Awards = HOF?: Part Forty-Two: The Vezina Trophy

Awards = HOF?: Part Forty-Two:  The Vezina Trophy
05 Jan
2020
Not in Hall of Fame

We here at Notinhalloffame.com thought it would be fun to take a look at the major awards in North American team sports and see how it translates into Hall of Fame potential.

Needless to say, different awards in different sports yield hall of fame potential.  In basketball, the team sport with the least number of players on a roster, the dividend for greatness much higher.  In baseball, it is not as much as a great individual season does not have the same impact.

Last time, we looked at the MVP in Major League Baseball.  This time, we go back to the rink with Vezina Trophy.

The origin of the Vezina trophy came from the owners of the Montreal Canadiens, who donated the award to the NHL in 1927.  It was named in honor of Georges Vezina, who played in net for Montreal.  Vezina collapsed during a game, and was diagnosed with tuberculosis.  He died the year after.

From 1927 to 1946, the Vezina went to the NHL’s best Goalie. That would change in 1946, when it was officially given to the Goalie from the team that allowed the fewest goals. It was only allotted to one Goalie, but as the NHL moved to longer regular seasons, they allowed it to go to multiple Goalies on a team beginning in the 1964-65 Season.  

Beginning in the 1981-82 Season, the William M. Jennings Award was created, and it took over with the parameters of the Vezina, while the Vezina reverted back to being awarded to the best Goalie.

So how many players have won the Vezina have been enshrined to the Baseball Hall of Fame?

Let’s find out!

The following are the past players who have won the Vezina Trophy in the NHL who are eligible for the Hockey Hall of Fame and have been enshrined.

George Hainsworth, Montreal Canadiens (1927)

George Hainsworth did not make his debut in the NHL until he was 30, and after starring the Western League.  He replaced Vezina on the Montreal Canadiens, who died, and had previously played in net every game in franchise history.  While those were big skates to fill, he managed to do so with 28 Wins, a 1.47 GAA and an NHL leading 14 Shutouts.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1961.

George Hainsworth, Montreal Canadiens (2) (1928)

Hainsworth repeated as the Vezina winner, and he would lead the NHL in Wins (26) and Goals Against Average (1.05).  He would also post a career-high 12.6 Goalie Point Shares. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1961.

George Hainsworth, Montreal Canadiens (3) (1929)

With a record of 22-7-15, Hainsworth would win his third and final Vezina Trophy, and had an NHL best (and personal best) 0.92 GAA.  His 11.8 Goalie Point Shares, would also lead the NHL, and was the second best of his career. While he would not win another Vezina, he would backstop the Hans to Stanley Cup wins the next two seasons. In 1930, he set a still-standing playoff record of 270 minutes and 8 seconds without allowing a goal.  He was traded to the Toronto Maple Leafs in 1933. He went back to Montreal to finish his NHL career in 1937.  He retired with a record of 167-96-54 and 1.78 GAA.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1961.

Tiny Thompson, Boston Bruins (1930)

Last season, Tiny Thompson was a rookie who would take the Bruins to a Stanley Cup win.  In 1930, he would win his first Vezina trophy with a career-high 38 Wins and an NHL leading 2.19 GAA.  He also led the league in Goalie Point Shares with 10.0.  Thompson was a true innovator, as he was credited with developing the glove save, and he also made history as the first Goalie in NHL history to record an Assist.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1959.

Roy Worters, New York Americans (1931)

Roy Worters was a surprise winner of the Hart Trophy in 1929 (remember he didn’t win the Vezina), he won the Vezina in 1931, making him the only New York American to win this award.  He led the NHL in GAA (1.61), and later would be named to two Second Team All-Stars.  Worters played until 1937, and though he had a losing record (171-230-82), his work in the net made his teams more competitive than they had any right to be.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1969.

Charlie Gardiner, Chicago Blackhawks (1932)

Charlie Gardiner was a First Team All-Star the season before, and was this year too, as he won his first Vezina Trophy.  Gardiner went 18-18-11 with an NHL leading 1.85 GAA, and 11.0 Goalie Point Shares.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1945.

Tiny Thompson, Boston Bruins (2) (1933)

Thompson led the NHL in Wins (25), Goals Against Average (1.76), Shutouts (11) and Goalie Point Shares (10.7) this season.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1959.

Charlie Gardiner, Chicago Blackhawks (2) (1934)

Gardiner won his second Vezina, and had a 1.63 GAA, with an NHL leading 10 Shutouts and 12.1 Goalie Point Shares.  More importantly he would lead the Blackhawks to the Stanley Cup, making him he first (and only) Goalie who was the team captain to win a championship.  This would be the last year that he would play, as Gardiner died shortly after.  He had been sick for some time, and he died of a brain hemorrhage.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1945.

Tiny Thompson, Boston Bruins (3) (1936)

Thompson had a record of only 22-20-7, but he was dominant in the pipes.  He finished first in the National Hockey League in Goals Against Average (1.68), Shutouts (10), and Goalie Point Shares (10.4).  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1959.

Tiny Thompson, Boston Bruins (4) (1938)

This was the last great season of Tiny Thompson’s career, and he would finish at the top of the NHL’s leaderboard in Wins (30), Goals Against Average (1.80), and Goalie Point Shares (11.5).  Thompson played until 1940, ending his career with the Detroit Red Wings.  Thompson retired with a record of 284-194-75 with a 2.07 GAA.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1959.

Frank Brimsek, Boston Bruins (1939)

This was one of the best rookie seasons in the history of the National Hockey League.  With a league-leading 31 Wins, and a 1.56 GAA, Frank Brimzek would win the Calder Trophy, and became the first player to win both the Calder and Vezina in the same season.  He would lead his Boston Bruins to a Stanley Cup Championship.  This was also a history making year for the Vezina, as Brimesk was the first American (and non-Canadian) to capture this trophy.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1966.

Turk Broda, Toronto Maple Leafs (1941)

Turk Broda became the first Toronto Maple Leaf to win the Vezina Trophy.  This season, he would do so while leading the NHL in Wins (28) and Goals Against Average (2.00).  The following year, Broda won the Stanley Cup, and would lead the Leafs in their greatest comeback in Finals history by taking Toronto back from a 3-0 deficit to defeat Detroit. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1967.

Frank Brimsek, Boston Bruins (2) (1942)

The American was a Second Team All-Star in 1940 and 1941 and in 1941-42, the native of Minnesota would lead the NHL in GAA (2.35) and Goalie Point Shares (11.0), and was third in Hart Trophy voting.  Brimsek was a Second Team All-Star the next four seasons (he missed two years due to World War II), and he retired with a record of 230-144-70.   Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1966.

Bill Durnan, Montreal Canadiens (1944)

This was the first of six Vezina Trophies for the Torontonian, and the runner-up for the Calder Trophy finished first in Wins (38), Goals Against Average (2.18), and Goalie Point Shares (15.0), the latter stat being a career-high.  Durnan took the Habs to a Stanley Cup win that season.   Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1964.

Bill Durnan, Montreal Canadiens (2) (1945)

Durnan matched his 38 Wins, and led the league in that category, as well as Goals Against Average (2.42) and Goalie Point Shares (13.2).   Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1964.

Bill Durnan, Montreal Canadiens (3) (1946)

Bill Durnan would win his second Stanley Cup this year, and in the regular season, he again had the most Wins (24), lowest Goals Against Average (2.60), and the most Goalie Point Shared (9.2).  For the first time, he was first in Shutouts (4). Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1964.

Bill Durnan, Montreal Canadiens (4) (1947)

Tiny Thompson was the first Goalie to win the Vezina four times, but Durnan was the first to capture in four years in a row. He was again the league leader in Wins (34), GAA (2.30), and Goalie Points Shares (14.7)  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1964.

Turk Broda, Toronto Maple Leafs (2) (1948)

After his Cup win in 1942, Broda would join the Canadian Military during World War II.  He returned to lead the Maple Leafs to a Championship in 1947, and again in 1948, where he would win his second Vezina.  That year, he also led the NHL in Wins (32), GAA (2.38) and Goalie Point Shares (13.2).  Broda would win two more Cups in Toronto, and retired with a record of 304-222-102 with a 2.53 GAA. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1967.

Bill Durnan, Montreal Canadiens (5) (1949)

After an off-season, where he lost the Vezina to Turk Broda, Bill Durnan became the first player to win the Vezina five times. Durnan was not first in Wins (he had 28), but he had an NHL leading 2.10 GAA and 10 Shutouts.  His 13.9 Goalie Point Shares also finished first.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1964.

Bill Durnan, Montreal Canadiens (6) (1950)

With this win, Durnan was the first player to win the Vezina for a sixth time.  Like the previous season, he wasn’t first in Wins (28), but his 2.20 GAA placed him first, as did his 14.2 Goalie Point Shares.  This was the end for Durnan as he ended his career.  In the seven seasons he played, he won six Vezinas.  He retired with a record of 208-112-62 and a GAA of 2.36.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1964.

Terry Sawchuk, Detroit Red Wings (1952)

Terry Sawchuk won the Calder Trophy the season before, with a career-high 44 Wins and 17.0 Goalie Point Shares.  Sawchuk replicated that success, equaling his 44 Wins (league leading), and he was also first in Goals Against Average (1.90), Shutouts (12) and Goalie Point Shares (16.6).  He would take the Red Wings to a Stanley Cup, and he went 8-0 with a 0.62 GAA. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1971.

Terry Sawchuk, Detroit Red Wings (2) (1953) 

Sawchuck won his second Vezina in as many seasons, and he was the NHL leader in Wins (32), Goals Against Average (1.80), and Goalie Point Shares (14.0).  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1971.

Harry Lumley, Toronto Maple Leafs (1954)

Harry Lumley would lead the NHL in GAA (1.86) and Goalie Point Shares (15.6), and he had a record of 32-24-13.  Lumley finished fifth in Hart Trophy voting, and he was second the following season, and would again lead the NHL in GAA (1.91) and Goalie Point Shares (16.2).  He played until 1960, after playing for all but the Montreal Canadiens of the Original Six. He retired with a record of 330-329-142 and a 2.74 GAA.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1980.

Terry Sawchuk, Detroit Red Wings (3) (1955)

In 1954, Sawchuk was a Second Team All-Star, and he led Detroit to another Stanley Cup win.  This season, he finished first in Wins (40) and Shutouts (12), and he had a GAA of 1.96.  He would again lead Detroit win the Stanley Cup.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1971.

Jacques Plante, Montreal Canadiens (1956)

Jacques Plante was far more than the first goalie to wear a face mask, as he was one of the best netminders that the game ever saw. After finishing third in Calder Trophy voting the year before, Plante would win his first Vezina where he led the Habs to a Stanley Cup win.  Plante led the NHL in Wins (42), GAA (1.86), and Goalie Point Shares (15.1).  This was the first year the league tracked Save Percentage, and he was the first man to lead that category with .930.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1978.

Jacques Plante, Montreal Canadiens (2) (1957)

The Montreal Canadiens won the Stanley Cup again, with Plante in the net.  He led the league in GAA (2.00) and Shutouts (9), and he would also have 31 Wins, a .920 Save Percentage and 14.2 Goalie Point Shares.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1978.

Jacques Plante, Montreal Canadiens (3) (1958)

This was very much a mirror image of the season before.  Plante was first in Wins (34), GAA (2.11), Shutouts (9), and Goalie Point Shares (13.2), and like the two years before, he would win the Stanley Cup.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1978.

Jacques Plante, Montreal Canadiens (4) (1959)

Plante would tie the record of four straight Vezina Trophies, and he a Stanley Cup in them all!  This year, the Quebecer would have league leads in Wins (38), Save Percentage (.925), GAA (2.16), Shutouts (9), and 15.6 Goalie Point Shares, which would be his career-high.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1978.

Jacques Plante, Montreal Canadiens (5) (1960)

History was made again as Plante would become the first Goalie to win the coveted Vezina Trophy five years in a row.  What else did he do in those five years?  He won Stanley Cups in all of them.  This season, he would have a league-leading 40 Wins, 2.54 GAA, and he would also have 14.0 Goalie Point Shares.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1978.

Johnny Bower, Toronto Maple Leafs (1961)

Johnny Bower would win his first two Vezina Trophies at age 36, but then again, he did not make the NHL until he was 29.  This was the first and only year that he would finish first in Wins (33) and he was his second straight season leading the NHL in Save Percentage (.922).  He was also a First Team All-Star and was second in Hart Trophy voting.  Bower would be in net for the Leafs as they won the next three Stanley Cups.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1976.

Jacques Plante, Montreal Canadiens (6) (1962)

Plante would tie Bill Durnan with his sixth Stanley Cup, and for the first time he would win the Hart Trophy.  This would be another first, as he was unable to win the Stanley Cup in a Vezina Trophy winning campaign.  Plante wo would finish first in Wins (42), Save Percentage (.923), GAA (2.37), and Goalie Point Shares (15.6).  The latter would tie his previous high.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1978.

Glenn Hall, Chicago Blackhawks (1963)

This is an excellent time to remind everyone that this was during the period where the Vezina was automatically given to the goalie(s) from the team that allowed the least goals.  We mention this, because before Hall won his first Vezina, he had already won the Calder, and was a First Team All-Star, and Second Team All-Star three different times.  This season, Hall was chosen for his fourth First Team All-Star, and would finish first in Save Percentage (.918), Shutouts (5), and Goalie Point Shares (13.6).  He would also have a GAA of 2.47.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1975.

Terry Sawchuk, Toronto Maple Leafs (4) (1965) (co-winner)

In Terry Sawchuk’s first year in Toronto, he would share the netminding duties with Johnny Bower.  As this was under the old rules, Sawchuck (who played in two more games than Bower), was to be awarded the trophy, but he refused unless Bower was the co-winner.  The NHL then changed the rule to allow multiple winners, providing the goalie in question played in at least 25 Games.  This was Sawchuk’s fourth and final Vezina, and he would have a record of 16-13-7 with a 2.81 GAA.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1971.

Johnny Bower, Toronto Maple Leafs (2) (1965) (co-winner)

As noted above, Terry Sawchuk’s refusal to accept the Vezina unless Bower was a co-winner, allowed the latter to win his second and final Vezina.  Winning this at age 40, made Bower the oldest Goalie to win that award, an honor he still holds to this day.  He would lead the NHL in Save Percentage with .925, and had a GAA of 2.65.  Bower played until he was 45, and retired with a record of 250-192-90.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1976.

Gump Worsley, Montreal Canadiens (1966) (co-winner)

Sharing the goaltending load with Charlie Hodge, Worlsey won his first Vezina at 36, 11 years after winning the Calder with the New York Rangers.  Worsley was a Second Team All-Star this year and he had a record of 28-13-6 with a 2.36 GAA. The Habs would win the Stanley Cup that season.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1980.

Glenn Hall, Chicago Blackhawks (2) (1967) (co-winner)

In between Hall’s first and second Vezina Trophy, he would be named to two First Team All-Stars.  This year, he only played 32 Games, but had a record of 19-5-5, and led the league in GAA (2.38).  He would be named a Second Team All-Star this year.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1975.

Glenn Hall, Chicago Blackhawks (2) (1967) (co-winner)

In between Hall’s first and second Vezina Trophy, he would be named to two First Team All-Stars.  This year, he only played 32 Games, but had a record of 19-5-5, and led the league in GAA (2.38).  He would be named a Second Team All-Star this year.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1975.

Rogie Vachon, Montreal Canadiens (1968) (co-winner)

This was Vachon’s second season in the NHL, and he would share the Vezina with Gump Worsley.  He would win 21 Games, with a 2.48 GAA, and he would win the Stanley Cup, which he would do so again the year after.  This may have been Vachon’s only Vezina, but not the only good season he would have.  He would later join the Los Angeles Kings, and helped bring them to respectability. With the Kings, he would earn a Second Team All-Star twice and was in the top three in Hart Trophy voting in both of those years.  He would later play in Detroit and Boston, retiring in 1982 with a record of 353-293-128 with an even 3.00 GAA.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2016.

Gump Worsley, Montreal Canadiens (1968) (co-winner)

This season, Worsley, was sharing the goaltending role with Rogie Vachon, and he had a 21-7-8 record with a GAA of 1.98, and that would lead the NHL.  He was also named a First Team All-Star.  The Habs would win the Stanley Cup this season, and would win his fourth Cup the year after.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1980.

Glenn Hall, St. Louis Blues (3) (1969)

Last season was Hall’s first in St. Louis, and his efforts brought the Blues to the Stanley Cup Final.  While they lost, he would win the Conn Smythe for his efforts. This year, he shared the goaltending duties with Jacques Plante, and they were the first expansion team goalies to win a Vezina.  This season, he was a First Team All-Star with a GAA of 2.17 and a league-leading 8 Shutouts.  Hall played two more years and retired with a record of 407-326-164 over 18 seasons.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1975.

Jacques Plante, St. Louis Blues (7) (1969) co-winner

Plante was traded to the New York Rangers in 1963, and was claimed by the St. Louis Blues in the 1968 Intra-League Draft.  In his first season with the expansion team, he would share the Vezina with Glenn Hall.  The tandem would be the first goalies on an expansion team to win the Vezina, and he would finish first in the NHL in Save Percentage (.940) and GAA (1.96).  Plante would later play for the Toronto Maple Leafs and Boston Bruins, and had a brief comeback in the WHA with the Edmonton Oilers.  As of this writing, no other Goalie has won the Vezina seven times, and it will likely be decades before anyone else can say the same thing.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1978.

Tony Esposito, Chicago Blackhawks (1970) 

For the first time since the 1963-64 season, we have a sole winner for the Vezina in Tony Esposito.  This was his rookie year, where he also was a First Team All-Star, the Calder Trophy winner, and he was the runner-up for the Hart Trophy. Esposito would lead all of the goalies in Wins (38), Save Percentage (.932), and Shutouts, and he had a nice GAA of 2.17. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1988.

Ed Giacomin, New York Rangers (1971) (co-winner) 

In the four years previous, Giacomin was wither a First Team and Second Team All-Star, and this year he would be a First Team All-Star this year.  Finishing eighth in Vezina Trophy voting, he would win 27 Games, with a 2.16 GAA and a league leading eight Shutouts.  Giacomin played until 1978, but would never be a post season All-Star again.  He played his last three years with the Detroit Red Wings, and retired with 290-209-96 and a GAA of 2.82.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1987.

Tony Esposito, Chicago Blackhawks (2) (1972) (co-winner)

Esposito was not the sole winner on his second Vezina, as he shared this with Gary Smith.  This season, Esposito was also a First Team All-Star, and for the first and only time he would lead the NHL in GAA (1.77), and this was his second and final Save Percentage lead (.934).  Both of those would be career-highs.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1988.

Ken Dryden, Montreal Canadiens (1973) 

The sole winner of this season’s Vezina, Ken Dryden had already won a Conn Smythe, a Stanley Cup and was a Second Team All-Star the year before.  This season, he was a First Team All-Star, was fourth in Hart Trophy voting, and led the NHL in Wins (33), Save Percentage (.926), GAA (2.26), Shutouts (6) and Goalie Point Shares (13.2).  He would back stop the Canadiens to another Stanley Cup win.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1983.

Tony Esposito, Chicago Blackhawks (3) (1974) (co-winner) 

For the first and only time in the era of co-winning possibilities, we have co-winners from different teams.  Bernie Parent of Philadelphia won this season along with Esposito, who was a Second Team All-Star that year.  He had an excellent record of 34-12-21 and a 2.05 GAA, and was fifth in Hart Trophy voting.  With the exception of 13 Games, he would play his entire career with the Blackhawks, and would be a First Team All-Star one more time.  He retired in 1984 with a record of 423-306-152 and a 2.93 GAA.   Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1988.

Bernie Parent, Philadelphia Flyers (1974) (co-winner) 

As discussed above, Parent co-won the Vezina with Tony Esposito, the first and only time that the award was split between two players from two different teams.  This season, Parent would lead all the Goalies in Wins (47), Save Percentage (.932), GAA (1.89), Shutouts (12) and Goalie Point Shares (19.9).  Parent would lead the Flyers to their first Stanley Cup win, and win the Conn Smythe Trophy.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1984.

Bernie Parent, Philadelphia Flyers (2) (1975) 

Parent was the sole winner of the Vezina this year, and he again took the Flyers to a Stanley Cup win, and won the Conn Smythe. The Flyer would finish first in GAA (2.04), Shutouts (12) and Goalie Point Shares (18.6), and he was a First Team All-Star, as he was the year before.  He played until 1979, and retired with a record of 271-198-119, and a 2.55 GAA.   Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1984.

Ken Dryden, Montreal Canadiens (2) (1976) 

In between this Vezina and the last one, Dryden took a year off due to a contract dispute, and he pursued a law degree.  He came back and would do what he always did, which was win a lot of games, and stop a lot of pucks.  This season, he finished first in Wins (42), GAA (2.03), Shutouts (8) and Goalie Point Shares (16.5).  He would also be named a First Team All-Star and would win a Stanley Cup.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1983.

Ken Dryden, Montreal Canadiens (3) (1977) 

This season, he would share the Vezina with Michel Larocque, but again he would win the Stanley Cup, and he would log all the minutes in the playoffs.  In the regular season, Dryden was a First Team All-Star, led the NHL in Wins (41), Save Percentage (.920)., Shutouts (10), and Goalie Point Shares (14.3).  He also had a spectacular GAA of 2.14.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1983.

Ken Dryden, Montreal Canadiens (4) (1978) 

Like the year before, Dryden shared the Vezina with Michel Larocque, but that was not the only similarity.  Dryden worked all of the minutes in the playoffs and would again raise the Stanley Cup over his head.  The Goalie had a 27-7-7 record with an NHL leading .922 Save Percentage, and 2.05 GAA.  He would also earn another First Team All-Star Selection.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1983.

Ken Dryden, Montreal Canadiens (5) (1979) 

Dryden again shared the Vezina with Michel Larocque, and he again took Montreal to a Stanley Cup win.  This season he won 30 Games, and led the NHL in GAA (2.30), Shutouts (5) and Goalie Point Shares (12.1).  Dryden would also be named a First Team All-Star for the fifth and final time.  Even though Dryden was still in his prime, he retired after this year.  He was a true renaissance man, who would be an acclaimed writer, commentator, hockey executive, teacher and politician.  He retired with a sparkling record of 258-57-74 and a 2.24 GAA.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1983.

Billy Smith, New York Islanders (1982) 

This was year three of the Islanders four-year run winning Stanley Cups, and Billy Smith would be there for all of them. This was the season where the Vezina reverted back to being awarded to the league’s best Goalie, and the previous parameters were placed in a new award; The William M. Jennings Trophy. Smith led the NHL with 32 Wins, and he would have a GAA of 2.97.  The year after, he would win the William M Jennings Trophy and the Conn Smythe.  Smith played until 1989, remaining with the Isles, and he had a record of 305-233-105 and a 3.18 GAA.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1993.

Grant Fuhr, Edmonton Oilers (1988) 

Grant Fuhr was the Goalie for the Oilers’ dynasty, and this season he was in 75 Games, with a league-leading 40 Wins. While his 3.43 GAA was high, in this era, the red light was lit often, and he played for the team that was always looking to concentrate on offense.  Fuhr was the runner-up for the Hart, and he would take the Oilers to their fourth Stanley Cup.  He played until 2000, and would also play for Toronto, Buffalo, Los Angeles, St. Louis and Calgary finishing with a record of 403-295-114.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2003.

Patrick Roy, Montreal Canadiens (1989) 

Three years ago, Patrick Roy was a rookie who carried Montreal on his back, and won the Stanley Cup and the Conn Smythe.  Roy would then proceed to win two William M. Jennings Trophies, and was a Second Team All-Star before this year.  In 1988-89, he was chosen for his first of four First Team All-Star, won his third straight Jennings Trophy, and finally won the Vezina.  He would lead the NHL in Save Percentage (.908), GAA (2.47), and he had a record of 33-5-6.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2006.

Patrick Roy, Montreal Canadiens (2) (1990) 

This year, Roy went back-to-back in Vezinas and for the first of three straight years, he would lead the goalies in Save Percentage (.912).  He also was first in Goalie Point Shares (11.9), and Wins (31), and he had a GAA of 2.53.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2006.

Ed Belfour, Chicago Blackhawks (1991) 

We have another Vezina Trophy winner who was also the Calder Trophy winner, as Ed Belfour had a phenomenal season for the Blackhawks in 1990-91.  Belfour led the NHL in Wins (43), Save Percentage (.910), GAA (2.47), and Goalie Point Shares (14.0).  “The Eagle” would also win the William M. Jennings Trophy.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2011.

Patrick Roy, Montreal Canadiens (3) (1992) 

Roy led the NHL for the fourth and final time in Save Percentage (.914), and was the league-leader in GAA (2.36) for the second time.  Roy would win 36 Games, and secured his fourth William M. Jennings Trophy.  The year after, Roy again took Montreal to another Stanley Cup, and won his second Conn Smythe Trophy.  He would later be traded to the Colorado Avalanche, and win two more Stanley Cups, another Conn Smythe, and his fifth William M. Jennings Trophy.  He retired in 2003 with a phenomenal record of 551-315-131 and a GAA of 2.54.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2006.

Ed Belfour, Chicago Blackhawks (2) (1993) 

Belfour would win his second and final Vezina, while also winning his second William M. Jennings Award.  He led the NHL in Shutouts (7), and had 41 Wins, with a 2.59 GAA. Belfour would later win two more Jennings Trophies and a Stanley Cup with the Dallas Stars in 1999.    Belfour also played for San Jose, Toronto and Florida, and retired in 2007 with a record of 484-320-125.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2011.

Dominik Hasek, Buffalo Sabres (1994) 

Dominik Hasek was a late bloomer in the pro hockey as he was 29 this year, and had three unremarkable seasons in the NHL, so it was safe to say that nobody saw the dominance that he would have over the next eight years.  In what would be his first Vezina win, he would also win the William M. Jennings Trophy. Statistically, he was first in Save Percentage (.930), GAA (1.95), Shutouts (7), and he would have 30 Wins. He would also finish second in Hart Trophy voting.  Historically, he is the first goalie from the Czech Republic to win the Vezina.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2011.

Dominik Hasek, Buffalo Sabres (2) (1995) 

Winning his second Vezina in as many years, Dominik Hasek would also win his second straight Save Percentage Title (.930), and GAA Title (2.11), and he also was third in Hart Trophy voting.  Hasek was also first in Goalie Point Shares with 10.3. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2011.

Dominik Hasek, Buffalo Sabres (3) (1997) 

The Czech superstar led the NHL in Save Percentage for the fourth consecutive year (.930), while having 37 Wins, and leading the NHL in Goalie Point Shares (17.2).  Hasek was so dominant and vital to the Sabres’ success, that he would win both the Hart and Lester B Pearson Award.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2011.

Dominik Hasek, Buffalo Sabres (4) (1998) 

Hasek was an absolute beast last year, and he was even better this season, and we will argue that this was the best year of one of the most incredible careers by an NHL goalie.  “The Dominator” was the NHL leader in Save Percentage for the fifth straight year (.932), and he had career-highs (that also led the NHL) in Shutouts (13) and Goalie Point Shares (18.6).  Hasek repeated as the winner of both the Hart and Pearson Trophy, and the success of Buffalo was primarily due to the Czech netminder.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2011.

Dominik Hasek, Buffalo Sabres (5) (1999) 

Hasek’s .937 Save Percentage would earn him that title for the sixth straight year, and while he was not the NHL leader in Goals Against Average, his 1.87 was his career-best.  He also led the NHL in Goalie Point Shares (16.8), and he was third in Hart voting.  Hasek would finally take Buffalo to the Stanley Cup, thought they lost in controversial fashion to the Dallas Stars.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2011.

Dominik Hasek, Buffalo Sabres (6) (2001) 

This was the sixth and last Vezina Trophy of the career of Dominik Hasek, and he did so while winning his second William M. Jennings Trophy.  He would have 37 Wins, a 2.11 GAA, with an NHL best 11 Shutouts.  Hasek also had 13.9 Goalie Point Shares.  This was his last year in Western New York, as he demanded a trade, and got one, as he was dealt to Detroit.  Hasek would later win two Stanley Cups with the Red Wings, and he played until 2008, where in his final season, where he would win his third Jennings Trophy.  He retired with a record of 389-223-95 and a GAA of 2.20.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2011.

Martin Brodeur, New Jersey Devils (2003) 

It may have taken until he was 30 before he won his first Vezina trophy, but don’t think that Martin Brodeur blossomed late. Prior to this win, Brodeur had already won the Stanley Cup twice, the William M. Jennings Trophy twice, the Calder Trophy, was a Second Team All-Star twice, and he had already been in the top five in Vezina voting in the seven seasons prior.  In this season, he not only won his first Vezina, but also his third Jennings Trophy.  For the fifth time, he was first in Wins (41), and had a GAA of 2.02.  He took the Devils to their third Stanley Cup, and he would be named a First Team All-Star.  Notably, he would also finish third in Hart Trophy voting.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2018.

Martin Brodeur, New Jersey Devils (2) (2004) 

Brodeur went back-to-back as a Vezina Trophy winner, and in this campaign, he would win his fourth William M. Jennings Trophy. Once again, he had the most Wins (38), and had the league lead in Shutouts (11), and captured his second First Team All-Star Selection.  Brodeur again had a great GAA of 2.03.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2018.

Martin Brodeur, New Jersey Devils (3) (2007) 

Brodeur appeared in 78 Games, and for the eighth time in his career, he would lead the NHL in Wins (43), and for the fourth time was first in Shutouts (11).  He would also have a career-high (and NHL-leading) Goalie Point Shares (17.3). The New Jersey Devil would also have a 2.18 GAA.  Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2018.

Martin Brodeur, New Jersey Devils (4) (2008) 

This was his Martin Brodeur’s last Vezina win, and for the first of his four wins, he was not a First Team All-Star, as that would go to Evgeni Nabokov of the San Jose Sharks.  This year, he had a record of 44-27-6 and a GAA of 2.18.  Brodeur would later win his fifth Jennings Trophy (in 2010), and he played until 2015.  His career with the exception of seven games was with the Devils, and he retired with a record of 691-397-154 and a GAA of 2.24.   Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2018.

The following are the players who have won the Vezina Trophy in the NHL who are eligible for the Baseball Hall of Fame and have not been selected:

Lorne Chabot, Chicago Blackhawks (1935)

Lorne Chabot was only with the Blackhawks for one season, and he replaced the legendary Charlie Gardner, who tragically died the summer before.  Chabot led the NHL in Goals Against Average (1.80) and Goalie Point Shares (11.5). He played for the Montreal Marrons and New York Americans after, and he previously won two Stanley Cups previously (one with the New York Rangers and one with the Toronto Maple Leafs).  Eligible since 1945.

Normie Smith, Detroit Red Wings (1937)

Normie Smith finished first among the NHL Goalies in Wins (25), Goals Against Average (2.05), Shutouts (6), and Goalie Point Shares (9.8), and this was the only season where he was post-season All-Star. Like he did the year before, Smith backstopped the Red Wings to a Stanley Cup win.  Eligible since 1948.

Dave Kerr, New York Rangers (1940)

Dave Kerr was a Second Team All-Star two seasons prior, but this year he was First Team, and would win his lone Vezina Trophy. Kerr had an NHL Leading 1.54 GAA and 13.1 Goalie Point Shares, both of which were also career-bests.  More importantly, Kerr would lead the Rangers to a Stanley Cup win.  Kerr would only play one more season, and retired with a record of 204-149-76 and a GAA of 2.14.  Eligible since 1945.

Johnny Mowers, Detroit Red Wings (1943)

Johnny Mowers was the runner-up for the Calder Trophy two seasons before, and he would win the Vezina this year.  Mowers led the NHL in Wins (25), GAA (2.47), Shutouts (6) and Goalie Point Shares (12.8), and would back stop the Red Wings to a Stanley Cup win.  He would leave the NHL for the military for three years, but when he returned, he was unable to reclaim his starting job, and was out of the game only a year later. Eligible since 1950.

Al Rollins, Toronto Maple Leafs (1951)

Rollins finished second in Calder Trophy voting, and he would lead the NHL in GAA with 1.77.  He would also have 10.4 Goalie Point Shares with a 26-6-7 record. Rollins led the Leafs to a Stanley Cup win, and later in 1954, he won a Hart Trophy as a Blackhawk.  He retired for good in 1960, but due to being on some horrible Chicago teams, he had a losing record of 140-206-82.  Eligible since 1963.

Charlie Hodge, Montreal Canadiens (1964)

With the great Canadiens goalies through the years, Charlie Hodge has been forgotten.  He would win the Vezina in 1964, where he would lead the goalies in Shutouts (8), and won 33 Games with a GAA of 2.26.  He was named a Second Team All-Star this season.  Eligible since 1974.

Charlie Hodge, Montreal Canadiens (2) (1966) (co-winner)

Hodge helped Montreal win the Stanley Cup the year before, and was also a Second Team All-Star.  He would not be a post-season All-Star this year, and he only played 26 Games, actually less than his teammate, Gump Worsley.  While his 2.57 GAA was respectable, he had a weaker year than the Gump.  Eligible since 1974.

Denis DeJordy, Chicago Blackhawks (1967) (co-winner)

Denis DeJordy shared this Vezina win with Hall of Famer, Glenn Hall.  DeJordy was in net for Chicago for 44 Games and had a record of 22-12-7 with a 2.46 GAA. He would finish tenth in Hart Trophy voting this year.  DeJordy played until 1974, and he would have stops in Los Angeles, Montreal and Detroit. Eligible since 1977.

Gilles Villemure, New York Rangers (1971) (co-winner)

Villemeure would win his only Vezina in a sharing effort with Ed Giacomin, and Villemeure’s contribution was 22 Wins with a 2.30 GAA.  He had only played 13 Games in the NHL before, and although he was 30, this was technically his rookie season, and he would finish third in Calder Trophy voting with a tenth place finish in Hart Trophy voting.  He played for another seven years, with his last two coming in back-up in Chicago.  Villemure retired with an even 100 Wins against 64 Losses and 29 Ties.  Eligible since 1980.

Gary Smith, Chicago Blackhawks (1972) (co-winner)

Smith led the NHL in Saves the two years before in Saves, but also in Losses, as he was with the abysmal California Golden Seals. This was Smith’s first season in Chicago, and he backed up Tony Esposito, with whom he shared the Vezina. He played 28 Games to qualify for the award, and he had 14 Wins with a 2.42 GAA.  He continued to play until 1980 with stops in Vancouver, Minnesota, Washington, Indiana (WHA) and Winnipeg.  Eligible since 1983.

Michel Larocque, Montreal Canadiens (1977) (co-winner)

As Ken Dryden’s backup, Larocque already won a Stanley Cup in 1976.  This season, he played in 26 Games, one more than the minimum to qualify.  In the games he did play in, he had a GAA of 2.09, which placed him first in the NHL, and he had an exemplary record of 19-2-4. He would get his name etched on the Cup again, but he did not play in the post-season, as Dryden did all the work in between the pipes.  Eligible since 1987.

Michel Larocque, Montreal Canadiens (2) (1978) (co-winner)

The similarities were there from this season and the last one, as Larocque was again the back-up to Ken Dryden, and he saw no action in a post-season where the Habs won the Stanley Cup.  In this regular season, the man with the nickname of “Bunny” played in 30 Games with an outstanding record of 22-3-4 and a 2.67 GAA. Eligible since 1987.

Michel Larocque, Montreal Canadiens (3) (1979) (co-winner)

The continuation of Larocque’s predictable run continues here with his third straight Vezina, as the backup to Ken Dryden. Like the previous two seasons, Larocque would win the Stanley Cup, though this time he would play in the post-season; albeit for 20 Minutes.  This season, Larocque would appear in 34 Games with a 22-7-4 record, and a GAA of 2.84. Eligible since 1987.

Don Edwards, Buffalo Sabres (1980) (co-winner)

Edwards was a Second Team All-Star two seasons before, and was so again this season.  He was one half a very good tandem with Bob Sauve, and Edwards would have a record of 27-912 with a 2.57 GAA.  He would play until 1986, with stops in Calgary and Toronto.  Edwards would play 459 Games with a record of 208-155-74.  Eligible since 1989.

Bob Sauve, Buffalo Sabres (1980) (co-winner)

Sauve would co-win this with Don Edwards, and in the 32 Games he played, he would win 20 of them, and led the NHL in GAA with a 2.36 metric.  While still with the Sabres, he would win the William M. Jennings Award with Tom Barrasso. He would play four more years; two with Chicago, and two with New Jersey.  Sauve would have a record of 182-154-54.  Eligible since 1992.

Denis Herron, Montreal Canadiens (1981) (co-winner)

This was the last year where the Vezina Trophy would go to the teams goalies (who played at least 25 Games) with the least amount of goals allowed.  We will go on record that Herron turned out to be the worst recipient of the Vezina, as he had had a losing record of 6-9-9 and a GAA of 3.50.  In the following season, he would co-win the William M. Jennings Trophy with Rick Wamsley.  He would play until 1986, finishing his career with the Pittsburgh Penguins.  His record was 146-203-76 with a GAA of 3.70. Eligible since 1992.

Michel Larocque, Montreal Canadiens (4) (1981) (co-winner)

There is a lot to discuss here.  First, as shown above and below (with Heron and Sevingy respectively), he is the one of three (and there will only ever be three) Goalies to win the Vezina in the same season.  The second is that Larocque was traded during the season to Toronto. This makes Larocque the only player to date to win the Vezina, while playing for two different teams.  That being true, with the rules established (at the time), it was won as a Hab.  Messed up, right?  Perhaps, and this might be part of the reason that after this, the Vezina would be awarded hereafter to the solitary goalie who was considered to be the best in the NHL. The William M. Jennings Award would be created the year after that would have the previous Vezina parameters.  As it stands, we have Michel Larocque, a four-time Vezina Trophy winner, who has zero chance to make the Hockey Hall of Fame. As it stands, Larocque’s regular season (only with Montreal), would see him play in 28 Games, winning 16 with a 3.04 GAA.  In addition to the Leafs, “Bunny” played for Philadelphia and St. Louis and retired in 1984. He had a record of 160-89-45, which was incredible, though mostly as a part of the last Montreal dynasty.  Eligible since 1987. 

Richard Sevingy, Montreal Canadiens (1981) (co-winner)

As seen in the above two entries, Sevingy shared the Vezina with Denis Herron and Michel Larocque.  Finishing eight in Calder Trophy voting this year, Sevingy appeared in 33 Games, and won 20 of them.  He would lead the NHL in GAA with 2.40.  He played for Montreal until 1984, and had three more seasons with the Quebec Nordiques.  He finished his NHL career with a record of 80-54-20 with a 3.21 GAA.  Eligible since 1989. 

Pete Peeters, Boston Bruins (1983) 

After four years in Philadelphia, Pete Peeters debuted in Boston, where he would have the best season of his career.  The Goalie would lead the league in Wins (40), GAA (2.37), Shutouts (8), and Goalie Point Shares (16.5).  He would again lead the NHL in GAA in 1987-88, when he was with the Washington Capitals.  Peeters played until 1991, and had a record of 246-156-51.  Eligible since 1989. 

Tom Barrasso, Buffalo Sabres (1984) 

At age 18, Tom Barrasso is the youngest player to win the Vezina. He would have a record of 26-12-3, with a 2.85 GAA, and he would also win the Calder Trophy.  A First Team All-Star this season, Barrasso would be a Second Team All-Star, and would win the William M. Jennings Trophy the year after. He would later win two Stanley Cups with the Pittsburgh Penguins, and he had stops in Ottawa, Carolina, Toronto and St. Louis.  Barrasso retired in 2003 with a record of 369-277-86.  Eligible since 2006.   Ranked #16 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Pelle Lindberg, Philadelphia Flyers (1985) 

This season, Pelle Lindberg became the first non-North American to win the Vezina Trophy.  The Swedish Goalie would lead the NHL in Wins (40), and Goalie Point Shares (13.8), and he would have a GAA of 3.02.  Lindberg would also take the Flyers to the Stanley Cup where they lost to the Edmonton Oilers.  Sadly, he died on November 10, 1986 when he lost control of his Porsche, thus cutting his career short.  Eligible since 1989.   

John Vanbiesbrouck, New York Rangers (1986) 

Vanbiesbrouck would win his lone Vezina in his second full season in the NHL, and he would lead the league in Wins (31), and have a 3.33 GAA.  He would later earn a Second Team All-Star with the Florida Panthers, and he would also play for Philadelphia, New York (Islanders) and New Jersey.  He retired in 2002, with a record of 374-346-119 and a 2.98 GAA.  Eligible since 1989.   

Ron Hextall, Philadelphia Flyers (1987) 

What a rookie year!  Hextall may not have won the Calder (he narrowly lost to Luc Robitaille), but he won the Vezina, leading the NHL in Wins (37), Save Percentage (.902) and Goalie Point Shares (13.8).  In that year’s playoff, he would take the Flyers to the Stanley Cup, and while they could not defeat the Edmonton Oilers, Hextall’s performance was so good, he would win the Conn Smythe.  Hextall played until 1999, mostly with Philadelphia, and he would have a career 2.98 GAA with a record of 296-214-69.  Eligible since 1989.  Ranked #45 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Jim Carey, Washington Capitals (1996) 

While not as famous as Jim Carrey, Jim Carey became the first Washington Capital to win the Vezina Trophy.  The year before, the native of Massachusetts was second in Calder, and third in Vezina voting, and this season he had an NHL-leading nine Shutouts, with a GAA of 2.26 and 35 Wins.  His play fell off quickly, and he was traded to Boston the year after.  He was out of the NHL in 1999, before he turned 25.  Carey left the pro ranks with a record of 79-65-16.  Eligible since 2002.  

Olaf Kolzig, Washington Capitals (2000) 

Born in South Africa to German parents (though raised mostly in Canada), Olaf Kolzig may likely be the only African born hockey player to win the Vezina…maybe ever.  “Olie the Goalie” debuted in the NHL for the Washington Capitals in 1990, and by the 1997-98 season, he was their main goalie.  This season, he would lead the NHL in Goalie Point Shares (14.6), and would win 41 Games with a GAA of 2.24.  All of those stats would be his career-bests.  Kolzig played until 2009, with all but his last year being played in Washington.  He retired with a record of 303-297-87.  Eligible since 2012. 

Jose Theodore, Montreal Canadiens (2002) 

Another Montreal Canadian winning the Vezina?  But, of course!  Jose Theodore won the Hart Trophy and the Vezina this year, though he would not be a First Team All-Star, as Patrick Roy nabbed that one.  Theodore would have to settle for the Second Team All-Star, which makes him the only Vezina Trophy winner to also win the Hart, who was not a First Team All-Star. This year, Theodore led the NHL in Save Percentage (.931), and Goalie Point Shares (17.4), and had a sparkling GAA of 2.11.  He played until 2013, and would also don the pads for Colorado, Washington, Minnesota and Florida.  Eligible since 2016.  

Miikka Kiprusoff, Calgary Flames (2006) 

Miikka Kiprusoff became the first Goalie from Finland to win the Vezina, and he was also the first Flame to win the award.  This season, Kiprusoff was also a First Team All-Star, a William M. Jennings Trophy recipient, and he would lead the NHL in Goals Against Average (2.07), which was also the second straight year he would win that statistical title.  The Finnish Goalie also was first in Shutouts (10), and had a Save Percentage of .923.  Eligible since 2016.  

Tim Thomas, Boston Bruins (2009) 

Tim Thomas was 34 when he won his first Vezina, and the American Goalie would lead the NHL in Save Percentage (.933) and GAA (2.10), and he was also win the William M. Jennings Trophy. He would also have 36 Wins and 14.7 Goalie Point Shares.  Eligible since 2017.  

Tim Thomas, Boston Bruins (2) (2011) 

Thomas would take the Boston Bruins to a Stanley Cup win in 2011, where he also won the Conn Smythe as the playoff MVP.  The Goalie, who also was a First Team All-Star for a second time, would win his second GAA Title (2.00), and he was also the leader in Save Percentage for the second time (.938).  Eligible since 2017.  

Let’s update our tally, shall we?

Award in Question

Percentage of recipients who have entered the HOF

Percentage of recipients by year who have entered the HOF.

NBA MVP

100%

100%

NHL Norris

90.5%

96.4%

NBA All Star Game MVP

89.5%

91.7%

NHL Conn Smythe

74.2%

85.4%

NFL AP Offensive Player of the Year

73.1%

79.4%

NHL Lady Byng

63.8%

76.0%

NFL Defensive Player of the Year

60.8%

71.1%

NFL Super Bowl MVP

60.6%

64.9%

NBA Defensive Player of the Year

58.3%

56.5%

NHL Vezina

57.1%

66.3%

NBA Rookie of the Year

56.5%

56.5%

MLB MVP

55.0%

60.2%

NFL Pro Bowl MVP

52.3%

54.8%

MLB Lou Gehrig Award

51.9%

51.9%

MLB Roberto Clemente Award

47.4%

47.4%

MLB/NL/AL Cy Young Award

44.4%

55.4%

MLB Babe Ruth Award

37.0%

39.3%

NHL Frank J. Selke Trophy

33.3%

36.7%

MLB Hutch Award

33.1%

33.1%

NFL Offensive Rookie of the Year

28.6%

28.6%

NHL Bill Masterton Memorial Trophy

27.9%

27.9%

MLB Edgar Martinez Award

26.7%

17.2%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Designated Hitter)

25.0%

30.8%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Shortstop)

23.5%

52.6%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove

21.7%

36.8%

NFL Defensive Rookie of the Year

20.6%

20.6%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Catcher)

20.0%

22.5%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Second Base)

18.8%

39.8%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Shortstop)

18.2%

35.1%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Pitcher)

18.2%

20.1%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Second Base)

16.7%

32.7%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Outfield)

16.7%

30.1%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Outfield)

15.7%

25.2%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Third Base)

14.3%

14.3%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (Third Base)

13.6%

14.3%

MLB (NL/AL) Silver Slugger (First Base)

13.6%

13.3%

MLB (NL/AL) Rookie of the Year

13.3%

13.3%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (Catcher)

10.3%

15.2%

NBA Most Improved Player of the Year

5.3%

3.2%

MLB (NL/AL) Gold Glove (First Base)

3.8%

3.2%

NFL AP Comeback Player of the Year

0.0%

0.0%

So, who is up next?

The following are the players who have won the Vezina in the NHL who have retired but have not met the mandatory years out of the game to qualify for the Hockey Hall of Fame:

None.

The following are the players who have won the Vezina who are still active.

Ryan Miller, Buffalo Sabres (2010)

From the United States, Ryan Miller would win his only Vezina in 2010, where he would lead the NHL in Goalie Point Shares with a career-high 16.8.  Miller, who was also fourth in Hart Trophy voting, would have a 2.22 GAA with a record of 41-18-8.  39 Years Old, Playing for the Anaheim Ducks.

Henrik Lundqvist, New York Rangers (2012)

Henrik Lundqvist became the second goalie from Sweden to win the Vezina.  He debuted in the NHL with the Rangers in 2005, and from that season until this one, he finished in the top six in Vezina Trophy voting.  This was the season that he finally won it, and was also a First Team All-Star and second runner-up for the Hart.  He would have a record of 39-18-5 and a GAA of 1.97.  37 Years Old, Playing for the New York Rangers.

Sergei Bobrovsky, Columbus Blue Jackets (2013)

Sergei Bobrovsky became the first Russian and the first Blue Jacket to win the Vezina in 2013.  This was his first year in Ohio after two seasons in Philadelphia, and he would have a record of 37-21-11 with a GAA of 2.00.  Bobrovsky was also fifth in Hart Trophy voting this season.  30 Years Old, Playing for the Florida Panthers.

Tuukka Rask, Boston Bruins (2014)

Tuukka Rask debuted for the Boston Bruins in the 2007-08 season and was the main Goalie for the team two years later.  A Stanley Cup Champion in 2011, Rask won the Vezina this year with 36 Wins with a 2.04 GAA.  32 Years Old, Playing for the Boston Bruins.

Carey Price, Montreal Canadiens (2015)

Carey Price added to the legacy of spectacular goalies for Montreal.  Price would lead the NHL in Wins (44), Save Percentage (.933), GAA (1.96), and Goalie Point Shares (16.2).  He would also collect a lot more gold this year, as he was named a First Team All-Star, the Hart Trophy winner, and also the Ted Lindsay Award.  32 Years Old, Playing for the Montreal Canadiens.

Braden Holtby, Washington Capitals (2016)

Braden Holtby debuted in the NHL for Washington in the 2010-11 season, and he was the main goalie in D.C. two years later. Holtby would finish fourth in Hart Trophy voting in his Vezina Trophy winning year, while leading the NHL in Wins with 48.  He would be a Second Team All-Star and William M. Jennings Trophy winner the year after, and in the season after that, he won the Stanley Cup.  30 Years Old, Playing for the Washington Capitals.

Sergei Bobrovsky, Columbus Blue Jackets (2) (2017)

Bobrovsky would win his second Vezina this year, while also finishing third for the Hart Trophy.  He would lead the NHL in Save Percentage (.931), Goals Against Average (2.06), and Goalie Point Shares (14.9), while also winning 41 Games.  30 Years Old, Playing for the Florida Panthers.

Pekka Rinne, Nashville Predators (2018)

From Finland, Pekka Rinne was a Second Team All-Star in 2011, and he would backstop the Predators to their first Stanley Cup appearance in 2017.  The following year, he would win the Vezina with a record of 42-13-4 with a 2.31 GAA, and an NHL leading eight Shutouts.  37 Years Old, Playing for the Nashville Predators.

Andrei Vasilecskiy, Tampa Bay Lightning (2019)

Vasilecskiy led the NHL in Wins (44) and Shutouts (8) in 2017-18, and this season he had a league-leading 39 Wins with a 2.40 GAA, and a First Team All-Star Selection.  The Lightning goalie from Russia helped Tampa win the Presidents Trophy that year, although they would be swept in the opening round.  25 Years Old, Playing for the Tampa Bay Lightning.

So, what is up next?

With the early 80s change of the Vezina Trophy, we suspect that this could potentially increase the percentage of prospective Hockey Hall of Famers.  Goalies are known for their streakiness, so this could easily alter by decade in substantial numbers.  Regardless, we prefer the new method.

We go back to the NFL, with the most important award, the MVP.

As always, we thank you for your support, and look for that soon.

Last modified on Wednesday, 08 January 2020 19:29
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Committee Chairman

Kirk Buchner, "The Committee Chairman", is the owner and operator of the site.  Kirk can be contacted at [email protected] .

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