2. Lou Gehrig
  1. General
  2. Awards
  3. Career Stats
  • Born: June 19, 1903 in New York, NY USA
  • Weight: 200 lbs.
  • Height: 6'0"
  • Bats: L
  • Throws: L
  • Debut: June 15, 1923
  • Final Game: April 30, 1939
  • Baseball Magazine All-Star - 1927
  • Baseball Magazine All-Star - 1927
  • Most Valuable Player - 1927
  • TSN All-Star - 1927
  • Baseball Magazine All-Star - 1928
  • Baseball Magazine All-Star - 1928
  • TSN All-Star - 1928
  • Baseball Magazine All-Star - 1930
  • Baseball Magazine All-Star - 1931
  • Baseball Magazine All-Star - 1931
  • TSN All-Star - 1931
  • TSN Guide MVP - 1931
  • Baseball Magazine All-Star - 1934
  • Baseball Magazine All-Star - 1934
  • Triple Crown - 1934
  • TSN All-Star - 1934
  • TSN Guide MVP - 1934
  • Baseball Magazine All-Star - 1936
  • Baseball Magazine All-Star - 1936
  • Most Valuable Player - 1936
  • TSN All-Star - 1936
  • TSN Guide MVP - 1936
  • Baseball Magazine All-Star - 1937
  • Baseball Magazine All-Star - 1937
  • TSN All-Star - 1937
 
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Considered by many baseball writers to be the finest First Baseman that ever lived, Lou Gehrig is also one of the most inspirational figures in sports history.

Known for his all around play and durability, Lou Gehrig played in 2,130 consecutive games, earning him the nickname of the “Iron Horse”.  These were not just games that he played in, but games where he excelled.  Gehrig hit for average, though why he only won one Batting Title, he had a career Batting Average of .340, and an even keener eye, winning five On Base Percentage Titles and is currently 5th all-time in that statistic.  Power wise, he finished seven shy of 500 Home Runs, a number he would have hit had he not been forced to retire early (we will get to that).  Ring wise, Gehrig collected six, with a playoff Slash Line of .361/.483/.731 with 10 Home Runs.

The story of why Lou Gehrig had to retire at age 36 is well known as he was stricken with ALS, now known as Lou Gehrig’s Disease.  He would become the first baseball player to have his number retired and he was rushed into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1939, shortly after Gehrig would give the most iconic speech in sports history where he called himself “The Luckiest Man on the face of the Earth”.  He would die less than two years later.

Anyone who watched him play was certainly the luckiest ones on Earth at the time.

The Bullet Points

  • Position: First Base
  • Acquired: Signed as a Free Agent 4/30/23.
  • Departed: Forced to retire after the 1939 season.
  • Games Played: 2164
  • Notable Statistics: 1,888 Runs Scored
    2,721 Hits
    534 Doubles
    163 Triples
    493 Home Runs
    1,995 RBI
    102 Stolen Bases
    .340/.447/.632 Slash Line
    112.4 bWAR
  • Major Accolades and Awards: World Series Champion (1927, 1928, 1932, 1936, 1937 & 1938)
    MVP (1927 & 1936)
    All Star Game (1933, 1934, 1935, 1936, 1937, 1938 & 1939)
    Highest bWAR for Position Players (1934, 1935 & 1936)
    Highest Batting Average (1934)
    Highest On Base Percentage (1928, 1934, 1935, 1936 & 1937)
    Highest Slugging Percentage (1934 & 1936)
    Highest OPS (1934, 1936 & 1937)
    Most Plate Appearances (1930 & 1931)
    Most Runs Scored (1931, 1933, 1935 & 1936)
    Most Hits (1931)
    Most Total Bases (1927, 1930, 1931 & 1934)
    Most Doubles (1927 & 1928)
    Most Triples (1926)
    Most Home Runs (1931, 1934 & 1936)
    Most Runs Batted In (1927, 1928, 1930, 1931 & 1934)
    Most Walks (1935, 1936 & 1937)
    Highest OPS+ (1934, 1936 & 1937)
    Highest Win Probability Added (1935 & 1936)
    Highest Putouts by a First Baseman (1927 & 1928)
    Most Assists by a First Baseman (1930)
    Most Double Plays Turned by a First Baseman (1938)
    Highest Range Factor per Game by a First Baseman (1927)
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