in Assists, Double Plays Turned and Total Zone Runs.  After this season, Knoblauch morphed into one of the worst infielders in the American League.  Knoblauch was on the ballot for one year in 2008 and received 0.2% of the vote.

Bret Boone, NL Cincinnati Reds (1998)

-0.4 dWAR.  Unbelievable.  This was Boone’s first Gold Glove of four.  He had something in common in all four, as he never should have won any of them.  Not only did he have a negative Defensive bWAR but he did not lead in any defensive metric.  Boone was on the ballot for one year in 2011 and received 0.2% of the vote.

Pokey Reese, NL Cincinnati Reds (1999)

3.2 dWAR.  Pokey Reese would put together the best season of his career in 1999, both with his bat and glove.  Defensively, Reese was third overall Defensive bWAR and Total Zone Runs.  Reese would lead the NL Second Basemen in Total Zone Runs with a very impressive tally of 27.  Reese did not play enough seasons in MLB to be eligible for the Hall of Fame.

Pokey Reese, NL Cincinnati Reds (2) (2000)

1.7 dWAR.  Reese would again put up a great defensive effort and finished fourth overall in Defensive bWAR in the National League.  Reese again led in Total Zone Runs amongst the Second Basemen and was fourth overall.  While this would be his last Gold Glove, in 2004 as a member of the World Series Champion Boston Red Sox he finished 5th overall in the AL in Defensive bWAR despite only playing 96 Games.  He was also second that year in Total Zone Runs.  He would never play another game in the Majors.  Reese did not play enough seasons in MLB to be eligible for the Hall of Fame.

Fernando Vina, NL St. Louis Cardinals (2001)

0.4 dWAR.  This was a bit of Jekyll & Hyde season for Vina.  He would lead the National League Second Basemen in Putouts, Double Plays Turned and Fielding Percentage he would not finish in the top ten in Range Factor per Game and Total Zone Runs.  Vina did have a good season offensively, which may have helped this win, though we know it shouldn’t.  Although Vina was eligible for the Hall of Fame in 2010 he was not on the ballot.

Bret Boone, AL Seattle Mariners (2) (2002)

0.5 dWAR.  The year before, Boone finished tenth in Defensive bWAR in the American League and led the Second basemen in Total Zone Runs, so of course he wins his second Gold Glove in a season he did none of those things.  He would however lead in Fielding Percentage.  Boone was on the ballot for one year in 2011 and received 0.2% of the vote.

Fernando Vina, NL St. Louis Cardinals (2) (2002)

0.5 dWAR.  While Vina’s overall Defensive bWAR didn’t change much from the previous season, he would not lead in any defensive category.  Although Vina was eligible for the Hall of Fame in 2010 he was not on the ballot.

Bret Boone, AL Seattle Mariners (3) (2003)

0.0 dWAR.  Boone again had a mediocre defensive season but was rewarded anyway.  He did not lead in any defensive category.  Boone was on the ballot for one year in 2011 and received 0.2% of the vote.

Luis Castillo, NL Florida Marlins (2003)

1.2 dWAR.  This was the best season of Castillo’s career, both offensively and defensively, not to mention he won the World Series that year.  Castillo would lead the NL Second Basemen in Putouts and finished second in Total Zone Runs.  Castillo was on the ballot for one year in 2016 but did not receive any votes.

Bret Boone, AL Seattle Mariners (4) (2004)

-0.7 dWAR.  So, Bret Boone saved the best for last?  Not exactly.  There is not metric that shows that Boone should have won this award and overall he had a career negative Defensive bWAR.  So, how did he win four Gold Gloves again?  Boone was on the ballot for one year in 2011 and received 0.2% of the vote.

Luis Castillo, NL Florida Marlins (2) (2004)

1.0 dWAR.  Castillo would lead the National League Second Basemen in Total Zone Runs.  Castillo was on the ballot for one year in 2016 but did not receive any votes.

Luis Castillo, NL Florida Marlins (2) (2005)

0.9 dWAR.  Castillo had a decent season defensively but it was nothing special.  He did not lead in any defensive category.  Castillo was on the ballot for one year in 2016 but did not receive any votes.

Mark Grudzielanek, AL Kansas City Royals (2006)

1.9 dWAR.  A decade after going to his lone All Star Game as a member of the Montreal Expos, Grudzielanek would win his lone Gold Glove.   The G-Man finished 5th in Defensive bWAR the year before and was 7th this year.  He would lead the American League Second Basemen in Double Plays Turned.  Grudzielanek was on the ballot for one year in 2016 but did not receive any votes.

Let’s update our tally shall we?

Award in Question

Percentage of recipients who have entered the HOF

Percentage of recipients by year who have entered the HOF.

NBA MVP

100%

100%

NHL Norris

90.5%

96.4%

NBA All Star Game MVP

89.5%

91.7%

NHL Conn Smythe

74.2%

85.4%

NHL Lady Byng

63.8%

76.0%

NFL Super Bowl MVP

60.6%

64.9%

NBA Defensive Player of the Year

58.3%

56.5%

NBA Rookie of the Year

56.5%

56.5%

MLB/NL/AL Cy Young Award

44.4%

55.4%

NHL Frank J. Selke Trophy

33.3%

36.7%

NFL Offensive Rookie of the Year

28.6%

28.6%

MLB Edgar Martinez Award

26.7%

17.2%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Designated Hitter)

25.0%

30.8%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Shortstop)

23.5%

52.6%

NFL Defensive Rookie of the Year

20.6%

20.6%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Catcher)

20.0%

22.5%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Second Base)

18.8%

39.8%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Pitcher)

18.2%

20.1%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Second Base)

16.7%

32.7%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Outfield)

15.7%

25.2%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Third Base)

13.6%

14.3%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (First Base)

13.6%

13.3%

MLB (NL/AL) Rookie of the Year

13.3%

13.3%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Catcher)

10.3%

15.2%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (First Base)

3.8%

3.2%

So who is up next?

The following are the players who have won the Gold Glove at Second Base who have retired but have not met the mandatory years out of the game to qualify for the Baseball Hall of Fame:

 

Orlando Hudson, AL Toronto Blue Jays (2005)

2.3 dWAR.  Orlando Hudson would lead the American League in Defensive bWAR in 2004 and finish second in 2003.  In 2005, he would finish second overall and lead the National League Second Basemen in Putouts, Range Factor per Game and Fielding Percentage.   Eligible for the Hall of Fame in 2018.

Orlando Hudson, NL Arizona Diamondbacks (2) (2006)

1.6 dWAR.  Hudson may not have finished in the top ten of his new league this year but this was still a very good year with the glove.  Hudson would lead the National League Second Basemen in Assists and Double Plays Turned.   Eligible for the Hall of Fame in 2018.

Orlando Hudson, NL Arizona Diamondbacks (3) (2007)

2.0 dWAR.  2.0 is an excellent number for a year in regards of Defensive bWAR yet it did not yield Hudson to the top of any defensive statistic amongst the National League Second Basemen.   Eligible for the Hall of Fame in 2018.

Placido Polanco, AL Detroit Tigers (2007)

1.6 dWAR.  Polanco almost always had a good season with his glove and 2007 was no different.  The Detroit Tiger would lead the AL Second Basemen in Fielding Percentage.  Eligible for the Hall of Fame in 2019.

Orlando Hudson, NL Arizona Diamondbacks (4) (2009)

0.9 dWAR.  Orlando Hudson won four Gold Gloves and while a case could be made for the first three, he had no business winning his fourth and final one.  Still, it can’t be disputed that Hudson had a good career in Major League Baseball predominantly defensively.  Eligible for the Hall of Fame in 2018.

Placido Polanco, AL Detroit Tigers (2) (2009)

0.9 dWAR.  While Polanco will go down in history as a very good defensive player, this wasn’t the best year he produced.  He would however lead the AL Second Basemen in Fielding Percentage.  Eligible for the Hall of Fame in 2019.

Placido Polanco, NL Philadelphia Phillies (3) (2011)

1.2 dWAR.  In what would be his third and final Gold Glove win, we have a player who finished in the top ten in Defensive bWAR six times, but he did not win the Gold Glove in any of them.  There is nothing wrong with Placido Polanco winning three Gold Gloves, just not in the years he won them.  Eligible for the Hall of Fame in 2019.

The following are the players who have won the Gold Glove at Second Base who are still active.

Dustin Pedroia, AL Boston Red Sox (2008)

1.8 dWAR.  Not only did Dustin Pedroia win his first Gold Glove this year, but he went to his first All Star Game, won his first Silver Slugger, he was also named the American League MVP.  Pedroia finished 9th overall in Defensive bWAR though he would not lead in the American League Second Baseman in any category.  33 Years Old, Playing for the Boston Red Sox.

Brandon Phillips, NL Cincinnati Reds (2008)

1.6 dWAR.  Brandon Phillips would have a good season but would only lead the National League Shortstops in Fielding Percentage.  36 Years Old, Playing for the Atlanta Braves.

Robinson Cano, AL New York Yankees (2010)

2.2 dWAR.  In 2007, Robinson Cano finished first in Defensive bWAR but did not win the Gold Glove.  He did however finish fifth in that stat in 2010 and would win his first Gold Glove.  Cano would lead in Assists, Putouts, Double Plays Turned and Fielding Percentage.  He would also finish third in MVP voting.  34 Years Old, Playing for the Seattle Mariners.

Brandon Phillips, NL Cincinnati Reds (2) (2010)

1.4 dWAR.  This would be the first of three All Star appearances for Phillips.  This year, he would lead in Assists.  36 Years Old, Playing for the Atlanta Braves.

Dustin Pedroia, AL Boston Red Sox (2) (2011)

2.3 dWAR.  Pedroia would finish 6th overall in Defensive bWAR and would lead in Fielding Percentage.  He would also finish second in Total Zone Runs.  33 Years Old, Playing for the Boston Red Sox.

Brandon Phillips, NL Cincinnati Reds (3) (2011)

1.1 dWAR.  Phillips still had a more than respectable Defensive bWAR, but this year he did not lead in any defensive category.  36 Years Old, Playing for the Atlanta Braves.

Robinson Cano, AL New York Yankees (2) (2012)

1.9 dWAR.  Cano would again finish in the top ten in Defensive bWAR, this year finishing tenth.  Cano would lead in Putouts and Range Factor per Game.  34 Years Old, Playing for the Seattle Mariners.

Darwin Barney, NL Chicago Cubs (2012)

3.6 dWAR.  Also named a NL Wilson Defensive Award winner, Barney would lead everyone in the NL in Defensive bWAR.  He also led in Putouts, Total Zone Runs and Fielding Percentage.  31 Years Old, Playing for the Toronto Blue Jays.

Dustin Pedroia, AL Boston Red Sox (3) (2013)

2.2 dWAR.  This time Pedroia would finish third overall in Defensive bWAR in the AL.  This season he would also lead in Total Zone Runs, the third time he would do so.  33 Years Old, Playing for the Boston Red Sox.

Brandon Phillips, NL Cincinnati Reds (4) (2013)

0.4 dWAR.  In what was his last Gold Glove, Phillips has no case for winning this award.  Granted he led in Assists and Putouts but he also spent the most time in the field than any other National League Second Baseman.  36 Years Old, Playing for the Atlanta Braves.

Dustin Pedroia, AL Boston Red Sox (4) (2014)

2.5 dWAR.  Pedroia would finish 5th in the AL in Defensive bWAR.  He would lead in Fielding Percentage and finish second in Total Zone Runs.  33 Years Old, Playing for the Boston Red Sox.

D.J. LeMahieu, NL Colorado Rockies (2014)

2.2 dWAR.  Finishing 7th overall in the NL in Defensive bWAR, D.J. LeMahieu would also lead in Double Plays Turned, Range factor per Game and finished second in Total Zone Runs.  28 Years Old, Playing for the Colorado Rockies.

Jose Altuve, AL Houston Astros (2015)

0.8 dWAR.  Altuve is a great player and this was to date his best defensive season.  Although his Defensive bWAR is not spectacular, he did lead the American League Second Baseman in Total Zone Runs and Fielding Percentage.  27 Years Old.  Playing for the Houston Astros

Dee Gordon, NL Miami Marlins (2015)

1.8 dWAR.  This was an excellent season for Gordon as not only did he win his first Gold Glove he also captured his first Silver Slugger and Batting Title.  Gordon would lead the National League Second Basemen in Fielding Percentage.  29 Years Old.  Playing for the Miami Marlins

Ian Kinsler, AL Detroit Tigers (2016)

1.7 dWAR.  In the previous two seasons, Kinsler would have Defensive bWARs of 2.9 and 2.6 finishing first and third respectively.  While he didn’t finish in the top ten in that statistic in 2016, this was still a very good season for Kinsler as he would still lead in Range Factor per Game.  35 Years Old.  Playing for the Detroit Tigers

Dee Gordon, NL Miami Marlins (2015)

1.8 dWAR.  This was an excellent season for Gordon as not only did he win his first Gold Glove he also captured his first Silver Slugger and Batting Title.  Gordon would lead the National League Second Basemen in Fielding Percentage.  29 Years Old.  Playing for the Houston Astros

Joe Panik, NL San Francisco Giants (2016)

0.6 dWAR.  While this was not reflected in his Defensive bWAR, Panik would lead in Total Zone Runs and Fielding Percentage.  27 Years Old.  Playing for the San Francisco Giants

This is a considerably higher Hall of Fame yield than what happened at First Base, and realistically with the premium that defense is held for that position it should be.

We will continue around the diamond and tackle Shortstop next.
Last modified on Tuesday, 01 August 2017 15:20
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Kirk Buchner, "The Committee Chairman", is the owner and operator of the site.  Kirk can be contacted at [email protected] .

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