3. Lance Berkman

The third member of the famed Houston Astros “Killer B’s”, Lance Berkman had a decade of success in the state of Texas where he would finish five times in the Top Ten in National League Most Valuable Player voting.  Berkman was a certified run producer who would tally over 100 RBIs as an Astro six times and would seven times exceed the .400 On Base Percentage mark.  That in itself is impressive enough to keep Lance Berkman in the top ten on this list for decades to come.
We here at Notinhalloffame.com have continued our expansion of our Baseball section with a look at those who will be eligible for the Baseball Hall of Fame in 2019. 

The following players will be the eligible for the Hall of Fame in 2019:

Andy Pettitte

Barry Zito

Brad Penny

Darren Oliver

Derek Lowe

Freddy Garcia

Jake Westbrook

Jason Bay

Jon Garland

Jose Contreras

Juan Pierre

Kevin Youkilis

Lance Berkman

Mariano Rivera

Michael Young

Miguel Tejada

Octavio Dotel

Placido Polanco

Rafael Furcal

Ramon Hernandez

Roy Halladay

Roy Oswalt

Ryan Dempster

Ted Lilly

Todd Helton

Travis Hafner

Vernon Wells

Yorvit Torrealba

A few things certainly stand out from this group.

Mariano Rivera, who without question is the greatest relief pitcher of all time is expected to enter the Baseball Hall of Fame on his first ballot. 

Roy Halladay, a two time Cy Young Award winner is also a huge name on the ballot, and conceivable the eight time All Star could also join Rivera on the first ballot. 

For our money, the most interesting name on the ballot is Todd Helton, who for a five year period was one of the top offensive players in the National League and has accumulatively put together a Hall of Fame resume.  Will the Coors Field bias affect him as it did Larry Walker?

Andy Pettitte is another intriguing candidate as his stats put him on the fence, but his admitted (though contrite) PED use could place him on the wrong side of the vote.

The third “Killer B”, Lance Berkman should also get a decent percentage of the vote.

Beyond those five, it is difficult to imagine anyone else making the second year of eligibility, though didn’t many peg Miguel Tejada as a strong contender once upon a time?

For what it is worth, there is also a healthy contingent of former World Series Champions from the Boston Red Sox and the St. Louis Cardinals.

Gang, you know what we want you to do!

Take a look at the new entries and cast your vote and offer us your opinion.

As always, we here at Notinhalloffame.com thank you for your support and we will continue to provide updates as often as possible.







We here at Notinhalloffame.com are slowly getting there in our pursuit of naming the Top 50 players from every major sports franchise in North America.

We return to the world of Baseball with the Houston Astros and that we believe are Top 50 players ever from that organization.

We encourage you to see the complete list here, but for those who can’t wait, here are the top five Houston Astros of all-time:



1.Jeff Bagwell

2. Craig Biggio

3. Lance Berkman

4. Cesar Cedeno

5. Jose Cruz



This won’t be the last of this, as we have the Detroit Lions up next. 

As always, we thank you for your support and look for your input!





Recently we uploaded our updated Notinhalloffame.com Rock List. We have another major update as our Baseball list has now been altered following the selection of six new members entering the elite halls of Cooperstown.

Six former players left our list, four via the vote (Chipper Jones #3, Jim Thome #6, Vladimir Guerrero #9 and Trevor Hoffman #20) and two from the Veteran’s Committee (Jack Morris #11 and Alan Trammell #12). This clears up both the top portion of our list but the Hall of Fame voter’s ballot, which should allow for others who have been waiting to enter the Hall.

While four major names left the Hall of Fame ballot the voters have some new names to consider, three of which are in our new top ten with another making our top twenty.

Our new top ten is as follows:

The #1 position is actually split in three, which is how we have done this since the inception of our Baseball list. As Pete Rose and Shoeless Joe Jackson are not eligible for the Baseball Hall of Fame, we have deemed them both “1A” and 1B”.

This means that Roger Clemens who is ranked “1C” is the highest eligible player. This is where he was ranked last year.

Barry Bonds remains at #2. Two years ago, Bonds held Clemens’ spot but your votes brought the switch. Regardless, we feel that both Clemens and Bonds are Hall of Famers.

The highest debut this year is Mariano Rivera, the greatest (no, we will not say arguably) reliever of all-time. The career New York Yankee enters our list at #3, but we suspect that he will enter the Hall on his first ballot.

Mike Mussina remains at #4. While he continues to gain support his name is a low-key in comparison to other candidates.

Another Pitcher debuts in the top five in the late Roy Halladay. The former two time Cy Young winner won 203 Games to only 105 Losses and he led his league in bWAR for Pitchers four times.

Bill Dahlen dropped from #5 to #6 while Curt Schilling moved up one spot from #8 to #7. Schilling traded spots with Manny Ramirez, who was #7 last year.

The top ten is rounded out by Lou Whitaker who moved from #10 to #9 and new entry Todd Helton is #10.

Another significant new entry is Andy Pettitte. The five time World Series winner debuts in #15.

There are three more entries with Lance Berkman #89, Miguel Tejada #95 and Roy Oswalt #104.

With these changes we now have 106 ranked former baseball players with our eventual intention to swell the number to 150.

You know what we want you to do!

Take a look at these new entries cast your votes and gives us your opinions as this does affect our future rankings.

You know how hard it is to get into the Baseball Hall of Fame? In 2013, with a ballot brimming with qualified candidates, not one player received the 75 percent of the votes needed for admission. (I identified 14 likely Hall of Famers on the 2013 ballot.)

Granted, 2013 was the first year of eligibility for Barry Bonds and Roger Clemens, both poster boys for performance-enhancing drugs (PED), bringing to a head the contentious debate about "cheaters" and their admission into the Hall. But there were certainly several "clean" players on that ballot, and a few of those, such as 3000-hit-club member Craig Biggio, would have been uncontroversial picks in any previous year.

And although 2014 saw the election of three players—Tom Glavine, Greg Maddux, and Frank Thomas—it was merely the tip of a talent-heavy iceberg (I identified 18 likely Hall of Famers for that ballot), while providing a burn to Biggio yet again as not only did he miss election by one vote (he garnered 74.8 percent of the vote), but three first-time candidates leapfrogged him into Cooperstown.
Baseball immortality: Precious few attain it, most do not even come close—and some perch on the cusp of that immortality as signified by the Baseball Hall of Fame. Theirs are the test cases, players whose careers, accomplishments, and legacies form the threshold of what separates a Hall of Famer from the rest.

Baseball Hall of Fame voting in the last few years has been fascinating for a number of reasons, particularly the logjam of qualified candidates, which promises to remain an issue for the next few years. That logjam puts additional pressure on the borderline candidates—will they be overlooked, perhaps unfairly, because there are too many candidates from which to choose?

89. Lance Berkman

Lance Berkman was the third “Killer B” of the Houston Astros, though it was his Comeback Player of the Year season with St. Louis (that also netted him his only World Series Ring) that he might hold most dear.